Education News Roundup for January 26, 2012

students in cap and gown walk into graduation ceremony

Graduates walk in/fotobydave/CC/flickr

Today’s Top Picks:

Governor’s top budget priority this year is funding education growth.
http://bit.ly/AtD493 (DN)
and http://bit.ly/wL4nld (SLT)
and http://bit.ly/wyN6kB (OSE)
and http://bit.ly/yT2v70 (PDH)
and http://bit.ly/wk06wd (CVD)
and http://bit.ly/wWSMaE (SGS)
and http://bit.ly/z8DxIV (Universe)
and http://connect2utah.com/news-story/?nxd_id=205607
and http://bit.ly/ydKcWJ (KTVX)
and http://bit.ly/zQFbNs (KSTU)
and http://bit.ly/zFyPEn (KCPW)
or a copy of the speech
http://1.usa.gov/xUJPo6

Legislature completes its audit of school community councils.
http://bit.ly/xdVBkG (SLT)
and http://bit.ly/wo6oid (DN)
or a copy of the audit
http://le.utah.gov/audit/12_02rpt.pdf

How are states planning on saving money? Encouraging early graduation.
http://bit.ly/ymu87a (Ed Week)

Principals are beginning to push back on all the teacher evaluations.
http://bit.ly/zgyNp8 (CSM)

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TODAY’S HEADLINES
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UTAH

Herbert touts Utah’s economy, blasts feds in State of the State speech

Auditors recommend more info for parents on school councils

Bill proposes residents of school districts share taxes 5 years after splitting

Senate passes bill requiring all students to take college entrance exam

Hundreds of teens from across Utah role play as legislators

Two teens arrested in alleged Roy High School bomb plot Escape plans » Duo allegedly planned on flying to freedom after attack.

Former St. George teacher pleads to sex charges

Provo School District reports a drop in safety violations

Hunter High building bots for competition Robotics » Students must assemble a robot that can shoot hoops.

‘Power to work’: Cafeteria manager plays big role in school equation

ALA invites dads and daughters to ‘Rock Around the Clock’

Top arts educator

American Fork High School Chamber Singers to perform

American Fork High School film festival

Meadow Elementary

Students of the month

OPINION & COMMENTARY

State of the state

Squeaking through life with all the right notes

Capitol Daily Memo: online testing bill SB 97 advances

How safe is your child’s school bus?

Just add more states

Give drivers ed students a ‘brake’

The True Cost of High School Dropouts

Business, Civil Rights Groups Blast Kline’s NCLB Proposal

Returning Character Education to Schools

Mobile devices have positive impact on education, survey says
Summary: Nearly 50 percent of American adults think that e-readers, tablets, smartphones and other electronic devices could benefit students rather than distract them, according to a new poll.

NATION

Obama Wades Into Issue of Raising Dropout Age

Some States Prodding Students to Graduate Early

City Students at Small Public High Schools Are More Likely to Graduate, Study Says

Under education reform, school principals swamped by teacher evaluations School principals, including some who back more rigorous review of teachers, are balking at education reforms required by Race to the Top. New teacher evaluations are all-consuming, they say.

Education Secretary Arne Duncan to Pembroke Pines students: Lead U.S. back to the top The nation’s chief of education answered questions from students and teachers about everything from college tuition to technology in the schools.

Education standards bill defeated in Indiana Senate panel Senator hopes to revive bill to halt ‘common core’

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UTAH NEWS
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Herbert touts Utah’s economy, blasts feds in State of the State speech

SALT LAKE CITY — Utah is on the road to economic recovery and the federal government needs to get out of its way, Gov. Gary Herbert said.
“Our state is growing now, and as we look to the horizon, Utah’s growth prospects are truly bright,” he said, noting that is something not many governors can say.
Herbert sounded many of the same themes in his State of the State speech Wednesday as he did last year, though this time backed with national recognition of the state’s economy.
And the Republican governor is likely to hit those same highlights as he campaigns this year for re-election.

The governor said his top legislative priority this year is to fund growth and innovation in the state’s education system. His proposed budget contains an additional $111 million for public schools, including a “modest” pay raise for teachers.
Democrats said Herbert’s education plans reflect what they have been saying for a long time. And now that the state’s economy is headed in the right direction, they said it is time to invest in Utah schools.
http://bit.ly/AtD493 (DN)

http://bit.ly/wL4nld (SLT)

http://bit.ly/wyN6kB (OSE)

http://bit.ly/yT2v70 (PDH)

http://bit.ly/wk06wd (CVD)

http://bit.ly/wWSMaE (SGS)

http://bit.ly/z8DxIV (Universe)

http://connect2utah.com/news-story/?nxd_id=205607

http://bit.ly/ydKcWJ (KTVX)

http://bit.ly/zQFbNs (KSTU)

http://bit.ly/zFyPEn (KCPW)

A copy of the speech
http://1.usa.gov/xUJPo6

Auditors recommend more info for parents on school councils

Many Utah schools are not giving parents enough information about school community council elections, according to a legislative audit released Thursday.
Legislative auditors found that most of the 38 schools they sampled do not provide all the information to parents required by law, such as dates and times of school community council elections and lists of open council positions. School community councils are groups of parents and school employees who decide how to spend a school’s share of money from the School LAND Trust Program.
Auditors recommended that school district offices work to better ensure school principals are delivering complete election notifications to parents.
Auditors also suggested, among other things, that lawmakers reexamine a law passed last year that prohibits educators from serving as parent members of community councils at schools within the districts for which they work.
http://bit.ly/xdVBkG (SLT)

http://bit.ly/wo6oid (DN)

A copy of the audit
http://le.utah.gov/audit/12_02rpt.pdf

Bill proposes residents of school districts share taxes 5 years after splitting

SALT LAKE CITY — A bill being proposed to Utah’s legislature would have residents in split school districts share taxes for five years. Earlier, a bill proposing that voters decide on school districts to split was struck down during committee.
Residents in the Jordan School District of the Salt Lake Valley southwest are still frustrated with the Canyons District split. And Wednesday evening, lawmakers in the House Education Committee have been revisiting that fight. The bill, sponsored by Rep. Jim Bird, would have changed the law completely by allowing voters in the school district being left to have the power to veto the new proposed district. That bill was soundly rejected with only one representative on the panel voting for it.
http://bit.ly/AgNQR6 (KSTU)

Senate passes bill requiring all students to take college entrance exam

SALT LAKE CITY — A bill that would require all high school students in the state to take a college entrance exam passed out of the Senate on Wednesday.
Sponsored by Sen. Margaret Dayton, R-Orem, SB10 would eliminate the Utah Basic Skills Competency test in favor of an assessment that gauges college and career readiness — likely the ACT exam, though it’s not specified in the legislation. The change would cost an extra $700,000 a year http://bit.ly/xm4b1V (DN)

http://connect2utah.com/news-story?nxd_id=205707

Hundreds of teens from across Utah role play as legislators

SALT LAKE CITY — More than 500 teens representing 35 cities met Wednesday morning at the Capitol to role play as legislators as part of the Utah League of Cities and Towns Local Officials Day.
As part of that experience, two groups debated whether cellphone use while driving should be prohibited for those younger than 18.
A third group debated prohibiting idling vehicles within town limits.
“We wanted to find a bill that teenagers would be passionate about and have opinions on,” said Cameron Diehl, an attorney with the league.
The majority of the students chose to participate in the cellphone debates.
http://bit.ly/ybrHJ8 (OSE)

http://bit.ly/wiGiN5 (DN)

Two teens arrested in alleged Roy High School bomb plot Escape plans » Duo allegedly planned on flying to freedom after attack.

Police have arrested two Roy High School students as suspects in an alleged plot to set off explosives during a future school assembly.
Roy Police Chief Gregory Whinham on Thursday said that Dallin Todd Morgan, 18, and a 16-year-old boy were in custody.
Morgan was booked into Weber County Jail on suspicion of conspiracy with bail set at $10,000, the same allegation that had the 16-year-old in custody at the Weber Valley Detention Center. Bond said additional charges were being screened as evidence continued to be gathered by investigators.
The two students, arrested Wednesday, allegedly were in possession of maps detailing the school and its security systems, and purportedly had made detailed plans to escape that included stealing a plane from the Ogden Hinckley Airport. Police said the students had allegedly prepared for the escape flight by training on flight simulation programs.
http://bit.ly/wyQQNG (SLT)

http://bit.ly/yUlyMA (DN)

http://bit.ly/y3OC5I (OSE)

http://bit.ly/zlJqaT (PDH)

http://apne.ws/yHFZ0l (CVD)

http://connect2utah.com/news-story/?nxd_id=205827

http://bit.ly/z5weDy (KTVX)

http://bit.ly/wcRqEd (KSL)

http://bit.ly/x7K629 (KSTU)

http://bit.ly/ACQQsp (KNRS)

http://wapo.st/xMTXAU (WaPo)

Former St. George teacher pleads to sex charges

A former southern Utah high school teacher has pleaded guilty to multiple sex offenses for fondling three young girls and a woman over a span of several years.
John Robert James Cody, 42, pleaded guilty this week in 5th District Court to three reduced second-degree felony counts of sexual abuse of a child and one second-degree felony count of forcible sexual abuse. He also pleaded guilty to a count of sexual battery, a class A misdemeanor.
According to court documents, Cody, a former social studies teacher at Pineview High School in St. George, grabbed a woman’s breast and touched a girl underneath her swimming suit at an apartment complex swimming pool in June 2008.
http://bit.ly/xPpTVu (SLT)

Provo School District reports a drop in safety violations

Inner-school violence in the Provo City School District has significantly declined in the last 12 years, and it may be because of a change in disciplinary policy.
“In just the last seven years, we’ve seen school safety violations drop by 38 percent,” said Associate Superintendent Greg Hudnall. “In the last 12 years we could have expelled 30 students. We’ve only expelled one.”
Hudnall explained that rather than expelling students, as was done in the former disciplinary model, he and his colleagues do everything they can to go after the heart of the problems in the lives of the students who act out.
http://bit.ly/xZ4Qoz (Universe)

Hunter High building bots for competition Robotics » Students must assemble a robot that can shoot hoops.

West Valley City • Last year, Hunter High’s Robotics Club smoked the competition.
This year, it’s hoping for a little better performance.
Students have begun building their entry for the 21st annual FIRST Robotics Competition — a tech event Hunter has participated in for three consecutive years.
http://bit.ly/yaNIn2 (SLT)

‘Power to work’: Cafeteria manager plays big role in school equation

Chris Leetham knows just what children need to do well in school — food.
Leetham, the cafeteria manager at Willow Valley Middle School, was recognized as the 2010-11 district food service employee of the Cache County School District.
“For a lot of these kids, this is the only meal they get during the day,” Leetham said. “School shouldn’t be all about learning. If they don’t have food, they don’t have the power to work.”
Leetham, an Ogden native who has worked in Cache Valley school cafeterias for the last 17 years, said she finds her job rewarding because it “makes kids happy.”
http://bit.ly/yfTtrm (LHJ)

ALA invites dads and daughters to ‘Rock Around the Clock’

SPANISH FORK — Letterman’s jackets, poodle skirts, hula hoops and bubble gum will be just a small part of the American Leadership Academy’s third annual Daddy-Daughter Dance. The theme this year “Rock Around the Clock,” and those who attend will be brought back to the ‘50s as they participate in a variety of activities, learn to dance and enjoy some yummy treats.
The annual event is hosted by the choir boosters and the choirs at ALA under the direction of Rick Lunt http://bit.ly/yO6itV (PDH)

Top arts educator

Each year Artistic Resource for Teachers and Students conducts an extensive search for outstanding Arts-In-Education educators from each of the 41 school districts throughout the State of Utah. This year, Don Applegate, a sixth-grade teacher at Mt. Loafer Elementary, was presented with the award. Applegate has been teaching for 31 years. He has served as a school facilitator and was the Mt. Loafer Teacher of the Year for 2010. Applegate has directed many musicals and singing groups at the elementary level. He uses drama in the classroom. He has conducted the Salem Superstars and Mt. Loafer Singers and has directed the musical, “Tom Sawyer” at three different schools.
http://bit.ly/xi50TI (PDH)

American Fork High School Chamber Singers to perform

The AFHS Chamber Singers have been invited to join the BYU Choirs for a concert on Feb. 1 at 7:30 p.m. in the deJong Concert Hall in the Harris Fine Arts Center. Those interested in attending can buy tickets at: http://arts.byu.edu/calendar/eventdescription_v2.php?eventid=114
http://bit.ly/wiFztz (PDH)

American Fork High School film festival

Film festival entries are due Wednesday, Feb. 1. All AFHS students are invited to participate and may pick up an application form in the main office or download an application off of the school’s website: http://afhs.alpineschools.org. No late entries will be accepted.
http://bit.ly/xm3j6j (PDH)

Meadow Elementary

Kindergarten registration will be held on from 10 a.m.-1 p.m. on Feb. 7. Parents nust bring proof of residency, birth certificate, complete immunizations including 5-year-old shots and any custodial agreements that are applicable.
http://bit.ly/yqTRhM (PDH)

Students of the month

Taylor Elementary has announced the December Students of the Month. The students were chosen by their teachers because of the great efforts they make in academics and behavior each day. Students enjoyed a fancy lunch of pizza and soda with Principal Daybell.
http://bit.ly/yTvUkh (PDH)

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OPINION & COMMENTARY
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State of the state
Deseret News editorial

The annual State of the State address typically follows a familiar formula of references to proud traditions, mentions of recent accomplishments and a rousing promise of future achievement.
On Wednesday night, Gov. Gary Herbert’s assessment of this state’s health and welfare largely followed the recipe, but there was a distinct emphasis on future initiatives made with enough detail to be at once refreshing and laudable.

On the pre-eminent issue of education, the governor again reiterated a pledge with a number attached: his goal is to see two-thirds of all Utahns in possession of a college degree or professional certification within eight years. We have previously expressed our skepticism about how the state can reach this goal, though it would indeed go a long way toward enhancing the state’s attractiveness to businesses in search of quality labor.
It is important for the governor to focus on public education, but it is also not an issue a chief executive can hugely influence on his or her own. Gov. Herbert’s budget request for more than a $100 million in new money for public schools is a good start and a commitment the Legislature should change only by increasing.
http://bit.ly/yWhLiH

Squeaking through life with all the right notes Deseret News commentary by columnist Cathy Free

SALT LAKE CITY — After a morning listening to trumpets blasting off-key at short range, it’s no surprise that Budge Porritt arrives for lunch in a loud shirt and necktie, with a loud voice to match.
Other diners pause and take notice of the guy in the bright turquoise shirt and M&Ms-print tie as he slides into the booth with an exuberant, “Hi, I’m Budge! Great to meet you!”
Porritt, 59, is used to the attention.
“I never walk through a door unnoticed,” he says, “and there’s a good reason for that. It helps to be colorful when you have to deal daily with hundreds of kids.”
For 31 years, Porritt has dedicated his life to the chaotic rhythms of a school band teacher, first for middle school, and now for six Salt Lake City elementary schools.
http://bit.ly/yeGQmu

Capitol Daily Memo: online testing bill SB 97 advances Sutherland Insitute commentary by Dave Buer, communications director

Speaking to the Senate Education Standing Committee today, Senator Aaron Osmond proposed funding the implementation of summative and adaptive online testing for Utah’s K-12 public schools. SB 97, which passed out of committee with a vote of four in favor and three abstaining, is requesting $15 million of one-time grant funding and $5 million in ongoing funding to implement adaptive and online assessments.
The funds would cover software, computer and networking costs, and staff training. The State Board of Education would oversee the use and implementation of the funds, and grant recipients would be required to implement the assessment system by the 2014-15 school year.
http://bit.ly/zV81yU

How safe is your child’s school bus?
KSL commentary by Guy Bliesner, school safety and security administrator for the Bonneville School District in Idaho Falls, Idaho

SALT LAKE CITY — How safe are school buses your children ride? That depends on what you mean by safe.
The American Public Health Association notes that, “Yearly in the United States, 440,000 school buses transport 24 million students to and from schools. Collectively these buses travel 4.3 billion miles daily, with only one adult to get them to their destination safely.”
http://bit.ly/xQRcKU

Just add more states
Salt Lake Tribune letter from Mark Smith

I teach middle school math in Utah, so I know that numbers don’t always tell the whole story.
For instance, Utah ranks dead last out of 50 states in per-pupil education spending. But we’re not just in last place, we can’t even see the rest of the states from here.
So, I was wondering, how many additional states would there have to be before Utah got out of last place?
http://bit.ly/yMUicU

Give drivers ed students a ‘brake’
Deseret News letter from Kerry A. Downs

I’m addressing this letter to many who drive on our roads along the Wasatch Front. You are rude, selfish, egotistical, discourteous and disgusting. And those are the kindest words I can use to describe your driving behaviors. However, it is not just the way you normally drive and treat each other about which I now want to focus. It is your attitude and actions toward driver education cars and the inexperienced drivers within them.
I am a local drivers education instructor, and I am sick and tired of the impatience and rude behavior we, and the students, receive from the driving public. I cannot understand the mental ineptitude of someone who would honk and gesture at an inexperienced but learning youthful driver who is under the guidance of an instructor to learn the lawful and safe driving techniques that you have long ago forgotten and currently ignore.
http://bit.ly/zoJh6N

The True Cost of High School Dropouts
New York Times op-ed by HENRY M. LEVIN and CECILIA E. ROUSE (Henry M. Levin is a professor of economics and education at Teachers College, Columbia University. Cecilia E. Rouse, a professor of economics and public affairs at Princeton University, was a member of President Obama’s Council of Economic Advisers from 2009 to 2011.)

ONLY 21 states require students to attend high school until they graduate or turn 18. The proposal President Obama announced on Tuesday night in his State of the Union address — to make such attendance compulsory in every state — is a step in the right direction, but it would not go far enough to reduce a dropout rate that imposes a heavy cost on the entire economy, not just on those who fail to obtain a diploma.
In 1970, the United States had the world’s highest rate of high school and college graduation. Today, according to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, we’ve slipped to No. 21 in high school completion and No. 15 in college completion, as other countries surpassed us in the quality of their primary and secondary education.
Only 7 of 10 ninth graders today will get high school diplomas. A decade after the No Child Left Behind law mandated efforts to reduce the racial gap, about 80 percent of white and Asian students graduate from high school, compared with only 55 percent of blacks and Hispanics.
Like President Obama, many reformers focus their dropout prevention efforts on high schoolers; replacing large high schools with smaller learning communities where poor students can get individualized instruction from dedicated teachers has been shown to be effective.
http://nyti.ms/xVuYk1

Business, Civil Rights Groups Blast Kline’s NCLB Proposal Education Week commentary by columnist Alyson Klein

A top GOP lawmaker’s plan for rewriting the No Child Left Behind Act amounts to a “rollback” of the law, 38 business, civil rights, and other advocacy organizations said in a letter, sent Jan. 24 to its sponsor.
The draft from U.S. Rep. John Kline, R-Minn., chairman of the House education committee, “would thrust us back to an earlier time when states could choose to ignore disparities for children of color, low-income students, English-language learners, and students with disabilities,” the letter says.
The letter was signed by a number of organizations, including the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, American Federation of Teachers, the Education Trust, the Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights, and the National Council of La Raza.
http://bit.ly/yfO5BC

Returning Character Education to Schools Education Week op-ed by Joseph A. Gauld, founder of the Hyde Schools, a network of character education-focused schools

The deep reason America is in imbalance and decline seems obvious: We have educated ourselves to value achievement and wealth over character and purpose. As a result, the present character of our leadership, economy, and culture cannot sustain the greatness of our nation.
Since the Soviet Union’s launch of Sputnik in 1957, we have chosen to seek only academic proficiency in our schools. And more than 54 years of reform efforts have failed.
The basic purpose of education should be character development, where learning is centered on values derived from the family. Family-based character education is clearly superior to the education practiced in our schools today.
http://bit.ly/xGCD4p

Mobile devices have positive impact on education, survey says
Summary: Nearly 50 percent of American adults think that e-readers, tablets, smartphones and other electronic devices could benefit students rather than distract them, according to a new poll.
ZDNet commentary by columnist Rachel King

Electronic devices have the strong potential to distract students (and employees, for that matter) from getting work done, whether it involves gaming, browsing the web, or watching videos.
But a new survey from Poll Position found that nearly half of American adults (47 percent) think that gadgets (mobile devices, in particular, as cited in the survey, such as e-readers, tablets and smartphones) have more of a positive impact upon the education of youth in America.
Tablets, in particular, have been found to serve a useful purpose here, whether it be learning games for younger kids or now the pending revolution of the textbook market. (Not to mention it’s a lot easier to carry around a single tablet than a ton of heavy schoolbooks.)
E-readers certainly have a place still for students in high school or college, and it helps for tighter budgets that they’re a lot cheaper than tablets.
http://zd.net/zAQdG6

A copy of the poll
http://bit.ly/x4NCC8

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NATIONAL NEWS
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Obama Wades Into Issue of Raising Dropout Age New York Times

President Obama’s State of the Union call for every state to require students to stay in school until they turn 18 is Washington’s first direct involvement in an issue that many governors and state legislators have found tough to address.
While state legislative efforts to raise the dropout age to 18 have spread in recent years, many have had trouble winning passage. Last year, for example, such legislation was considered in Alaska, Illinois, Kentucky, Maryland and Rhode Island — but only Rhode Island actually changed its law.
“Efforts to raise the age usually come up against the argument that requiring students to stay in school when they no longer want to be there is disruptive to other students and not fair to the teacher,” said Sunny Deye, a senior policy analyst at the National Conference of State Legislatures. “Home-school groups often oppose raising the compulsory attendance age, and especially now, in this budget crunch, there are major concerns about the fiscal impact.”
http://nyti.ms/zG78tc

Some States Prodding Students to Graduate Early Education Week

To give students an incentive to work hard—and save education dollars along the way—some states are encouraging early high school graduation by ramping up curricula or giving college scholarships.
The policies emphasize proficiency over seat time. By giving students the green light to move on if they are ready, the hope is to bypass a senior slump, save families tuition money, and curb districts’ instructional costs.
While a few states have rewarded early finishers for years, the concept is gaining momentum. New scholarship programs for early high school graduates are being rolled out in Idaho, Indiana, Minnesota, and South Dakota, and legislation is pending in other states.
Still, the model can face opposition when state money to districts walks with the departing students. And others are skeptical that students can be truly ready for college a semester or two early.
http://bit.ly/ymu87a

City Students at Small Public High Schools Are More Likely to Graduate, Study Says New York Times

New York City teenagers attending small public high schools with about 100 students per grade were more likely to graduate than their counterparts at larger schools, according to new findings from a continuing study released on Wednesday night.
The findings are part of a study that tracked the academic performance of more than 21,000 students who applied for ninth grade admission at 105 small high schools, mainly in Brooklyn and in the Bronx, from 2005 to 2008. The study appeared to validate the Bloomberg administration’s decade-long push to create small schools to replace larger, failing high schools.
Of the students studied, about 40 percent were admitted by lottery to the small schools, and 60 percent attended other high schools.
The $3.5 million study — one of the largest and most comprehensive reviews of the impact of small schools on learning — is being financed by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and conducted by MDRC, a nonprofit education research group based in Manhattan.
http://nyti.ms/xMwIJc

A copy of the study
http://bit.ly/A7DV87

Under education reform, school principals swamped by teacher evaluations School principals, including some who back more rigorous review of teachers, are balking at education reforms required by Race to the Top. New teacher evaluations are all-consuming, they say.
Christian Science Monitor

Sharon McNary believes in having tough teacher evaluations.
But these days, the Memphis principal finds herself rushing to cram in what amounts to 20 times the number of observations previously required for veteran teachers – including those she knows are excellent – sometimes to the detriment of her other duties. “I don’t think there’s a principal that would say they don’t agree we don’t need a more rigorous evaluation system,” says Ms. McNary, who is president of the Tennessee Principals Association as well as principal at Richland Elementary. “But now it seems that we’ve gone to [the opposite] extreme.”
In New York, which is also beginning to implement a new teacher evaluation system this year, many principals are even less constrained in their opinion.
http://bit.ly/zgyNp8

Education Secretary Arne Duncan to Pembroke Pines students: Lead U.S. back to the top The nation’s chief of education answered questions from students and teachers about everything from college tuition to technology in the schools.
Miami Herald

From standardized testing to the cost of college tuition, U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan fielded questions from an audience of Broward County high school students Thursday morning.
More than 500 students, teachers and parents crowded into the Pembroke Pines Charter High School auditorium for a town hall-style meeting, where Duncan spoke about college affordability, investing in technology and raising the base salary and status of the nation’s teachers.
“Right now, we’re fighting for our country,” Duncan said. “One generation ago, we led the world in college graduates … now we’re 16th.”
He turned to students and said the nation needs to regain its top spot.
“Guess who’s going to lead us there?” Duncan said. “It’s you guys.”
Duncan chose to the school as the site for his town hall at the request of Pembroke Pines Mayor Frank Ortis, who told the audience he kept inviting Duncan to visit the award-winning school.
http://bit.ly/yc2VTz

Education standards bill defeated in Indiana Senate panel Senator hopes to revive bill to halt ‘common core’
Indianapolis (IN) Star

An effort to force Indiana to withdraw from “common core” education standards failed Wednesday, but the bill’s sponsor promised to try to revive it.
Sen. Scott Schneider, R-Indianapolis, said he was concerned Indiana was signing on to national standards that did not measure up to standards the state previously had.
“It concerns me enough that I will continue to press on,” he said after the Senate Education Committee defeated his bill 6-4.
The common core is an effort led by governors in 46 states, including Indiana Gov. Mitch Daniels, to agree to follow the same educational standards and, eventually, create common tests to measure whether kids are meeting them. The Indiana State Board of Education adopted the common core standards in 2010 and are phasing them in.
http://indy.st/AoD28G

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