Education News Roundup: Feb. 22, 2012

School bus in traffic

School Time/Let Ideas Compete/CC/flickr

Today’s Top Picks:

Is a tax form donation to elementary schools in the offing?
http://bit.ly/xFIzmO (SLT)

Democrats complain that too much revenue is going to roads.
http://bit.ly/wqDNsz (SLT)

Sen. Osmond discusses education in the legislature.
http://bit.ly/A8L0SE (UPD)

Rep. Wilson discusses computer adaptive testing.
http://bit.ly/x9Y29S (DCC)

Rep. Ivory discusses federal lands.
http://bit.ly/xjFfuo (Sutherland)

Maine school district says giving iPads to kindergarteners works.
http://bit.ly/y37CJ0 (Bangor Daily News) or a copy of the report http://bit.ly/wlbiWH

Are you a student or teacher? The Education Department wants your tweets.
http://bit.ly/y6Kr4y (USN&WR)

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TODAY’S HEADLINES
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UTAH

Bill could mean donations to elementary schools

Utah’s Budget Surplus Gets Slightly Larger

Roads earmark nabs 20 percent of revenue growth State budget » An earmark law passed last year slices $71 million off the top of revenue growth; Democrats complain it shows flawed priorities.

Budget Surplus Could Lead To Tax Cuts

Utah lawmakers eye federal control of state lands

Utah Legislature passes school supply bill

Bill would require all Utah schools K-12 to recite pledge daily

Utah task force has ideas to help women become college grads Utah’s gender gap between college attainment rates is nation’s largest.

Canyons considers moving middle school
Education » Parents want district to build in Draper.

Davis school board considers elementary school boundary study Assistant superintendent also introduces plan to hire more minority teachers

Students see how charity efforts in Japan have paid off

American Fork High School Counseling Center program

OPINION & COMMENTARY

Teacher mentors
Bill would encourage excellence

Time and Money: Education Is Highest Legislative Priority

Pilot program could help improve testing in schools

Reclaiming Utah’s public lands

HB 123 modernizes schools

The three Rs

School’s Chinese language program needs review

Pre-empting parents on sex ed

Has legislator lost his mind?

Blame parents for tardiness

What Research Says About School Choice

Republicans for Education Reform
Race to the Top deserves some credit, but GOP victories deserve more.

Math Matters

No Student Left Untested

Report Scrutinizes States’ Teacher-Induction Policies

NATION

Panel to Assess Methodology for Judging Teacher Prep

Report says giving iPads to Auburn kindergartners increases test scores

Education Department Wants Tweets from Teachers and Students

Arizona House approves measure to allow teaching of Bible in public high schools

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UTAH NEWS
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Bill could mean donations to elementary schools

Utahns might soon be able to give money to elementary schools when they file their income tax returns, if a bill that gained initial Senate approval Tuesday becomes law.
SB59 would allow Utahns the option, when filing their income tax returns, of designating elementary schools to receive contributions in the amounts of their choosing. The school principal would then, in consultation with the school community council or charter school board, decide how to spend the money.
http://bit.ly/xFIzmO (SLT)

Utah’s Budget Surplus Gets Slightly Larger

The last, critical piece of information Utah’s 104 legislators need to wrap up their work in the 2012 general session was revealed Tuesday — $16 million extra in updated revenue estimates for the fiscal 2013 budget.
Now the final budget documents can be pieced together by the budget subcommittees and the all-powerful Executive Appropriations Committee for adjournment March 8, now just over two weeks away.
Officially, the new estimates say there will be an extra $4 million in one-time surpluses for the current budget year and $12 million more in anticipated tax and fee revenue growth for fiscal 2012-2013, which starts July 1.
http://bit.ly/xEXsuA (UPD)

http://bit.ly/AtsqmY (PDH)

http://bit.ly/yMHgae (OSE)

http://bit.ly/zbniny (CVD)

http://bit.ly/wrPbd9 (KUTV)

http://bit.ly/zHlUEj (KSL)

http://bit.ly/A3dER1 (KCPW)

Roads earmark nabs 20 percent of revenue growth State budget » An earmark law passed last year slices $71 million off the top of revenue growth; Democrats complain it shows flawed priorities.

Before Utah’s budget process begins, 20 cents of every dollar available to fund programs and pay salaries has already been committed to one mission: maintaining roads.
Under legislation passed last year, $71 million of sales tax revenue has been earmarked for road construction and upkeep. The figures were not even included in new revenue projections legislators received Tuesday.
“It shows you where the priorities are for the Republican majority,” said Sen. Pat Jones, D-Holladay.
She said there are plenty of needs in public and higher education, health care and human services.
“If you really want to know what is important, follow the money,” she said.
http://bit.ly/wqDNsz (SLT)

Budget Surplus Could Lead To Tax Cuts

Utah’s projected budget surplus has some lawmakers thinking about tax cuts. Republican Representative John Dougall of American Fork wants to cut the state income tax by one-percent. Dougall’s House Bill 299 also calls for a similar cut in Utah’s sales tax. Dougall’s tax cuts would easily eat up all of the state’s 400-million dollar projected surplus.
http://bit.ly/yFO7ea (MUR)

Utah lawmakers eye federal control of state lands

SALT LAKE CITY — A group of Utah lawmakers is ready to take on the federal government over the transfer of federal lands to the state, citing a promise made 116 years ago when Utah gained statehood.
Lawmakers considered five separate bills dealing with the transfer of land to the state in committee Tuesday. Members of the House Natural Resources, Agriculture and Environment Standing Committee approved four of the five and will forward them to the House for consideration.
Those measures include a joint resolution on the federal transfer of public lands to Utah, House Joint Resolution 3, sponsored by Rep. Roger Barrus, R-Centerville, calling for the federal government to turn over federal land to the state by Dec. 31, 2014. Other measures address some of the mechanisms to make that happen, including an act addressing potential litigation of the issue at the federal level.
The bills dovetail with each other to cover the parameters of the issue, Barrus said.
http://bit.ly/zjJDRg (OSE)

http://bit.ly/z0lFUp (DCC)

http://bit.ly/y7fjID (KSL)

http://bit.ly/ynOath (KSTU)

Utah Legislature passes school supply bill

Teachers may soon feel more comfortable sending home requests for school supplies, thanks to a bill the Legislature passed Tuesday.
The House unanimously approved small changes the Senate had already made to HB62, meaning the bill now goes to the governor for his signature. The bill, sponsored by Rep. Kraig Powell, R-Heber City, aims to clarify that elementary schools are allowed to request supplies from parents, though it would still be optional for parents to buy them. If parents didn’t wish to buy the supplies, the school would still have to provide them, according to the bill.
http://bit.ly/xpeyc3 (SLT)

Bill would require all Utah schools K-12 to recite pledge daily

SALT LAKE CITY — Every morning in every Utah public school class, students soon may by required by law to stand, put their hands over their hearts and have a fellow student lead them in a recitation of the Pledge of Allegiance.
“I believe we need to make the Pledge of Allegiance more meaningful for our students,” said the sponsor of SB223, Sen. Aaron Osmond, R-West Jordan.
Currently, state law only requires elementary school students to recite the pledge daily. The bill would apply the law to all public and charter schools, grades K-12.
http://bit.ly/wvCIOc (DN)

Utah task force has ideas to help women become college grads Utah’s gender gap between college attainment rates is nation’s largest.

As she approaches graduation this spring at age 35, Utah Valley University student Nicolle Johnson credits a relationship with a prominent researcher for keeping her on track.
“I had key mentors in my life who have made a difference and pushed me along in healthy and productive ways,” said Johnson, a member of a task force that explored why Utah women don’t finish college and what to do about it. “It is absolutely imperative that we include mentoring programs, otherwise the minority students are not going to complete at the rates we want them to.”
Utah must act to reverse the widening gap between men’s and women’s rates of college attainment if the state hopes to reach its education goals, according to findings of the Utah Women’s College Task Force, presented Tuesday to the Governor’s Education Excellence Commission. Recommendations include boosting the state’s “college-going culture” by expanding counseling services, buttressing existing initiatives that support women, creating flexible course offerings, and finding new ways to maintain college credits during long gaps in education.
http://bit.ly/wNaEDc (SLT)

http://bit.ly/zcLz7D (KCPW)

http://bit.ly/Atdhyy (KCPW)

Canyons considers moving middle school
Education » Parents want district to build in Draper.

For more than a year, Canyons School District has wrestled with how best to redraw the boundaries for its eight middle schools and relieve crowding in the district’s south end. Now, the district is considering a new option: move a middle school to Draper.
On Tuesday, Superintendent David Doty recommended that the Canyons board consider moving Crescent View Middle, 11150 S. 300 East in Sandy, to a district property near 1300 East and 13200 South in Draper. The school’s boundaries would include all homes south of 12300 South. Currently, none of the district’s eight middle schools is in Draper.
Doty said the shift would allow for cleaner boundaries and simpler feeder systems to middle and high schools. A new building will cost about $36 million. The district has set aside $20 million to renovate Crescent View as part of a $250 million bond but will need to come up with an additional$16 million. With the new location, the district expects it could eliminate at least four bus routes and save about $88,214 a year.
http://bit.ly/yX7Om4 (SLT)

Davis school board considers elementary school boundary study Assistant superintendent also introduces plan to hire more minority teachers

FARMINGTON — The Davis County Board of Education discussed a boundary change for Wasatch and Holt elementary schools during a workshop Tuesday.
A boundary study for the two schools began last year and is expected to be finalized at the end of the academic year in preparation for the opening of the new Wasatch Elementary School in the fall. Assistant Superintendent Craig Poll presented the study and said the proposed changes ease enrollment at Holt, which is over capacity, while simultaneously filling the classrooms of the new school.
http://bit.ly/zYxhRE (DN)

Students see how charity efforts in Japan have paid off

ROOSEVELT — When an earthquake and tsunami devastated Japan with a one-two punch in March 2011, Chris Dye began looking for a way to help.
Two of her sons served missions in Japan for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, and Dye and her husband spent 10 days touring the country at the conclusion of one son’s mission.
“We fell in love with the Japanese people,” she said, adding that after the twin natural disasters, “I thought, ‘Is there any way we can just personally help them?'”
Dye teaches art at Roosevelt Junior High School and decided in April 2011 to teach her students to fold origami cranes. The idea came from the book “Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes” — the story of Sadako Sasaki, a young girl who died of leukemia after being exposed to radiation when the atomic bomb was dropped on Hiroshima.
http://bit.ly/yOdtq4 (KSL)

American Fork High School Counseling Center program

The Counseling Center will host “Open the Doors to the Future” today.
“Open the Doors to the Future” is an event for juniors in which career and other academic information (AP, CTE, MATC, various departments and other programs) is presented to assist students in choosing classes for their future schedules. This year the Counseling Center is also inviting sophomores to attend. Juniors will attend during second period and sophomores will attend third period.
http://bit.ly/zN1OEi (PDH)

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OPINION & COMMENTARY
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Teacher mentors
Bill would encourage excellence
Salt Lake Tribune editorial

Utah public schools have trouble keeping new teachers. Nearly half of all teachers just starting their careers leave the profession within the first five years.
That kind of turnover is expensive, and it hurts the quality of education schools are able to provide. Another alarming reality is that too many of the teachers who do stick with it are not effective or they become less effective as they continue teaching. Low pay in Utah is partly to blame for teachers quitting, but there are other reasons, too, including a feeling of isolation and lack of guidance to learn the craft and to continue improving skills throughout a career.
Thankfully, a bill making its way through the Legislature would go a long way toward addressing some of the most prevalent reasons for teachers leaving the classroom too soon and for the lack of professionalism among some who stay.
http://bit.ly/zGzVHk

Time and Money: Education Is Highest Legislative Priority Utah Policy Daily op-ed by Sen. Aaron Osmond

The education of Utah’s children is a priority to the legislature not only in terms of the budget (over 50% of the budget goes to public education and an additional 10% goes to higher education) but in time allocation as well.
Of all the categories covered by legislative drafting teams, one and in a few cases two attorneys handle the work load. But, the education team has three full-time attorneys working constantly to keep up with the heavy load of bills concerning education.

This year there were 1152 bill requests filed. Of those, 147 dealt with education. Health care came in second with 98 bills drafted. That puts education issues a full third higher than any other concern in the legislature.
Additionally, there are two full appropriations committees dedicated exclusively to education funding concerns.
http://bit.ly/A8L0SE

Pilot program could help improve testing in schools Davis County Clipper op-ed by Rep. Brad Wilson

When I was in school, tests were taken with paper and pencil. Once completed, it might take a few weeks for the teacher to grade the stack of tests and then analyze the results. The tests would be static and aimed at the determining the average range of students that had mastered the subject matter. Even the current use of scantron testing, which cuts the grading time significantly, still relies on the same theory of determining average student subject mastery.
A new dawn of computer adaptive testing is upon us and it could radically change and improve testing in our public schools. The State has been running a pilot project in several districts on this new testing system and the results have been so impressive the Legislature and the State School Board believe this program needs to be rolled out to all of our schools.
The basic idea of CAT testing is that test items are selected by the computer to individually match the ability level of each student.
http://bit.ly/x9Y29S

Reclaiming Utah’s public lands
Sutherland Institute commentary by Alexis Young, multimedia report

On Tuesday, four bills that could help Utah reclaim its public lands from the federal government passed a House committee. Representative Ken Ivory, sponsor of HB 148, explains more about his bill in this video:
http://bit.ly/xjFfuo

HB 123 modernizes schools
(Provo) Daily Herald letter from Gloria J. Perry

Thank you Rep. Dougall for bill HB 123. It is about time something outside the box is presented instead of just more money for education.
If Germany can allow 15-year-olds to enter the work force as apprentices, learning the skills of using math and computers in 21st-century manufacturing plants, why can’t we do the same. Not only would it help the youth who are motivated but it would give those who are bored and ready to drop out other opportunities.
http://bit.ly/AhWCj5

The three Rs
Salt Lake Tribune letter from Benjamin Williams

A vast majority of Utah’s fourth-graders, who are at a critical time, can’t read or do math at grade level.
I just don’t get how that happens. What in hell goes on during all those class hours every weekday for grades 1-3?
We’d be better off teaching only reading, writing and arithmetic and really get them right.
http://bit.ly/wciQf4

School’s Chinese language program needs review
(Ogden) Standard-Examiner letter from Russ Godfrey

I am writing this letter because I am upset and concerned about the way our tax dollars and resources are being used at Heritage Elementary School in Layton. This year the school has started a Chinese immersion program in kindergarten and I have heard many mixed reviews about this program; yet it seems it is going to continue, and at what expense?
I have several problems or concerns with this program and its implementation at the school my children attend. I learned the teacher coming from China to teach Chinese to our children does not have to have any sort of teaching certificate, teaching education or experience in the classroom. How would you feel if your child was in a class where the teacher lacks the necessary skills to not only teach, but lacks the knowledge on how to deal with children of different ages? I also learned the Chinese teacher has to replace one of the teachers on staff who has gone to school and obtained a teaching certificate/education.
http://bit.ly/yyzVLL

Pre-empting parents on sex ed
(Provo) Daily Herald letter from Brian McCoy

I’m an out of state visitor who enjoys getting a feel for the local pulse, so I enjoyed reading the op-ed in Thursday’s Daily Herald. I’m glad the piece was identified as “views from the other side” though it was obvious which side the author was coming from within the first paragraph.
I’m always intrigued by advocates of sex education in the public schools — the theory is always the same — teens are going to do it anyway so we might as well teach them how to do it “safely.” What advocates of “safe sex” don’t understand is that kids (including young adults) who can’t control themselves (practice abstinence) aren’t likely to stop and think long enough to take precautions either.
So, what have you achieved, other than to preempt not religion, but the parents’ right to teach their children about sensitive (as opposed to “taboo”) issues. It’s not up to the state (public schools) to take over all parents’ rights in this very sensitive area because some parents don’t fulfill their responsibility to teach their children.
http://bit.ly/zdT5Rt

Has legislator lost his mind?
(Logan) Herald Journal letter from Scott Page

As an LDS father of five girls and one son, I’m greatly disturbed by Bill Wright’s HB363 anti sex education bill. Is he out of his mind? Some kids have sex. No amount of preaching is going to prevent some kids from letting their hormones get the better of them. All kids need to be educated in matters of being an adult, which includes knowing about sex and the prevention of unwanted pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases.
This kind of education is not adequately taught in the home or at church. It needs to be taught at school.
http://bit.ly/wbYV0k

Blame parents for tardiness
(Logan) Herald Journal letter from Ed Rogers

I found Sunday’s article (“LHS to fine hall loiterers”) light on supporting information. The only action listed to combat tardiness, absence and loitering is “Saturday Credit Restoration.” However, the most important tools have been omitted: Telephone notification and online tracking for parents.
Parents are the single most important component in the student success equation. It’s easy for a mother or father to hold someone else accountable for their child — I perceive the school is just doing what is within its power to improve a drastic downward trend.
http://bit.ly/yV2S5r

What Research Says About School Choice
Education Week op-ed by Kenneth Campbell, Paul Diperna, Robert C. Enlow, Greg Forster, Jay P. Greene, Frederick M. Hess, Matthew Ladner, Michael J. Petrilli, Patrick J. Wolf

Last year we saw an unprecedented wave of new school choice programs launch across the country. These hard-won political victories for the choice movement also consolidated important improvements in program design. Following 20 years of heated debate, new programs reflect a growing sophistication regarding the design and implementation of school choice policies.
It is time for claims and counterclaims about school choice to show similar maturation. There are limits to how much we can learn by studying existing programs, and to what extent we can apply these findings to other contexts. However, we have learned much in the two decades since the start of the Milwaukee voucher program in 1990 and the passage, in Minnesota, of the nation’s first charter school law in 1991.
We are scholars and analysts who support school choice in some fashion, though we have varied perspectives regarding the optimal nature, extent, and design of choice-based arrangements. Choice’s track record so far is promising and provides support for continuing expansion of school choice policies.
http://bit.ly/yuZy7V

Republicans for Education Reform
Race to the Top deserves some credit, but GOP victories deserve more.
National Review commentary by Michael J. Petrilli & Tyson Eberhardt (Michael J. Petrilli and Tyson Eberhardt are executive vice president and research fellow, respectively, of the Thomas B. Fordham Institute)

The “Race to the Top” education initiative is one of President Obama’s most vaunted domestic-policy successes. The name itself connotes progress, forward movement, even competition. And there’s plenty of substance for the president to brag about: Forty-six states and the District of Columbia signed on to rigorous common standards; dozens of states got serious about teacher evaluations; key jurisdictions removed caps on charter-school expansion. This is what New Yorker contributor Steven Brill called “a sweeping overhaul” of the system.
With the Department of Education proposing a new $5 billion Race to the Top–style competitive grant program aimed at teacher policy, however, it’s worth taking a closer look at Race to the Top’s results. When you do, the scorecard changes considerably.
Ponder: Did the 2009–10 period, in which states were competing for Race to the Top funds, see the most reforms ever enacted? No. That distinction belongs to 2011, after the 2010 midterm elections swept historic Republican majorities into office in state after state.
http://bit.ly/ynBOpL

Math Matters
Nationally syndicated commentary by columnist Walter E. Williams

If one manages to graduate from high school without the rudiments of algebra, geometry and trigonometry, there are certain relatively high-paying careers probably off-limits for life — such as careers in architecture, chemistry, computer programming, engineering, medicine and certain technical fields. For example, one might meet all of the physical requirements to be a fighter pilot, but he’s grounded if he doesn’t have enough math to understand physics, aerodynamics and navigation. Mathematical ability helps provide the disciplined structure that helps people to think, speak and write more clearly. In general, mathematics is an excellent foundation and prerequisite for study in all areas of science and engineering. So where do U.S. youngsters stand in math?
Drs. Eric Hanushek and Paul Peterson, senior fellows at the Hoover Institution, looked at the performance of our youngsters compared with their counterparts in other nations, in their Newsweek article, “Why Can’t American Students Compete?” (Aug. 28, 2011), reprinted under the title “Math Matters” in the Hoover Digest (2012). In the latest international tests administered by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, only 32 percent of U.S. students ranked proficient in math — coming in between Portugal and Italy but far behind South Korea, Finland, Canada and the Netherlands. U.S. students couldn’t hold a finger to the 75 percent of Shanghai students who tested proficient.
What about our brightest? It turns out that only 7 percent of U.S. students perform at the advanced level in math.
http://www.creators.com/opinion/walter-williams.html

No Student Left Untested
New York Review of Books commentary by Diane Ravitch, Research Professor of Education at New York University

Last week, the New York State Education Department and the teachers’ unions reached an agreement to allow the state to use student test scores to evaluate teachers. The pact was brought to a conclusion after Governor Andrew Cuomo warned the parties that if they didn’t come to an agreement quickly, he would impose his own solution (though he did not explain what that would be). He further told school districts that they would lose future state aid if they didn’t promptly implement the agreement after it was released to the public. The reason for this urgency was to secure $700 million promised to the state by the Obama administration’s Race to the Top program, contingent on the state’s creating a plan to evaluate teachers in relation to their students’ test scores.
The new evaluation system pretends to be balanced, but it is not. Teachers will be ranked on a scale of 1-100. Teachers will be rated as “ineffective, developing, effective, or highly effective.” Forty percent of their grade will be based on the rise or fall of student test scores; the other sixty percent will be based on other measures, such as classroom observations by principals, independent evaluators, and peers, plus feedback from students and parents.
But one sentence in the agreement shows what matters most: “Teachers rated ineffective on student performance based on objective assessments must be rated ineffective overall.” What this means is that a teacher who does not raise test scores will be found ineffective overall, no matter how well he or she does with the remaining sixty percent. In other words, the 40 percent allocated to student performance actually counts for 100 percent. Two years of ineffective ratings and the teacher is fired.
http://bit.ly/AwnDIM

Report Scrutinizes States’ Teacher-Induction Policies Education Week commentary by columnist Stephen Sawchuk

Even as there are more and more novice teachers in the ranks of the profession, states’ teacher induction policies are generally piecemeal, contends a new report by the New Teacher Center.
The report by the Santa Cruz, Calif-based group, which works to help districts institute induction systems, is billed as the first comprehensive examination of states’ teacher-induction policies. States were reviewed against 10 standards, which include such factors as how mentors are selected and trained, induction program delivery, and whether there is dedicated funding for the mentoring.
Among the group’s findings:
http://bit.ly/xFhM1o

A copy of the report
http://bit.ly/xZUtLI

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NATIONAL NEWS
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Panel to Assess Methodology for Judging Teacher Prep Education Week

A variety of methods for evaluating teacher education programs will be weighed for their methodological rigor, accuracy, and utility as part of a new research project recently launched by the National Academy of Education and George Washington University.
The new project is at least partly a reaction to a controversial review of every teacher education school in the country that is now being conducted by the Washington-based National Council on Teacher Quality and U.S. News & World Report.
The chair of the academy project’s steering committee, Michael J. Feuer, has been among those raising concerns about the methodology of the NCTQ review—though he insists it is not the only impetus behind it.
http://bit.ly/xFaEfa

Program’s website
http://bit.ly/zZcQ1r

Report says giving iPads to Auburn kindergartners increases test scores Bangor (ME) Daily News

AUBURN, Maine — Kindergartner David Hall worked on math on his iPad Wednesday morning.
Playing “Feed the Hippos Hot Peppers,” the Sherwood Heights Elementary pupil counted aloud as his fingers moved peppers into a hippo’s mouth.
Early test results of kindergarten pupils like David who used iPads for nine weeks last fall — compared to kindergartners who did not — show the iPads pupils did better, according to an Auburn School Department report released Wednesday.
In 9 of the 10 areas of testing around pre-reading skills, the group of 129 students with iPads made slightly larger gains than the 137 students without. Testing included listening and comprehension, identifying letters, reading, vocabulary and identifying letter sounds.
Only one area, however, was statistically higher: recognizing sounds and writing letters.
http://bit.ly/y37CJ0

A copy of the report
http://bit.ly/wlbiWH

Education Department Wants Tweets from Teachers and Students U.S. News & World Report

February has been a busy month for K-12 education. On February 1, U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan kicked it off by announcing that all U.S. schools should transition to digital textbooks within the next five years. On the 9th, President Obama waived 10 states from No Child Left Behind. And last week, the president proposed a 2013 budget that includes a $1.7 funding increase for education.
Although these federal policy decisions may not seem directly connected to day-to-day classroom activities, the Department of Education is using Twitter to encourage teachers, administrators, parents, and students to play a more active role.
http://bit.ly/y6Kr4y

Arizona House approves measure to allow teaching of Bible in public high schools Capitol Media Services via (Tempe, AZ) East Valley Tribune

The state House voted 42-15 Tuesday to allow high schools to teach elective courses on the influence of the Bible on Western culture and civilization.
Tuesday’s vote came over the objections of House Minority Leader Chad Campbell. The Phoenix Democrat said limiting schools to using the Old and New Testaments “is going to run into a constitutional challenge.”
But Rep. Terri Proud, R-Tucson, who crafted HB 2563, said she does not see a problem. She said the language allowing the use of the texts for non-religious purposes has been approved by others.
http://bit.ly/wMtgIu

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