Education News Roundup: July 19

Education News Roundup "Money" by PTMoney/CC/flickr

“Money” by PTMoney/CC/flickr

Today’s Top Picks:

Sen. Osmond looks at commercial property taxes for funding education.
http://goo.gl/9LU5q (SLT)

House candidate looks at taxes on Utah’s natural resources.
http://goo.gl/HhALq (CVD)

Wasatch Taxpayers Association wants the Wasatch School District to cut $5 million from its budget.
http://goo.gl/fZ0Oc (DN)

Six more states and the District of Columbia get federal education waivers.
http://goo.gl/1IYBL (Wash Times)
and http://goo.gl/80igM (Ed Week)
or http://goo.gl/JOpYq (ED)

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TODAY’S HEADLINES
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UTAH

Utah lawmaker wants to equalize school funding Education » Senator’s bill focuses on commercial property tax.

District 3 candidate sees education funding opportunities in Utah’s natural resources

‘True friend’: UEA endorses Matheson in 4th District race Politics » Rival vows to work for local control of education.

Taxpayer association calls on Wasatch schools to cut $5M

Tax hikes becoming common for Utah cities

New educ. standards a ‘ramping up’ of federal control

Granite District Wants Parents To Review Sex Ed Materials

KUER News Pod

Utahn wins award, donates money to Jordan School District Education » $10,000 grant sponsored by MassMutual will implement leadership program.

Teacher at Murray’s Liberty Elementary strives to make school relevant Huntsman Award » Judy Mahoskey won $10,000 for her excellent teaching.

Girls-only classes a benefit to learning?

Fractions, spatial skills key for success in math

P.E. classes fail to combat obesity, study shows

Franklin Covey Co. Partners with Abril Education, Brazilian Publishing and Education Giant, to Take The Leader in Me Process to Schools and Students in Brazil Franklin Covey Brazil to Assist in Delivering Education Process to Schools

OPINION & COMMENTARY

Lawmaker quits ALEC over lack of openness

Thinking Not Allowed

Making Utah education truly exceptional – increase teacher pay

So this would be a great Utah charter school

Fact-checking USOE claims on Common Core

JEA wants collaboration with actual education stakeholders, not attorney

Witness protection

Do away with public schools

Seizing the Moment for Mathematics

How Summer Is Making U.S. Kids Dumber and Fatter

NATION

D.C., six states get pass on No Child education deadlines

Report: US states’ financial woes eroding services

Taxing sales to fund Ohio schools?

George W. Bush’s Think Tank Advances Education Policy Agenda

Students’ online photos of California tests delay release of scores Results of the standardized tests won’t be released until Aug. 31. Millikan High in Long Beach and North Hollywood High are among the schools that could have their API scores invalidated, leading to sanctions or loss of grants.

States Find Laws Against Sports Head Injuries Tricky to Enact

US-born kids of migrants lose rights in Mexico

Sandra Day O’Connor champions civics education

NEA Boosts Education Bet, Leads $25M Investment in Edmodo

Back-to-School Looks Up

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UTAH NEWS
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Utah lawmaker wants to equalize school funding Education » Senator’s bill focuses on commercial property tax.

South Jordan • Sen. Aaron Osmond, R-South Jordan, unveiled details of his new property tax equalization bill Tuesday night to his hometown city council, acknowledging that any legislation to redistribute funds more equitably among the state’s school districts faces a fight.
“When dealing with complex and difficult and somewhat divisive issues it’s better to communicate early,” Osmond said, adding that he plans to include all stakeholders in discussions on the historically divisive topic.
Osmond’s proposal focuses on commercial rather than residential property taxes. His unnumbered bill — still a work in progress — has three major parts:
http://goo.gl/9LU5q (SLT)

District 3 candidate sees education funding opportunities in Utah’s natural resources

Roger Donohoe says he decided to run for Utah state Representative in District 3 because he is tired of lawmakers pointing fingers and blaming others for problems we have instead of working together to solve those problems.
A resident of Hyde Park, Donohoe is challenging incumbent Jack Draxler, R-District 3, and he says, if elected, getting more funding for education will be his highest priority. So where will the funding come from?
“First of all we need to focus on severance taxes on our natural resources,” Donohoe explains, “on coal, oil, natural gas, things like that. Our tax rates on those fossil fuels are extremely low right now.”
Donhoe was a guest on KVNU’s Crosstlalk show Tuesday and said that Utah can still be competitive in developing natural resources while also helping to fund education.
http://goo.gl/HhALq (CVD)

‘True friend’: UEA endorses Matheson in 4th District race Politics » Rival vows to work for local control of education.

Utah Rep. Jim Matheson received the endorsement Wednesday of the 18,000-member Utah Education Association, which praised the Democratic congressman as a “true friend to education.”
“From standing up against private-school vouchers to helping save teachers’ jobs during the recession, to opposing inflexible No Child Left Behind rules, he has been a champion for Utah teachers, parents and schoolchildren,” said UEA President Sharon Gallagher-Fishbaugh.
Matheson, a six-term incumbent, faces a Republican challenge from Saratoga Springs Mayor Mia Love in Utah’s new 4th District.
http://goo.gl/XHfD9 (SLT)

http://goo.gl/tx8MX (DN)

http://goo.gl/jNl8D (PDH)

http://goo.gl/g60P7 (KSL)

http://goo.gl/vHS5A (KSTU)

Taxpayer association calls on Wasatch schools to cut $5M

HEBER CITY — The Wasatch Taxpayers Association is calling on the Wasatch School District to cut $5 million in property tax revenue from its 2013 budget.
In a prepared statement, the association calls for increased fiscal responsibility and cites figures showing that property tax increases have outpaced student enrollment growth. The group also takes issue with increased administrative costs in the district.
“As the WTPA, we are eager to work with the Wasatch School District to remedy this oversight in being fiscally responsible to the patrons of the district they serve,” the statement reads.
The association alleges that the school district has violated state code by accumulating approximately $9 million in unassigned reserve funds and failing to make public the most recent budget for an appropriate amount of time prior to approval.
http://goo.gl/fZ0Oc (DN)

Tax hikes becoming common for Utah cities

WEST JORDAN, Utah — If there’s safety in numbers, then West Jordan is safe as it pursues a possible 17 percent increase in its city property tax.
That’s because 29 governments, from cities to counties to school districts across Utah are considering or have already decided to hike property taxes.
http://goo.gl/dGmCp (KSTU)

New educ. standards a ‘ramping up’ of federal control

A panel of high-profile education experts convened at Utah’s Salt Lake Community College to talk about the downside of the Common Core standards being trumpeted by the Obama administration.
Even though those experts were instrumental in helping to develop Common Core, Neal McCluskey of the Cato Institute says Utah probably has more opponents of the standards than do most states.
“And maybe other states will start to see more people in the near future get angry about Common Core,” he states, “but right now it doesn’t look like there is a widespread revolt — largely because most people don’t really know that Common Core exists; and even if they do, they’re not really sure what it is.”
Though Utah is upset by the push for Common Core, the associate director of Cato’s Center for Educational Freedom says federal intrusion into education is nothing new — although this time around there is an aspect that is new.
http://goo.gl/dI6XZ (OneNewsNow)

Granite District Wants Parents To Review Sex Ed Materials

This week, families in the Granite School District received a recorded phone message informing them the materials for Human Sexuality and Maturation Education are available for review. Ben Horsley, Communications Director for the Granite School District said the materials have not changed, but a letter from the state superintendent of schools, prompted the phone calls to parents.
In the letter, State Superintendent Larry Shumway reminded all superintendents that materials for Sex Education and Maturation Classes must be reviewed by a committee before they are approved by the school boards and the materials “must be available for parents or residents to review before the vote.”
Horseley said there have been no changes in the instruction; the district just wants to make parents aware they have the right to review the materials before the board votes on them on August 7th.
http://goo.gl/Vn12u (KUTV)

KUER News Pod

A murder suspect attempts to steal a plane at the St. George Airport, Utah’s education leaders discuss the Common Core curriculum, and drought conditions in the state are driving up the price of food.
http://goo.gl/oO6eD (KUER)

Utahn wins award, donates money to Jordan School District Education » $10,000 grant sponsored by MassMutual will implement leadership program.

Thirty years have passed since Greg Williams last walked the hallways of Hillcrest High School in Midvale as a teacher.
Williams pursued a career in finance after working as a history, psychology, and geography teacher and coach at the school. But he didn’t leave his passion for education behind as he climbed the ranks as a financial adviser for the Massachusetts-based MassMutual Financial Group.
Williams joined the board of the Jordan Education Foundation more than a decade ago, where he has worked to raise money for school activities and programs.
So when Williams’ company offered a contest of sorts to honor volunteers — with an award of $10,000 to donate to the winners’ favorite charity — he submitted an application.
Out of more than 5,000 people in Williams’ company, he was recently selected as one of 10 winners nationwide for his history of community service and success as a financial adviser at Intermountain Financial Group in Salt Lake City.
The $10,000 grant will be used to fund a program called The Leader in Me, modeled after Stephen Covey’s book The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People, at Silver Crest Elementary in Herriman and Southland Elementary in Riverton.
http://goo.gl/KAts7 (SLT)

Teacher at Murray’s Liberty Elementary strives to make school relevant Huntsman Award » Judy Mahoskey won $10,000 for her excellent teaching.

Judy Mahoskey took a variety of courses in college, but when she enrolled in an education class, she discovered her teaching passion. She said she loved planning lessons as part of the curriculum.
“It was something I could do forever,” she said.
In May, Mahoskey, a sixth-grade teacher at Liberty Elementary in Murray, was one of six Utah educators who received the Huntsman Awards for Excellence in Education.
http://goo.gl/v945Z (SLT)

Girls-only classes a benefit to learning?

SALT LAKE CITY — Schools across the country are experimenting with girls-only math and science classes to encourage them to continue in those fields. But is it the best way to go about it?
A Georgetown University study forecast 8 million jobs will be available in the math, science and technology fields by 2018, but many worry future generations will be unprepared for the jobs, particularly the next generation of female workers.
Utah educators say girls may feel more confident or less embarrassed in a girls-only class. However, the girls-only class approach may be a disservice when the students move to college and into a career.
http://goo.gl/9pi1i (KSL)

Fractions, spatial skills key for success in math

SALT LAKE CITY — Over the last 30 years, U.S. high school students have been falling behind their counterparts in China, Japan, Finland, the Netherlands and Canada in mathematics achievement.
The source of the achievement gap, according to a new study: inadequate understanding of fractions and long division. Among grade five students, a team of researchers at Carnegie Mellon University led by Robert Siegler found a strong positive correlation between students’ understanding of fractions and long division and their ability to learn more complex mathematics.
http://goo.gl/1dpW7 (DN)

P.E. classes fail to combat obesity, study shows

Six states in the U.S. adhered to the recommended 150 minutes of physical education in elementary schools, a new study conducted by Bryan McCullick, a kinesiology professor at the University of Georgia, found. While two states followed the physical education guidelines, no states followed the guidelines at the high school level.
The study scrutinized the role of federal courts in interpreting physical education statues that have been left to different interpretations, the Huffington Post reported. “While public health reforms have emphasized school-based physical education as a means of combating the childhood obesity epidemic, the study’s results found that courts typically do not interfere with state legislative decisions concerning curriculum.”
http://goo.gl/zl9QP (DN)

Franklin Covey Co. Partners with Abril Education, Brazilian Publishing and Education Giant, to Take The Leader in Me Process to Schools and Students in Brazil Franklin Covey Brazil to Assist in Delivering Education Process to Schools

SALT LAKE CITY — Franklin Covey Co. and FC Brasil Consultoria e Representacoes Ltda (“Franklin Covey Brazil”), announced today that they have partnered with Abril Education, granting the Brazilian publishing and education giant exclusive licensing rights to The Leader in Me(R), Franklin Covey’s education process for teaching leadership principles to students within elementary schools. Franklin Covey Brazil will assist and support Abril Education in delivering The Leader in Me process to both public and private schools throughout Brazil. ( www.TheLeaderinMe.org )
http://goo.gl/fj3Oa (Business Wire via MarketWatch)

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OPINION & COMMENTARY
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Lawmaker quits ALEC over lack of openness Salt Lake Tribune commentary by columnist Peg McEntee

Clearly, Rep. Christine Watkins had had enough.
One of the few women and even fewer Democrats to be a member of the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC), she withdrew her membership in an organization that has come under intense scrutiny for putting state lawmakers in touch with big corporations — in private. Watkins lives in Price and serves District 69, which encompasses San Juan County and parts of Carbon, Emery and Grand counties.
She said in a news release that she joined ALEC “because I felt their goals on issues such as public lands matched what was best for the people in my district. However, I’ve become troubled by other aspects of their work.”

This year, Utah Rep. Ken Ivory sponsored a flawed bill demanding that the federal government surrender virtually all public lands to the state. Critics say that will never work and cost a fortune, but the bill now is considered to have model language at ALEC, which is holding a four-day conference in Salt Lake City starting Wednesday.
http://goo.gl/Ph6n7

Thinking Not Allowed
Salt Lake City Weekly commentary by columnist Katharine Biele

Let’s face it: The Utah Eagle Forum is a force to contend with, if only in your mind—or someone’s mind. Take the Jordan School Board, for instance. Because of delayed mini-outrage over the school play, Dead Man Walking, the school board is considering an apology for making kids think and maybe even shocking parents. We’ve had this discussion before, and it involves the role of education, not the content of plays. Sen. Margaret Dayton, R-Orem, tried to eliminate the International Baccalaureate from state curriculum because it advocates critical thinking. Both cases involved high school students who are set to embark in the real world. One has to wonder why the Eagle Forum has so little faith in the judgment of teens faced with reasoned pros and cons.
http://goo.gl/bAuAa

Making Utah education truly exceptional – increase teacher pay Deseret News commentary by columnist Mary McConnell

In my last post I noted that whenever I cite articles questioning connections between education spending, class size or teacher pay and education results, I invariably receive comments along the lines of “well, not in Utah.”
Yup, Utah has some of the largest class sizes in the country. (In fact, according to one analysis I’m going to cite, Utah ranks at the very top – or bottom – in number of enrolled students per teacher: 22.3). According to the same report, published in The Atlantic, Utah ranks fourth from the bottom in teacher salaries. On the other hand, Utah ranks in the upper half on 2009 National Assessment of Educational Progress math and reading scores.
http://goo.gl/FYfie

So this would be a great Utah charter school Commentary by Charter Solutions President Lincoln Fillmore

Cristo Rey is a network of private Catholic schools, not charters, but the idea and model they use for real-world education and financial sustainability would work for charters, and someone should write such a plan for Utah. Or I will.
The model is that the students go to school and learn, much like they would in any other school, but starting in ninth grade, students spend one day per week working for a company as an employee, doing actual work, for which the company pays the school actual money.
http://goo.gl/oKyqI

Fact-checking USOE claims on Common Core Sutherland Institute commentary by Matthew Piccolo, policy analyst

As the debate about Common Core carries on, many interested parties are making claims about what effect the new standards will have on public education and children in Utah. The latest comes from Brenda Hales of the Utah State Office of Education (USOE) and a response by Christel Swasey, a public-school teacher in Utah.
After several months of research, Sutherland Institute published a report recommending the state exit Common Core and agreements related to it. In this blog post, we have rated how true or false the USOE claims are, and explain our ratings based on our research. All page numbers refer to our full report, and we made format changes to USOE quotes to maintain consistency.
http://goo.gl/sWClt

JEA wants collaboration with actual education stakeholders, not attorney Deseret News letter from Jennifer Boehme

Members of the Jordan Education Association, or JEA, are disappointed with the negotiations process chosen by the Jordan School Board this year. With new school board members and a new superintendent, employees felt calm and hopeful with improving morale. The JEA negotiations team desired collaboration through interest-based bargaining. Hope was lost when the board chose to “broker” negotiations through an attorney at the bargaining table.
The school board encourages collaboration; yet, sending a “broker” to negotiations prevented collaboration. The school board supports the “Leader in Me” program; yet, sending a “broker” not invested in the success of students made reaching a win-win agreement impossible.
The school board and administration tell teachers how valuable they are; yet, teachers do not see their actions and words matching.
http://goo.gl/iu2Ul

Witness protection
Salt Lake Tribune letter from Marilyn Gibson

I was saddened to read about the Utah Eagle Forum sticking its nose into a high school production because the play contained what the Eagle Forum deemed as bigotry (“Controversial play at Bingham High aimed at critical thinking,” Tribune, July 16).
I can’t imagine that a play about a Catholic nun counseling with death-row inmates prior to their execution promotes bigotry, although it may depict it. But isn’t that what art is about — to provoke thoughts and feelings so that you may see and reflect on them?
The Eagle Forum wants to so protect people that they don’t live.
http://goo.gl/ltMbw

Do away with public schools
(Logan) Herald Journal letter from Jordan Porter

Mr. Saunders:
Let me begin by first stating that I have absolutely no intention of belittling public educators. As a Cache Valley native, I knew many great educators. I do, however, disagree with you. To a much lesser extent, I also disagree with Mr. King.
Mr. King placed a lot of focus on the quality of education. He is correct in that public education does not come close to offering the quality of education that privately schooled and homeschooled children receive. Studies have shown that homeschooled children out-perform publicly educated children by 30 to 37 percentile points in all subjects. Mr. Saunders, you failed to mention anything at all about the quality of public education. Perhaps this is because you cannot dispute the lack of quality public education provides.
Mr. King stated he thought public education should be reserved for the poor. The fact is, public education should cease to exist. Why? Public schools have become breeding grounds for juvenile delinquency because educators cannot give the needed time and attention to individual students.
http://goo.gl/DFQvV

Seizing the Moment for Mathematics
Education Week op-ed by William Schmidt, Michigan State University distinguished professor and co-director of the university’s Education Policy Center

For years now it has been clear that the U.S. mathematics curriculum is a mile wide and an inch deep, and that the fragmented quality of mathematics instruction is related to our low ranking on international assessments. Nearly a generation after the first Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study, the nation’s governors and chief state school officers, in concert with other stakeholders, have fashioned the Common Core State Standards for mathematics that may finally give American students the high-quality standards they deserve.
These new math standards have attracted some criticism, however. Aside from more abstract arguments, a number of specific claims have been leveled against them, including that they are untested; that they are not world-class; and that some existing state standards are superior.
As part of our ongoing research, Richard Houang and I recently concluded a study of the math standards and their relation to existing state standards and the standards of other nations. Drawing from our work on the 1995 TIMSS, we developed a measure of the congruence of the common core to all 50 state standards in effect in 2008-09, as well as to an international benchmark. We also examined the relationship of each state’s math standards to the common standards and how each state performed on the 2009 National Assessment of Educational Progress. Although, we can’t project the success of the common math standards with certainty, it would give us reason for optimism if states whose standards more closely resembled those of the common core performed better on NAEP.
What did our research uncover?
http://goo.gl/ZJuJK

How Summer Is Making U.S. Kids Dumber and Fatter Bloomberg commentary by Peter Orszag, vice chairman of global banking at Citigroup

It’s July, and for many of us, that brings back fond childhood memories of family vacations, summer camp or long, happy days spent playing with friends. But this quaint notion of summers as a kids’ paradise is dangerously misleading, evidence from social research suggests.
After spending the summer away from the classroom, children return to school one month or more, on average, behind where they were when the previous year ended. Kids also tend to put on weight in the summer two to three times faster than they do during the school year.
To put it unkindly, the average child becomes dumber and fatter during the vacation. And although there’s no need to declare war on summer, there’s plenty we could do to combat the seasonal learning loss and weight gain.
http://goo.gl/egd29

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NATIONAL NEWS
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D.C., six states get pass on No Child education deadlines Washington Times

Schools in the nation’s capital will no longer be subject to the mandates and deadlines of the federal No Child Left Behind education law.
The District of Columbia was among the seven recipients of NCLB waivers granted Thursday by the Obama administration. The others are Arizona, Kansas, Michigan, Mississippi, Oregon and South Carolina.
http://goo.gl/1IYBL

http://goo.gl/80igM (Ed Week)

http://goo.gl/JOpYq (ED)

Report: US states’ financial woes eroding services Associated Press

WASHINGTON — U.S. states face long-term budget burdens that are already limiting their ability to pay for basic services such as law enforcement, local schools and transportation, a report released Tuesday said.
Aging populations and rising health care costs are inflating Medicaid and pension expenses. At the same time, revenue from sales and gas taxes is shrinking. And grants from the federal government, which provide about a third of state revenue, are likely to shrink, the report said.
Those challenges are made worse by a lack of planning by many states and the repeated use of one-time accounting gimmicks to cut costs, the report added.
http://goo.gl/K7xM9

A copy of the report
http://www.statebudgetcrisis.org/wpcms/report-1

Taxing sales to fund Ohio schools?
Associated Press

COLUMBUS, Ohio — As Ohio considers new ways to pay for public schools, legislative analysts said Wednesday one option is to replace local property tax revenue with an increase in the state sales tax, but they cautioned that it might be a risky move.
To raise the more than $9.9 billion that’s needed, policymakers would need to more than double the sales tax rate — from 5.5 cents on the dollar to 13.2 cents.
It’s one of many ideas being kicked around by an Ohio House subcommittee laying the groundwork for a new state funding formula for schools.
http://goo.gl/1Hi34

George W. Bush’s Think Tank Advances Education Policy Agenda Dallas Morning News via Education Week

George W. Bush has steadfastly avoided the political fray since leaving the White House, save for the casual endorsement of Mitt Romney he offered in May through an elevator’s closing doors.
But the former president has nonetheless advanced a robust policy agenda in the last few years, using his Dallas-based think tank, the Bush Institute, to signal the issues on which he plans to focus his post-presidency.
Far from steering clear of public policy—as media reports often portray him—Bush has quietly guided the institute to start building upon parts of his presidency that remain hot topics of debate: foreign aid, accountability in education, tax policy and democracy movements.
Bush and his staff are careful to honor post-White House standards of decorum that typically limit how much presidents engage in day-to-day politics—and the nonpartisan bent required for the institute’s tax-exempt status.
But some of the ideas that Bush and the institute are promoting put him at odds with many in the GOP, and especially those who participated in this year’s acrid Republican presidential primary.
http://goo.gl/gMPbf

Students’ online photos of California tests delay release of scores Results of the standardized tests won’t be released until Aug. 31. Millikan High in Long Beach and North Hollywood High are among the schools that could have their API scores invalidated, leading to sanctions or loss of grants.
Los Angeles Times

Student photos of state standardized tests posted on social networks have caused a two-week delay in the release of scores and could result in more serious ramifications for nearly 150 California schools.
In a letter sent to all state school districts this week, the Department of Education announced the postponement of the 2012 test results until Aug. 31.
http://goo.gl/lVaRi

States Find Laws Against Sports Head Injuries Tricky to Enact Stateline

Ohio State Representatives Michael Stinziano and Sean O’Brien thought they had a bill that would pass with no more than token opposition. It was a youth safety bill — a piece of legislation protecting young athletes who suffered head injuries on the playing field. Other states had taken similar action. The sponsors didn’t expect a backlash. But a backlash is what they got.
It took multiple hearings and 10 rewrites to get the anti-concussion bill through the Ohio House. And it still faces an uncertain future in the state Senate. The reason has to do with the concerns of some doctors and the slippery problem of “return to play” decisions.
The bill aims to reduce the number of kids who suffer repeated concussions by requiring a coach to remove athletes from play if they show concussion symptoms and mandating that a health care professional sign off on their return to play. But which professionals are authorized to make that call? Some are bound to be excluded. Many legislators, says Stinziano, have an optometrist or a physical therapist in their district who is concerned about being cut out as an authorized concussion expert who could return a kid to play. Rural representatives argue that for their constituents, getting an athlete to a doctor or hospital for an evaluation can be too time-consuming to be practical.
The Ohio House reached a compromise and passed the bill by allowing each school district or governing authority of a chartered or private school to authorize which licensed health care providers can make return-to-play decisions. Stinziano acknowledges that while the doctors don’t love it, it’s what was needed to move the legislation. “This issue is not necessarily resolved,” Stinziano says, “and we have our work cut out for us in the Senate.”
http://goo.gl/gNZoc

US-born kids of migrants lose rights in Mexico Associated Press

MALINALCO, Mexico — As a cold drizzle washed over this town of narrow cobblestone streets in the forested highlands of central Mexico, mothers waiting outside the colonial-era cultural center wrapped wool blankets around the infants snuggled in their arms. Other parents tightened plastic bags around folders filled with U.S. passports and birth certificates from California, Ohio and Texas.
One by one, the parents filed inside, sat down before a Mexican government worker and told stories of lives that had crossed the U.S.-Mexico border twice. First, they crossed illegally into the United States for work, found jobs, and had children. Then, they were caught and deported, or left on their own as the work dried up with the U.S. economic slump. Now they are back in Mexico with children who are American citizens by virtue of being born on U.S. soil.
Because of the byzantine rules of Mexican and U.S. bureaucracies, tens of thousands of those children without Mexican citizenship now find themselves without access to basic services in Mexico – unable to officially register in school or sign up for health care at public hospitals and clinics that give free check-ups and medicines.
At issue is a Mexican government requirement that any official document from another country be certified inside that country with a seal known as an “apostille,” then be translated by a certified, and often expensive, translator in Mexico.
http://goo.gl/n4wBa

Sandra Day O’Connor champions civics education CNN

The retired Supreme Court justice is all business as she walks into our meeting room.
But inside, she’s got the heart of an educator.
Of course, Sandra Day O’Connor will always be associated with her historic “first,” as the first woman justice to sit on the U.S. Supreme Court. Prior to that appointment by President Ronald Reagan in 1981, she also served as a judge and a state senator.
Since her retirement from the high court in 2006, she has found a new passion – civics education.
How did she decide to become a champion of that cause?
http://goo.gl/N1I7v

NEA Boosts Education Bet, Leads $25M Investment in Edmodo Bloomberg

Education has long been a challenging market for startups because it’s hard to sell into school systems and students tend not to be flush with cash.
New Enterprise Associates thinks that’s ancient history. The venture capital firm announced today it led a $25 million investment in Edmodo, the social-networking service for teachers and students in kindergarten through high school.
Earlier this week, the firm added to its stake in Coursera, a site for higher education classes, which NEA first backed in April as part of a $16 million investment with Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers.
NEA and other investors see new opportunities in education, thanks to the increasing adoption of smartphones and tablets, and the near ubiquitous usage of social networking tools.
http://goo.gl/C1NAR

Back-to-School Looks Up
Wall Street Journal

Average back-to-school spending this year is projected to increase 14%, according to an annual survey conducted for the National Retail Federation.
The bright outlook in an otherwise weak retail scene reflects the fact that more children are entering grades K to 12 this fall and that last year’s spending was flat, creating a need for more replenishment this year,, the NRF said.
A 14% increase in spending would mark the fastest pace since at least 2003, when the survey began.
http://goo.gl/1jsNs

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CALENDAR
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USOE Calendar
http://tinyurl.com/5x9oh9

UEN News
http://www.uen.org

August 3:
Utah State Board of Education meeting
250 E. 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

August 9:
Utah State Charter School Board meeting
250 E. 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://1.usa.gov/Axtt5K

August 14:
Executive Appropriations Interim Committee meeting
1 p.m., 445 State Capitol
http://goo.gl/E0hoC

August 15:
Education Interim Committee meeting
2 p.m.
http://goo.gl/8WODJ

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