Education News Roundup: Aug. 17, 2012

"Recycle cubes" by GenBug/CC/flickr

“Recycle cubes” by GenBug/CC/flickr

Today’s Top Picks:

Activist urges Utah to take a look at SITLA mandate.
http://goo.gl/LRGF8 (SLT)

Murray’s Portuguese immersion program may be struggling, but Provo’s is up and ready to go.
http://goo.gl/JqWCf (PDH)

When should poorly-performing charter schools be closed?
http://goo.gl/Tn7Q8 (Ed Week)

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TODAY’S HEADLINES
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UTAH

Activist seeks state shift from oil shale and tar sands “Working on a fantasy” » SITLA mandate is money, but environmentalists say it has larger duty to kids.

Students already hard at work in Provo Portuguese program

District’s tax hike expected to hit businesses harder

Students plunge into first day at school in Iron Co.

Best bus behavior could pay off big for elementary school kids

Provo teacher in child porn investigation found dead

Ex-Brighton High choir teacher charged regarding texts, porn Courts » Police say “inappropriate communications” with student triggered investigation.

Dismissed Fast Forward teacher now charged in child abuse case

Layton High School raises money for people with disabilities Helping hand » The $12,000 raised will help PARC participants learn skills.

West Jordan teacher attends boot camp to teach about sustainability Hawthorn instructor was among 70 from around the world who attended boot camp.

13-year-old Riverton teen doing the ‘write’ thing

Elk Ridge teenagers inspire city’s new recycling program

Elks to host fashion show to help Millcreek High

OPINION & COMMENTARY

Adventure Kids: Are you read for a new school year?

Still another bite at a “farewell to algebra”

Sick of the conversation

UHSAA cites administrative headaches as justification for denying transfer to depressed student

Report finds crisis in teacher retentions

The Case for the Private Sector in School Reform Innovative companies have improved nearly every area of public life. So why are ideologues trying to keep them away from education?

The big business of charter schools

Common Core opens a second front in the Reading Wars

Do the math: Too much calculus?

NATION

Debate Grows Around Charter School Closure

Louisiana Supreme Court refuses voucher program injunction

Private schools considering state curriculum

Bill to create statewide teacher evaluation system clears key hurdle Measure would effectively eliminate state requirements to use student test scores in evaluating teachers. L.A. district says that would mean ‘less accountability.’

To Train Teachers, a New Lesson Plan

Schools Pass Debt to the Next Generation

Missouri Rep. Akin opposes spending on National School Lunch Program

Schools try new approaches to building fan support

Easton Area School District’s ‘I Heart Boobies’ appeal to be heard before full circuit

How The Poor, The Middle Class And The Rich Spend Their Money

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UTAH NEWS
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Activist seeks state shift from oil shale and tar sands “Working on a fantasy” » SITLA mandate is money, but environmentalists say it has larger duty to kids.

If there’s any public lands agency that’s unabashedly pro-energy development, it would have to be the Utah School and Institutional Trust Lands Administration. Maximizing profits for the benefit of schools is, after all, in its legal job description.
So it was with no illusions of quick change Thursday that Ryan Pleune appeared before SITLA’s board for the third and final time this year seeking an about-face on leasing oil shale and tar sands deposits to would-be energy developers.
Until the world accepts the preponderance of climate science and alters its economy to phase out fossil fuels, Pleune said after addressing the board, SITLA likely won’t take up his proposals to stop leasing to companies and start awarding non-competitive bids to conservation groups instead.
“This is a fantasy,” Pleune said. “I recognize that. But it’s one that I’m willing to work on.”
More realistic, he believes, is his final request: that SITLA bump its royalties to around 16 percent to bring them in line with what it charges for oil and gas. The agency’s price for unconventional fuels — none of which have yet been produced commercially in the state except as asphalt — range from 5 percent to 12.5 percent depending on volume.
http://goo.gl/LRGF8 (SLT)

Students already hard at work in Provo Portuguese program

PROVO — What do the U.S. Department of Defense, the National Security Agency and first-graders at Lakeview Elementary School in Provo have in common? According to Gregg Roberts, dual language immersion specialist with the Utah State Office of Education, the answer is Portuguese.
The U.S. government has deemed Portuguese a critical, strategic language to know for the future. Lakeview Elementary is joining other schools in the state, including Rocky Mountain Elementary in the Alpine district, in preparing children now. A new dual language immersion class will start in Portuguese, with funding from a National Security Language Initiative for youth learners called Star Talk. A $124,000 grant will help with teacher training and Portuguese student training camps in the state — $10,000 was set aside for Lakeview’s camp.
“This gave us a huge bump at the beginning of this project,” said Jamie Leite, Portuguese director in the dual immersion program with the USOE. Leite lives in the Lakeview neighborhood, served an LDS mission to Brazil and is married to a Brazilian. “There is a lot of interest in Portuguese with a large Brazilian population in Utah.”
http://goo.gl/JqWCf (PDH)

District’s tax hike expected to hit businesses harder

The Tooele County School District’s proposed tax increase is alarming some local business owners, who say the increase will force them to cut expenses, including hiring, as they scramble to find a way to cover the unexpected bill.
“Last year we paid $4,392 in property tax, and our notice for this year is for $5,298,” said Cliff Jennings, who along with his father and brother runs S. Jennings Racing, a company that builds high-end racing engines in the Tooele Commercial Park. “That’s a 20 percent jump in one year.”
However, that 20 percent increase is only partially caused by the Tooele County School District’s proposed 9.1 percent increase over the certified tax rate, according to Valerie Lee, deputy Tooele County assessor.
http://goo.gl/UjvhW (TTB)

Students plunge into first day at school in Iron Co.

CEDAR CITY – As the new academic year for schools in the Iron County School District began Thursday, a class of first-graders at East Elementary School experienced their first day in a new Spanish/English dual language immersion program while Cedar High School twins Jessica and Taylor Boxwell began the first day of their last year in high school.
Steve Burton, principal for East Elementary, said the dual immersion program is starting with one class at the first-grade level that is split into two groups using two classrooms. One group spends the first half of the day learning to speak Spanish fluently while the other group learns in English. The groups then switch to the other classroom for the other half of the day.
http://goo.gl/3CCDl (SGS)

Best bus behavior could pay off big for elementary school kids

SALT LAKE CITY — Most Utah students go back to the classroom next week, and that means the state’s school buses are getting ready to hit the roads again.
This year in the Canyons School District, “good bus behavior” could pay off big for students.
The idea behind the program is to teach students how to behave properly on a bus using positive reinforcement. The program will launch in 29 elementary schools in the district on the first day of class.
http://goo.gl/ccg83 (KSL)

Provo teacher in child porn investigation found dead

PROVO — A veteran teacher in Provo was found dead in Idaho of an apparent suicide over the weekend as an investigation into his possible involvement in a child pornography case continues.
Jason Zimmerman, a popular teacher at Amelia Earhardt Elementary, was found dead in Idaho Saturday, a couple of weeks after police served a search warrant at his home.
More than 35,000 images of child pornography were downloaded over the past year to a file-sharing ID linked to Zimmerman, according to a search warrant filed in 4th District Court. Police say the downloading occurred over a neighbor’s Internet connection that was not password-protected.
Zimmerman was never arrested or charged.
http://goo.gl/1K8Vj (DN)

http://goo.gl/TtM4u (PDH)

http://goo.gl/Qzksh (KSL)

Ex-Brighton High choir teacher charged regarding texts, porn Courts » Police say “inappropriate communications” with student triggered investigation.

A former Brighton High School choir teacher faces several misdemeanor charges for alleged inappropriate texting involving a male student, sexual solicitation and possession of pornography on school property.
Steven Richard Smith, 39, was charged Thursday in the Holladay Municipal Justice Court with the class B misdemeanor counts, which allege that between March 2011 and Feb. 2 of this year he made “repeated contact by means of electronic communications” with the intention of harassing the student.
The sexual solicitation charge also involved alleged incidents where Smith allegedly offered the 17-year-old boy unspecified “opportunities” in exchange for sex.
http://goo.gl/2VzAv (SLT)

http://goo.gl/SoHCA (DN)

http://goo.gl/90Gw8 (KSL)

Dismissed Fast Forward teacher now charged in child abuse case

A Logan teacher was charged on suspicion of child abuse this week in an investigation launched before her controversial dismissal from Fast Forward High School.
Students of Angie Coats Johnson rallied to her defense after finding out her contract had not been renewed earlier this summer, and Johnson complained she was given no reason for the dismissal. School administrators have declined to discuss the reasons for their actions.
According to court records, class-A misdemeanor charges were filed against Johnson, 42, this week in relation to an incident that police say occurred June 6.
The Cache County Attorney’s Office is releasing few details about the incident because they are concerned about revealing the identity of the victim.
However, they have confirmed that the alleged victim is a family member and not a student at Fast Forward, where Johnson has been a teacher for four years.
http://goo.gl/HvwyC (LHJ)

Layton High School raises money for people with disabilities Helping hand » The $12,000 raised will help PARC participants learn skills.

Singing in grocery stores, making over teachers and collecting spare change from cars as classmates left the school parking lot were all techniques used by students at Layton High School to raise scholarship money for the Pioneer Adult Rehab Center.
PARC is a nonprofit established in 1972 that is administered by the Davis School District. PARC serves more than 600 people with disabilities in Davis, Weber, Salt Lake and Tooele counties. PARC’s mission is to foster independence for people with disabilities through employment and training. Programs are supported by a combination of state and federal dollars through a fee for service and PARC’s own government and commercial contracts. PARC participants are served based on their personal needs and employment decisions.
SteVan Gates, a PARC Community Partnership Foundation Board member, came up with the idea for an Ambassador program that would allow high school students the opportunity to get involved with PARC.
http://goo.gl/KBqjX (SLT)

West Jordan teacher attends boot camp to teach about sustainability Hawthorn instructor was among 70 from around the world who attended boot camp.

Meet Tara Haslam, Energy Vampire Hunter.
If that doesn’t grab the attention of her seventh-grade Career and Technology students at Hawthorn Academy, nothing will.
Haslam, a teacher at the West Jordan charter school, recently returned from the fourth annual Green Boot Camp, a five-day interactive workshop designed to inform middle-school teachers on how better to teach the concepts of energy, sustainability and environmentally friendly ideas.
http://goo.gl/QUHb3 (SLT)

13-year-old Riverton teen doing the ‘write’ thing

Riverton • It started out as just another English assignment from Joel Devey’s middle school teacher — but it turned into something much bigger.
“People consider me a writer,” Devey said, refuting that he isn’t. “I just wrote one good essay.”
Not only was it good, the essay about bullying and curbing violence was so good that Devey was encouraged to enter it into a national competition. His entry stuck out among the 1,400. He became one of more than 50 finalists nationwide in Do the Write Thing Challenge as part of the National Campaign to Stop Youth Violence.
http://goo.gl/Mwpo7 (SLT)

Elk Ridge teenagers inspire city’s new recycling program

This summer Elk Ridge launched a new resident recycling option, an arrangement that has been discussed by city council members for more than a year. Interest in a recycling program was sparked after two teenage girls from Salem Hills High School delivered a presentation at a city council meeting on the positive impact recycling has on the both the environment and management of city waste.
“They presented us with research and a recycling program they had developed themselves,” said Jan Davis, a member of the Elk Ridge City Council. “Since then, it’s been a topic we’ve been negotiating. The process to implement a recycling system has taken quite some time, and although ultimately we didn’t use the girls’ proposed program, they were the catalysts that got the ball rolling.”
It was through a Family, Career and Community Leaders of America community project that 17-year-olds Morgan Sessions and Sarah Maddock became concerned about the lack of recycling options in their city. Inspired to use their newfound research to implement change, the girls attended an Elk Ridge City Council meeting with the hope that the local platform would raise awareness and give their ideas a public voice.
http://goo.gl/uj5e6 (PDH)

Elks to host fashion show to help Millcreek High

ST. GEORGE – A fashion show and luncheon fundraiser is scheduled for 1 p.m. Aug. 25 at the St. George Dixie Elks Lodge, 630 W. 1250 North.
The cost is $12 and includes the show and lunch.
http://goo.gl/2RMTJ (SGS)

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OPINION & COMMENTARY
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Adventure Kids: Are you read for a new school year?
(Provo) Daily Herald commentary by columnist Regina Pikus

A new challenge has taken hold! Get ready for school on time or you may be at the back of the recess line! For a kid, school is a place of ups and downs. There are new things to look forward to and new problems to deal with. (Bullies in school can be very mean. You have to be aware!)
There are plenty of things to get ready for. Let’s go take a look at them!
http://goo.gl/abH78

Still another bite at a “farewell to algebra”
Deseret News commentary by columnist Mary McConnell

While I’ve expressed my skepticism about letting many (if any) students opt out of algebra, I have also posted about many math educators’ concern that universal algebra requirements result in schools offering dumbed-down math courses that penalize gifted students.
http://goo.gl/M8qUh

Sick of the conversation
Commentary by Charter Solutions President Lincoln Fillmore

“We’ve heard it all a dozen times, if not more,” said Senator Aaron Osmond (R-South Jordan) in Education Interim Committee meeting on Wednesday, according to the Deseret News.
Apparently, lawmakers and state education officials are frustrated that a very vocal and significant segment of the population doesn’t like the state’s move to the Common Core Standards.
Since I’m part of the broad right wing of education reform, I interact with such critics all the time. I talk to them at conventions and schools.
The problem is that the concerns of Common Core critics are real and can’t be properly addressed. The overall concern is about the outsourcing of Utah’s education policy to the federal government.
http://goo.gl/6TTLc

UHSAA cites administrative headaches as justification for denying transfer to depressed student Sutherland Institute commentary by Derek Monson, director of Public Policy

In a stunning display of callous disregard for a child’s emotional health and well-being, a spokesman for the Utah High School Activities Association (UHSAA) recently justified denying depressed children seeking to transfer schools the opportunity to immediately play sports at their new school because of the administrative burden it would create.
In explaining the denial of a hardship waiver to a child claiming he was transferring, in part, because of depression, UHSAA attorney Mark Van Wagoner stated the board “was sympathetic” to the child’s emotional problems, but said that “if we were to grant every kid who was depressed a transfer, we would have nothing but transfer requests for depressed kids.”
http://goo.gl/Eh0sd

Report finds crisis in teacher retentions Washington Post editorial

A COMPREHENSIVE study three years ago by the New Teacher Project showed how U.S. schools generally fail to recognize teacher quality, instead treating all teachers the same. Now comes an even more devastating finding from the group: Even when schools know the difference between good and bad teachers, they make no special effort to retain the good ones. Just as the previous report spurred improvements in teacher evaluation systems, this study should prompt changes in how teachers are treated.
The aptly named report, “The Irreplaceables,” concludes that the real teacher retention crisis in urban schools is not about the number of teachers who are leaving but the loss of really good ones. The two-year study identified the top 20 percent of teachers whose students consistently make the most progress on state exams. Not only do these teachers on average help students learn two to three additional months’ worth of math and reading compared to the average teacher (and five to six months more compared to low-performing teachers), but they also get high marks from students.
Yet the researchers found little effort by districts to hold on to these top performers.
http://goo.gl/n7Qot

The Case for the Private Sector in School Reform Innovative companies have improved nearly every area of public life. So why are ideologues trying to keep them away from education?
Atlantic commentary by Joel Klein, who oversees the News Corp venture Amplify

Given the costly chasm between the educational performance of U.S. students and those in other countries—and the shameful gap between white students and their black and Latino counterparts here at home—you’d think school improvement would be an all-hands-on-deck imperative in which the best minds in the public, private, and philanthropic sectors came together to lift our children’s prospects.
Yet such pragmatic problem, solving is threatened today by critics who condemn any private involvement in schools as a matter of “privatization,” “profiteering,” or worse. These ideological foes of business’ contribution to the public good ignore history in their attempt to protect a failed status quo. If their campaign to quash educational innovation succeeds, the real losers will be our kids.
A moment’s reflection reminds us that business innovation has long been critical to public goals in sectors as diverse as health care, energy, and computing.
http://goo.gl/IAHUP

The big business of charter schools
Washington Post commentary by columnist Valerie Strauss

If you are wondering why you should add charter schools to your investment portfolios, here’s David Brain, head of a major investment concern called Entertainment Properties Trust, to tell you.
This isn’t a joke.
You may think charter schools are just one option for parents looking for an alternative to traditional public schools for their children, but they are big business in some quarters.
What is Entertainment Properties Trust? According to its website, it is “a specialty real estate investment trust (REIT) that invests in properties in select categories which require unique industry knowledge, and offer stable and attractive returns.”
And the website also says this: “Our investment portfolio of nearly $3 billion includes megaplex movie theatres and adjacent retail, public charter schools, and other destination recreational and specialty investments. This portfolio includes over 160 locations spread across 34 states with over 200 tenants.”
http://goo.gl/HPmno

Common Core opens a second front in the Reading Wars Thomas Fordham Institute commentary by Kathleen Porter-Magee, Bernard lee Schwartz Policy Fellow

Up until now, the Common Core (CCSS) English language arts (ELA) standards were considered path-breaking mostly because of their reach: This wasn’t the first time a group attempted to write “common” standards, but it is the first time they’ve gained such traction. But the Common Core ELA standards are revolutionary for another, less talked about, reason: They define rigor in reading and literature classrooms more clearly and explicitly than nearly any of the state ELA standards that they are replacing. Now, as the full impact of these expectations starts to take hold, the decision to define rigor—and the way it is defined—is fanning the flames of a debate that threatens to open up a whole new front in America’s long-running “Reading Wars.”
http://goo.gl/543xB

Do the math: Too much calculus?
Washington Post commentary by columnist Jay Mathews

I don’t want to alarm students who think taking calculus in high school is the key to a brilliant future. But leaders in math education are warning that, in many schools, that course is a mess, causing bright students to forsake, rather than embrace, their dream of a career in math and science.
This is not true for students who take Advanced Placement calculus and score at least a 3 on the 5-point exam, but they make up only a third of the 600,000 students who take high school calculus each year. The rest are in trouble, because colleges don’t know what to do with them.
http://goo.gl/cYTN2

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NATIONAL NEWS
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Debate Grows Around Charter School Closure Education Week

One of the most vexing questions about charter schools—when low-performing ones should be shut down—is receiving new attention, amid concerns that lax and inconsistent standards for closing them will undermine the public’s confidence in the sector.
Over the past few years, a growing number of researchers, policymakers, and charter school backers have called for removing obstacles to closing academically struggling schools, though many barriers remain.
Numerous states have approved laws in recent years that have raised or clarified standards for charter school performance, while also establishing policies to make it easier for charters to open and secure facilities and public funding.
Even so, state and local policies vary greatly in their expectations for charter schools, and in the standards they set for authorizers—the state, local, or independent entities typically charged with approving charters and overseeing their performance.
http://goo.gl/Tn7Q8

Louisiana Supreme Court refuses voucher program injunction Associated Press via New Orleans Times-Picayune

Baton Rouge — The Louisiana Supreme Court refused to stop the launch of Gov. Bobby Jindal’s statewide voucher program while a lawsuit challenging the constitutionality of the program winds through the courts. The high court denied an injunction request from teacher unions and school boards that claim the law creating the voucher program and the separate financing formula that pays for it are unconstitutional.
A hearing is set for October. Union leaders have worried that without the injunction, they might not be able to reclaim the money sent to some of the private schools even if they win the lawsuit.
Students began attending voucher schools around the state this month. Under the program, taxpayer dollars are being used to pay for private and parochial school tuition for students who otherwise would attend public schools graded with a C, D or F by the state.
The Supreme Court decision was issued Wednesday without comment and was announced a day later by the Department of Education, which praised the ruling.
http://goo.gl/f3pfY

Private schools considering state curriculum Lafayette (LA) Advertiser

BATON ROUGE – While most of the 377 private and parochial schools approved by the Board of Elementary and Secondary Education are utilizing their own curricula or that or a national organization, several – including some archdioceses around the state – are considering aligning with a new state curriculum.
Nick Bolt, assistant chief of staff for Superintendent of Education John White, said Tuesday that some private schools “have bought into Common Core curriculum.”
“We heard from about 10 schools that they were interested in sending one or more of their teachers to our summer training institutes, and we’ve heard from three diocesan representatives that they are taking steps to integrate the Common Core in their schools,” he said.
http://goo.gl/ZeJwX

Bill to create statewide teacher evaluation system clears key hurdle Measure would effectively eliminate state requirements to use student test scores in evaluating teachers. L.A. district says that would mean ‘less accountability.’
Los Angeles Times

A key Senate committee approved a bill Thursday aimed at enhancing teacher evaluations that would effectively eliminate state requirements to use student standardized test scores to measure an instructor’s effectiveness.
AB 5, by Assemblyman Felipe Fuentes (D-Sylmar), would establish a statewide uniform teacher evaluation system that would increase performance reviews, classroom observations, training of evaluators and public input into the review process. The bill was approved, 5-2, by the Senate Appropriations Committee after Fuentes found $89 million to fund it and move it forward.
But the bill would require negotiated agreement with unions, including United Teachers Los Angeles, which opposes the Los Angeles Unified School District’s use of student test scores as one measure of teacher effectiveness. LAUSD Supt. John Deasy has said the bill, which the district opposes, would make it more difficult to push forward a new voluntary evaluation program.
“We oppose every piece of this,” Deasy said of the bill. “It’s very clear that what this bill does is legislate less accountability for teachers and administrators.”
Fuentes called his bill “leagues better” than current state law, which has largely resulted in pro-forma evaluations of teachers that critics say offer little useful feedback on how to improve their performance.
http://goo.gl/Zpuyj

To Train Teachers, a New Lesson Plan
Wall Street Journal

CHICAGO—Standing before a class of 28, Katie Filippini was losing the battle to teach her third-graders that the “er” in “germ” sounds the same as the “ir” in “dirt.” Ten minutes into the lesson, two boys fought over space on the blue carpet, a girl giggled at the commotion and a boy named Dandre stared out the window.
But Ms. Filippini wasn’t alone that winter day at the Morton School of Excellence. Veteran teacher Mauricia Dantes, Ms. Filippini’s yearlong mentor, quietly suggested having students clap out each sound, knowing that some children learn better with physical activity. Ms. Filippini did so, and Dandre and the other students began paying attention.
Now, as Ms. Filippini embarks on a new school year this week, she is drawing on those small victories as a trainee, confident that she is ready to teach on her own. “Last year gave me the confidence and experience to go into the classroom and control it.”
Ms. Filippini is part of an experimental and controversial program to improve the results of classroom teaching—a major hurdle for U.S. schools. Morton is run by the Academy for Urban School Leadership (AUSL), a Chicago-based nonprofit group. Modeled after medical residencies, the program places prospective teachers like Ms. Filippini with seasoned educators who shadow them for an entire year.
http://goo.gl/fnxyI

Schools Pass Debt to the Next Generation New York Times

The deleveraging of America is well under way, as individuals and companies recover from the excess borrowing that helped to produce the boom and left many people vulnerable when the bust arrived. Household debt is down nearly $900 billion over the last four years, partly from repayments and partly from defaults.
During the crazy times, homeowners could get mortgages that allowed them to pay less than the full amount of interest being charged, with the rest added to the principal. Commercial property owners generally paid the full amount of interest, but did not have to repay any principal until the loan matured in five or 10 years. For both homes and commercial properties, lenders were willing to rely on extremely optimistic appraisals.
For property buyers, those days are gone,
But for some borrowers, it is still possible to borrow now and pay nothing for decades.
There is a furor in California because the Poway Unified School District, in San Diego County, borrowed money last year on terms that even Countrywide would have laughed at during the boom. It will not pay a dime of interest or principal for more than two decades. Only then will it begin to service the bonds.
It is paying a high price. Although it has a good credit rating — Aa2 at Moody’s and AA– at Standard & Poor’s — it will eventually pay tax-exempt interest of up to 6.8 percent for the borrowings. When it issued more conventional bonds last year, it paid rates that were much lower, ranging up to just 4.1 percent.
For borrowing $105 million in 2011, taxpayers — or perhaps it would be more accurate to say the children and grandchildren of today’s taxpayers — will pay $877 million in interest between 2033 and 2051.
http://goo.gl/0D8D2

Missouri Rep. Akin opposes spending on National School Lunch Program Kansas City Star

SEDALIA — Missouri’s two U.S. Senate candidates tangled Thursday over whether taxpayers should subsidize school lunches for more than 34 million students across the country.
U.S. Rep. Todd Akin, the Republican candidate, said he opposes federal spending for the National School Lunch Program, which provides cash and surplus food for nearly 650,000 school lunches in Missouri each day.
“Is it something the federal government should do?” Akin said. “I answer it no. … I think the federal government should be out of the education business.”
Akin made the statement outside the 60th annual Governor’s Ham Breakfast at the Missouri State Fair on the week many students are heading back to the classroom.
http://goo.gl/lnw4z

Schools try new approaches to building fan support Columbus (MS) Dispatch

Tonight, around dusk, time will stop. A quarter will be tossed, shining silver against the darkening sky. Heads. Tails. Game on.
For the heroes of the night, it is the moment for which they’ve spent countless hours in the Mississippi heat, running laps, dodging tackles and taking hits like the men they will soon become.
In recent years, high school football has played to a tough crowd, fighting for dominance over competing interests, but across the Golden Triangle, determined fans and booster clubs are hoping they can bring back the glory — and the crowds — for what once was the only show in town anyone wanted to see.
http://goo.gl/ZVPs4

Easton Area School District’s ‘I Heart Boobies’ appeal to be heard before full circuit (Easton, PA) Express-Times

The entire U.S. 3rd Circuit Court of Appeals will hear the Easton Area School District’s appeal of a federal court ruling that allows students to wear “I Heart Boobies” bracelets in school.
The case has been scheduled for a rehearing before the entire bench, according to court documents.
A date for the rehearing before all 14 judges has not yet been set, but it will probably not be held until February, said Bill Bradley, court sessions coordinator.
U.S. District Judge Mary McLaughlin ruled April 12 that the bracelets cannot reasonably be considered lewd, vulgar or disruptive to the educational process. Those are the legal grounds by which Pennsylvania schools may restrict student speech.
That ruling only temporarily overturns the bracelet ban while the lawsuit proceeds. Officials said legal costs associated with the appeal will be covered by the district’s insurance.
A final ruling on the suit has not been rendered.
http://goo.gl/Hv8hf

How The Poor, The Middle Class And The Rich Spend Their Money NPR Planet Money

How do Americans spend their money? And how do budgets change across the income spectrum?
The graph below answers these questions. It shows average household spending patterns for U.S. households in three income categories — one just below the poverty line, one at the middle of the income distribution and one at the top of the distribution.
Both the similarities and the differences are striking.
Everyone devotes a huge chunk of their budget to housing, for example. Poor, middle class and rich families spend similar shares of their budgets on clothing and shoes, and on food outside the home.
But poor families spend a much larger share of their budget on basic necessities such as food at home, utilities and health care. Rich families are able to devote a much bigger chunk of their spending to education, and a much, much bigger share to saving for retirement.
http://goo.gl/Hq56o

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CALENDAR
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USOE Calendar
http://tinyurl.com/5x9oh9

UEN News
http://www.uen.org

September 6-7:
Utah State Board of Education meeting
250 E. 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

September 13:
Utah State Charter School Board meeting
250 E. 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://1.usa.gov/Axtt5K

September 18:
Executive Appropriations Interim Committee meeting
1 p.m., 445 State Capitol
http://goo.gl/E0hoC

September 19:
Education Interim Committee meeting
2 p.m., 30 House Building
http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2012&Com=INTEDU

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