Education News Roundup: Sept. 4, 2012

"back to school" by Emma_Brown/CC/flickr

“back to school” by Emma_Brown/CC/flickr

Today’s Top Picks:

You had to know it would be late and long, but after four days off, ENR is back.

Granite, Ogden and Provo, Morgan, Washington districts join in the district Race to the Top.
http://goo.gl/ajmR1 (SLT)
and http://goo.gl/LQ7Hl (ED)

Utah Core Standards continue to get coverage.
http://goo.gl/ygje2 (DN)
and http://goo.gl/n4lKG (OSE)
and http://goo.gl/c8Szo (SGS)

Standard notes that there are still a few teacher openings.
http://goo.gl/JoMX1 (OSE)

Dixon Middle School, North Sevier High School, and Gunnison Valley Elementary School will be Smart Schools.
http://goo.gl/LqhoV (PDH)

Congratulations to ENR’s old boss (yes, ENR has worked for everyone at one time or another), Ray Timothy, new head of UEN.
http://goo.gl/iqGbH (SLT)
and http://goo.gl/lCmFs (DN)
and http://goo.gl/n51kk (PR)

What does ED do next with all the waiver states?
http://goo.gl/BFrgK (Ed Week)

Two Times look at teacher union-Democratic Party relations.
http://goo.gl/QWXzE (LA Times)
and http://goo.gl/xMZ3L (Washington Times)

Jeb Bush put the spotlight on education at the GOP convention.
http://goo.gl/Xl3Vd (Tampa Times)
and http://goo.gl/MHhJn (Hechinger Report)
and http://www.politico.com/news/stories/0812/80486.html

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TODAY’S HEADLINES
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UTAH

Five Utah school districts to apply for millions in federal cash
Education » Districts hope to secure for Race to the Top money.

Students go back to school across the nation
Kids across the nation will be tested in new ways in 2012-13 year

DESK Academy training teachers to improve readers

New standards a part of education initiative to improve learning

Teacher hiring not always a bed of roses

Dixon Middle School to become iSchool

Park City superintendent tapped to lead Utah Education Network

5 educators nominated for Utah’s Teacher of the Year award

Lehi High School bursting at seams with more than 2,000 students

Utah students get cool science lesson as they watch hot air balloon
Education » Demo at Syracuse school provides a lofty look at aerodynamics.

Westminster using grant to expand computer science in Utah high schools

Jordan School District changes drama policy after flak over play

Educator retires after almost 40 years of teaching

One shot not enough: Utah nurses urge 4 vaccines for teens
Health » Officials recommend vaccines for flu, HPV and meningococcal disease.

Roy High student sentenced to jail for bomb plot
Courts » Teen pleads no contest to lesser charge, also receives probation and a fine.

East High stadium evacuated after smoke reported

‘Works bombs’ investigated at Syracuse High School

Alleged gunman near SLC elementary school in custody

Community unites to protect schoolchildren from busy crosswalk

Mystery of the missing backpacks solved

Canyons District accepting SALTA applications for 2013-14

Ford dealership, Davis High band team for fundraiser

Local club helps school in Japan

UHSSA, MaxPreps.com link up

Search underway for Utah’s top youth volunteers

American Fork High School dress code

Alpine School District school bus routes

Green Ribbon Week

Legacy Elementary School tuition preschool

Maggie Gyllenhaal harbors high hopes for public education

Photo of mother’s glee at back to school goes viral

OPINION & COMMENTARY

Utah ACT reports compared to other states is a hard lesson learned

Utah charter schools a story of success and promise

No apologies
School-play policy right move

Caring educators know students never rise to low expectations

Thumbs up, thumbs down

Utah teachers are fighting to keep kids cool

Utah Students take the ACT

Matheson running against a “crazy person,” Eskelsen says

Stop bullying to prevent problems

Thanks for memories

Higher standards at Logan High

Democratic Platform Hails Common Core, Praises Teachers

Subverting the Unions

Spellings Slams Waivers, Race to the Top

Arne Duncan: Invest in education reform

When Separation Anxiety Goes Overboard
You mean that in the first week of school you don’t follow the school bus in your car? What kind of monster are you?

The supplies kids really need for school

An expert’s view of Common Core’s focus on nonfiction texts

Our ignorance of learning disabilities

Is Teach for America Working?

U.S. high schoolers get another F in financial literacy, new study shows

My Crazy Teacher Tweets

NATION

Ed. Dept. Gears Up to Oversee NCLB Waivers
States must show evidence they aim to meet promises

Teachers unions’ alliance with Democratic Party frays
Public efforts toward school reform have some Democrats questioning the party’s support of guarantees that school districts have made to teachers for decades.

Jeb Bush uses convention platform to discuss education policy

Q&A with Paul Tough: The Obama administration’s big missed opportunity

New attendance push prized by students, educators

From A Single Charter School, A Movement Grows

What’s A Charter School If Not A Game Changer?

Security Cameras In School: Protective Or Invasive?

Judge stops W. Va. single-sex classes: Were they a success or psuedoscience?
A federal judge prevented a West Virginia public school from proceeding with its single-sex classes, saying parents didn’t get a fair chance to withdraw their kids. But the question of whether single-sex classes work or are built on unhelpful gender stereotypes gathers pace.

Arizona reaches deal over education of English language learners

‘Dynasty’ Young, mom sue IPS over bullying at Tech

In parts of China, BYO school supplies include desks

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UTAH NEWS
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Five Utah school districts to apply for millions in federal cash
Education » Districts hope to secure for Race to the Top money.

At least five Utah school districts plan to vie for millions in federal cash as part of the U.S. Department of Education’s Race to the Top District program.
The Granite, Ogden and Provo school districts plan to seek $20 million to $30 million each; the Morgan County School District will likely apply for $5 million to $10 million; and the Washington County School District plans to apply for $30 million to $40 million, according to the U.S. Department of Education.
The five districts are among 893 nationwide that have submitted letters saying they intend to apply for a chunk of nearly $400 million meant to support reforms aimed at personalizing learning, closing achievement gaps and preparing kids for college and careers.
http://goo.gl/ajmR1 (SLT)

http://goo.gl/LQ7Hl (ED)

Students go back to school across the nation
Kids across the nation will be tested in new ways in 2012-13 year

CLEARFIELD — Nine-year-old Emma Turpin wore a white skirt with black butterflies to her fourth grade class at Antelope Elementary School in Clearfield on Friday, complemented by a black top, yellow earrings and a tote bag that looks like a purse.
“She’s a girly girl,” said Emma’s mother, Emily Turpin. “She always has her hair done in curls, and she wants to look nice.”
Antelope Elementary follows a year-round school schedule necessitated by rampant growth in the suburbs between Salt Lake City and Ogden, so Emma’s school track started earlier this month. For her older brothers — Connor, 15, and Matthew, 12 — school opens on today, right after Labor Day.
The Turpin kids join 49.8 million students in public schools this year, from pre-kindergarten through 12th grade, according to the National Center for Education Statistics. It will cost $571 billion to educate them, or $11,467 per pupil. School reforms in key areas mean kids across the nation will be taught and tested in new ways during the 2012-13 school year.
http://goo.gl/ygje2 (DN)

DESK Academy training teachers to improve readers

KAYSVILLE — Learning to better integrate reading and writing into every aspect of a student’s education was the focus of training this week for hundreds of Davis County teachers, librarians, counselors and administrators.
As part of the new Common Core State Standards, high school and junior high school educators gathered at several secondary schools to participate in what they termed DESK Academy. The training focused on the new Davis Essential Skills and Knowledge (DESK) strategies for teaching literacy standards in every content area.
“In this (core) are the types of reading and writing and thinking that are important in individual content areas. It’s talking about those discipline- specific kinds of reading and writing skills that teachers in your individual content area have to do,” Superintendent Bryan Bowles told educators during his keynote address at Centennial Junior High.
He encouraged teachers to teach and use the vocabulary and styles of writing specific for their content area.
http://goo.gl/n4lKG (OSE)

New standards a part of education initiative to improve learning

ST. GEORGE — As students return to school, one issue weighing on the minds of teachers and administrators is the continued implementation of the new math common core.
Kris Cunningham, Washington County School District math coordinator, said the new math core standards over the past year came about as an education initiative pushed by the states to improve student learning.
“The United States is outsourcing a lot of jobs and part of that is because math here is just broken,” she said. “It is so important for our students to be successful after school and they need math to do that.”
Cunningham said since Utah adopted the new common core, it has been a transition for teachers, students and parents to relearn certain educational materials and methods of learning.
http://goo.gl/c8Szo (SGS)

Teacher hiring not always a bed of roses

OGDEN — Students across the Top of Utah are seeing some new faces at the front of the classroom, as many new teachers are starting with the new school year in Ogden, Weber and Davis districts.
Ogden has 90 new teachers, Weber has 101 and Davis has 242 new hires this school year.
There are still some open positions as well. Weber district has one full-time and two part-time positions open.
Ogden has one full-time and three part-time positions open. Davis has five positions open. All figures are as of Friday.
http://goo.gl/JoMX1 (OSE)

Dixon Middle School to become iSchool

PROVO — Jarod Sites is not afraid to admit what is about to happen to his middle school is totally 21st century.
Dixon Middle School is one of three schools in the state selected as part of a test program to bring a greater level of technology into schools.
With the idea from the Smart School Technology Act approved this year and $3 million from the Governor’s Office of Economic Development, the school will be able to provide iPads for all 850 of its students. They’ll use the computers both in school and at home to do homework, read textbooks, do research and interact with others.
With that funding come evaluations, expected outcomes and performance reports. But according to Sites it is a huge opportunity to enrich their gifted children’s learning and to help lift children who may face learning challenges. It also will help children work at their own pace.
Out of 49 schools that applied for the opportunity, Dixon Middle school, North Sevier High School and Gunnison Valley Elementary School were chosen to pilot the program. Dixon serves only 7th-and 8th-grade students.
http://goo.gl/LqhoV (PDH)

Park City superintendent tapped to lead Utah Education Network

The superintendent for the Park City School District has been selected to lead the Utah Education Network.
Ray Timothy will take over the position of chief executive officer at UEN starting Oct. 1. He replaces Mike Petersen, who resigned in January to accept a faculty position at Utah State University.
UEN provides network, application and support services to public education, higher education and libraries. The network operates as a public/private partnership and connects more than 750,000 students and 61,000 educators across Utah.
http://goo.gl/iqGbH (SLT)

http://goo.gl/lCmFs (DN)

http://goo.gl/n51kk (PR)

5 educators nominated for Utah’s Teacher of the Year award

SALT LAKE CITY — Five educators have been nominated for Utah’s 2013 Teacher of the Year award.
The nominees are: Jennifer Graviet, ninth-grade English, Sand Ridge Junior High; Britnie Powell, sixth-grade teacher, the Salt Lake Center for Science Education; Julie Allen, kindergarten through sixth grades, Antimony Elementary School; Sara Hacken, seventh- and eighth-grade U.S. history and language arts, Lakeridge Junior High School; and Camille Clegg-Patch, seventh-grade science, Clarke N. Johnsen Junior High School.
http://goo.gl/MlZ15 (DN)

Lehi High School bursting at seams with more than 2,000 students

LEHI — As this school year begins, overcrowding is on the minds of many Lehi parents.
At a Lehi PTA Council meeting Tuesday, Alpine School District administrator Mark Pew said there are roughly 2,100 students enrolled at Lehi High School this year. According to Pew, the district will bring in a self-contained satellite building to the high school campus next fall to help deal with the crowding. The unit will have 14 to 18 classrooms along with bathrooms, drinking fountains and lockers.
http://goo.gl/2et6U (PDH)

Utah students get cool science lesson as they watch hot air balloon
Education » Demo at Syracuse school provides a lofty look at aerodynamics.

Syracuse • The rain paused just long enough on Thursday morning to allow nearly a thousand excited students at Bluff Ridge Elementary to watch a seven-story hot air balloon spring up from the grass behind their school.
In light of the upcoming Antelope Island Stampede Festival, the students were treated to a hot air balloon demonstration in which the pilot explained the dynamics and history of balloon flying. They squealed when the balloon’s burners sent off searing flames, and they laughed as their principal and teachers were taken up on short tethered flights.
http://goo.gl/jXBHX (SLT)

http://goo.gl/gryIb (OSE)

Westminster using grant to expand computer science in Utah high schools

SALT LAKE CITY — Westminster College officials are working to expand the number of computer science courses in Utah high schools with the help of a $790,000 grant from the National Science Foundation, the college announced Friday.
The grant money will be used to train teachers in the implementation of rigorous Exploring Computer Sciences curricula, according to Westminster spokeswoman Arikka Von. She said the courses go beyond the basic uses of electronic devices and teach students how computers work.
The courses are currently in a pilot stage at three schools but officials expect to expand to 100 schools within three years, according to Von.
http://goo.gl/Bp7hn (DN)

Jordan School District changes drama policy after flak over play

SALT LAKE CITY — A backlash over a high-school performance of “Dead Man Walking” has prompted a Utah school district to give parents a greater role over student plays.
The conservative family-values group Utah Eagle Forum objected to the play at South Jordan’s Bingham High School last spring.
The Eagle Forum says “Dead Man Walking” — about a Catholic nun who counsels a death-row inmate in Louisiana — contained profanity, slurs and sexual language.
District officials said much of the profanity was stripped from the play and drama students were allowed to change their lines.
Nonetheless, the Jordan School Board revised its drama policy Tuesday night.
http://goo.gl/XVscA (OSE)

Educator retires after almost 40 years of teaching

KAYSVILLE — Marie Barber, of Kaysville, recently finished boxing up 38 years’ worth of school supplies she had gathered as a family and consumer science instructor at Davis High School.
The time was right, said Barber, 60, when she announced her retirement recently.
Barber began working at the school as a student teacher in 1974. She was hired as a full-time teacher in 1975.
http://goo.gl/o4Htp (OSE)

One shot not enough: Utah nurses urge 4 vaccines for teens
Health » Officials recommend vaccines for flu, HPV and meningococcal disease.

Watch out, Utah tweens: School nurses want you to get four shots instead of one for seventh grade.
State law requires that students get the Tdap vaccine to protect against tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis for seventh grade.
But public health officials also recommend getting vaccinated against the flu, human papillomavirus, which can cause cervical cancer, and against meningococcal disease, which can cause meningitis along with blood infection and pneumonia.
http://goo.gl/Ded3E (SLT)

http://goo.gl/uBNUS (MUR)

Roy High student sentenced to jail for bomb plot
Courts » Teen pleads no contest to lesser charge, also receives probation and a fine.

Ogden •An 18-year-old Roy High School student accused of plotting to bomb the school in January pleaded no contest to reduced charge of second-degree felony criminal mischief on Thursday.
Dallin Todd Morgan was originally charged with one count of first-degree felony possession of weapon of mass destruction, which is punishable by up to life. The criminal mischief count is punishable by up to 15 years in prison.
Second District Judge Michael Lyon, however, immediately sentenced Morgan to 18 months probation, 105 days in jail and a $500 fine. If Morgan successfully completes probation, the charge will be amended to class A misdemeanor.
Morgan and another student, a 16-year-old boy, were arrested Jan. 25, after other students reported receiving troubling text messages from the boy.
http://goo.gl/LL5sQ (SLT)

http://goo.gl/C0SO0 (DN)

http://goo.gl/LuvRr (OSE)

http://goo.gl/NLscn (KSL)

East High stadium evacuated after smoke reported

The Salt Lake City Fire Department evacuated the East High School football stadium Friday night after crews responded to reports of smoke in a nearby building.
Fire department spokesman Jasen Asay said the report came in at about 8:45 p.m. Smoke could be seen from an electrical shed near the stadium. Fire crews decided the best course of action would be to evacuate the game, shut off power to the stadium and investigate from there, Asay said.
“We don’t know if there is a fire or if it’s just smoke, but just to be on the safe side, we evacuated the stadium,” he said.
http://goo.gl/mcvrK (SLT)

http://goo.gl/4o7Bl (DN)

http://goo.gl/lOu5O (PDH)

http://goo.gl/cozaf (KUTV)

http://goo.gl/B8hDC (KTVX)

http://goo.gl/tE4A8 (KSL)

http://goo.gl/frg6X (KSTU)

‘Works bombs’ investigated at Syracuse High School

SYRACUSE — Police are investigating who made a pair of “works bombs” at Syracuse High School on Thursday.
The school’s athletic director found the remains of the homemade devices when he started painting the football field Thursday morning for the junior varsity game, said Principal Wendy Nelson. The bombs had been detonated on the Syracuse side of the field.
http://goo.gl/odzx1 (OSE)

Alleged gunman near SLC elementary school in custody

SALT LAKE CITY – A man accused of carrying a gun near a Salt Lake City elementary school is in police custody.
Salt Lake City Police were searching in the area of 900 East and just north of 1700 South Friday afternoon before the man was arrested just before 5 p.m.
Emerson Elementary school was temporarily placed on partial lock down according to Dennis McGowan, Salt Lake City Police Department.
http://goo.gl/m9SBq (KSTU)

Community unites to protect schoolchildren from busy crosswalk

RIVERTON, Utah – Riverton city leaders are responding to parents pleading to protect their children from a road with no crossing guard.
It stands at 13400 South 5000 West. Children as young as 5-years-old would be required to cross 5 lanes without a crossing guard.
The mix-up took place between the Jordan School District who accidentally marked the route as in Herriman, as a result Riverton City leaders didn’t learn about the needed crossing guard until a week before school started.
http://goo.gl/kxtb9 (KTVX)

Mystery of the missing backpacks solved

OGDEN — The mystery of 50 missing backpacks has been solved.
Michael Vaughan, provost and vice president of academic affairs at Weber State University, organized a donation for Catholic Community Services’ annual Backpack Bonanza! Drive.
On Aug. 8, a man picked up the bags, but they never made it to the donation drive. No one knew who he was, or where he took the bags.
Police had surveillance video, but no one could identify the man.
After the story aired on KSL Ch. 5, a man called WSU and said he had the bags. He said he was with another charity that had asked for 50 plastic bags that it could use as grab bags for an event.
http://goo.gl/Cn4eh (DN)

http://goo.gl/4H4AD (OSE)

Canyons District accepting SALTA applications for 2013-14

SANDY — Canyons School District is accepting applications from students who want to take the test for admittance to its SALTA magnet program.
The request for testing form for SALTA, which stands for Supporting Advanced Learners Toward Achievement, will be accessible on the Canyons District website until midnight Sept. 24.
http://goo.gl/23rLB (DN)

Ford dealership, Davis High band team for fundraiser

The Ed Kenley Ford Dealership in Layton and the Davis High School Marching Bank will stage a fundraiser Sept. 15 to help the band with funding so it can march in the 2013 Rose Parade.
The event — Ford’s Drive One 4 UR School — will run from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Davis High School, 325 S. Main St., Kaysville.
http://goo.gl/q3gwE (SLT)

Local club helps school in Japan

PROVO — The devastating tsunami that hit Japan in March 2011, leaving more than 28,000 dead, is still wreaking havoc with those trying to bring their lives back to normal.
Local Rotary Club member Dean Jackson is hoping Utah County residents are willing to open their pocketbooks to help with one special project that would help bring a school and its students in Japan a little closer to normal.
Jackson, the past district governor of Rotary International and Provo’s Rotary Club, teamed with the Rotary Club in Riskuzentakata, Japan, to build a tennis court and changing facility at the junior high school in town.
http://goo.gl/oJ3mk (PDH)

UHSSA, MaxPreps.com link up

MIDVALE — The Utah High School Activities Association and MaxPreps.com, the online high school sports leader and a CBSSports.com site, have signed a partnership agreement for the next five years, UHSAA officials announced.
The selection of MaxPreps.com as the association’s official statistician will give the UHSAA member schools a single location to report all box score information.
http://goo.gl/1oxVY (OSE)

Search underway for Utah’s top youth volunteers

The Prudential Spirit of Community Awards is launching its search for Utah’s top youth volunteers of 2013.
Students in grades five through 12 are invited to apply for an award if they have made meaningful contributions to their communities through volunteer service within the past 12 months.
http://goo.gl/D3On2 (SLT)

http://goo.gl/FZ06O (UP)

American Fork High School dress code

The AFHS administration would like to remind parents and students of the school’s dress code. Principal Doug Finch said, “A school’s dress code is important to maintain a safe learning environment focused on high quality teaching and learning. At American Fork High School, school dress code is expected at all school-sponsored events.”
The dress code “quick tips” are included below:
http://goo.gl/AKKS9 (PDH)

Alpine School District school bus routes

School bus routes and schedules for the 2012-13 school year are available on line at the Alpine School District website, alpineschools.org. Click on Parents/Students “bus stops.”
http://goo.gl/ISQ4h (PDH)

Green Ribbon Week

The Hidden Hollow Elementary School PTA will sponsor Green Ribbon Week for pedestrian safety Tuesday, through Friday.
http://goo.gl/H7YvP (PDH)

Legacy Elementary School tuition preschool

The tuition preschool will start Tuesday.
http://goo.gl/oMPnX (PDH)

Maggie Gyllenhaal harbors high hopes for public education

Actress Maggie Gyllenhaal may be best known for playing Bruce Wayne’s love interest in “The Dark Knight” or earning an Oscar nomination for her role in “Crazy Heart.” But the Columbia-educated Gyllenhaal — recently dubbed “the ultimate hipster actress” by syndicated columnist Naomi Schaefer Riley — is also known for her social activism, including a stint as host of the PBS documentary series “Independent Lens.”
In her new film “Won’t Back Down,” Gyllenhaal plays a mother who fights to improve the public school her daughter attends. The plot of “Won’t Back Down” centers on parents and teachers teaming up to take over a failing school by invoking a “trigger law.” Although that particular circumstance has not played out fully anywhere in the U.S., some grass-roots parents’ groups in places like California are attempting to invoke trigger laws and seize control of failing schools.
“Won’t Back Down” will be released Sept. 28, and the film’s trailer is playing in theaters. Gyllenhaal recently spoke with the Deseret News about her passion for education issues.
http://goo.gl/tI7f0 (DN)

Photo of mother’s glee at back to school goes viral

Sometimes a picture speaks more than a thousand words.
Not everyone is upset that summer vacation is over, so when Lara Forgrave posted a picture on her Facebook page that quickly spread across the Web, mothers everywhere were laughing in agreement. She had no idea her hilarious back-to-school photo would quickly go viral, shared from parent to parent on Facebook and on popular blogs and websites like reddit.com and Pinterest.
“I am jumping for joy because all of my kids are in elementary school this year, and after having a baby or toddler with me for the past 11 years, it was a momentous occassion,” Forgrave said. Her children are now in kindergarten, 2nd, 4th and 6th grades.
http://goo.gl/jKIKj (KSL)

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OPINION & COMMENTARY
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Utah ACT reports compared to other states is a hard lesson learned
Deseret News editorial

A new report on how well prepared Utah high school students are for college compared to students in other states is hard to view with our customary sense of optimism.
Not that the Utah numbers are horrible, but they can be seen as a harbinger of worse things to come if the trend isn’t reversed.
The report details the relative success of students on ACT examinations, and they offer a measurement of how many kids are ready for college by percentage. In Utah, the number is 23 percent, which ranks 34th in the nation. By contrast, the top-ranking state – Massachusetts – boasts a number twice as high.
The general reaction among our education establishment is that the numbers could be worse. In truth, they have to get much better in coming years if Utah hopes to maintain its edge in luring businesses in search of an educated workforce.
In fairness, the statistics are skewed by the fact that Utah is among only 10 states that push nearly all students to take the test.
http://goo.gl/X5zS8

Utah charter schools a story of success and promise
Deseret News editorial

Utah’s first charter school, the Tuacahn High School for the Performing Arts in Ivins, opened its doors in the fall of 1999 amid a good deal of grumbling from the local educational establishment. Thirteen years later, Utah has more than 90 charter schools in operation, with seven opening this year. Nearly 10 percent of Utah’s K-12 schoolchildren now attend a charter school, and much of the resistance to this alternative form of public education has dissipated with time. That’s because charter schools have improved tremendously in terms of academic performance, and they’ve been able to discover innovative ways to do more with less.
Still, misperceptions about charter schools persist. Many don’t realize that charter schools are public schools that charge no tuition, accept all students, employ academically certified schoolteachers and receive less public money than traditional public schools. Limited dollars for charter schools require creative solutions. Consequently, they find it necessary to make their public money go further, which helps Utah accommodate the burgeoning number of new students entering the public system every year.
All this would be irrelevant if charter schools weren’t producing positive results. Yet a new study concludes that even a charter school that gets off to a rocky start tends to improve quickly and, after a few years in operation, a charter school’s test scores and overall academic performance rival and often exceed those of a comparable traditional public school.
http://goo.gl/01iET

No apologies
School-play policy right move
Salt Lake Tribune editorial

The Jordan School Board, like a good parent, teacher or coach faced with rowdy, aggressive children, listened to a small group of parents and members of the ultra-conservative Eagle Forum who wanted to rant about a high school’s drama production.
Then, to its credit, the board did not apologize for Bingham High School’s reportedly well-done presentation of the play “Dead Man Walking,” but did adjust its policy to get more parent input before plays are chosen in the future.
There was no need for any more drastic action, and no apology is needed. The protests about the play, largely engineered by Eagle Forum leaders who had not seen it, were mostly an insignificant tempest in an artificial teapot. They complained months after the play had completed its run before appreciative audiences and the students had gone back to their usual studies. Only one school patron had objected to the play before the Eagle Forum jumped in.
http://goo.gl/Z0s4y

Caring educators know students never rise to low expectations
Deseret News editorial

This week marks the beginning of the school year for New York City public schools. Returning teachers and students will find that the district’s disciplinary code has been softened. Responding to criticism that there has been overreliance on zero-tolerance policies and punitive measures, such as suspension and expulsion, and that these punishments were disproportionately meted out to historically underprivileged youth, New York schools have adopted a carefully specified system of what they call progressive discipline.
In recent years, suspensions in New York Schools have increased by nearly 10 percent while enrollment decreased according to the Dignity in Schools Campaign, a non-profit advocacy group. Furthermore, African-American students have been suspended at a rate of nearly two times their represented population in the school.
Critics of the new policies are concerned that educators send a terribly misguided message to youths about consequences when the official response to increased rates of rule-breaking is abandonment of the rules being broken.
In fairness, if the increased rates of suspension and expulsion have been because of unprofessional classroom management, petty legalism, officiousness or stereotyping, then introducing a more carefully specified program of discipline based on a shared understanding of student rights, responsibilities and maturity levels makes sense.
http://goo.gl/z8CGO

Thumbs up, thumbs down
(Ogden) Standard-Examiner editorial

Thumbs up: To the Ogden School District, which has seen a rise in graduation rates. We congratulate the school board, administrators, parents, students, and most of all, the district’s teachers.
Thumbs down: To high school students who are trying to sacrifice on sleep to catch up with their studies. According to a study by the journal, Child Development, a poor night of sleep leads to a very poor day, no matter the studying accomplished during the long night.
http://goo.gl/wzXw1

Utah teachers are fighting to keep kids cool
Salt Lake Tribune commentary by columnist PAUL ROLLY

Conservatives in the Utah Legislature and their puppet masters in the Utah Eagle Forum are fond of demeaning public school teachers — constantly proposing ways to get rid of the “bad teachers” and formulating ways to rate their effectiveness, always focusing on the negative.
But some of those legislators ought to spend a day or so in the classrooms of, say, Skyline High School, which does not have air conditioning and has many classrooms stuffed with as many as 40 students dealing with 90-degree-plus temperatures.
Many teachers purchased swamp coolers with their own money because the district can’t afford them. They bring large bottles and jugs to carry water for filling the coolers.

Ghost of Christmas past?
In a classic case of the past coming back to haunt you, state and local governments and school districts in Utah will be taking a financial hit beginning next fiscal year because of what happened four years ago.
The Utah Retirement System has notified government leaders that, because earnings from its investments have not met projections, it is increasing the contribution rates employers must pay the system by nearly 2 percent of their total payroll.
So, while governments and school districts pay an average of about 20 percent of their payroll into the retirement system now, that will increase to nearly 22 percent beginning July 1.
http://goo.gl/C0cOm

Utah Students take the ACT
(Provo) Daily Herald op-ed by David Wright, professor of mathematics at Brigham Young University

More of Utah’s 2012 high school seniors took the ACT test than every before thanks to the Utah State Office of Education and funding from the Utah State Legislature. This past year 97 percent of our high school seniors took the exam compared to 73 percent the previous year.
Now that almost all seniors take the test, we have a better way of comparing Utah with other states with high participation rates. There are nine states that have 100 percent of seniors taking the ACT. The states are Colorado, Illinois, Louisiana, Kentucky, Michigan, Mississippi, North Dakota, Tennessee, and Wyoming. The national eighth grade math tests, adjusted for ethnicity, rank Colorado 6th, North Dakota 11th, Illinois 23rd, Wyoming 29th, and Utah 39th. The other five comparison states, are ranked 46th through 50th. So one would hope that Utah would be above average in this group.
So how do we compare? The State Office of Education reports, “Among the 10 states with at least 95 percent participation, Utah ranked second in the nation.” What the State Office of Education continually fails to do is disaggregate by race/ethnicity.
http://goo.gl/LZNyv

Matheson running against a “crazy person,” Eskelsen says
Salt Lake Tribune commentary by columnist Matt Canham

Democrats took aim at Mia Love, the Republican running against Rep. Jim Matheson, during the breakfast gathering of Utah delegates to the national convention.
The toughest shot came from Lily Eskelsen, the vice president of the National Education Association and a Utahn who ran for Congress in 1998 but lost.
“I ran against Merrill Cook. You would think that it would help that you were running against a crazy person,” Eskelsen said. “As Jim Matheson is finding out that doesn’t necessarily disqualify a candidate.”
http://goo.gl/6EMVY

Stop bullying to prevent problems
(Logan) Herald Journal letter from Morgan Crosby

I go to South Cache 8-9 Center in Hyrum, and I am worried about students bringing weapons to school. It seems to occur just about everywhere else, but luckily not in Cache Valley, or just Utah in general. For example, at one high school, a student brought a shotgun to school and shot at least one student before teachers and faculty stopped him.
Some, it seems, were bullied whenever they came to school. They had a sense of insecurity that caused them to act. But a main part of this is the students actually using these weapons on their fellow students. I think to lower the risk schools could stop the bullying in the first place.
http://goo.gl/b5oXu

Thanks for memories
Salt Lake Tribune and Deseret News letter from Marie Lemon Barber

After spending the past 38 years at “Dear Old Davis High School,” I express gratitude to former students, many now dear friends, for making it such a wonderful and successful experience.
As I graduate (retire) to write a new chapter in my book of life, I have no regrets. I have loved teaching essential life skills in classes in home economics (family and consumer science), foods, adult roles, financial literacy, clothing and interior design. Child development and early childhood education are my passion.
http://goo.gl/mvWnH

http://goo.gl/A5PGt

Higher standards at Logan High
(Logan) Herald Journal letter from KelliAnne Brown

I would like to commend our new administration at Logan High School. They are dedicated, supportive, and expect the very best from our children. Our new principals have been spotted at nearly every sporting event thus far cheering on our teams. They have gone out of their way to welcome all students back to school, and they have enforced a long-since-ignored dress code.
I believe it’s time for the large percentage of pleased parents to show our gratitude because the small percentage of disgruntled parents are letting them have it.
http://goo.gl/aGPgg

Democratic Platform Hails Common Core, Praises Teachers
Education Week commentary by columnist Andrew Ujifusa

Charlotte, N.C. – The Democratic Party has released its official platform for 2012, and there’s at least one section that might raise eyebrows among education observers.
The platform put out Monday states that President Barack Obama and Democrats in general are intent on providing states and communities with the “flexibility and resources” to improve K-12 education. It then goes on to say:
“To that end, the President challenged and encouraged states to raise their standards so students graduate ready for college or career and can succeed in a dynamic global economy. Forty-six states responded, leading groundbreaking reforms that will deliver better education to millions of American students.”
This is a clear reference to the Common Core State Standards in English and math, which were the work of the National Governors Association and the Council of Chief State School Officers and adopted by states on an individual basis.
http://goo.gl/0ITjS

Subverting the Unions
Wall Street Journal commentary by columnist ALLYSIA FINLEY

The movie “Won’t Back Down,” which chronicles the challenges a teacher and mother face in their campaign to take over a failing public school in Pennsylvania, may be fictional, but it feels true to life. And a little too true for the unions to countenance.
The film was screened in Tampa this week at the Republican National Convention in advance of its Sept. 24 premier and will also be shown next week at the Democratic convention in Charlotte. Regardless, the unions are denouncing the film as right-wing, anti-union propaganda. Their outrage, however, merely underscores one of the film’s themes: that teachers unions are entrenched and reactionary creatures—hostile to anything that threatens their hegemony, including teachers themselves.
“Won’t Back Down” is based loosely on California’s parent trigger law, which allows a majority of parents to take over a low-performing school by signing a petition. The trigger law in the film, however, is more union-friendly since it also requires a majority of teachers to back the takeover. That’s a tall order, as the film shows.
http://goo.gl/36FuY

Spellings Slams Waivers, Race to the Top
Education Week commentary by columnist Alyson Klein

Tampa, Fla. – More than a decade ago, Margaret Spellings was a driving force in getting the overwhelmingly bipartisan No Child Left Behind Act over the finish line. But in an interview, she told me she wants to see the civil rights and business coalition that came together to pass the law “power up as we did before. … I think we have to revive it,” she said.
“We need to get the genie back in the bottle,” she added on the last day of the Republican National Convention, referring to a strong accountability system.
Spellings, who served as President George W. Bush’s domestic policy adviser and then as U.S. Secretary of Education, was originally on GOP presidential nominee Mitt Romney’s education team. She bowed out when she realized she didn’t like the direction of his education proposals.
While she’s glad the GOP platform doesn’t propose getting rid of the U.S. Department of Education, it sounded like she was lukewarm, at best, on Romney’s plan, which includes a robust role for school choice.
http://goo.gl/O8C5q

Arne Duncan: Invest in education reform
CNN commentary by U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan

When it comes to education, Governor Romney and President Obama agree on more than either side will admit.
They both want more charter schools. They both want teacher compensation tied to performance. And they both supported extending low interest rates on Stafford loans that help pay for college.
Where they disagree is on the role of the federal government. Mitt Romney praises some aspects of the Obama administration’s Race to the Top program, but he says he would give more control to state and local governments.
The federal government pays for just 12.5% of all elementary and secondary education, and conservatives say the federal government imposes sweeping mandates but leaves others to pay the bill.
In April, Mitt Romney said that if he becomes president, the department of education will be “consolidated with another agency” or will be “a heck of a lot smaller”.
So how does Arne Duncan plan to fix the education system?
http://goo.gl/8aRDE

When Separation Anxiety Goes Overboard
You mean that in the first week of school you don’t follow the school bus in your car? What kind of monster are you?
Wall Street Journal commentary by LENORE SKENAZY, author of “Free-Range Kids”

As yellow buses start heading back to school, you might notice some of them being trailed by a little line of cars. Predators? Pervs?
Nope. Parents.
“I was talking to a bunch of parents and found out they all follow the bus for the first week or so,” one mother told me the other day. “I sat there thinking that I was a really bad mom because that thought had never even occurred to me!”
Although I am officially the World’s Worst Mom—I even have a TV show with that name—the thought had never occurred to me, either. But apparently it’s becoming par for the course as the line gradually blurs between shipping a child off to school and shipping a child off to ‘Nam.
“They can’t seem to let go,” says Natascha Santos, a school psychologist in Great Neck, N.Y., on Long Island—and she’s not talking about the kids. This could be because everywhere parents turn, the advice-o-sphere keeps harping on how incredibly hard they must work to ease their child’s incredibly harrowing adjustment to school
http://goo.gl/wmVlG

The supplies kids really need for school
Washington Post commentary by Madeline Levine, author of “Teach Your Children Well: Parenting for Authentic Success,” and Vicki Abeles, director of the education documentary “Race to Nowhere”

It’s that time of year once more, when purveyors of school supplies begin their campaign to entice school-age children— or more precisely, their parents — to stock up on all manner of academic paraphernalia. Three popular 30-second spots from mega-retailer Target recently began filling the airwaves, harbingers of the back-to-school buying frenzy.
“Hey Parents!” the teacher in each spot calls out. “… Here’s what they’ll need!” The scenes burst into a tableau of fluorescent-clad kids banging on instruments and conducting lab experiments as a teacher belts out the myriad “must-have” school supplies they’ll need for September.
But with the return of the back-to-school commercial genre comes a reminder that we’d do well — in our individual homes as well as in our culture at large — to take a harder look at what our children really need as they re-enter the schoolyard gates this fall.
Markers and notebooks? Of course. Calculators and backpacks? Sure. But more important? Parental and community support that nurtures the coping skills and psychological resources that students need. These are the true “supplies” that encourage not only steady academic growth but also the kind of holistic, authentic success that will ensure our children’s well-being as they move into their adult years.
http://goo.gl/YdqJd

An expert’s view of Common Core’s focus on nonfiction texts
Boston Globe commentary by Jim Stergios, executive director of the Pioneer Institute

The Common Core national standards are increasingly controversial, with Utah, Indiana and a number of states that had adopted them now reconsidering. A recent New York Times education blog notes the following:

There’s been a lot written on the loss of literature in curricula around the country. And there is good reason for that.
http://goo.gl/xnnCp

Our ignorance of learning disabilities
Washington Post commentary by columnist Jay Mathews

Raising the achievement of students with learning disabilities is hard, expensive, controversial and complex. School systems must pay private school tuition for students they can’t adequately serve. Educators and parents sometimes disagree on what methods to use. Education writers like me rarely deal with the subject because it is difficult to explain and lacks many success stories.
That explains in part why learning disabilities are so poorly understood, as revealed by a remarkable survey just released by the nonprofit National Center for Learning Disabilities. The representative sampling of 2,000 Americans provides a rare look at the depths of our ignorance.
Forty-three percent believe that learning disabilities correlate with IQ. Fifty-five percent think that corrective eyewear can treat certain learning disabilities. Twenty-two percent believe that learning disabilities can be caused by spending too much time watching computer or television screens. All of those impressions are wrong.
Other mistaken views include the 31 percent of survey respondents who think learning disabilities are caused by poor diet, the 24 percent who blame childhood vaccinations and the more than a third who think those disabilities are caused by poor parenting or teaching in early childhood.
That so many of us know so little is a shame, although the survey shows that at least one disability is familiar to most people. The survey found that 90 percent of Americans know that dyslexia is a learning disability, and 80 percent can accurately define it.
http://goo.gl/wQNGG

Is Teach for America Working?
New York Times commentary by Julian Vasquez Heilig, Ketica Guter, Olga Serpas, Malissa Yung-Grubb Mootoo, Alex Caputo-Pearl, Jessica Amos

When Teach for America entered the national stage it was applauded as a fresh, innovative approach to education. Now, well into its second decade of providing teachers to struggling schools across the country, is it still a good idea for our children? Has bringing in smart, young college graduates improved the education that American children are receiving?
http://goo.gl/RmavL

U.S. high schoolers get another F in financial literacy, new study shows
(Portland) Oregonian commentary by columnist Brent Hunsberger

Another study is out showing our nation’s youth with a poor grasp of basic financial concepts and a knowledge gap favoring boys.
This time, the problem emerged even among motivated students competing for cash prizes.
Researchers at the University of Nebraska say that nearly 6,700 U.S. high school students last year scored on average 52 percent on a standardized personal finance test. That’s “an F letter grade for most high school grading scales,” the authors wrote.
They also found a significant gender gap in performance, with boys scoring higher than girls in 20 of 23 subject areas ranging from budgeting, taxes, insurance, credit and investing.
http://goo.gl/BvWJN

My Crazy Teacher Tweets
Satire from Late Night with Jimmy Fallon

http://goo.gl/WPB3T

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NATIONAL NEWS
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Ed. Dept. Gears Up to Oversee NCLB Waivers
States must show evidence they aim to meet promises
Education Week

Now that more than half the country is operating with waivers of key mandates of the federal No Child Left Behind Act, the U.S. Department of Education must turn to overseeing a hodgepodge of 34 different state accountability systems and holding states to the promises they made to win the new flexibility.
As the school year begins, states are preparing to provide their first evidence that they are implementing their plans as proposed—and are already asking federal officials if they can tweak their proposals.
For its part, the Education Department is gearing up to manage a new portfolio of states that have adopted vastly different grading systems, diverse ways of tracking the achievement of small groups of students deemed academically at risk, and new ways of evaluating teachers. Gone, for the most part, is a one-size-fits-all accountability law.
http://goo.gl/BFrgK

Teachers unions’ alliance with Democratic Party frays
Public efforts toward school reform have some Democrats questioning the party’s support of guarantees that school districts have made to teachers for decades.
Los Angeles Times

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Teachers unions have been the Democratic Party’s foot soldiers for more than half a century, providing not only generous financial backing but an army of volunteers in return for support of their entrenched power in the nation’s public schools.
But this relationship is fraying, and the deterioration was evident Monday as Democrats gathered here for their national convention.
A handful of teachers and parents, carrying large inflated pencils, picketed a screening of “Won’t Back Down,” a movie to be released this month starring Maggie Gyllenhaal and Viola Davis as mothers, one a teacher, who try to take over a failing inner-city school.
The plot is ripped from the headlines: California has the first “parent trigger” law in the nation, which allows parents to petition for sweeping changes to improve low-performing schools. The first parent trigger attempts have occurred in Compton and Adelanto; the former failed, and the latter faces numerous obstacles.
Parent triggers, along with other emerging efforts, have some Democrats questioning their party’s longtime support of guarantees that public school districts have made to teachers for decades. Those efforts also include merit pay, charter schools, weakening the tenure system and evaluating teachers partly based on their students’ performance on standardized tests.
http://goo.gl/QWXzE

http://goo.gl/xMZ3L (Washington Times)

Jeb Bush uses convention platform to discuss education policy
Tampa Bay (FL) Times

TAMPA — Former Gov. Jeb Bush on Thursday used his first high-profile speaking slot at a Republican National Convention as a platform to discuss his favorite subject, calling the need for better schools “the great moral and economic issue of our time.”
Bush also bashed a favorite target, calling “politically powerful” teacher unions a roadblock to education reforms.
Delivering his first prime-time address to a political convention, Bush concentrated on the issue that marked his two terms as governor of Florida from 1999 to 2007 and remains his top priority as head of a nonprofit foundation.
http://goo.gl/Xl3Vd

http://goo.gl/MHhJn (Hechinger Report)

http://www.politico.com/news/stories/0812/80486.html

Like GOP, Dems Likely to Offer Little on Education
National Journal

Just about anyone you talk to believes that education should be a more important campaign issue than it is. Republicans and Democrats agree that the country’s economic future depends on the next generation of children being fully prepared for college and for sophisticated, challenging careers. Few dispute that the global rankings of 15-year-olds in the United States (below average in math, average in reading) fall well short of what the nation will need to compete internationally.
But, beyond platitudes, you didn’t hear much during the Republican National Convention about education reform from Mitt Romney’s campaign, and you won’t hear much this week from President Obama’s camp in Charlotte either. Romney has more or less decided to ignore the issue, in part because Republicans are split on whether the federal government should push for radical school reforms, following the path of President George W. Bush, or get out of public education entirely, following the path of a tea party favorite, Sen. Rand Paul.
Obama has it slightly easier. He has support from the teachers unions and a strong record of defending federal education funding and encouraging state innovation in schools.

Q&A with Paul Tough: The Obama administration’s big missed opportunity
Hechinger Report

What if much of what we think we know about success is wrong? What if the metrics we use in college admissions, for example, aren’t capturing the qualities of character and mind that we should actually care most about?
And what if the content of one’s character truly does matter more than anything else?
Paul Tough, a former editor at The New York Times Magazine and the author of Whatever It Takes: Geoffrey Canada’s Quest to Change Harlem and America (2008), has written a new book about these very questions.
In How Children Succeed: Grit, Curiosity, and the Hidden Power of Character, Tough looks at character traits integral to success—curiosity, conscientiousness, optimism, perseverance and self-control, among them—and considers their relation to raising children and running schools.
The Hechinger Report spoke with Tough last week to get his take on college admissions, education reform, poverty and the Obama administration’s education agenda.
http://goo.gl/Aoz03

New attendance push prized by students, educators
Associated Press

BERKELEY, Calif. — School day wake-up calls recorded by celebrities. Weekend makeup classes. Contests with laptop computers, private concerts and cars as prizes.
Educators across the nation are using creative strategies as another school year gets under way to convince students and parents that regular attendance matters – and not just for grades and achievement.
New research suggests missing as little as two weeks of school can put young children behind their peers, burden overworked teachers, cost districts state dollars and undermine mandates to raise standardized test scores. So many public school districts have launched campaigns to reduce all absences, not just those serious enough to warrant a home visit from a truant officer.
http://goo.gl/Zy3US

From A Single Charter School, A Movement Grows
NPR Weekend Edition Sunday

City Academy in St. Paul, Minn., became the nation’s first publicly funded, privately run charter school when it opened its doors in 1992. Its founders, all veteran public school teachers, had tried but failed to create new programs for struggling students in their own schools.
The school helped launch a movement that has since grown to 5,600 charter schools across the U.S. But back in the late 1980s, it faced strong resistance.
http://goo.gl/1CLIK

What’s A Charter School If Not A Game Changer?
NPR Weekend Edition Saturday

The charter school movement is now at a crossroads. More than 2 million students will be enrolled in charter schools in the fall — a big number for a movement that’s barely 20 years old. The publicly funded, privately run schools have spread so fast, they operate more like a parallel school system in some places.
The intention was to create labs for education experimentation. But the quality of charters and their record of success are mixed. Sometimes, the results aren’t much different from their public counterparts. Original arguments against the business model have never dissipated, and now there are questions about whether charters are serving their initial purpose.
http://goo.gl/4VlWv

Security Cameras In School: Protective Or Invasive?
NPR Talk of the Nation

More and more schools are installing security cameras in halls, classrooms and buses. Administrators say it helps protect students and staff, but some argue the practice is invasive. Guests discuss the use of surveillance cameras in schools and where to draw the line between safety and privacy.
http://goo.gl/OF7g1

Judge stops W. Va. single-sex classes: Were they a success or psuedoscience?
A federal judge prevented a West Virginia public school from proceeding with its single-sex classes, saying parents didn’t get a fair chance to withdraw their kids. But the question of whether single-sex classes work or are built on unhelpful gender stereotypes gathers pace.
Christian Science Monitor

Separate classes for girls and boys at Van Devender Middle School in Parkersburg, W. Va., have to be reorganized into coed classes by Monday, a federal judge ruled this week.
The injunction comes after a mother and her daughters, represented by the American Civil Liberties Union, alleged that the school was using pseudoscience and gender stereotypes to teach boys and girls, and that the different methods harmed them academically and violated their civil rights.
One of the girls, diagnosed with attention-deficit disorder, alleges she was frequently reprimanded for not sitting still, while boys were encouraged to move about their classroom. Another, legally blind, alleges the lights were not bright enough in her classroom because the teachers have been told that girls respond better to a different kind of light.
Wood County district officials deny the allegations, and one single-sex education expert who testified on behalf of the school agrees, saying she thought the approaches in the classroom were thoughtful, rather than based on stereotypes.
But as a tiny but growing number of public schools – about 1,000 by one estimate – offer full programs or individual classes for boys and girls in separate settings, the Van Devender case highlights the debate about whether such programs are important experiments in closing achievement gaps or a reinforcement of troubling gender stereotypes.
http://goo.gl/7ktdY

Arizona reaches deal over education of English language learners
Reuters

PHOENIX – Arizona has agreed to offer targeted reading and writing instruction to tens of thousands of public school students who were wrongly denied services under an English Language Learner program, the Justice Department said on Friday.
The settlement resolves a complaint filed with the Department of Education’s Office of Civil Rights and the Department of Justice that students had been incorrectly identified as fluent in English over the past five school years or prematurely moved out of the language assistance program.
“All students are entitled to equal opportunities, and this resolution will help to make sure Arizona students receive the education they deserve,” Russlynn Ali, Assistant Secretary for the Office for Civil Rights at the Department of Education, said in a statement announcing a settlement in the case.
http://goo.gl/4ZGqA

http://goo.gl/uoglq (AP via Ed Week)

‘Dynasty’ Young, mom sue IPS over bullying at Tech
Indianapolis (IN) Star

Indianapolis Public Schools did nothing to stop the “relentless, severe harassment” of a gay student at Tech High School, according to a lawsuit filed against the district Friday.
Darnell “Dynasty” Young, 17, and his mother, Chelisa Grimes, are suing the district, seeking unspecified damages over a series of alleged bullying incidents that led Young to fire a stun gun at the school this spring to scare away bullies.
The family’s attorneys say the district discriminated against Young because, despite repeated complaints, IPS didn’t protect him from bullies who taunted him for being gay.
http://goo.gl/99kt4

In parts of China, BYO school supplies include desks
NBC

BEIJING – While millions of students all over the world return to school this month, youngsters in one part of China were expected to bring not just pencils and notebooks, but their own desks and chairs when school opened.
As students all over China headed back to class on Monday, the grandmother of 3-year-old Wang Ziqi was spotted carrying a desk in Shunhe, Hubei Province, for the boy’s first day, while his older sister carried a chair for him.
Wang’s case is hardly unique. In Shunhe, there are more than 5,000 students in the town’s primary and middle schools, but the government only supplied 2,000 desks for them, leaving 3,000 children to bring their own from home.
http://goo.gl/140YW

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CALENDAR
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USOE Calendar
http://tinyurl.com/5x9oh9

UEN News
http://www.uen.org

September 6-7:
Utah State Board of Education meeting
250 E. 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

September 13:
Utah State Charter School Board meeting
250 E. 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://1.usa.gov/Axtt5K

September 18:
Executive Appropriations Interim Committee meeting
1 p.m., 445 State Capitol
http://goo.gl/E0hoC

September 19:
Education Interim Committee meeting
2 p.m., 30 House Building
http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2012&Com=INTEDU

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