Education News Roundup: Oct. 18, 2012

"Bleeding victory" by Court_59/CC/flickr

“Bleeding victory” by Court_59/CC/flickr

Today’s Top Picks:

Man. Nothing brings out the cameras and microphones like a good old legislative discussion of sex.
http://goo.gl/jWvDS (SLT)
and http://goo.gl/3HB7u (DN)
and http://goo.gl/Mao1S (OSE)
and http://goo.gl/xCPxW (KUTV)
and http://goo.gl/CftEt (KTVX)
and http://goo.gl/623gW (KSL)
and http://goo.gl/iPiAY (KSTU)
and http://goo.gl/EJTKw (KCPW)
and http://goo.gl/05yzC (KUER)
and http://goo.gl/t3fyP (MUR)

A legislative discussion of concussions … eh, not so much media interest.
http://goo.gl/uYxCB (DN)
and http://goo.gl/eOw5q (KSL)

St. George News catches up with the lawsuit filed over the Utah State Board of Education selection method.
http://goo.gl/YE8zn (SGN)

KSL looks at Salt Lake District’s Star Initiative on new teachers.
http://goo.gl/1FZL2 (KSL)s

USA Today tries to sort out the education policy differences between Barack Obama and Mitt Romney.
http://goo.gl/hTLEc (USAT)

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TODAY’S HEADLINES
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UTAH

Should parents get sex ed training? Lawmakers not sure Education » Legislators discuss merits of idea to help parents have birds-and-bees talk.

Lawmakers propose changes to Utah’s concussion law

Lawsuit claims UT School Board selection process biased, unconstitutional; movement for legislative change

Davis County GOP decries signs at Bountiful school

Davis High School students participate in virtual marketing conference

First year is key for Utah’s teachers, district says

Seventh-graders explore career options at Richmond middle school

Skyline High exposed to pertussis cases; officials urge prevention

UHSAA ruling: East High forced to forfeit seven games, eliminated from high school playoffs Appeal could be heard this weekend

A bison mascot finds a new home at Buffalo Point Elementary School

Davis High hosts Davis Cup Invitational for 39th year

Utah School Donates Hair To Locks Of Love

OPINION & COMMENTARY

Education and football priorities skewed?

Candidate talks education, jobs

Non-fiction vs. fiction smackdown

5 Myths about Education

NATION

Obama, Romney have different views on education

Idaho granted waiver for No Child Left Behind

Scott: Education department should change strategic plan

Newark Tries Merit Payouts For Teachers

Cheerleaders Gain Ally in Free Speech Fight

Ruby Bridges reflects on her life at book festival

IES to Seed New Methods for Studying Schools

Boy kicked out of school because he has gene for cystic fibrosis

Appeals court reverses decision in Wilson brothers’ case Steven and Sean Wilson were granted a preliminary injunction allowing them to return to school before their suspensions were served

Online auction to liquidate surplus school items

Putin Backs Ban on Muslim Head Scarfs at Schools

Omaha schoolgirl dresses as a different historical figure each day

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UTAH NEWS
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Should parents get sex ed training? Lawmakers not sure Education » Legislators discuss merits of idea to help parents have birds-and-bees talk.

A proposal to create a sex education training program for parents received criticism at its first public hearing Wednesday.
Lawmakers took no action on the proposed bill Wednesday, but they discussed it, with some questioning its merits. The bill would require the state school board to develop a training program for parents who could then use what they learn to teach their kids about sex in the privacy of their own homes. Parents could attend live trainings across the state and/or access an online program to be developed by the State Office of Education.
Sen. Stuart Reid, R-Ogden, who plans to sponsor the measure, said the idea grew out of discussions over HB363 last session, a controversial bill that would have scaled back sex education in schools that the governor ultimately vetoed. He said those discussions made him wonder why more parents aren’t teaching sex ed themselves in their homes and are instead relying on schools.
Reid said he learned that many parents simply don’t feel comfortable discussing the topic or don’t know how to broach it. He said a training program would give parents the confidence to tackle the lessons themselves.
http://goo.gl/jWvDS (SLT)

http://goo.gl/3HB7u (DN)

http://goo.gl/Mao1S (OSE)

http://goo.gl/xCPxW (KUTV)

http://goo.gl/CftEt (KTVX)

http://goo.gl/623gW (KSL)

http://goo.gl/iPiAY (KSTU)

http://goo.gl/EJTKw (KCPW)

http://goo.gl/05yzC (KUER)

http://goo.gl/t3fyP (MUR)

Lawmakers propose changes to Utah’s concussion law

SALT LAKE CITY — Lawmakers proposed a change to Utah’s concussion rule that would exempt property owners, including cities, from liability.
Rep. Paul Ray, R-Clearfield, is seeking to modify the Protection of Athletes with Head Injuries Act, to put organizations in charge of their own events, regardless of where they are held.
He presented the changes in Wednesday’s Health and Human Services Interim Committee meeting.
http://goo.gl/uYxCB (DN)

http://goo.gl/eOw5q (KSL)

Lawsuit claims UT School Board selection process biased, unconstitutional; movement for legislative change

ST. GEORGE – Instead of allowing the public to vote for the candidates they want through primaries, what if a state-level committee decided who was qualified to run and who wasn’t?
Every two years the governor chooses a selection committee to receive all the names of people from across the state that want to run for the Utah State Board of Education. Through a series of interviews and committee votes the selection committee narrows the field of prospective candidates – board incumbents and newcomers alike – to three names per district. The names are then forwarded to the governor, who will eliminate one more name, leaving the final two for each district that will appear on the November ballot.
Though the state has used the selection process for years, it has proven controversial.
“The current process of selecting school board candidates by a selection committee contingent upon the approval of the governor takes away the voice of the people in the electoral process.”
According to a statement on the Utah Education Association’s webpage, “The current process of selecting school board candidates by a selection committee contingent upon the approval of the governor takes away the voice of the people in the electoral process.”
http://goo.gl/YE8zn (SGN)

Davis County GOP decries signs at Bountiful school

BOUNTIFUL — The Davis County Republican Party condemns the action of those who stored Davis School Board candidate signs in the faculty room of a Bountiful elementary; and, to level the political playing field in the nonpartisan races, the group is trying to educate voters on where the candidates stand on the issues.
The education effort, and terse response by Davis GOP Chairwoman Kris Kimball, is in follow-up to a story that appeared in the Standard-Examiner on Sept. 27.
http://goo.gl/NULP2 (OSE)

Davis High School students participate in virtual marketing conference

KAYSVILLE — Marketing students at Davis High School sat in for a historic virtual conference Wednesday, where they heard from five marketing experts from across that nation.
No longer limited to how far a presenter is willing to travel, students were being taught by experts who were only a click away in a Google+ Hangout session, while they interacted with questions and even tweeted about the presentation live on Twitter.
In a time when phones are still prohibited for the most part during classes at Davis High School, marketing instructor Jeff McCauley was encouraging the students to tweet about the event. So nearly half the class whipped out their smartphones or other technical gadgets to start commenting online while listening to the presentation from Coca-Cola’s Brad Ruffkess, in charge of the company’s social marketing.
http://goo.gl/SnhGY (OSE)

First year is key for Utah’s teachers, district says

SALT LAKE CITY – As thousands of teachers from across Utah gather Thursday for the first day of UEA convention, one topic is bound to come up – how to keep teachers from leaving the classroom.
Teacher turnover is becoming a problem across the nation, with Utah no different.
Standing in front of 30 children for the first time can be daunting. Even with a teaching degree and student teaching experience, handling a classroom by yourself is a huge transition. And so, some teachers quit.
“We know that transition is huge. They need that support to make that step,” said Jason Olsen with the Salt Lake School District.
Olsen says that’s why the district has the Star Initiative. Each new teacher is paired with a mentor, a veteran teacher in the same school, preferably with the same grade or subject.
http://goo.gl/1FZL2 (KSL)

Seventh-graders explore career options at Richmond middle school

RICHMOND — For seventh-graders at White Pine Middle School, starting a career is probably the last thing on their minds.
http://goo.gl/dzc65 (LHJ)

Skyline High exposed to pertussis cases; officials urge prevention

SALT LAKE CITY — Parents of students at Skyline High School received recorded phone messages and a letter from the Salt Lake Valley Health Department on Wednesday, reminding them to keep students up to date on pertussis vaccinations.
A waning efficacy of the vaccine means people need booster doses to prevent illness and decrease further dissemination of the disease.
The action was prompted by surveillance of the spreading illness, and the fact that epidemiologists may have identified a point of contact that involved a large number of people, said department spokeswoman Pamela Davenport.
http://goo.gl/EQih2 (DN)

http://goo.gl/VAM5q (KUTV)

http://goo.gl/7IBO5 (KSL)

http://goo.gl/Cr4iy (KSTU)

http://goo.gl/zk322 (MUR)

UHSAA ruling: East High forced to forfeit seven games, eliminated from high school playoffs Appeal could be heard this weekend

SALT LAKE CITY – It was an almost perfect season that officially never was.
Top-ranked East will be forced to forfeit eight games this season, including four of its five region contests, after they played four ineligible players.
The decision made by five members of the Utah High School Activities Association’s executive committee was announced Thursday morning. The 3-2 vote and four and a half hour deliberation indicate just how monumental the struggle about what the appropriate punishment should be for the Leopards, who played four ineligible players this season, one of them in every game except their the Highland win.
“There is no doubt that forfeiture is a harsh penalty,” the decision read. “Nevertheless, the Association has repeatedly affirmed and enforced such a penalty for the use of ineligible players. Indeed, the Association recognizes that most, if not all, governing organizations of sports regularly impose forfeiture of games in which ineligible players participate.”
http://goo.gl/H9ngn (DN)

http://goo.gl/Tsebs (DN)

http://goo.gl/Ic7Zr (SLT)

http://goo.gl/2VK5T (SLT)

A bison mascot finds a new home at Buffalo Point Elementary School

FARMINGTON — When the chips are down, Davis County elected leaders can be counted on to provide a relatively new Syracuse elementary school with the life-size fiberglass bison mascot it longs for.
On Tuesday, the Davis County Commission agreed to allow Buffalo Point Elementary in Syracuse, the home of the “Stampede,” to adopt the decoratively painted fiberglass bison that has stood out front of the Memorial County Courthouse in downtown Farmington for the past nine years.
The bison was one of about 50 bison that were part of the 2002 Winter Games celebration.
http://goo.gl/Q04q1 (OSE)

Davis High hosts Davis Cup Invitational for 39th year

KAYSVILLE — Thirty-three bands from across Utah and Idaho descended upon the newly turfed football field at Davis High School in Kaysville on Tuesday for the 39th annual Davis Cup Invitational, the oldest marching band competition in the state.
A handful of schools from the Top of Utah participated, battling the wind and periodic rain that plagued several of the performances.
http://goo.gl/qlkQT (OSE)

Utah School Donates Hair To Locks Of Love

Utah students and teachers took scissor to their hair on Wednesday—for a good cause.
It happened at the Hartvigsen Special Needs School.
http://goo.gl/6Pu7v (KUTV)

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OPINION & COMMENTARY
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Education and football priorities skewed?
Deseret News letter from Virginia Riley

Thank goodness the professional football referees are back on the job. Democrats and Republicans united over this important issue and pressured the league to end the lockout. It would have ended civilization as we know it if they hadn’t found the money to increase the referees’ salaries $24,000 in 2013, to increase their retirement income and to hire more officials.
The screams from the public to get the knowledgeable professionals making the decisions warmed the hearts of all true Americans. I am so grateful the officials are getting the respect they so deserve.
I can hardly wait for that same public pressure on the Legislature to adequately fund education — increasing educators’ salaries more than the pitiful $358 total master teachers in our district have received in the last four years, increasing rather than decreasing educators’ retirement income and hiring more teachers so there aren’t English classes of 40 students and math and science classes of 44.
I anticipate the cries of support for education professionals to make the decisions and the demands to give them the respect they deserve. Oh, wait.
http://goo.gl/qATcX

Candidate talks education, jobs
(Logan) Herald Journal letter from Al Snyder

Cache Valley needs a strong and growing economy that will attract new economic development and provide good jobs for our children. To attract new jobs and enable our children to compete in the world economy requires that Utah adequately fund K-12 and higher education. Our children must receive a challenging education in well-funded schools, with well-paid and respected teachers.
Sadly, Utah public schools are in decay and disarray. There is something wrong when Utah employers must go out of state and even country to hire qualified employees. There is something wrong when nearly one half of all new K-12 teachers in Utah leave their jobs within five years due to poor working conditions, low salary and poor benefits. There is something wrong when classrooms are overcrowded and our students’ achievement scores and high school graduation rates are in decline.
I have watched the decline with dismay over the past 10 years and decided we need to act now for our children.
http://goo.gl/szIL5

Non-fiction vs. fiction smackdown
Washington Post commentary by columnist Jay Mathews

Among the most disturbing facts about U.S. schools is that 17-year-olds have shown no significant improvement in reading since 1980.
The new Common Core State Standards in 46 states and the District are designed to solve that problem. Among other things, students are being asked to read more non-fiction, considered the key to success in college or the workplace.
The Common Core is one of our hottest trends. Virginia declined to participate, but was ignored in the rush of good feeling about the new reform. Now, however, the period of happy press conferences is over and teachers have to make big changes. That never goes well. Expect battles, particularly in this educationally hypersensitive region.
Teaching more non-fiction will be a key issue. Many English teachers don’t think it will do any good. Even if it was a good idea, they say, those who have to make the change have not had enough training to succeed—an old story in school reform.
The clash of views is well described by two prominent scholars for the Pioneer Institute, a Boston-based public policy group, in a new paper.
http://goo.gl/hYbPa

A copy of the paper
http://goo.gl/A0fd2

5 Myths about Education
Philadelphia Daily News op-ed by ROBERT MARANTO and MICHAEL Q. MCSHANE (Robert Maranto is the 21st Century Chair in Leadership at the University of Arkansas. Michael Q. McShane is a research fellow in education policy at the American Enterprise Institute in Washington, D.C. This essay is adapted from their book, “President Obama and Education Reform: The Personal and the Political.”)

MARK TWAIN observed that “it’s not what you don’t know that kills you, it’s what you know for sure that ain’t true.” After 15 years doing fieldwork in more than 100 public schools and interviewing more than 1,000 students, parents, and educators, we’re convinced that no area is more fraught with myths and misconceptions than education policy, especially during election seasons like this one. Indeed our friend Jay Greene wrote a whole book, “Education Myths,” devoted to debunking them.
With apologies to Jay here are our own favorite myths about public education.
http://goo.gl/mU9BA

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NATIONAL NEWS
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Obama, Romney have different views on education USA Today

WASHINGTON — Glance at the two presidential candidates’ education plans and you may not immediately see much of a difference. Both want greater scrutiny of teacher effectiveness. Both champion privately run, but publicly funded K-12 charter schools as well as higher academic standards. Both want more high school and college graduates and a more competitive workforce.
But scratch beneath the surface and a few key differences emerge. President Obama has given states freedom from the sanctions of the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) education law, while his challenger, former Massachusetts governor Mitt Romney says he supports the Bush-era law and wants to reinvigorate it.
Obama effectively killed a federal program that offered D.C. students tuition money for area private schools; Romney would double down on the idea, taking the program nationwide and expanding it to give even more funding for kids with disabilities.
Here are a few key ways in which the two candidates differ on education, based on their policy papers and public appearances, as well as statements from campaign advisers:
http://goo.gl/hTLEc

Idaho granted waiver for No Child Left Behind Associated Press via (Boise) Idaho Statesman

BOISE, Idaho — The U.S. Department of Education has finally granted Idaho’s schools a waiver from some of the most onerous requirements and benchmarks spelled out in the Bush-era No Child Left Behind law.
Superintendent of Public Instruction Tom Luna cheered the decision Wednesday, saying the state can now use its own system to more accurately measure student achievement and recognize schools that are performing well or struggling.
In granting Idaho the waiver, federal education officials also signed off on Luna’s new accountability system that uses a variety of measures to gauge student achievement, including academic growth.
http://goo.gl/DnkEM

http://goo.gl/WQZOP (Ed Week)

Scott: Education department should change strategic plan News Service of Florida via Florida Courier

TALLAHASSEE – Gov. Rick Scott called Tuesday for the State Board of Education to overhaul its strategic plan, inserting himself into the racially charged debate over how much should be expected of students from different groups.
“The actions taken last week by the State Board of Education in adopting their strategic plan did not clearly articulate our shared commitment to fully close that achievement gap for all students, regardless of race, geography, gender or other circumstance,” Scott said in a statement issued by his office late Tuesday.
Scott contended that all students can perform at grade level, and the state should strive to get rid of the achievement gap between students of different ethnic and racial groups.
“With this in mind, I would ask the board to more completely incorporate this recognition into its strategic plan so that we can focus our efforts on helping every student to achieve the highest level of success,” Scott said.
http://goo.gl/C1Paf

http://goo.gl/FVNoQ (NYT)

Newark Tries Merit Payouts For Teachers
Wall Street Journal

Newark and its teachers union on Thursday are expected to sign a tentative contract deal blessed by Gov. Chris Christie that would overhaul teacher pay, introducing lucrative merit bonuses and giving teachers a role in grading each other.
The contract, fueled by about $50 million from the foundation started by Facebook Inc. founder Mark Zuckerberg, covers the next three years and would offer a compensation system that removes lifetime pay increases for those who earn advanced degrees and blocks poorly rated teachers from receiving automatic pay raises for years of experience, officials said.
Teachers could, however, choose to stick with the current pay scheme, which offers small, annual pay bumps for years served and for advanced degrees earned, officials said. They wouldn’t be eligible for some bonuses.
“It’s bold,” Newark Teachers Union President Joe Del Grosso said. “The teachers are really—if they vote [yes] on this—they’re showing a lot of courage. And they’re the heroes. I just brought it to a point. The rest is up to them.”
Union members will hear about the contract’s details on Tuesday and take a vote later this month.
http://goo.gl/tzPUA

Cheerleaders Gain Ally in Free Speech Fight New York Times

AUSTIN, Tex. — Gov. Rick Perry on Wednesday lent his support to a group of East Texas cheerleaders who are fighting in court to keep using banners with Bible verses at public school football games.
Last month, school district officials in Kountze, Tex., a town of 2,100 northeast of Houston, prohibited the cheerleaders from displaying the banners at the beginning of games. Fifteen middle school and high school cheerleaders and their parents sued the district, asserting that the ban violated their free speech rights. A state judge then issued a temporary restraining order against enforcing the ban, allowing the cheerleaders to continue using the banners at games.
Mr. Perry was joined at the Capitol here on Wednesday by the attorney general, Greg Abbott, who said the district’s action against the students was improper. He argued that the banners were protected by a state law that requires school districts to treat student expression of religious views in the same manner as secular views. That law, signed by Mr. Perry in 2007, is called the Religious Viewpoint Antidiscrimination Act.
“We’re a nation that’s built on the concept of free expression of ideas,” Mr. Perry said. “We’re also a culture built upon the concept that the original law is God’s law, outlined in the Ten Commandments. If you think about it, the Kountze cheerleaders simply wanted to call a little attention to their faith and to their Lord.”
The governor and attorney general — seated before pictures of a banner reading, “If God is for us, who can be against us?” — made their remarks the day before the two sides were scheduled to appear in court in Kountze. An extension of the restraining order expires Thursday, and the judge who issued it will consider whether to grant a temporary injunction against the ban, which would most likely permit students to use the signs for the rest of the football season.
http://goo.gl/q4di2

http://goo.gl/KqwYZ (AP)

Ruby Bridges reflects on her life at book festival Associated Press

NEW ORLEANS — Ruby Bridges remembers how excited she was when an anonymous donor sent Dr. Seuss books to her New Orleans home in 1960, the year she ended segregation in local public education by enrolling at a previously all-white elementary school.
The civil rights icon says the books were a bright spot during the time she entered the William Frantz Elementary School at the age of 6. They were pivotal not only to her passion for reading, but also to her later work to get books to as many schoolchildren as possible.
Bridges will be furthering that mission Friday and Saturday at the New Orleans Children’s Book Festival, an event she launched with Mayor Mitch Landrieu’s wife, Cheryl Landrieu, in 2010.
http://goo.gl/8Bsy1

IES to Seed New Methods for Studying Schools Education Week

Washington – It can be tough to translate evidence into action in education research.
A principal or superintendent might sift through academic journals or vendors’ pamphlets for an effective reading program, but even a seal of approval from the federal What Works Clearinghouse is no guarantee that what helped students in one district will be successful with another.
To better inform that knowledge base, the Institute of Education Sciences is crafting a new research program, called “continuous improvement research in education,” to go beyond “what works” and add more context to education findings.
“Knowing what works plays a very important role in school improvement, but alone it’s not enough,” said John Q. Easton, the director of the IES, the research arm of the U.S. Department of Education. “There are questions about building the capacity to implement what works, building the capacity to measure, check, and adapt to changes.”
http://goo.gl/tnffM

Boy kicked out of school because he has gene for cystic fibrosis NBC Today

A California boy has been ordered to transfer to another middle school because he carries the gene for cystic fibrosis, even though he doesn’t actually have the incurable, life-threatening and non-infectious disease. His parents have gone to court to fight the move.
Their son, 11-year-old Colman Chadam, was told last week that he’d have to transfer from Jordan Middle School in Palo Alto, Calif., to a school three miles away because he posed a risk to another student at school who does have the disease, according to TODAY.
“I was sad but at the same time I was mad because I understood that I hadn’t done anything wrong,” Colman told TODAY. He added: “It feels like I’m being bullied in a way that is not right.”
http://goo.gl/OWAet

http://goo.gl/W4cdo (SF Chronicle)

Appeals court reverses decision in Wilson brothers’ case Steven and Sean Wilson were granted a preliminary injunction allowing them to return to school before their suspensions were served Lee’s Summit (MO) Journal

An appeals court has reversed a preliminary injunction granted in a case involving a pair of Lee’s Summit North High School students who sued the R-7 school district and remanded the case back to the district court level after determining the district court erred in granting the students’ injunctive relief allowing them to return to the school.
The United States Eighth Circuit Court of Appeals ruled today (Oct. 17) that the district court’s findings in the case did not support the relief granted to twin brothers Steven and Sean Wilson, and that the findings “do not establish sufficient irreparable harm to justify a preliminary injunction.”
The Wilson family – including parents Brian and Linda Wilson – sued the district for a violation of free speech, and in March asked for a preliminary injunction so that the brothers could finish last school year at North.
A federal judge in United States District Court for the Western District of Missouri ruled March 23 that the Wilson brothers, who were involved with a blog site that contained racial and sexual slurs against Lee’s Summit North students, could return to the school to complete their junior years despite being suspended by the school district for 180 days.
Attorneys for the Wilson brothers, who are currently enrolled at Lee’s Summit North, argued during the appeals process in district court that the brothers needed to return from the district’s alternative school to the more rigorous educational setting at Lee’s Summit North in order to get into honors classes, prepare for college entrance exams and audition for leadership positions with the school band.
U.S. District Judge Howard Sach ruled in favor of the Wilson brother’s motion for a preliminary injunction, allowing them to return to Lee’s Summit North before the end of the 180-day suspensions. Sachs ordered the school district to allow the twins to return April 9 and continue their studies at North while their First Amendment case against the district proceeded.
However, the Eighth Circuit Court of Appeals ruled today that they “were not convinced the Wilsons were at risk of any real academic harm, much less any ‘certain and great’ harm that could be prevented by an injunction.
http://goo.gl/b6y7e

http://goo.gl/xwUmX (Ed Week)

A copy of the ruling
http://www.ca8.uscourts.gov/opndir/12/10/121727P.pdf

Online auction to liquidate surplus school items Associated Press

DETROIT — Tennis rackets, at least two pianos, science lab microscopes and a battery-powered scooter are among dozens of surplus items that will be auctioned off from Detroit’s closed Southwestern High School.
The online auction is a pilot program that begins at 8 a.m. Thursday.
Money raised will be used to help the cash-strapped public school district pay down its $75 million budget deficit.
http://goo.gl/58Inb (AP)

Putin Backs Ban on Muslim Head Scarfs at Schools RIA Novosti

Russian President Vladimir Putin said on Thursday that he was against allowing students to wear Muslim head scarfs at schools, but welcomed the idea of returning to school uniforms.
Several Muslim families in the city of Stavropol in southern Russia have recently complained to the muftiat saying that their daughters were not allowed to attend school wearing head scarfs.
“We should always respect people’s religious feelings but we must proceed from the fact that we live in a secular state,” Putin said at a meeting with People’s Front activists.
“We need to see how our neighbors in European countries are dealing with this problem, then everything will become clear,” he said.
http://goo.gl/hGne6

Omaha schoolgirl dresses as a different historical figure each day Omaha World-Herald

This is how Stella Ehrhart, age 8, decides what to wear for school.
She opens her closet. She opens her book, “100 Most Important Women of the 20th Century.” And she opens her mind.
Voilà, she is Billie Holiday, in a black dress with a red tissue-paper flower tucked into her strawberry-blond hair.
Behold, she is Grace Kelly in pink satin lace on her wedding day.
Poof, she is Burmese opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi, wearing a hat her aunt got her in Vietnam.
The Dundee Elementary School third-grader comes to school dressed as a different historical figure or character — Every. Single. Day. And she’s done that since the second day of second grade, when this all started.
http://goo.gl/Rv4x7

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CALENDAR
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USOE Calendar
http://tinyurl.com/5x9oh9

UEN News
http://www.uen.org

November 1-2:
Utah State Board of Education meeting
250 E. 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

November 8:
Utah State Charter School Board meeting
250 E. 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://1.usa.gov/Axtt5K

November 13:
Executive Appropriations Interim Committee meeting
1 p.m., 445 State Capitol
http://www.le.utah.gov/Interim/2012/html/00002224.htm

November 14:
Education Interim Committee meeting
2 p.m., 30 House Building
http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2012&Com=INTEDU

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