Education News Roundup: Dec. 4, 2012

"Early Literacy @ Georgetown" by ACPL/CC/flickr

“Early Literacy @ Georgetown” by ACPL/CC/flickr

Today’s Top Picks:

KSL looks at Utah’s dual immersion program.
http://goo.gl/LFcU0 (KSL)

KCPW spends some time on Utah’s graduation rate and the state’s rural schools.
http://goo.gl/Lexk0 (KCPW)

UVU takes on literacy.
http://goo.gl/Kgi54 (PDH)
and http://goo.gl/UgLoR (DN)
and http://goo.gl/QEp46 (KSL)

AFT proposes a certification exam for teachers.
http://goo.gl/eBTA4 (AP)
and http://goo.gl/wo4bc (WaPo)
and http://goo.gl/G8ahS (Fox)
and http://goo.gl/lt18Q (Ed Week)
or a copy of the report
http://goo.gl/Tmwqy (AFT)

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TODAY’S HEADLINES
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UTAH

Utah immersion program the envy of the nation

How to Boost High School Grad Rates/Evaluating Rural Education in Utah

UVU, United Way partner in multi-year literacy project

A coddled generation? Some educators see lack of ‘soft skills’

Youth employment in Utah at lowest level since 1979

Utah educator arrested, facing sodomy charges

Ex-Kaysville coach accused of sexual relationship with student

Teacher disciplined for receiving foot massages from students, violating professional standards Education » Third-grade teacher was also accused of using a hammer on a student’s desk to scare the child.

Drunken driver gets prison for crash that killed Utah coach Courts » Defendant asks his victim’s family for forgiveness.

Funeral to be held Tuesday for bullied suicide victim

Student arrested in fire at Roosevelt school

Students raising funds to perform at Obama inauguration

Preston School Board mulls 10-year building plan

School testing: high stakes vs. low stakes

Dad builds drone to escort son to bus stop

Deseret Media Companies sponsors school to help families obtain holiday gifts

OPINION & COMMENTARY

Early-learning activities prepare children for success in school

Should teachers be required to pass “the bar”?

Outrageous behavior

Michigan governor proposes massive reforms, following a Utah model

Stronger support needed for education

Common-Core Momentum Is Still in Jeopardy

Study Probes Math Course-Taking, Finds Flaws in Repeating Algebra

Cultivating Tech-Savvy Teachers Should Be Higher Priority, Report Says

Review of The School Staffing Surge

NATION

Union calls for teacher certification exam

Study: More Churn at the Top in Large Districts

Indiana senator has plans other than creationism bill

NY court OKs $1M school racial harassment award

Urbandale students take hands-on role in learning High-schoolers set own pace in some science classes

Google gives $23M to spur innovation in charities

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UTAH NEWS
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Utah immersion program the envy of the nation

SALT LAKE CITY – Thousands of Utah students have something directly in common with one of the country’s most famous kids — Suri Cruise.
Suri – daughter of actors Tom Cruise and Katie Holmes – attends Avenues: The World School in New York City. Her tuition is $40,000 a year. Class size: 17.
Then there’s Cierra, daughter of Dave and Linda. She attends Spring Lane Elementary School in Sandy. Tuition: free, if you don’t count taxes. There are about 25 kids in her class.
Strip away location and tuition costs, and Suri and Cierra are receiving close to the same education. In fact, they’re learning from the same program that was developed here in Utah.
Avenues is the new school many rich and famous are choosing for its dual-immersion language program. Kids learn half the day in a new language and half in English.
It is the same program spreading like wildfire in Utah schools. Both are designed by educator Myriam Met.
http://goo.gl/LFcU0 (KSL)

How to Boost High School Grad Rates/Evaluating Rural Education in Utah

New stats show that only 76 percent of Utah students are graduating from high school, with much lower rates for Latinos and Asian/Pacific Islanders. The data from the U.S. Department of Education has state educators and policymakers looking at solutions. On Tuesday, we’ll talk about ways to boost Utah in the rankings and better accommodate today’s students.

Utah’s rural students have a higher graduation rates, but fewer go to college. Those are conclusions from a new study by the non-partisan think-tank Utah Foundation. On Tuesday, we’ll examine the challenges and opportunities to students in the state’s rural areas.
http://goo.gl/Lexk0 (KCPW)

UVU, United Way partner in multi-year literacy project

The joy of reading can only come if one knows how to read, and three out of 10 Utah County children are not reading at their grade level.
That is why Utah Valley University and the United Way of Utah County are teaming up on a multi-year project inspired by the EveryDay Learners program initiated last year to help the youngest children learn how to read.
On Monday a special kickoff was held at the South Franklin Community Center, giving tutors and dignitaries the chance to interact with children of the area in an afternoon reading program. Books donated by the university were given to children to take home.
http://goo.gl/Kgi54 (PDH)

http://goo.gl/UgLoR (DN)

http://goo.gl/QEp46 (KSL)

A coddled generation? Some educators see lack of ‘soft skills’

SALT LAKE CITY — Many of today’s youth are academically ready for college and a career, but an increasing number of them are lacking the so-called soft skills — things like time management, grit, and compassion, according to some educators.
Karen Hicks, associate director of the START Center at Westminster College, says many parents who think they are helping their children are really enabling them.
“The helicopter parents and the hand-holding, (the students) get all that through high school and then in college it’s a free-for-all,” she said.
Hicks says many new students don’t know how to get along with roommates, wake up on time, do their laundry, pick classes, or manage their time.
The START Center offers students help and resources while showing them how to do things on their own.
http://goo.gl/c2RKU (KSL)

Youth employment in Utah at lowest level since 1979

SALT LAKE CITY — What was once a rite of passage — an after-school or summer job at a restaurant, store or other place of business — has become increasingly elusive for Utah teenagers and young adults, a new national report says.
The report from the Annie E. Casey Foundation’s KIDS COUNT Project says youth employment is at its lowest level since World War II.
In Utah, the unemployment rate for people ages 16-24 is at its lowest point since 1979. The percentage of employed people in this age group has dropped from 70 percent to 56 percent.
http://goo.gl/zQgMS (DN)

http://goo.gl/XaP4J (OSE)

http://goo.gl/c4eUp (KSL)

http://goo.gl/kXubP (KSTU)

http://goo.gl/iMu1I (KUER)

http://goo.gl/9yXLU (MUR)

Utah educator arrested, facing sodomy charges

A Utah man with more than 40 years of experience as a teacher and principal is facing six first-degree felony counts of forcible sodomy for alleged sex acts with a young male student.
Court papers filed Monday in Wasatch County’s 4th District Court say Charles Edward Weber had a sexual relationship with a 15-year-old student between January and April of this year. Weber was the principal of a Wasatch County elementary school, but was fired in August, the documents state. The court documents don’t detail which school Weber worked at or why he was fired.
The Utah Attorney General’s Office filed the case.
Weber was arrested in southern Utah on Monday and was being held in the Purgatory Correctional Facility in Hurricane on $1 million bail. It was not immediately clear whether Weber had an attorney. No hearings have been set for the case.
http://goo.gl/YvUOZ (SLT)

http://goo.gl/RabP7 (DN)

http://goo.gl/WsPcQ (OSE)

http://goo.gl/aoyBf (KTVX)

http://goo.gl/h4DhC (KSL)

http://goo.gl/XloLU (KSTU)

http://goo.gl/syIb8 (KNRS)

Ex-Kaysville coach accused of sexual relationship with student

BOUNTIFUL — A former Kaysville basketball coach has been arrested for allegedly having a sexual relationship with a teenage girl for more than a year.
Stephen Paul Niedzwiecki, 33, was arrested Monday for investigation of two counts of forcible sexual abuse, two counts of object rape, six counts of forcible sodomy and one count of attempted rape. He was booked into the Davis County Jail.
Bountiful Assistant Police Chief Ed Biehler said Niedzwiecki met his alleged victim in 2010 while he was a teacher and basketball coach at Jefferson Academy in Kaysville. The girl was 14 at the time. In addition to being her coach and teacher, Niedzwiecki also tutored the girl, Biehler said.
By the summer of 2011, the two began engaging in sexual acts, he said. The abuse was committed often and at “various places along the Wasatch Front, including Mr. Niedzwiecki’s home in Bountiful,” Biehler said.
http://goo.gl/acZCn (DN)

http://goo.gl/pG60S (OSE)

http://goo.gl/eDmEA (SLT)

http://goo.gl/QAmry (KUTV)

http://goo.gl/1KiQH (KSL)

http://goo.gl/H4nWD (KSTU)

Teacher disciplined for receiving foot massages from students, violating professional standards Education » Third-grade teacher was also accused of using a hammer on a student’s desk to scare the child.

A Taylorsville Elementary School teacher has returned to his third-grade classroom after being disciplined for violating professional standards after students reported they scratched his back, rubbed his feet and had other inappropriate contact while at school.
Granite School District officials found no criminal conduct by elementary teacher Bryan Watts, 53, who has worked at the school since 2004, but the district claims to have taken “appropriate disciplinary action” following complaints about Watts.
“The district has put measures in place so no inappropriate actions can be taken [by Watts],” Doug Larson, district director of policy and legal services, said Monday.
http://goo.gl/vNhRv (SLT)

http://goo.gl/JFbpl (OSE)

http://goo.gl/JM4km (PDH)

http://goo.gl/YjDyN (CVD)

Drunken driver gets prison for crash that killed Utah coach Courts » Defendant asks his victim’s family for forgiveness.

Blake Timothy Molder asked for forgiveness and leniency Monday during an emotional hearing to determine his punishment for killing a high school football coach in a drunken driving collision in June.
He found forgiveness from Michael Gallegos’ widow, but the judge handed down he stiffest sentence he could.
Molder will spend one to 15 years in the Utah State Prison, the maximum sentence for second-degree automobile homicide, a charge to which he pleaded guilty in October. Molder admitted to being under the influence of alcohol when he drove into the back of Gallegos’ car at a stoplight on Bangerter Highway. Officials estimated he was driving 95 mph in a 60 mph zone when he slammed into the back of Gallegos’ car. There were no skid marks behind the crash site.
http://goo.gl/8UuGV (SLT)

http://goo.gl/rKyR7 (DN)

http://goo.gl/7fr2O (OSE)

http://goo.gl/c395n (PDH)

http://goo.gl/YAc2n (CVD)

http://goo.gl/7jRv4 (KUTV)

http://goo.gl/7bY8d (KTVX)

Funeral to be held Tuesday for bullied suicide victim

TAYLORSVILLE, Utah — A Taylorsville teenager who committed suicide outside Bennion Junior High school last week will be laid to rest Tuesday.
http://goo.gl/KUUO7 (KSTU)

Student arrested in fire at Roosevelt school

ROOSEVELT — A girl has been booked into the Split Mountain Youth Detention Center after police say she started a fire Monday inside a bathroom at school.
The fire alarm sounded about 1:25 p.m. at Roosevelt Junior High School, forcing the school’s faculty and 800 students to evacuate.
Investigators say a female student set the fire inside the girls bathroom, but declined to say what she used to start the blaze.
http://goo.gl/nKiF5 (DN)

http://goo.gl/UCT9Y (KSL)

Students raising funds to perform at Obama inauguration

With an opportunity to perform at the Inauguration of President Barack Obama members of the Logan High Band and Choir are busy raising money for the trip in mid-January to the nation’s capital.
“We will be in Washington, DC for five days and that will include several activities and a couple of concerts; we will be playing for the President and the Senate,” said Shelby Howard, mother of a band member who is involved in fundraising.
http://goo.gl/3KKqM (CVD)

Preston School Board mulls 10-year building plan

The Preston School District Board of Trustees is currently discussing a tentative 10-year construction plan for improvements to the buildings that includes improvements in both school and district structures.
http://goo.gl/Afikf (LHJ)

School testing: high stakes vs. low stakes

Most Asian education systems favor high-stakes tests empowered to dash college plans and career choices in one mighty swoop.
American schools resist such draconian measures, but do plenty of testing, too, without giving students a sense that the results count for anything. (Most of the consequences of American accountability testing fall upon schools and teachers, not students.) Is there, perhaps, some middle ground between such extremes?
Panic over high-stakes testing in Hong Kong has led to the rise of “tutor kings” and “tutor queens” — celebrity exam coaches who promise to improve mediocre grades, according to a BBC News story.
http://goo.gl/W18Fe (DN)

Dad builds drone to escort son to bus stop

VERMONT — A Vermont dad came up with a creative idea to keep his son safe while keeping his own feet dry: he built a drone to follow his grade-schooler son to the bus stop every day.
The cold Vermont winters were the impetus for the project: “If I am walking my kid to the bus stop in December and January, I would really rather not be doing that,” Paul Wallich told NBC News.
http://goo.gl/NyaSa (KSL)

Deseret Media Companies sponsors school to help families obtain holiday gifts

SALT LAKE CITY — Deseret Media Companies sponsored Toy Depot for selected families at Washington Elementary School in Salt Lake City, Monday, Dec. 3, 2012. DMC sponsors a local elementary school each year to help families provide toys and gifts for their children. The company has sponsored Washington two years in a row.
http://goo.gl/mCROj (DN)

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OPINION & COMMENTARY
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Early-learning activities prepare children for success in school
(Ogden) Standard-Examiner commentary by columnist Paul Schvaneveldt

My daughter Ashley started kindergarten this year. For several weeks before school began, she was very excited and practiced putting her notebook in her backpack and getting dressed in her new school clothes. Every day she would ask, “Can I go to kindergarten today?”
Her older siblings started school a week before, and she was very sad. It was difficult for her to wait to visit her classroom, meet her new teacher, and play with her new friends. Finally, the first day of kindergarten arrived.
http://goo.gl/ALNTF

Should teachers be required to pass “the bar”?
Deseret News commentary by columnist Mary McConnell

One of my favorite commentors – an experienced Utah teacher – sent me a link to a Washington Post article entitled “Union proposes ‘bar exam’ for teachers.” His email made it very clear that he thinks this is a terrible idea.
I’m not quite so sure, though I AM sure that it could and probably would be implemented terribly – and in a way that unnecessarily protects the status quo. But for that I have a proposed tweak.
http://goo.gl/mpYWe

Outrageous behavior
(Provo) Daily Herald op-ed by Tim Bridgewater, a former Utah K-12 Education Deputy and parent of a student athlete on Timpview’s 2012 Regional and State Championship football team

Recently, the UHSAA administrators misused their discretionary authority to abuse and punish innocent students, schools and sports programs across the state in order to correct administrative paperwork errors. In the case of Timpview, understand that an underclass student athlete who played in only two games in the last few minutes of blowout victories incorrectly filled out a transfer form. Had he filled it out correctly, he would have been instructed to request a waiver via a second form, which waiver would likely have been granted in his type of case. The student in question does not speak English as his primary language. Timpview was stripped of their 2012 Region Championship and forced to forfeit four games. They lost over $100,000 in gate receipts and concessions income and then it got worse.
A week later, Timpview suffered a humiliating victory, beating favored Logan 49-14 while afterwards facing taunts by Logan supporters and students hurling expletives and labeling our team as cheaters. This UHSAA sanctioned abuse came after a spectacular performance by the Thunderbird athletes and coaches.
http://goo.gl/8LhN0

Michigan governor proposes massive reforms, following a Utah model Commentary by Charter Solutions President Lincoln Fillmore

Michigan is following Utah’s lead in allowing a la carte education. Utah’s model allows students to take some classes online and some classes at the local district, while the state splits funding between the providers of education.
http://goo.gl/UL1Tp

Stronger support needed for education
(St. George) Spectrum letter from Karl Tippets

On Nov. 26, an item that appeared on page A2 reported “State high school graduation rates among lowest in the country,” reprinted from the Associated Press. I believe the title is misleading.
Review of the source data shows that the average graduation rate for all 49 reporting entities is 77.98 percent, with a high of 88 percent and a low of 59 percent. Utah at 76 percent may be slightly below average but not as bad as the headline suggests.
The article goes on to suggest that there is a connection between low per pupil spending and this “low rate.” There are 14 states that out spend Utah with lower graduation rates. When viewed as how much bang we are getting for the buck — Utah is near the top.
http://goo.gl/4eqHS

Common-Core Momentum Is Still in Jeopardy Education Week op-ed by Rick Dalton, president and chief executive officer of College for Every Student

The re-election of President Barack Obama has many proponents of standards-based education reform feeling a strong sense of relief. The president has been a long-term advocate for the national adoption of the Common Core State Standards, which bring continuity to what’s taught in every classroom and expected of students nationwide. Developed by a diverse group of stakeholders in order to level the academic playing field, the standards are particularly important to students from low-income families who will now be expected to meet the same academic goals as their more affluent peers. But those of us who support the idea of standards shouldn’t rest now. It is my belief that the vision of national learning standards is in jeopardy.
For starters, despite the president’s support of the common core, the administration’s No Child Left Behind Act waivers that allow individual states to set moving proficiency targets for struggling students are counter to the standards’ objectives. And although 46 states and the District of Columbia have adopted the standards, the challenges facing many urban and rural schools that serve large numbers of low-income students make implementation an uphill battle.
As the president of College for Every Student, a nonprofit that’s committed to improving college readiness for some 20,000 students from lower-income families, I hope we can keep the standards effort on track.
http://goo.gl/6UQqK

Study Probes Math Course-Taking, Finds Flaws in Repeating Algebra Education Week commentary by columnist Erik Robelen

New research takes a deep dive into the math course-taking patterns of students across 24 California districts from grades 7-12, with a special focus on better understanding “when and why students stumble and veer off track.”
One thing that’s clear from the study is that repeating algebra doesn’t seem to work for a lot of students. Consider this: For those students who repeated algebra in grade 9, only one in five (21 percent) achieved proficiency afterward, according to the research, conducted by a team at WestEd and SRI International. It looks worse for students who first took algebra in 9th grade and took it again the next year. Only 9 percent scored proficient on a state exam following the second attempt.
This dimension of the new research raises questions about schools’ decisions to have students repeat the subject, and what is happening (and isn’t) during that experience, said Neal D. Finkelstein, a senior research scientist at WestEd and a coauthor of the study.
http://goo.gl/IdTwz

A copy of the report
http://www.cftl.org/CenterView.htm

Cultivating Tech-Savvy Teachers Should Be Higher Priority, Report Says Education Week commentary by columnist Sean Cavanagh

Teachers may be the undisputed authorities on academic content in their classrooms, but when it comes to their knowledge of technology, many of them have a lot of catching up to do.
The widely acknowledged need to improve the tech skills of teachers and other school officials, and help them understand how digital tools should be used in the classroom, should be a major area of focus among state officials and other policymakers, according to a report released today by the National Association of State Boards of Education.
The association’s recommendations cover a lot of ground—from the need to improve educational infrastructure in schools, and tailor learning to personalize instruction, to the need to use technology to build students’ foundational research and analytical skills.
But the report also examines the extent to which many teachers, principals, curriculum specialists, and support staff lack the necessary familiarity with technology to make the most of it in classrooms.
http://goo.gl/Wvyxm

A copy of the report
http://goo.gl/kwmBj (Ed Week)

Review of The School Staffing Surge
National Education Policy Center analysis by Joydeep Roy, Teachers College, Columbia University

The School Staffing Surge: Decades of Employment Growth in America’s Public Schools
Benjamin Scafidi
Friedman Foundation for Educational Choice
The School Staffing Surge finds that between 1992 and 2009, the number of full-time equivalent school employees grew 2.3 times faster than the increase in students over the same period. The report claims that despite these staffing and related spending increases, there has been no progress on test scores or drop-out reductions. The solution, therefore, is school choice. However, the report fails to adequately address the fact that achievement scores and drop-out rates have actually improved. If the report had explored the causes and consequences of the faster employment growth, it could have made an important contribution. However, it does not do so. Unless we know the duties and responsibilities of the new employees, any assertion about the effects of hiring them is merely speculative. Further, the report’s recommendations are problematic in its uncritical presentation of school choice as a solution to financial and staffing increases. The report presents no evidence that school choice – whose record on improving educational outcomes and efficacy is mixed – will resolve this “problem.” The report’s advocacy of private school vouchers and school choice seem even odder given that private schools have smaller class sizes and charter schools appear to allocate a substantially greater portion of their spending on administrative costs—two of the main policies attacked in the report.
http://goo.gl/KKcWw

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NATIONAL NEWS
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Union calls for teacher certification exam Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Schoolteachers should have to pass a stringent exam – much like the bar exam for lawyers – before being allowed to enter the profession, one of the nation’s largest teachers unions said Monday.
The American Federation of Teachers called for a tough new written test to be complimented by stricter entrance requirements for teacher training programs, such as a minimum grade point average.
“It’s time to do away with a common rite of passage into the teaching profession, whereby newly minted teachers are tossed the keys to their classrooms, expected to figure things out, and left to see if they and their students sink or swim,” said AFT President Randi Weingarten, calling that system unfair to students and teachers alike.
The proposal, released Monday as part of a broader report on elevating the teaching profession, calls for the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards to take the lead in developing a new test. The nonprofit group currently administers the National Board Certification program, an advanced, voluntary teaching credential that goes beyond state standards.
http://goo.gl/eBTA4

http://goo.gl/wo4bc (WaPo)

http://goo.gl/G8ahS (Fox)

http://goo.gl/lt18Q (Ed Week)

A copy of the report
http://goo.gl/Tmwqy (AFT)

Study: More Churn at the Top in Large Districts Education Week

Running one of the nation’s largest school districts typically comes with prestige and pay that draw would-be educational superstars, but also pressure and political complexity that cause them to burn out far faster than leaders of the majority of districts.
A study published in the December issue of the American Educational Research Journal finds in 90 percent of 100 California districts studied, 43 percent of superintendents left within three years—but 71 percent of superintendents left the largest 10 percent of districts, which include those of 29,000 or more students, during that time.
http://goo.gl/1tcwm

A copy of the study
http://aer.sagepub.com/content/49/6/1146.abstract

Indiana senator has plans other than creationism bill Indianapolis (IN) Star

Sen. Dennis Kruse said today he has no plans to refile a bill allowing schools to teach creationism along with evolution in science classes.
But, Kruse added, he plans instead to pursue legislation that allows students to challenge teachers on issues, forcing them to provide evidence to back up their lessons.
Kruse, chairman of the Senate Education Committee, authored a bill in the legislature in this year’s session that allowed schools to teach religion-based views on the origin of creation, along with evolution, in public school science classes. It passed the Senate 28-22 in February, but House Speaker Brian Bosma, R-Indianapolis, effectively killed the bill by assigning it to the House rules committee rather than the education committee.
At the time, Bosma said he did so to avoid the possibility of a costly lawsuit for the state. The U.S. Supreme Court in 1987 voided a Louisiana law that required creationism to be taught.
http://goo.gl/1BSaH

NY court OKs $1M school racial harassment award Associated Press via Wall Street Journal

NEW YORK — An appeals court says a Dutchess County school district must pay $1 million to a man who was racially harassed for 3-½ years in high school.
The 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals on Monday upheld the award for Anthony Zeno (ZEE’-noh). He faced repeated harassment in the Pine Plains Central School District from 2005 to 2008.
The 2nd Circuit said he faced racist, demeaning, threatening and violent conduct. It happened in the presence of friends, classmates and teachers at Stissing Mountain High School.
The court said a jury could find that the harassment would have a profound and long-term impact on Zeno’s life.
http://goo.gl/I4pQL

http://goo.gl/CIL9J (Ed Week)

A copy of the ruling
http://goo.gl/30llZ (2nd Circuit Court)

Urbandale students take hands-on role in learning High-schoolers set own pace in some science classes Des Moines (IA) Register

Katie Bunce’s students no longer do homework assignments. They take on quests.
The Urbandale High School teacher is one of many educators in the Urbandale school district to adopt a philosophy that allows students to take a more active role in their education.
Bunce put the quest system into effect with 130 of her students in biology and human physiology classes.
At the beginning of a school year, students used to worry about the points they needed to earn and what grade they had in the grade book, she said.
She sought to eliminate that tension and learn more about how well the students understood the material she taught.
Now, armed with ideas she learned during an education workshop a few months ago, Bunce has applied new practices to her classroom.
Instead of giving daily homework assignments to her advance placement students, she created a flow chart for each unit the class is studying. Within the unit are several quests that students can work on until they get 100 percent.
http://goo.gl/OXC1Y

Google gives $23M to spur innovation in charities Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Google is announcing $23 million in grants to spur innovation among charities and increase education for girls and minority students in science and technology.
Seven nonprofits will win the first Google Global Impact Awards on Tuesday.
http://goo.gl/g0rgm

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CALENDAR
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USOE Calendar
http://tinyurl.com/5x9oh9

UEN News
http://www.uen.org

December 3:
Executive Appropriations Interim Committee meeting
2 p.m., 445 State Capitol
http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2012&Com=APPEXE

December 7:
Utah State Board of Education meeting
250 E. 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

December 11:
Public Education Appropriations Committee meeting
8:30 a.m., 445 State Capitol
http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2012&Com=APPPED

December 13:
Utah State Charter School Board meeting
250 E. 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://1.usa.gov/Axtt5K

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