Education News Roundup: Jan. 10, 2013

"Homework" by __Jens__/CC/flickr

“Homework” by __Jens__/CC/flickr

Today’s Top Picks:

D-News catches up with Prosperity 2020
http://goo.gl/aGv1R (DN)

State Charter School Board looks at charter school graduation rates.
http://goo.gl/I35e9 (SLT)

D-News also looks at refugees and immigrants in schools.
http://goo.gl/QRcjb (DN)

Utah moves up in the latest Quality Counts survey from Ed Week.
http://goo.gl/Z1yVH (SLT)
and http://goo.gl/ETb0e (Ed Week)

MSNBC talks with Utah teacher about guns in school.
http://goo.gl/Yvi1S (MSNBC The Ed Show)

Retired Utah teacher discusses homework.
http://goo.gl/h7Pnm (KSL)

Wall Street Journal takes up school grades.
http://goo.gl/qlPs7 (WSJ)

And you, yes you, put down that highlighter. It just won’t do you any good.
http://goo.gl/wOMJ2 (Time)
or a copy of the report
http://goo.gl/JTNDV (Association for Psychological Science)

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TODAY’S HEADLINES
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UTAH

Prosperity 2020 plan to improve education includes more spending, new revenue

Charter schools have some of the lowest, highest graduation rates Why? Poor self-reporting makes it hard to track students, one state official says.

An American education: refugees and new immigrants face challenges to graduation

Report ranks Utah education 38th in nation Schools » Utah moves up slightly in the rankings.

Parents do ‘not necessarily’ have a right to know if I’m armed, says teacher

Utah teacher: assigned homework does not benefit kids

Clearfield employment training center may lose 400 student slots

Kaufusi named chairwoman of Provo school board

Logan Board of Education shuffles leadership, welcomes new member

Alpine board member tries to change way board OKs payments

Bill would give 10% of liquor sales to schools

Legacy Prep students get to perform for Broadway theatergoers Strutting their stuff » Students sang in the lobby of the Gershwin Theatre before seeing the play “Wicked.”

Theater teacher honored with UHSAA distinguished service award Long wants students to become expressive and responsible artists.

Students get hands-on experience at BioInnovations Gateway Real-world experience » The nonprofit helps startup companies research cancer and make medical equipment, among other ventures.

Salt Lake area school districts using social media to interact with students, parents Instant communication » Granite District uses Twitter to give updates on safety, schedules, events.

Lehi and Westlake PTA councils honor Reflections winners

Davis High students find way to profit from soda ban

Entitled students: Too much self-esteem, disconnect between high opinions and actual ability

OPINION & COMMENTARY

Should teachers pack heat?

Jordan District is all shook up

Year-round school for the win

Taking on tough jobs?

What English classes should look like in Common Core era

Sample Common-Core Test Items Inspire Worry, Hope

A ’21st Century’ Education Is SO Last Century

NATION

Schools Get Taste of Own Medicine
States Assign A to F Grades Based on Test Results, Other Factors; Some Parents, Administrators Are Shocked by Poor Scores

Calif. Teachers Fund Moves to Divest from Firearms

27% Think Teachers Should Carry Guns

Arizona Sheriff Launches Patrols Outside Schools

Legislation concerns Wyoming Board of Education members

Highlighting Is a Waste of Time: The Best and Worst Learning Techniques

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UTAH NEWS
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Prosperity 2020 plan to improve education includes more spending, new revenue

TAYLORSVILLE — The business leaders behind Prosperity 2020 presented their plan for investing in education on Wednesday, which included a call for increased spending in education and, potentially, new state revenues.
Prosperity 2020 is a partnership between Utah education officials and private businesses to increase educational outputs in the state. Specifically, the group has adopted the goal of two-thirds of Utah’s adult workforce holding a post-secondary degree or certificate by the year 2020, along with other public education and higher education benchmarks.
Educators, lawmakers and representatives from various chambers of commerce around Utah met Thursday at Nelson Laboratories, where Prosperity 2020 leaders presented their plan for reaching goals though innovation, investment and accountability in education.
http://goo.gl/aGv1R (DN)

Charter schools have some of the lowest, highest graduation rates Why? Poor self-reporting makes it hard to track students, one state official says.

The high school graduation rate in charter schools improved slightly from last year, but several schools posted some of the worst rates in Utah, state officials said on Wednesday.
Seventy-one percent of charter students who started high school in 2009 graduated on schedule in 2012, compared with 69 percent graduating the previous year.
Utah education officials were unsure why some charter high schools posted such low graduation rates: Beehive Science & Technology Academy in Sandy graduated 26 percent in 2012.
http://goo.gl/I35e9 (SLT)

An American education: refugees and new immigrants face challenges to graduation

It’s a chilly winter morning and eight students sit in Valerie Gates’ ESL class for “new arrivals” at West High School. They are enjoying a feast of international flavors including Egyptian basbousa cake, Burmese breakfast rice and Mexican rice with mole.
Gates talks with her students about the dishes they have each brought to share. She speaks slowly and clearly so her students, who only speak a few words of English, have time to hear and translate her words. They answer her questions with shy smiles and short, cautious phrases.
“What time did you wake up to make this rice?”
“Five o’clock I wake up today,” answers Rafiq, a refugee from Burma who is proud of his efforts, though he doesn’t know what his breakfast dish is called.
“Did you make this mole yourself?”
“No,” comes the quiet reply from a girl from Mexico, “My mother make.”
Gates teaches ESL classes at West, where almost 40 percent of 2,500 students are English language learners. She says some are “so bright, and yet things are hard here because of the language.”
Population data indicate 40 million immigrants were living in the United States in 2010, double the immigrant population of 1990.
http://goo.gl/QRcjb (DN)

Report ranks Utah education 38th in nation Schools » Utah moves up slightly in the rankings.

A new report ranks Utah 38th in the nation when it comes to education — an improvement over recent years despite the state’s ongoing last-in-the-nation status for school spending.
The report, Education Week’s annual Quality Counts, gave Utah a grade of C, slightly worse than the national grade of C-plus. It ranked states on six measures: chance for success; transitions and alignment; school finance; K-12 achievement; standards, assessments and accountability; and the teaching profession.
Utah moved up a few spots since last year when it ranked 42nd in the nation. It ranked 41st in 2011.
http://goo.gl/Z1yVH (SLT)

http://goo.gl/ETb0e (Ed Week)

Parents do ‘not necessarily’ have a right to know if I’m armed, says teacher

The Dec. 14 massacre of 20 first-graders and six adults in Newtown, Connecticut, terrified parents across the country and started an emotional national debate over guns and school security. Some of those parents, including President Barack Obama, called for tougher gun restrictions.
The National Rifle Association countered with “arm the teachers.” Gun clubs claim hundreds of teachers are applying for free weapons training. Two hundred people showed up for a class in West Valley City, Utah, outside Salt Lake City, on December 27, 2012, for example. Not all of the people who took the course were teachers. But some were, including Carolyn Cain, who teaches special education kids in kindergarten to the 6th grade in Utah County, Utah.
“When I was watching the news and listening to those teachers’ stories I couldn’t help but put myself in their shoes and wonder what would I do,” said Cain. “And I wanted options.”
Cain said she learned that the state of Utah has allowed teachers to carry concealed weapons at school for 12 years now, without being required to notify parents or students.
“Do you think parents have a right to know?” Schultz asked.
“Not necessarily, not necessarily” Cain responded.
http://goo.gl/Yvi1S (MSNBC The Ed Show)

Utah teacher: assigned homework does not benefit kids

FARMINGTON — After years in the classroom, a Utah educator is taking a stance on homework: he says it isn’t needed, at least from a traditional standpoint.
Lynn Stoddard has years of experience as a teacher and administrator in northern Utah schools. Having written several books on the subject, he calls his approach “educating for human greatness.”
“It’s such a strong myth in our society that teacher assigned homework is good for kids,” he said.
http://goo.gl/h7Pnm (KSL)

Clearfield employment training center may lose 400 student slots

CLEARFIELD — A cutback in federal spending for select Job Corps centers is expected to reduce the enrollment at the Clearfield Job Corps by as many as 400 students, a Department of Labor official confirmed Wednesday.
The Clearfield facility is one of seven Job Corps centers in the U.S. where funding will be cut on a temporary basis until at least June of this year, according to Elizabeth Todd, a regional spokesman for the DOL based in Dallas.
The announcement amounts to a loss of 400 slots, or potential applications, for students, Todd said.
http://goo.gl/r0v6L (OSE)

Kaufusi named chairwoman of Provo school board

PROVO — Michelle Kaufusi received a unanimous vote of approval Tuesday from her peers on the Provo school board to take over as the new chairman of the board. Kaufusi steps into her new roll following a year of turmoil within the district, but with great excitement and optimism for the future.
“I am so excited to get going with this,” Kaufusi said. “I’m happy to serve and I am working hard for the community.”
Newly elected board member Julie Rash was voted in as the assistant board chairwoman. The dynamics between the two board members and the parts of the city they represent will be a focus of the board and the district at large.
http://goo.gl/1hdzJ (PDH)

Logan Board of Education shuffles leadership, welcomes new member

The Logan City School District Board of Education welcomes its newest member in four years during a board meeting Tuesday evening.
Connie Morgan replaced board member Fred Duersch, who decided last year not to run for another term. She was sworn in as a member of the board along with the Lynn Hobbs and Ann Geary, previous board members who were reelected in uncontested races in November.
Boardmember Kristie Cooley was unanimously selected as the new board president, with James Blair as the new vice president. Cooley, who previously served as vice president, replaced Lynn Hobbs as the president of the board.
http://goo.gl/bbxDw (LHJ)

Alpine board member tries to change way board OKs payments

The debate rose over the seemingly innocuous — approving payment of the bills. But at a recent meeting of the Alpine School District board, some elected officials momentarily halted the process so they could challenge 85 years of tradition.
Typically at the beginning of every meeting, board members are asked to approve the bills. But when the notes on bills being paid stretches for more than 400 pages, what is a person to do?
Board member Wendy Hart said she wanted to be clear that she could not in good conscience vote to approve the bills if her approval means she has to “read every line item and understand it.” In reality, board members really don’t know what they are approving payments for in most cases.
“I can’t stand behind that” definition of approval, she said. “We are not saying we personally approve absolutely every expenditure.”
District officials did not immediately respond on Wednesday when asked to provide the total dollar amount of bills approved in a recent meeting.
http://goo.gl/UWQgJ (PDH)

Bill would give 10% of liquor sales to schools

SALT LAKE CITY — Utah’s lawmakers will debate a bill this legislative session that taps money from liquor sales to help pay for public education.
Rep. Jim Bird has become known as the guy who’s looking for new and sometimes unusual ways to find more education funding. He sponsored a bill that eventually allowed school districts to sell and put advertisements on school busses.
Now he’s trying for a second time to tap state liquor sales as a way to fund schools. This time around, Bird’s bill would take 10 percent from liquor sales and earmark it for public education to help pay teachers’ salaries.
http://goo.gl/w92xb (KSL)

http://goo.gl/QG9u7 (KCPW)

Legacy Prep students get to perform for Broadway theatergoers Strutting their stuff » Students sang in the lobby of the Gershwin Theatre before seeing the play “Wicked.”

North Salt Lake • It was lights, cameras, action for eight high school students from Legacy Preparatory Academy. The students traveled to the Broadway stage in New York City as part of the three day Broadway Next Program.
The drama students were part of a select group given the opportunity to attend workshops with choreographers, casting directors, producers and agents in an effort to improve their skills and give them increased insight into Broadway acting.
The students performed in the Gershwin Theatre lobby for patrons attending the Broadway play Wicked where two Legacy Preparatory Academy students, Abby Watts and Morgan Hyndman, performed solos.
http://goo.gl/NQqpe (SLT)

Theater teacher honored with UHSAA distinguished service award Long wants students to become expressive and responsible artists.

When Josh Long was named Hillcrest High’s 2011-12 teacher of the year, his school surprised him with a banner. The only problem was they had gotten the wrong banner intended for a teacher at another school.
“There was another guy’s name,” Long said. “I was like, ‘What does that mean?’ ”
In December, when Long found out he had received the Utah High School Activities Association’s 2012 Distinguished Service Award for theater teacher of the year, he had another “funny reaction.”
http://goo.gl/e3lWN (SLT)

Students get hands-on experience at BioInnovations Gateway Real-world experience » The nonprofit helps startup companies research cancer and make medical equipment, among other ventures.

South Salt Lake • Many scientific ideas that revolutionize life as we know it began as small, almost singular, creative endeavors doggedly pursued with little cash and fraught with the risk of failure.
When they succeed, these inventions are the brain-children of their inventors, but are often the result of behind-the-scenes support.
In short, this is what BioInnovations Gateway, a small nonprofit located at the Granite Education Center, does. Perhaps it is no small irony that its office — and the tiny life science companies it incubates —reside in the former labor and delivery rooms of the renovated hospital.
Today, its director, Kevin Jessing, will ask the Governor’s Office of Economic Development Board for more funds because the largest portion of BiG’s funding, a Utah Science and Technology Research or USTAR grant, will end on June 30. Without additional funding, BiG will survive for one more year as its startup companies gradually pack up and it undertakes a host of creative, and difficult, measures to stave off “a very slow and painful death,” in Jessing’s words.
http://goo.gl/puar7 (SLT)

Salt Lake area school districts using social media to interact with students, parents Instant communication » Granite District uses Twitter to give updates on safety, schedules, events.

The Salt Lake City School District, under the handle @slcschools, recently reached 1,000 followers on Twitter. Its Facebook page is covered with accolades for teachers in the district, recaps of holiday service projects and a picture of Santa Claus next to a statue of a ram at Highland High.
Social media, a growing force around the world, is growing in schools around the valley as well. It not only links parents and students to important stories and happenings inside the districts, but also will be an important component to keeping children safe in the future.
Granite was the first district in Utah to embrace social media. Under the guidance of communications director Ben Horsley, Granite’s twitter feed, @GraniteSchools, has grown to more than 3,400 followers. Horsley started the feed in 2009, initially to communicate with the media, but has seen rapid expansion among Gen-X parents.
http://goo.gl/76q8r (SLT)

Lehi and Westlake PTA councils honor Reflections winners

Principals, parents and PTA officers honored creative students and admired their colorful artwork at council PTA awards ceremonies held in December.
http://goo.gl/wSGqZ (PDH)

Davis High students find way to profit from soda ban

KAYSVILLE – A ban on lunchtime sodas at Davis High school has turned into a business opportunity for some students.
Three juniors, Cameron Bettolo, Justin Olsen and Zack Longson, have set up a soda store to help other students get their fix during lunch.
Bettolo said Olsen originally came up with the idea that has now turned into a booming business.
http://goo.gl/S3jkj (KSL)

Entitled students: Too much self-esteem, disconnect between high opinions and actual ability

U.S. college freshmen have been rating themselves in comparison to their peers via the American Freshman Survey since 1966, and they have never looked better — in their own eyes, that is. About nine million young people have taken the survey since it began. The results over time reveal a growing disconnect between students’ high opinions of themselves and their actual ability, said a story in the Daily Mail, an English newspaper.
“While students are much more likely to call themselves gifted in writing abilities, objective test scores actually show that their writing abilities are far less than those of their 1960s counterparts,” the Daily Mail said. The survey also reveals a sharp rise in the number of students who say they have a drive to succeed. Meanwhile, the time spent studying has declined. “A little more than a third of students say they study for six or more hours a week, compared to almost half of all students claiming the same in the late 1980s,” the Daily Mail said.
http://goo.gl/OzqLc (DN)

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OPINION & COMMENTARY
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Should teachers pack heat?
Salt Lake Tribune commentary by columnist Tom Wharton

I am the son of a teacher-turned-principal. My late wife was an elementary-school teacher. My sister currently teaches. I’ve been in dozens of Utah schools over the years as a parent and a journalist. That doesn’t make me an education expert, but I’ve spent much of my life talking to teachers and principals.
I am also familiar with guns. My dad let me fire his shotgun and deer hunting rifles when I was very young. I passed hunter safety. I’ve hunted deer, waterfowl and upland game birds. In 21 years in the military, I qualified to fire and carry an M-16 and then a .45 caliber pistol. I still enjoy target practice and trap, skeet and sporting clays shooting. There are many who know more than I, but I have a working knowledge of firearms.
With that background and after spending hours watching news reports and reading about the recent shootings in a Newtown, Conn., elementary school, I remain as confused as ever as to what exactly society can do to stop these horrific mass killings. We seek instant answers to solve complex problems that defy easy solutions.
Thus, I read with interest the story about the Utah Shooting Sports Council recently offering classes at West Valley City’s Maverik Center to teachers that included concealed carry and mass violent response training. I get that we want to do everything possible to protect our kids. But I’m not certain that training educators to carry guns into school is the answer.
http://goo.gl/sKcRm

Jordan District is all shook up
Salt Lake Tribune commentary by columnist Tom Wharton

“We want our drama to be a great experience not just for our students but the theatergoers. We don’t want to offend anyone.”
That was the explanation that Sandy Riesgraf, a spokeswoman for Jordan School District, gave when asked why Herriman High School’s production of the musical “All Shook Up” was canceled because one school patron had filed a complaint.
The play based on Elvis Presley’s music and Shakespeare’s “Twelfth Night” — which will now be performed with the censorship of a song and some edits — was considered too racy for the tender ears and eyes of high-school students.
Goodness. We can’t have that. Not in Utah.
What’s next? A production of “Mary Poppins,” where a nanny uses magic to turn two children against their parents, including the mother who is, horror of horrors, out promoting women’s liberation, while the father is an evil banker?
http://goo.gl/f5OKR

Year-round school for the win
(Provo) Daily Herald letter from Natalie Tobler

Is year-round school a realistic idea to implement in all schools? Many students groan at the idea of year-round school, but do they really know what it is? Year-round school is a couple weeks at and a week off of school through the entire year. There’s still a summer break; it’s just not as long as school that isn’t year-round. Year-round school has more benefits. Students have more free time throughout the year so they don’t get burnt out and stop caring about school. The more time students have to recuperate from all they’ve learned and the stresses from school, the better they will do. Students have the same amount of school, it’s just spread thinner. Students would have more time to be their own person and do homework. Students would be able to concentrate on school more and would do better.
http://goo.gl/49d5m

Taking on tough jobs?
Deseret News letter from Brock England

I had to laugh at Gov. Gary Herbert’s inaugural address about taking on tough challenges and not postponing difficult decisions. Here are a few of the tough challenges this governor has not taken on:
Asking Utah parents to step up and pay the price for their children’s education.
Improving the solidly mediocre performance of Utah schools.
http://goo.gl/hbmA0

What English classes should look like in Common Core era Washington Post commentary by Carol Jago, a past president of the National Council of Teachers of English

The claim that the Common Core State Standards have abolished the teaching of literature makes for a great headline. Who wouldn’t get hot and bothered over the idea that high school students will no longer be reading “Romeo and Juliet,” “The Crucible,” and “Invisible Man?” I would be up in arms, too. Fortunately, nothing in the standards supports this claim.
What seems to be causing confusion are the comparative recommended percentages for informational and literary text cited in the Common Core’s introduction.
http://goo.gl/L0tk4

Sample Common-Core Test Items Inspire Worry, Hope Education Week commentary by columnist Liana Heitin

While teachers are getting to know and become more comfortable with the Common Core State Standards, many still feel the presence of a dark, amorphous cloud hanging over them: the assessments.
At the What Works in Urban Schools conference last weekend (sponsored by KIPP: NYC, TNTP, Google, and Scholastic, among others), representatives from the New York City Department of Education led educators through a comparison of the old and new assessments, answering questions about what the differences mean for teachers. Surprisingly, and unlike the other common-core sessions at the conference, this presentation had a small turnout—only about 30 of the more than 1,000 conference attendees. But the group was quite vocal, firing off questions from the get-go that indicated a mix of optimism and concern.
http://goo.gl/dQAAJ

A ’21st Century’ Education Is SO Last Century Huffington Post commentary by Lydia Dobyns, president, New Tech Network

It’s not rational, but I’ll admit that whenever I hear “21st century classroom” or “21st century skills” — I tense up. Why? Because we are starting the 13th year of this “future” century. It’s empty phraseology designed to sound like we are preparing for the future when we are already living in that future; and no one believes that what passes for a typical classroom today will be the classroom experience even 10 years from now, let alone for the next 87 years. We can’t know what the classroom will look or feel like. We do know, however, that most school districts are organized to deliver education that inhibits rather than encourages innovation. That needs to change.
http://goo.gl/R6lFR

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NATIONAL NEWS
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Schools Get Taste of Own Medicine
States Assign A to F Grades Based on Test Results, Other Factors; Some Parents, Administrators Are Shocked by Poor Scores Wall Street Journal

Schools long have graded students. Now they are being graded themselves, as a growing number of states assign them A-to-F scores to evaluate their performance.
The results can be surprising. Eliot Elementary School in Tulsa, Okla., has been well-regarded by parents for years, in part for its high scores on state achievement exams. The school draws young families moving into the historic Brookside neighborhood that surrounds it.
So parents and administrators were stunned when a new state report card last autumn gave Eliot a “C” on an A-to-F scale. Stephanie Coates, a mother of two Eliot students, called the ranking an “unpleasant surprise” and said she isn’t convinced the state “assessed what’s going on with Eliot very well.”
In the past two years, at least 10 states, from Arizona to North Carolina, began handing out letter grades to schools and, in some cases, districts.
http://goo.gl/qlPs7

Calif. Teachers Fund Moves to Divest from Firearms Associated Press

SACRAMENTO, Calif. — The nation’s largest teacher pension fund took the first step Wednesday toward divesting from companies that make guns and high-capacity ammunition magazines that are illegal in California.
State Treasurer Bill Lockyer made a motion to begin the divestment process after pension fund officials determined that the fund invests in the owner of a company that manufactured one of the weapons used in the Connecticut school shooting. The California State Teachers’ Retirement System’s investment committee unanimously approved the motion.
“CalSTRS’ action targets ammunition clips that turn ordinary guns into killing machines, assault weapons and other firearms that pose extreme dangers to public health and safety,” Lockyer said.
The pension fund has investments in private equity firm Cerberus Capital Management LP, which owns the manufacturer of an assault weapon used at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn. The pension fund also owns shares of Sturm, Ruger & Co. and Smith & Wesson Holding Corp., two publicly traded gun-makers.
The three investments make up a tiny fraction of the pension system’s holdings, about $11.7 million out of the $155 billion fund, according to CalSTRS staff.
http://goo.gl/DAKNi

27% Think Teachers Should Carry Guns
Atlantic Wire

In the wake of the Newtown shootings, the NRA has called for armed guards in schools, state legislators from Arizona to Georgia pushed to arm principals, and hundreds of teachers are learning to handle and fire a gun. But a new Public Policy Polling survey shows that just a quarter of Americans support giving teachers guns, with NRA support dropping below 50 percent and support for its armed-guard plan narrow even amongst Republicans.
http://goo.gl/1nima

Arizona Sheriff Launches Patrols Outside Schools Associated Press

PHOENIX — The sheriff for metropolitan Phoenix has launched a plan to have as many as 500 armed volunteers patrol areas just outside schools in an effort to guard against shootings like month’s attack at a Connecticut elementary school that left 26 people dead.
Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio’s office said Wednesday that the patrols were launched earlier this week at 59 schools in unincorporated areas and communities that pay his agency for police services.
Arpaio hopes to have as many as 400 posse volunteers and another 100 volunteers known as reserve deputies take part in the patrols.
http://goo.gl/ORLoV

http://goo.gl/VIcWl (Fox)

Legislation concerns Wyoming Board of Education members Casper (WY) Star-Tribune

CHEYENNE — Members of the Wyoming State Board of Education have concerns about proposed legislation that would make major changes to the board’s role.
House Bill 91 would establish the board as a separate operating agency of state government. It also would move four vacant employee positions and funds from the Wyoming Department of Education to the board and pay board members for their added duties in carrying out the Wyoming Accountability in Education Act.
The bill also would remove the state superintendent of public instruction as a voting member of the board. The superintendent would remain on the board as an ex officio member.
Members of the board expressed concerns about moving the board away from its traditional and statutorily-assigned role of making policy to taking on an administrative role that has been the responsibility of the Department of Education.
http://goo.gl/Uvl54

Highlighting Is a Waste of Time: The Best and Worst Learning Techniques Time

In a world as fast-changing and full of information as our own, every one of us — from schoolchildren to college students to working adults — needs to know how to learn well. Yet evidence suggests that most of us don’t use the learning techniques that science has proved most effective. Worse, research finds that learning strategies we do commonly employ, like rereading and highlighting, are among the least effective.
The scientific literature evaluating these techniques stretches back decades and across thousands of articles. It’s far too extensive and complex for the average parent, teacher or employer to sift through. Fortunately, a team of five leading psychologists have now done the job for us. In a comprehensive report released on Jan. 9 by the Association for Psychological Science, the authors, led by Kent State University professor John Dunlosky, closely examine 10 learning tactics and rate each from high to low utility on the basis of the evidence they’ve amassed. Here is a quick guide to the report’s conclusions:
http://goo.gl/wOMJ2

A copy of the report
http://goo.gl/JTNDV

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CALENDAR
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USOE Calendar
http://tinyurl.com/5x9oh9

UEN News
http://www.uen.org

January 10:
Utah State Board of Education meeting
8 a.m., 250 E. 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

January 28:
Utah Legislature 2013 General Session
Utah State Capitol
http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Cal.asp

February 13-14:
Utah State Charter School Board meeting
9 a.m., 250 E. 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://goo.gl/Mu36l

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