Utah Core and Student/Teacher Data Resolutions

The Utah State Board of Education has approved two resolutions relating to the core standards and student and teacher data security and sharing.

Resolution No. 2013-02 states the board’s officialUtah State Board of Education Seal position on the Utah standards for mathematics and English language arts. The resolution calls on the Utah governor and members of the Utah State Legislature to collaborate with the board in supporting teachers, parents and students during the transition to the news Utah Core Standards.

Resolution No. 2013-3 establishes the board’s official position regarding the security and sharing of confidential student and teacher data in the state. It asks members of the Utah Legislature to pass and/or revise “such laws as are necessary to strongly secure and protect the sensitive personal data of students and teachers.”

You can read the two resolutions in their entirety below.

 

UTAH STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION

RESOLUTION NO. 2013-02

A RESOLUTION ESTABLISHING THE OFFICIAL POSITION OF THE UTAH STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION REGARDING THE ESTABLISHMENT OF MINIMUM MATHEMATICS AND ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS STANDARDS FOR THE INSTRUCTION OF STUDENTS IN K-12 PUBLIC EDUCATION IN THE STATE OF UTAH.

WHEREAS, the Utah State Board of Education has the legal obligation to establish minimum standards of competency for students enrolled in public schools in the state of Utah, and has done so for decades, and has consistently reviewed, revised, and adopted updated standards since that time; and

WHEREAS, the Utah Core Standards in mathematics and English/language arts were substandard and insufficient in academic rigor to prepare students for college readiness; and

WHEREAS, the Governor of the State of Utah and the Utah State Superintendent of Public Instruction, as members of their respective associations and in collaboration with other states, participated in the development and recommendation of a common set of state standards for mathematics and English/language arts called the Common Core State Standards (CCSS); and

WHEREAS, the Utah State Board of Education engaged in public discussions, meetings, and information gathering activities regarding the Common Core State Standards throughout the state over a period of approximately 14 months and additionally, discussed the proposed standards regularly in publicly noticed and broadcasted Board meetings; and

WHEREAS, the Utah State Board of Education received significant input from the public regarding the quality of the proposed Common Core State Standards; and

WHEREAS, the individual members of the Utah State Board of Education studied the proposed Common Core State Standards according to their fiduciary duty of care, and in their capacities as duly elected representatives of the people; and

WHEREAS, the members of the Utah State Board of Education, acting in their constitutionally defined official capacities, voted unanimously on August 6, 2010 to adopt the Common Core State Standards as the Utah Core Standards for mathematics and English/language arts; and

WHEREAS, the Utah Office of Legislative Research and General Counsel has determined Utah’s adoption of the Common Core State Standards is not a condition of the receipt of money accepted by the state through a federal program; and 2

therefore, does not create an obligation or binding relationship between the state and the federal government or any other entity; and

WHEREAS, the Utah Office of Legislative Research and General Counsel has verified Utah’s adoption of the Common Core State Standards does not require Utah or its school districts and charter schools to share data or report student information to the federal government or any other entity;

NOW THEREFORE BE IT KNOWN, that the Utah State Board of Education supports rigorous, statewide educational standards in all academic areas, and, desiring all students to graduate from the public education system prepared for college or a career, the Board reaffirms its support of the Utah Core Standards in mathematics and English/language arts as revised in August 2010.

BE IT AFFIRMED, that the Utah State Board of Education has complete purview over and control of the Utah Core Standards; that the standards can be changed, augmented, or revised as appropriate for Utah students; and that local educational agencies will continue to control the textbooks, educational materials and instructional methods used by teachers to teach at or above the level of rigor required by the Utah Core Standards.

BE IT RESOLVED, that the Utah State Board of Education calls upon the Governor of the State of Utah and the members of the Utah Senate and the Utah House of Representatives: 1) to support the goal of career and college ready outcomes for Utah students; 2) to resist the demands calling to “remove Utah from the Common Core,” based on erroneous information; and 3) to collaborate with the State Board of Education in supporting teachers, parents and students during the transition to these new Utah Core Standards.

PASSED and APPROVED this 2nd  day of May, 2013.

Utah State Board of Education

____________________________________

Debra G. Roberts, Chair

ATTEST:

__________________________

Lorraine Austin

Board Secretary

 

UTAH STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION

RESOLUTION NO. 2013-03

A RESOLUTION ESTABLISHING THE OFFICIAL POSITION OF THE UTAH STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION REGARDING THE SECURITY AND SHARING OF CONFIDENTIAL STUDENT AND TEACHER DATA IN THE STATE OF UTAH.

WHEREAS, the Utah State Board of Education has the constitutional obligation of general control and supervision of public education in the state of Utah; and

WHEREAS, the Utah State Board of Education is required by law to oversee the licensing of teachers in K-12 public education; and

WHEREAS, the enrollment of students and the licensure of teachers in public schools both require the acquisition and maintenance of sensitive, personal information; and

WHEREAS, the Federal Education Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) prohibits the inappropriate sharing or disclosure of private student data; and

WHEREAS, the Utah State Board of Education rules and Utah State Office of Education policies currently protect the security of individual student data and do not allow for the release of identifiable student data; and

WHEREAS, recent changes to federal administrative rules and Utah laws have caused confusion and significant concern among Utah citizens about the security and propriety of sharing student and teacher data; and

WHEREAS, new technologies are being developed with the goal of enhancing teaching through educational data mining and learning analytics, and the use of these technologies is being discussed by members of the Utah State Legislature; and

WHEREAS, the Utah State Board of Education has significant concerns regarding the requirements of the law regarding student and teacher data, including new Utah laws that may compromise this data; and

WHEREAS, the Utah State Board of Education strongly supports public policies requiring extreme caution and a high level of security with student and teacher data;

NOW THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED, that the Utah State Board of Education requests the support of the citizens of Utah to insist on proper care and vigilance in the effort to secure and protect the sensitive personal data of students and teachers

in Utah’s K-12 public education system, especially in seeking the resources and legislation necessary to strongly secure and protect the aforementioned data; and

RESOLVED, that the Utah State Board of Education calls upon the members of the Utah legislature to pass and/or revise such laws as are necessary to strongly secure and protect the sensitive personal data of students and teachers and to work jointly with the Utah State Board of Education to appropriately define the delicate balance of that privacy with the proper transparency and availability of aggregated, non-identifiable data necessary to provide accountability and oversight of Utah’s K-12 public education system.

PASSED and APPROVED this 2nd day of May, 2013.

Utah State Board of Education

____________________________________

Debra G. Roberts, Chair

ATTEST:

__________________________

Lorraine Austin

Board Secretary

 

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5 comments to Utah Core and Student/Teacher Data Resolutions

  • This is the problem with common Core. My students teachers are completely at a loss. There is no book therefore no homework, She feels lost, the teacher is lost. My understanding is that if she fails there is NOOOOOOOOOO remidiation for her. The Principle is lost. How is it good if they are all lost. I guess when my student takes the ACT that she will score well right. I am very concerned about the implementaion of this Common Core. Then of course if being Common is the goal then maybe we are doing great.

  • Phil Dean

    What is the state of Utah thinking? I don’t want Common Core for my children! Anytime the state or federal government gets involved with anything they mess it up! The state should not have any say as to my children and what they learn my kids are not common or just numbers they are human beings that have a mind and can think! I don’t need the state telling me that oh or kid is better at math or science and so we(the state) need to push them into becoming a doctor or a scientist or something that maybe my kid really has no interest in becoming. Maybe my kid is good at math but maybe his real dream is to become a lawyer or something else. I don’t need the state telling me how to raise my kid or kids. Personally I think that the state board of education has their heads so far up someone you know what they forget that parents are the ones that can help their kids better then the board can! Don’t take my rights away when it comes to helping my kids I know them a heck of a lot better then the state can and ever will!

  • Heidi Parker

    Just because 46 states have adopted common core does not mean it is a proven system. One has only to read the publication in the American Association of School Administrators (ASAA) titled “Common Core State Standards: An Example of Data-less Decision Making” written by Christopher H. Tienken, EdD. It is clear that these standards are not based on valid science or data, but instead on data created by the very groups pushing the common core standards. I strongly recommend that parents and educators look more closely at this information before jumping on board.

  • Heidi Parker

    Here is the publication that I referred to in the previous comment:
    http://www.aasa.org/uploadedfiles/publications/newsletters/jsp_winter2011.final.pdf

  • Matt McCarty

    Everyone, please keep in mind that Common Core Standards are not federally mandated standards. They were developed by a private entity with input from state education leaders. I’m a little surprised to hear people say on one hand that they don’t want federally mandated education standards and support outsourcing education-related support activities. Then, in short order, the same people criticize Common Core Standards because the state doesn’t directly control them as they were developed by a private entity. Am I the only one picking up on the irony?
    Personally, I don’t care for the manner of implementation of the Common Core Standards. My biggest concern is that my 7th-grade daughter brings home math assignments, asks me for help, has no textbook, and I can’t discern from the homework sheet what the goal of the lesson is. I can do math. I can teach my daughter to do math, but what is the best way for me to teach her math to support the lesson goal???? I just don’t know. I feel for parents who are mathphobes. It must be completely overwhelming.

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