Education News Roundup: June 13, 2013

for June 13, 2013

Education 6 by wrightbrosfan/CC/flickr

Today’s Top Picks:

Will Utah make its 66 by 2020 goal?
http://goo.gl/yJQ6s (SLT)
and http://goo.gl/dqLDb (OSE)
and http://goo.gl/pZT3N (PDH)
and http://goo.gl/13Rxa (SGS)
and http://goo.gl/J1vSy (KUTV)
and http://goo.gl/1ja7C (NYT)
or a copy of the report
http://goo.gl/fwPX1 (Lumina Foundation)

Fordham issues a science standards grade. Utah is in the top third of the class.
http://goo.gl/m68i0 (SLT)
and http://goo.gl/zP0VA (Ed Week)
or a copy of the report
http://goo.gl/NgzX1 (Fordham)
or just the Utah report
http://goo.gl/UKTKh (Fordham)

Utah school classrooms look very different demographically today than they did just a few years ago.
http://goo.gl/NNcSj (SLT)
and http://goo.gl/egtlK (KSL)
and http://goo.gl/zZl3U (AP)
or a copy of the report
http://goo.gl/uM0s5 (Census)

Know anyone interested in joining the Utah State School Board?
http://goo.gl/x7RLI (DN)
or http://goo.gl/1m0i3 (USOE)

Goldman Sachs putting money into Salt Lake early education.
http://goo.gl/hLPLM (NYT)
and http://goo.gl/AOB2H (Rock Hill [SC] Herald)

Senate passes Sen. Harkin’s bill on replacing NCLB.
http://goo.gl/Qw0oW (WaPo)
and http://goo.gl/itjwC (Ed Week)

 

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TODAY’S HEADLINES

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UTAH

Report: Utah behind on 2020 college graduate goal
Report » Having 66% of college grads by 2020 unlikely at the current rate.

Science in Utah high schools missing more than one link
Strong standards for state’s youngsters weaken as students approach college.

Utah minority population gaining on whites
Census » Rate of increase of minority population twice the white growth rate.

Gov. Herbert seeking nominations for State School Board seat

Goldman Sachs to Finance Early Education Program

High attendance at Ogden School Board meeting Wednesday night

New school buildings set to open in Granite School District

USU’s Engineering State for high schoolers becoming very popular throughout Utah

Clearfield, Syracuse high schools’ hope squads to watch for suicide trouble

Sir yessir! Educators get taste of boot camp at Marine workshop

My mother was named teacher of the year: Her job is to get students college-ready

The new superhero: School Dad

Record number of Utah inmates graduate high school

Two Students At South Jordan Elementary Diagnosed With Whooping Cough

Utah high school seniors receive Horatio Alger John Moran Scholarship

Skyline student wins Tribune scholarship
Media » $1,000 award helps students pursue journalism education.

Canyons School District plans surplus sale at old Butler Middle School

Provo High football luau

Believers, nonbelievers vent over religious expressions during graduation

 

OPINION & COMMENTARY

Perfection is killing the American experiment

3 trends connect NSA snooping and Common Core testing

Common Core an assault on liberties

Ogden district’s pools used by many in community

Why two reform movements — choice and accountability — have fallen short

School discipline 101
Why suspensions are vital

 

NATION

Senate committee approves bill updating federal education law

States Seek Flexibility During Common-Test Transition

Diploma Requirements ‘Out of Sync’ With Common Core, Report Says

Raising the bar
A battle over school standards

Panel Backs Introduction of Digital Learning in US

Education Secretary Arne Duncan works to sell Obama administration’s preschool initiative

 

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UTAH NEWS

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Report: Utah behind on 2020 college graduate goal
Report » Having 66% of college grads by 2020 unlikely at the current rate.

Utah must significantly ramp up the number of people earning college degrees and certificates to meet its goal of increasing those numbers to 66 percent by the year 2020, according to a new report.

If progress continues at the current rate, the state will increase the number of degree-holders by just over 1 percent a year, the nonprofit Lumina Foundation projected.

“Clearly, Utah has a long way to go,” the report found. The study indicated that minorities in Utah are falling behind their national counterparts and a relatively high number of Utahns start college but don’t finish.

“Encouraging and helping these adults to complete degrees would go a long way toward helping Utah reach the … goal,” the report said.
http://goo.gl/yJQ6s (SLT)

http://goo.gl/dqLDb (OSE)

http://goo.gl/pZT3N (PDH)

http://goo.gl/13Rxa (SGS)

http://goo.gl/J1vSy (KUTV)

http://goo.gl/1ja7C (NYT)

A copy of the report

http://goo.gl/fwPX1 (Lumina Foundation)

 

Science in Utah high schools missing more than one link
Strong standards for state’s youngsters weaken as students approach college.

As Utah begins a $10 million push to boost science, math, engineering and technology (STEM) education, a national education foundation found the state’s science standards have critical gaps, especially in high school.

High school physics and chemistry standards are missing key topics, including Kepler’s laws of planetary motion, modern physics such as lasers and nuclear power, organic chemistry and writing chemical equations, the analysis said.

But the standards include an “excellent” treatment of evolution and are strong for kindergarten through second grade, earning the state an overall “B” from the Thomas B. Fordham Institute. It ranked Utah 13th nationally.
http://goo.gl/m68i0 (SLT)

http://goo.gl/zP0VA (Ed Week)

A copy of the report
http://goo.gl/NgzX1 (Fordham)

Just the Utah report
http://goo.gl/UKTKh (Fordham)

 

Utah minority population gaining on whites
Census » Rate of increase of minority population twice the white growth rate.

New U.S. Census Bureau estimates released Thursday show that population growth among Utah minorities zoomed twice as fast as for whites between 2011 and 2012 — up 2.7 percent compared with 1.2 percent.

Minorities accounted for a third of the 40,940 total new residents added to Utah in 2012.

If current trends continue, minorities could outnumber whites in Utah perhaps around 2050 — with that transition happening as early as 2035 in the nation as a whole and perhaps in places such as Salt Lake City, West Valley City, Ogden and Midvale, says Pam Perlich, senior research economist at the University of Utah.

“The cohort of kids coming up will see a very different Utah. It’s unfolding fairly rapidly in just this generation,” she said. “It’s a very different world they are growing up in than the old very homogenous one.”
http://goo.gl/NNcSj (SLT)

http://goo.gl/egtlK (KSL)

http://goo.gl/zZl3U (AP)

A copy of the report
http://goo.gl/uM0s5 (Census)

 

Gov. Herbert seeking nominations for State School Board seat

SALT LAKE CITY — Gov. Gary Herbert is seeking nominations to fill an open seat on the State Board of Education.

Interested individuals are encouraged to email a résumé to cbradford@utah.gov with “Nomination to District 6” in the subject line by June 21. The District 6 seat, which represents portions of West Jordan, Taylorsville, Kearns and West Valley City, was recently vacated by board member Joel Coleman, who was appointed last week as the new superintendent of the Utah Schools For the Deaf and Blind.
http://goo.gl/x7RLI (DN)

or http://goo.gl/1m0i3 (USOE)

 

Goldman Sachs to Finance Early Education Program

Goldman Sachs is making its second foray into an experimental method of financing social services, lending up to $4.6 million for a childhood education program in Salt Lake City.

This “social impact bond,” in which Goldman stands to make money if the program is successful but will lose its investment if it fails, will support a preschool program intended to reduce the need for special education and remedial services. The upshot, in theory, is that taxpayers will not have to bear the upfront cost of the program.

Goldman is being joined in this effort by the Chicago investor J.B. Pritzker, who is providing a subordinate loan of up to $2.4 million, bringing the total financing to $7 million. The loans will be announced at an event in Chicago on Thursday.
http://goo.gl/hLPLM (NYT)

http://goo.gl/AOB2H (Rock Hill [SC] Herald)

 

High attendance at Ogden School Board meeting Wednesday night

OGDEN — Concerned residents who attended the Ogden School District board meeting Wednesday said they were pleased by the hiring of seven library media specialists but disappointed it could not be more.

“It was a good compromise,” board member Steven Marker said after the meeting, at which the district’s 2013-14 budget was approved.

“I was not comfortable with the way things happened last month. It was good to hear people’s concerns, and it was good that we could act on that and find funding for a compromise.”
http://goo.gl/oYNeq (OSE)

 

New school buildings set to open in Granite School District

SOUTH SALT LAKE — Three new school buildings will open their doors in the Granite School District this fall.

Granger High School, Hartvigsen School and Neil Armstrong Academy will be ready to go as part of a 2009 voter-approved bond project.
http://goo.gl/Rp7ip (DN)

 

USU’s Engineering State for high schoolers becoming very popular throughout Utah

High school students from across Utah have converged on the Utah State University campus to participate in Engineering State, a week-long engineering experience.

Since Monday, students have participated in activities focused on the different disciplines of engineering, and college scholarships will be awarded at the end of the week.

Kathy Phippens, Engineering State director, said the event gives students a taste of mechanical, electrical, biological and computer science engineering.
http://goo.gl/kEPHU (LHJ)

 

Clearfield, Syracuse high schools’ hope squads to watch for suicide trouble

In the last couple of years, Clearfield High School has seen three of its students commit suicide. Just a few miles west, Syracuse High School has experienced similar tragedies with two of its students in the last year. On top of that, Syracuse city has seen a marked increase of suicides in the community.

All three entities knew it was time to take action. Syracuse city worked with its police department and spearheaded a program with the help of the Northern Utah Suicide Prevention Coalition that helps implement hope squads in area high schools.

The program is patterned after a similar one in Provo School District that has resulted in no student suicides since the program started seven years ago.

Davis School District will pilot the program in two high schools, Syracuse and Clearfield, this upcoming school year.
http://goo.gl/Ag4up (OSE)

 

Sir yessir! Educators get taste of boot camp at Marine workshop

SAN DIEGO — “Get off my bus right now!”

With eyes wide open, Payson High School teacher Krystal Baker and Pleasant Grove High School athletic trainer Kristin Pond, along with 38 other educators from various western states, scrambled past the screaming drill instructor and off the vehicle. This was their welcome to Marine Corps Recruit Depot San Diego — the same welcome that new recruits arriving for basic training would receive.

The friendly recruiters that had welcomed the educators to San Diego for the five-day Marine Corps Western Recruiting Region Educators Workshop had been replaced by campaign cover-wearing drill instructors. As the educators hustled off the bus and onto the famous yellow footprints, which signify the beginning of a life-changing experience, a number of DIs swarmed about them barking orders.
http://goo.gl/zaUXz (PDH)

 

My mother was named teacher of the year: Her job is to get students college-ready

My mother, Rebecca Worthen Chandler, was named Teacher of the Year at a charter school in North Carolina where she teaches English, bringing an unexpectedly buoyant end to what has been one of the toughest years of her 36-year career.

The award “floored” her, she said, because by the last day of school, all she could think about was what she wished she had accomplished. She didn’t give personal feedback on all her students’ papers. She wasn’t able to set up individual writing conferences for everyone. She never made it to the games.

“You know in ‘Alice in Wonderland,’ where the Queen says she thinks about six impossible things before breakfast?” she said. “I feel like teachers do six impossible things and probably don’t have breakfast.”

For most of her career, she taught middle-school English at a private girls school in Shaker Heights, Ohio, where class sizes were small and college ambition was assumed, and where she was able to make a first-rate education affordable for my sisters and me (and to be our eighth-grade English teacher.)

Like many women in her generation, she graduated with a Masters in Education from Brigham Young University at a time when professors advised that it was wise to “have something to fall back on in case, heaven forbid, you ever need to support yourself.”

She went on to raise eight children while working full time.

Her first job was in West Jordan, Utah, where she taught 10th-grade English to mostly farmers’ kids. By November, she recalled, students started coming to her with green sheets of paper asking her to release them from school forever. Dropping out wasn’t considered a tragedy then. Many teens went to work or started families at that age.
http://goo.gl/9kg1z (WaPo)

 

The new superhero: School Dad

When Brent Anderton shows up at Salt Lake City’s Morningside Elementary School, he gets noticed. “Hi, Cambri’s dad!,” “Hi, Caleb’s dad!,” the kids chirp, as Anderton high-fives his way down the school’s hallways.

Anderton, 44,volunteers often at Morningside, a tidy school in Salt Lake City’s Millcreek neighborhood where 10-year-old Cambri is a 4th grader, and where son Caleb attended before graduating to Wasatch Jr. High. All of Morningside’s teachers and staff are women, so Anderton’s masculine presence is a novelty around the school. He’s going to be the school’s PTA co-president next year (with another dad, Kevin Hobbs), and that makes him even more of an anomaly. Men made up just 10 percent of national PTA membership, according to 2009 data. (PTA’s original name was “National Congress of Mothers.”)
http://goo.gl/Hgyoz (DN)

 

Record number of Utah inmates graduate high school

A record-high number of state inmates — 360 men and women — received high school diplomas Wednesday in a graduation ceremony at the Utah State Prison in Draper.

Another 140 inmates at the Central Utah Correctional Facility in Gunnison will graduate from high school programs later this month. The Utah Department of Corrections coordinates with the Canyons School District in Draper and South Sanpete School District in Gunnison to provide high school equivalency programs.
http://goo.gl/Ei7Wy (SLT)

http://goo.gl/n8beY (OSE)

http://goo.gl/1gnHE (KUTV)

http://goo.gl/3Us9B (KSTU)

http://goo.gl/pcoLB (MUR)

 

Two Students At South Jordan Elementary Diagnosed With Whooping Cough

On Wednesday the principal of South Jordan Elementary School sent a message to parents letting them know that two sibling students at South Jordan Elementary were diagnosed with whooping cough.

Although the students have been removed from school until they are better, pertussis (whooping cough) is very contagious, so other children in the school may have been exposed.
http://goo.gl/yIglK (KUTV)

 

Utah high school seniors receive Horatio Alger John Moran Scholarship

WASHINGTON — The Horatio Alger Association of Distinguished Americans has announced the winners of the Horatio Alger John Moran Utah Scholarship.

Horatio Alger scholarship recipients are chosen based on their demonstrated commitment to education, dedication to community service, and strength of character in overcoming personal obstacles to achieve academic excellence, according to a press release.

The Utah winners are: Victoria Au, Itineris Early College High School; Emily Kwok, Timpanogos High School; Erin A. O’Connor, West Jordan High School; Zachery L. Patrick, Bonneville High School; Ashlyn D. Perry, Timpanogos High School; Kayla A. Quinn, Park City High School; Danielle M. Williams, Stansbury High School.
http://goo.gl/0utgZ (DN)

 

Skyline student wins Tribune scholarship
Media » $1,000 award helps students pursue journalism education.

Students such as Park City High School’s Catherine Blakemore are the reason The Salt Lake Tribune this month awarded 15 college scholarships to graduating high-school seniors interested in pursuing media careers.

“Passions cannot be ignored or stifled,” Blakemore said in her scholarship application. “I choose to pursue my highest passion, which is the field of journalism … a way of life and a type of mind-set.

“It’s the power of investigation in everything you do and the extensive passion for knowledge, [combined] with the need to always ask questions and to never stop.”

Journalism’s future depends on promising young people such as Blakemore, who along with other recipients receives $1,000 for college expenses.
http://goo.gl/nT2sV (SLT)

 

Canyons School District plans surplus sale at old Butler Middle School

COTTONWOOD HEIGHTS — The Canyons School District will hold a surplus sale at the old Butler Middle School, 7530 S. 2700 South.

The sale will be from 8 a.m. to noon on Saturday, June 15, 2013, at the Cottonwood Heights school.
http://goo.gl/CKZfK (DN)

 

Provo High football luau

Kick off Father’s Day weekend by taking your dad to the Provo High football luau, where you can get him some extra help with work around the house. The PHS football players will be auctioning off their time to the highest bidders to complete yard work, painting, and general help around the house. Besides the labor auction the luau will have Polynesian barbecue and live entertainment provided by the Utah Valley University Polynesian club.
http://goo.gl/9Vw8V (PDH)

 

Believers, nonbelievers vent over religious expressions during graduation

Graduation, religion and free speech combined for the perfect storm at the conclusion of the 2013 high school year.

The most recent flap came out of Texas, where school district officials cut the mic after Joshua High School senior Remington Reimer strayed from his pre-approved text and started talking about his faith and constitutional rights.
http://goo.gl/C7Bfy (DN)

 

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OPINION & COMMENTARY

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Perfection is killing the American experiment
(Provo) Daily Herald commentary by columnist Heidi Toth

Do not let the perfect become the enemy of the good.

I’ve heard this sentiment multiple times of late, related to education, gun laws, health and even in a Thomas Jefferson biography about the American experiment. The argument here is that even if a law, a movement, a program or an idea don’t fix an entire problem, that doesn’t mean we should throw it out and keep looking for perfection.

Education

I wasn’t educated in Utah, I don’t have children in the schools here and I don’t know a whole lot about the Common Core and education other than the thousands of words I have read in the newspaper. But I don’t think anyone can argue that education in Utah needs to get better. Students need be held to higher standards. Education should be hard. Public education should prepare students for college, which should prepare students for the real world. Common Core seems to me to have some real benefits to it because it provides standards. Are they perfect? No. Are they better than what we have? Educators with whom I have spoken say yes.
http://goo.gl/gwKjK

 

3 trends connect NSA snooping and Common Core testing
Deseret News commentary by columnist Matt Sanders

In recent days, yet another problematic revelation has roiled Washington, D.C. This time it goes beyond snooping around journalists looking for a scoop. It involves the National Security Administration collecting phone data on of Verizon customers.

This is a problem. A real problem. The U.S. federal government derives its power through the consent of the governed through a system of duly elected representatives acting as agents for their local populations. Additionally, the Constitution goes to great lengths to curb the tendency of government to overreach its bounds, and therefore set up a system of checks and balances.
http://goo.gl/tMbrk

 

Common Core an assault on liberties
Deseret News op-ed by Christel Swasey, a teacher from Heber City

Utah state delegates officially disapproved Common Core when they passed the anti-common core resolution this year by a 65 percent vote.

Was that not enough for our state school board and governor?

Gov. Gary Herbert continues to promote the Common Core-dependent Prosperity 2020 initiative. And the state school board continues to label teachers and others who long to reclaim local control and who want legitimate, non-experimental education standards, “the misinformed.”

The fact is, we are not misinformed; we know what Common Core is, and we reject it.

The board won’t even respond to requests for specifics about what we’re so misinformed about.
http://goo.gl/SQtE7

 

Ogden district’s pools used by many in community
(Ogden) Standard-Examiner letter from Wendy Sparrow

I would like to offer a rebuttal to the letter of June 11, “Do we want Ogden district pools?”  In it, the letter writer insinuates nobody but Brad Smith will care if the pools close because he won’t be able to use them. I can’t recall personally ever seeing him swimming in either pool; but I can tell you who I have seen: seniors, just like the writer, participating in fitness classes, families, students and other athletes training in competitive swimming, groups of Boy Scouts passing off water requirements, kids taking life-saving swimming lessons, and diverse multitudes of children from all walks of life.

I don’t know most of the people I see there, but I gladly offer up my share of taxes so they can enjoy these amenities. Why? Because I’m part of a community and in choosing to live here in Ogden, I also choose to support even programs I don’t use.
http://goo.gl/IVFVS

 

Why two reform movements — choice and accountability — have fallen short
Washington Post commentary by by Jack Schneider, author of “Excellence For All: How a New Breed of Reformers Is Transforming America’s Public Schools”

Over the past 20 years, two reform movements — choice and accountability — have transformed the face of K-12 education.  With strong support at the state and federal level, as well as among the American public, each has become a standard feature of the modern policy landscape.  As such, parents today frequently choose which schools their children attend, and low-scoring schools are routinely sanctioned for their performance.

Yet while each movement has shown some promise for improving access to good schools, neither has lived up to expectations.  Why?  Critics have a whole host of explanations, some of which are quite compelling, and some of which are burdened by political agendas.  But the simplest answer, which also happens to be true, is that both movements are dependent on good information about school quality.  And, frankly, our information stinks.
http://goo.gl/cRgyV

 

School discipline 101
Why suspensions are vital
New York Post op-ed by EVA MOSKOWITZ, founder and CEO of the Success Academy Charter Schools

Some mayoral candidates are complaining that schools are suspending students too much. I’m not so sure.

My father wound up a professor of mathematics, but as a child he was sent away to reform school for hitting a classmate who called him a “dirty Jew.” Compare this to three elementary-school students at PS 194 who made a classmate perform oral sex. Their punishments: five days suspension for two of them, 10 days for the third because he’d attacked a girl before.

My father’s teacher would’ve been shocked both by this conduct and by how leniently it was punished. Yet some critics say schools are actually too strict.
http://goo.gl/5N4Y2

 

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NATIONAL NEWS

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Senate committee approves bill updating federal education law
Washington Post

On a party line vote, a Senate committee approved a bill Wednesday to update the country’s main federal education law by erasing some of its most punitive aspects.

The Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions voted 12 to 10 on the bill filed by chairman Tom Harkin (D-Iowa), with Democrats defeating nearly every amendment Republicans offered.

The two parties have been at loggerheads over the appropriate role of the federal government in K-12 public education.
http://goo.gl/Qw0oW

http://goo.gl/itjwC (Ed Week)

 

States Seek Flexibility During Common-Test Transition
Education Week

With the debut of common assessments less than two years away, states and districts are worried about the accountability systems that hinge on those tests. A growing chorus of policy groups is urging more flexibility in how states evaluate teachers, label schools, and enforce other high-stakes consequences during what’s likely to be a messy transition.

Position papers from a range of organizations seek to stake out turf on the delicate question of how to postpone or temporarily ease some rules without abandoning accountability, at a time when the new, tougher assessments are projected to send test scores—at least at first—into a nose dive.

Whether those moves are coming too late is an open question.
http://goo.gl/Ztm39

 

Diploma Requirements ‘Out of Sync’ With Common Core, Report Says
Education Week

Most states that adopted the common-core math standards lack high school graduation requirements that ensure all students will get the coursework they need to meet the new expectations, according to a report issued today.

Only 11 common-core states fully meet the definition of math alignment set out in the report by the National School Boards Association and Change the Equation, a Washington-based coalition of business leaders promoting improved STEM education. Those states include North Carolina, Tennessee, Ohio, and Arizona. Another 13 states that adopted the common core are partially aligned, the organizations conclude. In all, 45 states plus the District of Columbia have adopted the math standards.
http://goo.gl/YcZHa

A copy of the report
http://goo.gl/MS6lT (Change the Question)

 

Raising the bar
A battle over school standards
The Economist

CHICAGO | HERE’S a multiple-choice question: if the federal government penalises states where pupils do badly in school, but lets the states themselves set the pass mark, will the states a) make the tests harder; or b) dumb them down?

Historically, the answer has been b). The National Centre for Educational Statistics (NCES), a federal body, looked at how the states’ definitions of “proficiency” at maths and reading compared with its own rigorous one. For grade 4 reading in 2009, not one state held its pupils to as high a standard (see map). Fifteen states labelled a child “proficient” when the NCES would have called her skills “basic”; 35 bestowed that honour on children performing at “below basic” level.

Small wonder parents are crying out for grades that mean something. Helpfully, the National Governors Association and the Council of Chief State School Officers have been pushing for “Common Core” national standards in maths and English. Forty-five states have said they will adopt them. Science standards are being developed by a separate group of 26 states, and were released in April.

The Common Core sets out the essential skills that pupils are expected to learn in every grade. (For example, by the age of eight they should be able to draw a bar graph.) Test results will be interpreted on a single scale, so children in Illinois can be measured against those in Alabama. If faithfully implemented (a big if), the Common Core should make it impossible for states to pretend that pupils are doing well when they are not. It should also make academic records comparable when pupils move from one state to another.

Naturally, this plan has many critics.
http://goo.gl/338OH

 

Panel Backs Introduction of Digital Learning in US
Associated Press

WASHINGTON — A week after President Barack Obama’s call for U.S. schools to be outfitted with high-speed Internet within five years, an independent panel that studied the lack of technology at school says digital learning, including the super-fast Internet connections, can be introduced even sooner.

The LEAD Commission is finalizing a five-point plan to speed the adoption of digital learning in schools by 2016. The Associated Press obtained a copy of the panel’s blueprint on Wednesday; the full plan is expected to be formally released in the coming weeks.

The commission was created in March 2012 to research the state of and figure out how to speech the introduction of technology in U.S. schools. The president of Columbia University and a former U.S. education secretary are among the panel’s four co-chairmen.
http://goo.gl/1ZHW0

 

Education Secretary Arne Duncan works to sell Obama administration’s preschool initiative
Washington Post

Arne Duncan woke at 5:30 a.m. in his Arlington County home, was driven to the airport and folded his 6-foot-5 frame into an aisle seat in coach. The education secretary buckled his seat belt and tilted his head back for a short flight to Atlanta, another stop in his uphill effort to sell the Obama administration’s next big idea: pre-kindergarten for every 4-year-old in the country.

The pitch on this day was to Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal, a Republican inclined toward the notion but dead-set against raising taxes to pay for it.

Duncan strode into an Atlanta preschool classroom, shook hands with Deal and joined the governor’s wife, Sandra, in reading “Roar!” to some wiggly 4-year-olds. Duncan called Deal an “amazing leader” and praised Georgia’s state-funded preschool program. He slipped in a reference to Deal’s mother, a first-grade teacher, and even said he wanted Sandra to join him on the road.

In the second term of the Obama administration, Arne Duncan is traveling to more locations than most other Cabinet members, save the secretary of state. With his plaid suit bag and his dark briefcase, the peripatetic Duncan is promoting an idea he says will improve millions of lives and strengthen the country.
http://goo.gl/Oq4bb

http://goo.gl/WusKc (Hechinger Report)

 

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CALENDAR

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USOE Calendar
http://tinyurl.com/5x9oh9

UEN News
http://www.uen.org

June 18:
Executive Appropriations Committee meeting
1 p.m., 445 State Capitol
http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2013&Com=APPEXE

June 19:
Education Interim Committee meeting
9 a.m., 30 House Building
http://le.utah.gov/Interim/2013/html/00002142.htm

June 26:
Education Task Force meeting
9 a.m., 210 Senate Building
http://le.utah.gov/Interim/2013/html/00002223.htm

July 11:
Utah State Charter School Board meeting
250 E. 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://goo.gl/Mu36l

August 2:
Utah State Board of Education meeting
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspxpr

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