Education News Roundup: Aug. 29, 2013

 

"School Supplies" by Nick Amoscato/CC/flickr

“School Supplies” by Nick Amoscato/CC/flickr

Education News Roundup

Today’s Top Picks:

Noooooooooooooo. Just when you thought it was safe to go back in your in box, ENR returns from vacation. So, what’s up?

Utah will be issuing school grades for the first time on Tuesday.
http://goo.gl/ohYw4x (UP)
and http://goo.gl/GXS7fi (DN)
and http://goo.gl/NO86WR (OSE)
and http://goo.gl/FphSSr (KUTV)
and http://goo.gl/WaOmKl (KSTU)
or learn more about them from USOE’s news conference held earlier this week: http://goo.gl/cTktJw (USOE)
or commentary from Sen. Stephenson: http://goo.gl/3BXfvg (UP)

A SITLA decision on the Book Cliffs is capturing a fair bit of media attention.
http://goo.gl/KF7TKA (SLT)
and http://goo.gl/KbAwSx (SLT)
and http://goo.gl/MRG1gW (DN)
and http://goo.gl/kYm6iB (KUTV)
and http://goo.gl/GKhor0 (KSL)
and http://goo.gl/JX1eRO (KSTU)
and http://goo.gl/Jf9v5B (KCSG)

Will there be a change to the State School Board election process?
http://goo.gl/yeB4Ky (DN)
and http://goo.gl/O8SjTT (PDH)

The Economist looks at Utah’s economy and school funding.
http://goo.gl/KG9NsT (The Economist)

KSL looks at where Utah’s education dollars go, which is mostly to teachers.
http://goo.gl/pPw1mC (KSL)

Sen. Jones proposes eliminating a tax deduction to fund education.
http://goo.gl/cYo3t2 (DN)

Utah’s ACT scores are tops in the nation for states with 100 percent participation.
http://goo.gl/rALI49 (LHJ)
and http://goo.gl/ZiXUgx (SLT)
and http://goo.gl/bv81p1 (DN)
and http://goo.gl/TNzCC1 (Universe)

Nationally, the feds begin to show a path for extending ESEA waivers.
http://goo.gl/2R10pl (AP)
and http://goo.gl/fJOpxG (Ed Week)
or http://goo.gl/Oxjsjx (ED)

Internationally, China considers ending homework and exams.
http://goo.gl/utC2L4 (Xinhua)

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TODAY’S HEADLINES
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UTAH

New School Grading System Comes On Line Next Week

Utah Gov. Herbert asks SITLA to reconsider Book Cliffs lease
Oil and gas exploration » 100,000-acre block of state lands holds some of the state’s finest wildlife.

Lawmakers consider changes to State School Board elections

Utah’s economy: Busy bees
Where taxes are low, jobs are plentiful and schools are starved

Crowded classrooms greet Utah students returning to school

Fewer aides are on buses to help students with special needs

76% of per-pupil spending pays teachers’ salaries, stats show

Utah senator wants money for schools — by eliminating family child tax exemption

Taxpayers Association Wary of Tax Hike Talk

‘It’s enough that it hurts,’ says parent of school activity fees

Suicides in Utah increasing, but solutions are in sight

Lawmakers: Is Salt Lake City School District serving west side students?
West side » Education Task Force members say gifted teachers are needed in lower-performing schools.

Weber County Democrats Demand Answers

End Compulsory Education in Utah?

Utah ACT scores high among states with 100 percent participation

Park City parents upset by assigned reading

Chinese teachers come to Springville for school year

Payson middle schooler a semifinalist in national science fair

Salt Lake School District Grants Two Awards for “Teacher of the Year”

School district boundaries to remain same after Logan, North Logan adjustments

Local high school student working to bring generations together

Former Utah teacher ordered to trial for alleged sex abuse
Courts » Courtney Jarrell is accused of sexually abusing a 17-year-old student.

Police Remind Drivers To Pay Attention To School Zones

DHHS offers reward leading to vandalism arrest
Buildings, car damaged in incident

Logan school district purchases parking lot nearby Ellis Elementary

Campaign kicks off for safe walking, biking to schools

North Sanpete Anti-Bullying Week

Elementary students to win new shoes by stopping bullies

Elementary school students to get special experience with Celebrate America Show

Vae View Elementary students like hot-air balloons

Speaker of House to hold Town Hall meeting in Sanpete

Healthier school lunches not going down well

Parenting, faith and a new school year: How scriptures can help parents

OPINION & COMMENTARY

Back to school
Parents have a key role to play

Education Accountability Principles, or Show. Me. THE MONEY?

Sen. Jones’ bill deserves discussion

SITLA’s pending deal should surprise no one

Utah’s education system gets ‘D’ in financial transparency

Charters can be the answer to higher taxes

10 safety tips for back to school

Back to school means keep it simple

The Feds Need To Let Up, And Give To Utah What Is Utah’s

Divorce discrimination

Equal educational opportunity

Funding for class-size reduction

America’s kids need a better education law

Treating Common-Core Syndrome

Five bad education assumptions the media keeps recycling

The NYT Is Asking the Wrong Question About Rapid Turnover at Charter Schools

Are Charter Schools Successful Because They Make Teachers Work Long Hours?

NATION

States Offered Longer Time to Ignore Education Law

At Charter Schools, Short Careers by Choice

More Than A Number? Educators On What Standardized Testing Means

Advanced Placement classes failing students

Rotten to the Core?
The Common Core standards have some up in arms, but state officials say there’s no cause for concern

Alabama senator calls for removal of Toni Morrison novel aligned with Common Core

CDC Report: US schools show progress in fostering healthy habits
US school environments are getting healthier with better nutritional choices, more opportunities for physical activity, and reduced exposure to tobacco smoke, found a recent report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

A View of What’s Missing From the Classroom

New memoir shines harsh light on U.S. schools
A new memoir by a self-described “bad teacher” shines a harsh light on data-driven school reform, concluding that tyranical principals often have too much power and that kids’ needs go unmet.

No homework or exams for China’s overloaded pupils

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UTAH NEWS
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New School Grading System Comes On Line Next Week

Get ready for some political heat, Utah legislators.
On Sept. 3 the state’s new public school grading system will officially begin, and citizens will be able to look up the grades their local schools receive.
And with that new ranking system will no doubt come anger and disappointment (unless your local grade, middle or high schools all get As).
“Yes, there will be political heat,” says Senate President Wayne Niederhauser, R-Sandy, who sponsored the first school grading bill back in 2011. (There have been several amendments since to the new statute which calls for the first grades to be compiled and made public Sept. 3.)
And that heat is a good thing, adds Niederhauser. “Because we all “own” our schools, and the children in them.”
In other words, the new grades will get the attention of parents, students, teachers and administrators – with the hoped-for rededication to improving each and every school.
http://goo.gl/ohYw4x (UP)

http://goo.gl/GXS7fi (DN)

http://goo.gl/NO86WR (OSE)

http://goo.gl/FphSSr (KUTV)

http://goo.gl/WaOmKl (KSTU)

Utah Gov. Herbert asks SITLA to reconsider Book Cliffs lease
Oil and gas exploration » 100,000-acre block of state lands holds some of the state’s finest wildlife.

Citing ongoing efforts to safeguard the Book Cliffs’ great hunting, Gov. Gary Herbert is urging state land managers to not lease key pieces of the iconic eastern Utah landscape for oil exploration.
A haven for wildlife, particularly trophy elk, unroaded terrain in the area should be traded for federal lands that don’t hold such strong wildlife values, sportsmen’s groups insist. In a meeting with reporters Tuesday, Herbert said he agrees this approach would yield greater returns to the permanent school fund supported by revenues off state lands.
An Aug. 20 decision by the Utah School and Institutional Trust Lands Administration (SITLA) to lease 96,000 acres in the Book Cliffs “is flawed in the process and even more flawed in the potential outcomes,” he said.
The governor asked the independent agency, which administers 3.3 million acres to financially benefit public education, to hold off executing a contract with Anadarko E&P Onshore LLC.
http://goo.gl/KF7TKA (SLT)

http://goo.gl/KbAwSx (SLT)

http://goo.gl/MRG1gW (DN)

http://goo.gl/kYm6iB (KUTV)

http://goo.gl/GKhor0 (KSL)

http://goo.gl/JX1eRO (KSTU)

http://goo.gl/Jf9v5B (KCSG)

Lawmakers consider changes to State School Board elections

SALT LAKE CITY — A discussion by lawmakers Tuesday suggests there’s a consensus that the governing model of Utah public education needs to be changed, but opinions remain divided on what should take its place.
Members of the Education Task Force looked at several potential models for oversight of public and higher education in the state, with particular interest toward the manner in which State School Board members are selected.
“The system we have is really because it’s the only thing we could settle on,” said Sen. Stuart Reid, R-Ogden. “It’s not the best system by any measure.”
Currently, State School Board members are elected through a hybrid process that sees the candidate pool vetted by a recruiting and nomination committee. That committee forwards three candidates for each seat to the governor, who then places two candidates on the ballot.
Gayle Ruzicka, president of the Utah Eagle Forum, spoke of the frustration she feels as a voter being allowed to choose only between the two candidates chosen by the governor.
http://goo.gl/yeB4Ky (DN)

http://goo.gl/O8SjTT (PDH)

Utah’s economy: Busy bees
Where taxes are low, jobs are plentiful and schools are starved

FEW things excite Gary Herbert, the Republican governor of Utah, more than trashing his own line of work. “Every sector is growing here except for one,” he says triumphantly. “You know which? Government!” He is right; private-sector employment in Utah grew by 4.5% in the year to July. Only the public sector shrank.
Unlike other states that have been piling on jobs, such as California, Utah is not merely rebounding; at its January 2010 peak unemployment was still well below the national average (see chart). Today it stands at 4.6%, the fifth-lowest rate in the country. And the diversity of Utah’s recovery, sniffs Mr Herbert, contrasts with the energy-fuelled boom of other low-unemployment states, like North Dakota.

Indeed, Utah and its cities regularly top national rankings of business-friendliness. Officials gush about low taxes, wages and energy costs, light regulations and enterprising spirits. All this, along with some generous tax sweeteners, has seduced the likes of Boeing, Procter & Gamble and eBay into the state. “We really value capitalism,” says Spencer Eccles, head of the governor’s economic development office.
Yet it is a peculiarly cuddly form of capitalism. Income inequality is lower in Utah than any other state, and a recent Harvard/Berkeley study found that economic mobility was higher in Salt Lake City than in any other big American city. “People here aren’t trying to be Donald Trump,” says Stephen Kroes, president of the Utah Foundation, a think-tank. Thanks partly to the Mormon influence, Utahns volunteer more than anyone else.
Being small and homogenous probably helps; but that is changing. Between 2000 and 2010 Utah’s Latino population grew three times quicker than the state overall. They are now 13% of Utahns, and some areas are majority-minority. Some of Utah’s schools are struggling to cope: the high-school graduation rate among minorities is dreadful. Skeletal education budgets do not help; per-pupil spending has been lower than in any other state since 1988, according to the Utah Foundation.
Utah’s sky-high birth rate helps explain that; it must find an extra $75m a year just to keep up with swelling school rolls. But in neighbouring Colorado and Nevada, both swing states with higher Latino concentrations, lawmakers have seriously debated raising taxes to fund schools. In one-party Utah, by contrast, politicians with ambition speak of taxes only when they want to lower them. (Earlier this year a Republican state senator violated that rule and found himself all over the front pages.)
http://goo.gl/KG9NsT  (The Economist)

Crowded classrooms greet Utah students returning to school

HERRIMAN — Sixth-grade teacher Brandon Maulis stood in front of his 30 students Wednesday at Butterfield Canyon Elementary School, reading from “Little Red Riding Hood” and posing who, what, where, when and why questions to the class.
His class had already dropped from 31 to 30 students since the first day of school, but Maulis said the numbers typically grow, not shrink, as the school year progresses.
“This is the largest class I’ve ever had at the beginning of the year,” he said. “I’ve gotten up to 30, but I’ve never started with 30. It’s a lot to start with.”
http://goo.gl/Ms5emH  (DN)

Fewer aides are on buses to help students with special needs

OREM — A loss of federal money for special education means fewer school aides will be on buses transporting special needs students in the Alpine School District.
The lack of aides on buses has one parent concerned that the bus driver, who has to focus on driving, may not be able to attend to students’ needs.
http://goo.gl/rT6zvB  (DN)

http://goo.gl/anraB0  (KSL)

76% of per-pupil spending pays teachers’ salaries, stats show

SALT LAKE CITY — As kids head back to class, it’s worth remembering that half of Utah’s state budget goes to schools. Utah spends less per student than every other state, but still, it’s a lot of money.
According to the newest data, 84 percent of student funding goes to salaries. When KSL reported that a few months ago, viewers asked if that means teachers’ or administrators’ salaries.
“I would say it’s very likely they pay themselves too much,” said Utah resident Ellie Bennett.
Another Utahn, Jamie Larsen, said, “I would assume administrators make the big bucks.”
Eunique Howard added, “I’ve been hearing a lot of complaints about the teachers not getting paid what they should be getting paid.”
Nearly everyone KSL heard from believes too much of Utah’s education money goes to pay administrators.
KSL sat down with the school finance experts at the State Office of Education to pull apart salary stats. Here are the findings:
http://goo.gl/pPw1mC  (KSL)

Utah senator wants money for schools — by eliminating family child tax exemption

SALT LAKE CITY — State Sen. Pat Jones, D-Holladay, has an idea to raise $400 million in new, ongoing funding for Utah’s public schools — but at the cost of an income tax exemption that benefits large families.
Jones’ bill, which is currently being drafted, would not raise the tax rate but would effectively constitute a tax increase by eliminating the tax exemption for dependents. A Utah family of three, for example, would see their annual tax return diminish by around $500, Jones said, depending on their income level and other factors.
She said her bill would keep the effective tax rate below 5 percent but would do away with one of the many exemptions that drive an individual’s taxes down, sometimes to the point of paying no state income tax at all.
http://goo.gl/cYo3t2  (DN)

Taxpayers Association Wary of Tax Hike Talk

Various groups, including the Salt Lake Chamber of Commerce, are talking these days about tax hikes for statewide needy programs, like roads and mass transit and public education.
Tax increases, of course, are always touchy subjects in Republican-dominated Utah.
Many Utahns will see on their November property tax bills hiked by local city, county or school district entities.
Taken together, some of the hikes are substantial.
http://goo.gl/eKpju0  (UP)

‘It’s enough that it hurts,’ says parent of school activity fees

SALT LAKE CITY— Schools can’t deny students the opportunity to participate in extracurricular activities based on the ability to pay, but parents said sometimes the cost to really play can be much higher than the stated fees.
Hilary Pembroke said she is a proud football mom at Highland High School, but fees need to be addressed. She said she understands it costs a lot of money to run a football program, but as a single mom she struggles every year to cover the fees.
“It’s enough that it hurts,” Pembroke said.
For some families, fees can be enough of a deterrent that they can’t afford for their kids to play.
http://goo.gl/t9uBOI  (KSL)

Suicides in Utah increasing, but solutions are in sight

SYRACUSE — Between the first day of June and the last day in July, 101 deaths in Utah were classified as suicides by the Utah State Office of the Medical Examiner.
In other words, suicide claimed lives at a rate of not quite two people each day in the span of only two months, putting Utah on pace to have slightly more suicides this year than last year.
Some believe there is a solution, but it is slow in coming:
“Communities, mental health agencies and schools coming together to prevent suicide. That’s the only way we can do it,” said Greg Hudnall, who tackled the issue as an administrator in the Provo School District for more than a decade.
http://goo.gl/T2W9C5  (DN)

Lawmakers: Is Salt Lake City School District serving west side students?
West side » Education Task Force members say gifted teachers are needed in lower-performing schools.

Utah lawmakers on an Education Task Force questioned Tuesday how well the Salt Lake City School District is serving children in west-side schools, encouraging school board member Michael Clara to continue investigating.
Clara filed a complaint with the federal Office of Civil Rights in February, asserting there are too many inexperienced and ineffective teachers in west-side schools. He has clashed with board members over his attempts to discuss that topic, as well as the dropout rate for Latino students, graduation rates, the district’s recent tax increase and other issues.
http://goo.gl/yHX2uU  (SLT)

Weber County Democrats Demand Answers

OGDEN, Utah – Weber County democrats are banding together and demanding answers from Ogden School District.
At its worst, the district was the lowest performing school district in the state and recent improvements have done little to calm concerns.
“We want solid figures so the people of Ogden can make a decision on is the school district going where they want it to go?” said Ben Pales.
http://goo.gl/lkNmbB  (KTVX)

End Compulsory Education in Utah?

State Senator Aaron Osmond recently argued that teachers are being forced to become surrogate parents, expected to do everything from behavioral counseling to providing adequate nutrition, to teaching sex education and that some parents act as if the responsibility to educate, and even care for their child, is primarily the responsibility of the public school system. He is proposing that we end compulsory education in Utah. We’ll get reaction from Lily Eskelsen Garcia, former Utah teacher and current National Education Association Vice President.
We’ll also talk about what’s working and what’s not in K-12 public schools. Our guest in the second half of the program is Ray Reutzel, Distinguished Professor and Director of the Early Childhood Center in the USU Emma Eccles Jones College of Education and Human Services. This is the first of a three-part series on K-12 education in Utah. Parts two and three will follow in the next two weeks and will cover private, charter, & online schools; and innovations in education.
http://goo.gl/ZTMbuE  (UPR)

Utah ACT scores high among states with 100 percent participation

According to new statistics released by the Utah State Office of Education, the Utah class of 2013 not only had statistical full participation in the ACT exam but received the highest composite score among the nine states that all had full participation.
A total of 34,514 Utah students from the 2013 graduating class received a composite score of 20.7 on the ACT. The score is the same as last year’s, despite an increase of 1,700 students taking the test and a new way of calculating state and national results. The new process includes scores from students who were granted extended time, an addition of 1,200 Utah students and 72,202 nationwide.
Other states who received statistically full participation include Illinois, with a composite score of 20.6, and Colorado, with a score of 20.4. Nationally, the average ACT score dropped from 21.1 in 2012 to 20.9 in 2013.
http://goo.gl/rALI49  (LHJ)

http://goo.gl/ZiXUgx  (SLT)

http://goo.gl/bv81p1  (DN)

http://goo.gl/TNzCC1  (Universe)

Park City parents upset by assigned reading

PARK CITY— Some parents of high school students in Park City are expressing anger over their children’s summer reading assignment.
“The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian” was required reading for all students at Park City High School this summer. The author, Sherman Alexie, won the 2007 National Book Award for Young People’s Literature for the book, which is semi-autobiographical.
The story is told by a Native American character, Arnold Spirit, Jr., who talks about his life on the Spokane Indian Reservation and decides to go to an all-white public high school.
Parents said this book contains explicit material and students had no other option but to read it, but after a meeting last Tuesday with district officials and teachers, they learned there actually were other reading options available they just didn’t know about it.
http://goo.gl/7Upml3  (KSL)

Chinese teachers come to Springville for school year

SPRINGVILLE — Miss Li, Miss An and Miss Shen are ready for their first day of school at Sage Creek Elementary in Springville. They speak Mandarin and English and have traveled from China to teach in the Chinese dual immersion program.
This is the first time any of the young women have been to the United States. They have been preparing for several months to teach in an American school and were selected from many applicants.
“These dedicated teachers are part of a group of 20 from China who are here to teach in Utah this year,” explained Weixin Le, Chinese dual immersion coordinator for the state of Utah. “They come after applying, taking four examinations and being interviewed by the College Board and China’s Confucius Institute Headquarters/Hanban and then by Utah officials. After being selected they received training in Beijing and then come to the United States for additional training.”
http://goo.gl/odCiqF  (PDH)

Payson middle schooler a semifinalist in national science fair

PAYSON — When Adam Call, a soon-to-be seventh grader, started his sixth-grade science fair project for Barnett Elementary in Payson, he never thought it would get him to where he is today — one of 300 national semifinalists in the Broadcom MASTERS Science and Engineering Competition.
Middle school students are nominated to compete in the Broadcom MASTERS by SSP-affiliated science fairs held during the school year. Nominees enter the competition by completing an application explaining their science project and demonstrating their use of STEM principles — science, technology, engineering and math — in the development and the presentation of their project. From entrants nationwide, 300 semifinalists are selected and then 30 finalists are chosen from the 300.
http://goo.gl/1FRXcT  (PDH)

Salt Lake School District Grants Two Awards for “Teacher of the Year”

SALT LAKE CITY, Utah – The Salt Lake City School District has named the two teachers who will receive awards for “Teacher of the Year” in 2014.
Catherine Praggastis was recently named the 2014 District Teacher of the Year by the Salt lake City School District and Salt Lake City School District Board of Education. Amy Gutting was also awarded the 2014 District Special Education Teacher of the Year.
http://goo.gl/22l3Nw  (KTVX)

School district boundaries to remain same after Logan, North Logan adjustments

The recent land swap between North Logan and Logan will not affect the boundaries — and property tax revenue — between the Cache County School District and the Logan City School District, according to representatives from both districts.
Recently, the city councils from both North Logan and Logan swapped parcels of land that redefined the border between the two cities near U.S. Highway 91.
The border between the Logan City School District and the Cache County School District will remain the same along the old North Logan/Logan boundary, which means that property tax revenue distribution will remain the same in those areas.
http://goo.gl/FLnRtW (LHJ)

Local high school student working to bring generations together

A 16-year-old Providence girl’s service project called “Youth Connect” is bringing generations together and strengthening communities at the same time.
Mountain Crest High School student Emilee Hamilton noticed there was a great need for elderly people in retirement centers to feel loved, needed and connected with the community. She organized students, with the help of both school districts, to start visiting the elderly and the program has thrived.
http://goo.gl/JwDkka (CVD)

Former Utah teacher ordered to trial for alleged sex abuse
Courts » Courtney Jarrell is accused of sexually abusing a 17-year-old student.

A former Riverton High School math and basketball teacher accused of having a sexual relationship with a 17-year-old student was ordered Monday to stand trial.
Ex-teacher Courtney Louise Jarrell, 22, is charged in 3rd District Court with object rape, a first-degree felony, and forcible sexual abuse, a second-degree felony. If found guilty, she could face up to life in prison for the first charge and up to 15 years for the second.
Jarrell’s attorney Kenneth Brown said Tuesday that his client had a consensual relationship with the teen, who testified to that effect at a Monday preliminary hearing in West Jordan.
http://goo.gl/R2ZVwV  (SLT)

http://goo.gl/Dm93as  (DN)

http://goo.gl/frcWip  (OSE)

http://goo.gl/WnFTtD  (PDH)

DHHS offers reward leading to vandalism arrest
Buildings, car damaged in incident

ST. GEORGE — Desert Hills High School administrators are asking the public for any information after at least two people vandalized the school and a driver’s education car Monday night.
According to a letter sent by DHHS principal Rusty Taylor to parents and students, at approximately 10:30 p.m. Monday night at least two individuals used spray paint to spray “obscenities” on the outside of the school’s commons area, academic building, physical education building and driver’s education car, located at 828 East Desert Hills Drive.
http://goo.gl/P9b3T4  (SGS)

http://goo.gl/aBMQt5  (KSTU)

Police Remind Drivers To Pay Attention To School Zones

School is in session for many students – and that means more kids near the roads and in crosswalks.
Police are making sure drivers are following the rules in school zones.
http://goo.gl/GOXti8  (KUTV)

http://goo.gl/ohi3h3  (KTVX)

Logan school district purchases parking lot nearby Ellis Elementary

The Logan City School District Board of Education approved the purchase of a parking lot next to Ellis Elementary School for $50,000.
The unanimous decision came during the board’s meeting Tuesday evening.
Previously owned by the Sunshine Terrace Foundation, the parking lot opens up more parking spaces to faculty, staff and patrons visiting the school.
http://goo.gl/gVRWAT  (LHJ)

Campaign kicks off for safe walking, biking to schools

Students at Dilworth Elementary in Salt Lake City helped kick off a statewide drive Wednesday to encourage more students to walk and bike safely to school this year — by holding a rally with state highway officials, and signing pledges for safety.
“Walking or biking to school at the start of the school year is a great way for students to develop and continue safe and healthy habits,” said Carlos Braceras, executive director of the Utah Department of Transportation. “Students who walk or bike to school not only stay active and perform better at school, but also reduce traffic congestion around schools, making these areas safer.”
The state is conducting what it calls the “Walk More in Four” challenge.
http://goo.gl/3UuFwq (SLT)

http://goo.gl/8yGrLo (DN)

http://goo.gl/9EHCBl (KTVX)

Elementary students to win new shoes by stopping bullies

WEST JORDAN — Oquirrh Elementary School launched a year-long anti-bullying campaign Tuesday where students can earn movie tickets and shoes for encouraging positive behavior.
During an assembly Tuesday, a popular Mark Wills’ country song played through the auditorium speakers at Oquirrh Elementary School. The lyrics to the song are familiar to anyone who’s been dealt a few blows by bullies.
http://goo.gl/YZS05X (KSL)

North Sanpete Anti-Bullying Week

Mt. Pleasant – The North Sanpete School District will begin an anti-bullying program next week following the Labor Day holiday. North Sanpete Superintendent Leslie Keisel says they will kick it off by introducing the districts anti-bullying policies. The rules go beyond a zero tolerance policy to include advocating intervention by those who witness bullying. A full day will be dedicated to introducing students to the concept of being an ally to those who are bullied. The week will wrap up with a day of kindness where each class will decide on acts of kindness to complete on that day.
http://goo.gl/kdqEIB (MUR)

Elementary school students to get special experience with Celebrate America Show

The 14th annual big band show “In the Miller Mood” returns to Utah State University Thursday, Friday and Saturday September 5-7. The Broadway-type show includes dinner and dancing.
Production director Brenda Anthony says the timeless sound and style of Glen Miller’s music and the big band era will once again fascinate the audience.
Vice President and business manager Gene Thomson says something new this year is a Tuesday night educational outreach to children.
“There’s a group of 4th and 5th grade students from Wilson Elementary. The principal there has given great support to this program as an education opportunity in studying this era with the students, even though they have been in school only a short time,” says Thomson. “They’ll be participating in that Tuesday night dress rehearsal. Others who wish to come can also get show-only tickets.”
http://goo.gl/ond869 (CVD)

Vae View Elementary students like hot-air balloons

LAYTON — To cheers of “how cool,” Vae View Elementary students watched their principal and several teachers fly high in a hot-air balloon.
But pilot Danny Stam was quick to correct them, saying, “If it was cool, it wouldn’t be called a hot-air balloon.”
As Antelope Island gears up for the annual Stampede Festival this weekend — which includes hot-air balloon demonstrations — its Kites and Balloons to Schools program had hot-air balloonists visiting several schools in Davis School District during the week. The balloonists made it to Vae View Elementary in Layton on Wednesday.
http://goo.gl/ELxzla  (OSE)

http://goo.gl/p88NLo  (OSE)

Speaker of House to hold Town Hall meeting in Sanpete

As part of the Conversations with the Utah House series, Becky Lockhart, Speaker of the House of Representatives, and Representative Spencer Cox will be visiting Sanpete County on Thursday, August 29. Lockhart will speak at Snow College at 12:30 that afternoon as part of their Convocation series. She and Cox will be meeting with Sanpete County residents that evening at the Gunnison City Hall from 6 to 8 p.m. for the Town Hall meeting. They will share their insights on important issues facing the State, as well as hear residents of Sanpete County’s thoughts on the economy, education, federal lands, and the budget.
http://goo.gl/u3QrF1  (MUR)

Healthier school lunches not going down well

Parents in Kentucky are chaffing at new federal school lunch requirements that, they say, are leaving kids hungry because they can’t get full on the limited meat and starches made available. Some schools are pushing back.
The USDA website on school lunches touts the new healthy program, with images of lunches heavy on fresh vegetables. The effort is a major element of first lady Michelle Obama’s Let’s Move initiative.
http://goo.gl/oXuY6F  (DN)

http://goo.gl/sT6qgz  (AP)

Parenting, faith and a new school year: How scriptures can help parents

The start of the new school year can create a steady stream of emotional and logistical stressors for parents of school-aged kids. But the emergence of new routines also creates an opportunity for Christians to recommit to cultivating their faith on a daily basis through the pages of scriptures.
Columnist Laurie Richardson penned an op-ed piece that the Christian Science Monitor published Wednesday with the headline “Parents’ role in back to school.”
http://goo.gl/LxSlDX (DN)

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OPINION & COMMENTARY
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Back to school
Parents have a key role to play
Salt Lake Tribune editorial

For Utah, which has more kids as a percentage of its population than any other state, the end of August is much more like the beginning of a new year than is Jan. 1. It’s the time when those kids, or most of them, head back to classrooms, starting a new school year in a new grade, with new teachers and courses and, for some, different physical surroundings.
Back-to-school is a bittersweet time for parents. It’s fulfilling to see our children advance, but it’s also frightening to understand that they will encounter new challenges and daunting to know what a huge part parents play in everything children do.
Utah parents and their children face unique challenges: the largest class sizes and smallest per-pupil expenditure of state funds in the nation. The continually growing number of children in the system, and the increasing percentage of children from minority groups, puts additional pressure on teachers and school administrators.
http://goo.gl/DYXoJU

Education Accountability Principles, or Show. Me. THE MONEY?
Utah Policy commentary by Sen. Howard Stephenson

Over the past several years, Senate President Wayne Niederhauser led the Legislature to adopt school grading, an education reform pioneered more than a decade ago by Florida Governor Jeb Bush. Before Florida embraced school grading, the average Florida student scored well below the average Utah student.
Within a decade of embracing school grading, the average Florida student was scoring substantially higher than the average Utah student. Moreover, after school grading Florida’s low-income Hispanic students, which statistically tend to score lower than nearly any other group of students, substantially outscored average Utah students.
School grading shines a light on what every parent and teacher knows – some schools do better than others. Unfortunately, Until now no one was sure which schools were better. Under school grading, every school receives an easily understandable letter grade (A, B, C, D, F) based on how much academic progress students make, and whether students have met the academic standards prescribed by the State Board of Education. High Schools’ grades are based on one additional standard – how well the student is prepared for life after high school, as evidenced by graduation rates and ACT scores.
In spite of the fact that everyone intuitively understands these letter grades, the Utah Public Education Coalition (UPEC) has opposed school grading from the beginning.
http://goo.gl/3BXfvg

Sen. Jones’ bill deserves discussion
Deseret News op-ed by John Mitchell, a former teacher and chairman of the mass communications department at Sogang University in Seoul, South Korea

On Aug. 25, the Deseret News announced in its local section that state Sen. Patricia Jones, D-Holladay, was drafting a bill for the upcoming 2014 legislative session which, among other issues, would “create jobs and allow schools to shrink class sizes by hiring new educators.” She also mentioned that the “equalization mechanism” in her planned bill would be “beneficial to rural schools which often suffer from lack of resources, while still providing support for larger student populations.”
Sen. Jones is right on target in addressing some of the rural schools’ educational issues as they face significant challenges. Those were concretely studied and described in the Utah Foundation’s “Research Report” of 2012: “they have greater difficulties than non-rural schools in hiring teachers, finding teachers with specialties, and finding teachers who teach multiple subjects.”
The vast majority of Utah is rural, although only a small portion of Utahns live and work in rural parts of the state. Rural schools educate about 15 percent of Utah’s students. The question is whether or not students in these areas are receiving the same educational opportunities for success comparable to non-rural students.
http://goo.gl/APWLbZ

SITLA’s pending deal should surprise no one
Salt Lake Tribune commentary by columnist Brett Prettyman

People keep using the word surprise when referring to the recent controversy involving oil and gas development on Utah’s Book Cliffs. The reality is that none of it should have come as a surprise.
This certainly is not the first and most likely not the last time the School Institutional Trust Lands Administration has thrown sportsmen under the bus.
Anglers got their taste of the ugliness in 2006 when SITLA officials ignored offers from the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources to do a land swap on an important piece of property across from Little Hole on the Green River, a blue-ribbon fishery. The land went up for auction, and the DWR, along with some help from others, ended up having to buy the 336 acres for $1.6 million.
The announcement last week that SITLA would lease 96,000 acres in the Book Cliffs, a popular trophy elk hunting area, to Anadarko came as a “surprise” to sportsmen.
http://goo.gl/SUZ2Qx

Utah’s education system gets ‘D’ in financial transparency
Sutherland Institute commentary by Public Policy Director Derek Monson

Are Utah’s public education administrators properly committed to openness and transparency regarding their stewardship over public schools and the tax dollars that pay for them? A recent analysis from the Cato Institute suggests the answer is no.
The analysis graded state education department websites for the financial transparency they provide. Utah’s State Office of Education (USOE) received a score of 65/100 – good for a “D” grade and coming in at 23rd out of 50 states. Two states got a grade in the “A” range (New Mexico got an “A” and South Dakota an “A-”), and 19 states got an “F” or a “F-” grade.
Utah’s score was driven primarily by the incompleteness of the “per pupil expenditure” (PPE) figures reported by the USOE.
http://goo.gl/izVaFm

Charters can be the answer to higher taxes
Commentary by Charter Solutions President Lincoln Fillmore

Earlier this month, the Jordan School District (my district of residence) asked voters to approve a property tax increase of more than $500 million to fund the construction of new schools and the remodeling of older schools as the district grows rapidly.
Since I’m a resident of the district, I got to take part in a survey it sponsored to get public feedback about what the school’s priorities should be. The survey presented a lot of false choices, like “smaller tax increase and higher class size”-type stuff.
It costs money to build new schools. That money has to come from somewhere. District schools are almost always built with new bonds paid for by new taxes. Charters aren’t.
Charter schools should be an aggressive part of the Jordan District’s plan to cope with rapid growth.
http://goo.gl/a7Kgq1

10 safety tips for back to school
KSL commentary by columnist Rolayne Fairclough

SALT LAKE CITY — There is no denying it; it’s back to school season. The sales have begun, sports teams are holding try-outs and teachers are heading back to prepare for the coming year. And although there is a lot of excitement about fall fashions and who might have gotten their braces off during the summer, it’s important that we pay attention to the safety of our children who are heading back to school.
At AAA Utah, we’re chock full of safety tips for motorists and those with whom we share the road, and today is no different. We’ve compiled 10 back-to-school safety tips for people of all ages, because it takes our collective effort to keep our roads safe as our children head back to school.
http://goo.gl/rR529m

Back to school means keep it simple
KSL commentary by columnist Connie Sokol

SALT LAKE CITY — As I face the barrage of signups, back-to-school fees and extracurricular juggling for six children (including the never-ending cycle of schedule changes as instructors try to accommodate parents), I’ve seen the need to keep the process simple.
This brought to mind an experience a few years ago when I was engaged in the very serious negotiations for … a carpool. Yes, it was that time of year when we grown women could possibly make a mountain out of a molehill, taking something that was seemingly easy and making it infinitely more complex, simply because we could.
http://goo.gl/GYjZR8

The Feds Need To Let Up, And Give To Utah What Is Utah’s
Forbes op-ed by Bob Williams, President of State Budget Solutions

The federal government’s ownership and management of land across the country is not a new concept. In fact the government still owns one-quarter of the nation’s land, the vast majority of which is in western states, where Washington, D.C., owns more than half the land.
The cause for concern in western states comes when that government reach is too big and too intrusive, and when the federal government fails to adequately manage that land. In Utah, where 67 percent of land is federally owned, the federal government handcuffs the state by blocking access to potential revenues from natural resources, essentially swallowing the key to natural resources and economic prosperity. It’s time to give to Utah what is Utah’s: the key to unlock the riches of their own land.
http://goo.gl/chtSc5

Divorce discrimination
Salt Lake Tribune letter from John Gardner

As a father in a high-conflict divorce, I was surprised when the office staff at my daughter’s elementary school refused to add my name to the emergency contact list. I was shocked that they would deny the provable father the right to be contacted in the event of an emergency, and that even having legal joint custody was not enough to make this simple change.
No, they informed me, a change must be made by my ex-wife. The principal, district coordinator, and even lawyers for the Utah State Office of Education provided no justification other than the convenience of only dealing with one parent.
http://goo.gl/FSYsxf

Equal educational opportunity
Deseret News letter from Barbara Yaros

Utah Sen. Pat Jones’, D-Holladay, proposed education bill for 2014 deserves all of our support. Her foresightedness and her determination to “create jobs and allow schools to shrink class sizes by hiring new educators” is worthy of our highest and greatest consideration. Her objectives seek to greatly elevate the state’s overall education system. I especially support her vision for educational improvement into rural areas where, it seems, less consideration is given. I especially support her verbiage regarding the “equalization mechanism” introduced in her bill, which explains that it “would be beneficial to rural schools which often suffer from lack of resources while still providing support for larger student populations.”
Equal educational opportunity for all the children should prevail. We should have a laser focus on ensuring this takes place.
http://goo.gl/GU3sMM

Funding for class-size reduction
Deseret News letter from Derek Smith

I’m writing in regards to the recent article, “Utah senator wants money for schools — by eliminating family child tax exemption.”
As a school teacher, I know that money for public education will make a difference. Schools are not only about performance and test scores. There is more to schools than just testing. As a parent, I don’t want my own children to be viewed as data by their teacher. As a teacher, I want to impact each student’s life so they are inspired to change the world for the better and not just to pass a test.
I have researched the impact of money in public education for many years, and there is one area it will help no matter what — class sizes.
http://goo.gl/TUpilB

America’s kids need a better education law
Washington Post op-ed by Arne Duncan, U.S. secretary of education.

The nation’s most sweeping education law — the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965, better known as No Child Left Behind — is outmoded and broken. Congress has gone home for its summer recess without passing a responsible replacement.
That’s too bad. America deserves a better law.
http://goo.gl/6AxGiS

Treating Common-Core Syndrome
Education Week op-ed by Linda Diamond, chief executive officer of the Consortium on Reaching Excellence in Education

A new disorder seems to have swept the nation: Common Core State Standards Syndrome. This malady is characterized by sharply polarized positions—worshiping the common core as schools’ salvation, or condemning it as on the path to Armageddon.

Entire states exhibit symptoms as well, embracing the standards one year and threatening to dump them the next.
Nonetheless, the attention being trained on the standards has the potential to transform our education system if the focus shifts to the more difficult challenge—implementation. Neither side in the debate believes that the standards alone will be sufficient, but the heavy lifting required may be beyond the capacity of many districts and schools.
“Are states really focusing on the crucial details of implementation and allotting enough time and resources to get the job done?”
As a nation, we do not have a history of thoroughly implementing or sustaining education reforms, which is troubling.
http://goo.gl/yRbRCO

Five bad education assumptions the media keeps recycling
Washington Post commentary by Alfie Kohn, author of 12 books about education and human behavior, including “The Schools Our Children Deserve”

It very rarely happens that the cover of The New York Times Book Review, which represents some of the most prestigious intellectual real estate in the United States, is given over to a discussion about education. When that does happen, as it did last Sunday, it becomes clear why “school reform” just perpetuates and intensifies the education status quo.
A certain ideology, along with a set of empirical assumptions, underlies most conversations about education in this country, most of what actually happens in schools, and most proposals for change. These assumptions are accepted by the overwhelming majority of politicians, business leaders, and journalists.
http://goo.gl/UlzjCQ

The NYT Is Asking the Wrong Question About Rapid Turnover at Charter Schools
Slate commentary by columnist Matthew Yglesias

Motoko Rich has a very interesting piece in the New York Times about the rapid turnover at charter schools compared with traditional public schools, where the average teacher has about 14 years of experience as opposed to the two to five years you’ll find at charter schools. But I think she frames this information around the wrong question. Rich is asking, basically, whether it’s good for kids to have so much turnover. And I think the answer is obviously: No, it isn’t.
There’s specific research showing that all else being equal, turnover is bad, and even studies that are highly skeptical of the current practice of giving teachers automatic annual seniority-based raises concede that teachers do gain in effectiveness across the first few years of their career. And that’s just common sense. In every workplace I’ve ever seen, the brand-new people struggle a little. That’s just the nature of life. You have to make certain kinds of mistakes in order to learn to avoid them. Even the best training isn’t going to be perfect.
But here’s the thing. We know that on the whole charter schools and traditional public schools get similar educational results. And we know that some of the schools Rich looks at do exceptionally well. So given that these charters are really held back by having such a large share of first- and second-year teachers, how is it that they’re able to produce decent educational results? The evidence isn’t airtight, but the natural inference to make from the turnover data is that the experience-adjusted quality of the charter school teachers is substantially higher than of the traditional public school teachers.
http://goo.gl/1zT5Oc

Are Charter Schools Successful Because They Make Teachers Work Long Hours?
Mother Jones commentary by columnist Kevin Drum

Motoko Rich writes in the New York Times that charter school teachers tend to turn over pretty quickly. The average charter teacher has only a few years of experience, compared to 14 in traditional public schools. However, even though everyone agrees that teachers with five-plus years of experience are better than those with only three or four years, charter school outcomes are pretty similar to those of public schools. Matt Yglesias wonders what’s going on:
“Given that these charters are really held back by having such a large share of first- and second-year teachers, how is it that they’re able to produce decent educational results? The evidence isn’t airtight, but the natural inference to make from the turnover data is that the experience-adjusted quality of the charter school teachers is substantially higher than of the traditional public school teachers.
“….If kids in charter schools were on average clearly learning less than kids in traditional public schools, then it’d be easy to finger the teacher turnover issue as the culprit. But they’re not doing worse, despite charter schools’ problems with hanging on to teachers for more than a few years. The interesting question is what accounts for that.”
I have a different guess. Charter school teachers might very well be the cream of the crop, but I suspect the real key to their success is long working hours. This is also what accounts for the turnover. Charter schools tend to demand that their teachers work very long hours and remain on call for students during the evening. That’s grueling stuff, and very few people are willing to do it for long. If you’re young, idealistic, unmarried, and have no kids, it might be rewarding for a while. After a while, though, it just gets to be a grind.
http://goo.gl/xWjYWh

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NATIONAL NEWS
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States Offered Longer Time to Ignore Education Law
Associated Press

WASHINGTON — The Education Department says states can ask to ignore requirements of the No Child Left Behind law through the spring of 2016.
It’s an offer that underscores the intensive work states have already undertaken on school reforms in exchange for flexibility from the federal government.
It also shows the grim outlook on whether Congress will act on a new education law. No Child Left Behind expired in 2007 and had goals now seen as too ambitious, such as having all students read and do math at grade level by 2014.
http://goo.gl/2R10pl

http://goo.gl/fJOpxG  (Ed Week)

http://goo.gl/Oxjsjx (ED)

At Charter Schools, Short Careers by Choice
New York Times

HOUSTON — Tyler Dowdy just started his third year of teaching at YES Prep West, a charter school here. He figures now is a good time to explore his next step, including applying for a supervisory position at the school.
Mr. Dowdy is 24 years old, which might make his restlessness seem premature. But then, his principal is 28. Across YES Prep’s 13 schools, teachers have an average of two and a half years of experience.
As tens of millions of pupils across the country begin their school year, charter networks are developing what amounts to a youth cult in which teaching for two to five years is seen as acceptable and, at times, even desirable. Teachers in the nation’s traditional public schools have an average of close to 14 years of experience, and public school leaders and policy makers have long made it a priority to reduce teacher turnover.
But with teachers confronting the overhaul of evaluations and tenure as well as looming changes in pension benefits, the small but rapidly growing charter school movement — with schools that are publicly financed but privately operated — is pushing to redefine the arc of a teaching career.
http://goo.gl/jTOLFw

More Than A Number? Educators On What Standardized Testing Means
NPR Tell Me More

Host Michel Martin hears from a group of teachers about how education policies and technology are changing today’s classrooms. She’s joined by fifth grade teacher Rafe Esquith, third grade teacher Tequila Pennington-Calwise and school librarian Elissa Malespina.
http://goo.gl/hbtVlK

Advanced Placement classes failing students
Politico

Taxpayers have spent hundreds of millions of dollars in recent years to nudge more students into Advanced Placement classes — but a close look at test scores suggests much of the investment has been wasted.
Expanding participation in AP classes has been a bipartisan goal, promoted by U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan and by Republican governors including Bobby Jindal of Louisiana and John Kasich of Ohio. In the last five years, the federal government has spent $275 million to promote the classes and subsidize exam fees for low-income students; states have spent many millions more.
Enrollment in AP classes has soared. But data analyzed by POLITICO shows that the number of kids who bomb the AP exams is growing even more rapidly.
http://goo.gl/fevPZ4

Rotten to the Core?
The Common Core standards have some up in arms, but state officials say there’s no cause for concern
(Cheyenne) Wyoming Tribune Eagle

CHEYENNE — Wyoming’s standards for reading, English and math are under fire from a Wyoming-based think tank.
The Wyoming Liberty Group recently brought a panel of people to Cheyenne to take a closer look at the Common Core State Standards. Wyoming adopted those standards in English/language arts and math in 2012.
The panel included education professor Sandra Stotsky, former Wyoming teacher Christy Hooley and Joy Pullmann from the Heartland Institute, is a free-market think tank started to help sustain the conservative/libertarian movement in Illinois.
http://goo.gl/LfGSOZ

Alabama senator calls for removal of Toni Morrison novel aligned with Common Core
Huntsville (AL) Times

HUNTSVILLE, Alabama — One week after facing an official GOP reprimand for failing to oppose Common Core, Sen. Bill Holtzclaw is calling upon state educators to ban a novel used in conjunction with the national standards.
Holtzclaw objects to “The Bluest Eye,” Toni Morrison’s first novel, being included on high school reading lists. He said was unaware whether the book was in high school libraries, but that he would also support removal from school libraries.
“The book is just completely objectionable, from language to the content,” said Holtzclaw, who points out the novel includes depictions of incest and child molestation.
The American Library Association lists “The Bluest Eye” as the 15th most commonly banned or challenged book in the United States from 2000 through 2009. Morrison, who released the novel in 1970, later won the Pulitzer Prize and Nobel Prize for literature.
http://goo.gl/sEVI06

CDC Report: US schools show progress in fostering healthy habits
US school environments are getting healthier with better nutritional choices, more opportunities for physical activity, and reduced exposure to tobacco smoke, found a recent report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
Christian Science Monitor

BOSTON — Between the classroom, the cafeteria, and the playground, American children spend at least one third of their day at school. In recent years, many schools have recognized their role in helping students to form healthy habits and have implemented policies to promote healthier choices around food, exercise, and tobacco use. The efforts seem to be paying off, at least in terms of setting the stage for a healthier school environment, concludes a new survey of school health policies and practices by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).
“There is really great news for schools across the country here,” Wayne Giles, director of the CDC’s Division on Population Health said in an interview. “Between now and when this survey last occurred six years ago we have seen very dramatic improvements in terms of nutrition, opportunities for physical activity, and being free of tobacco smoke.”
http://goo.gl/PfOCKx

A View of What’s Missing From the Classroom
New York Times

THE Advertising Council and the United States Army, hoping to lower absenteeism in schools across the country, are introducing a public service campaign this week aimed at helping parents keep track of their children’s absences.
The ads are targeted to parents, and stress that poor attendance can add up to big problems for students.
As many as 7.5 million students miss nearly a month of school each year, according to the Ad Council, which noted that chronic absenteeism — defined as missing 10 percent, or 18 days, or more of school for any reason — is a critical warning sign that a student will fall behind and risk not graduating from high school.
The campaign’s Web site, BoostAttendance.org, was started Monday. Both it and the ads are timed to coincide with next month’s Attendance Awareness Month, a new nationwide initiative promoting the role of attendance in academic achievement.
http://goo.gl/HxvPz3

New memoir shines harsh light on U.S. schools
A new memoir by a self-described “bad teacher” shines a harsh light on data-driven school reform, concluding that tyranical principals often have too much power and that kids’ needs go unmet.
USA Today

After more than 30 years as a writer, editor and publishing executive, John Owens left a high-paying job as senior vice president and editorial director of Hachette Filipacchi Media to “give back” to the U.S. public schools he’d attended as a kid. He landed a teaching job at a high school in the Bronx — he calls it “Latinate High School” — that was a model of school reform, but what he found was reform “gone terribly wrong.”
Owens lasted only about five months, but in the process he began writing about his experience. The result is a closely observed, often hilarious and profane new memoir, Confessions Of A Bad Teacher (Sourcebooks, $13.99). USA TODAY education writer Greg Toppo spoke with Owens recently:
http://goo.gl/Exzzer

No homework or exams for China’s overloaded pupils
Xinhua

BEIJING — The Ministry of Education (MOE) issued a draft regulation on Thursday to reduce the academic burden on the nation’s pupils, including a suggested ban on written homework and exams.
Instead of written homework, the MOE suggested primary schools organize visits to museums, libraries and cultural facilities after class, and cultivate students’ hands-on capabilities through handicrafts or farm work.
The draft suggests abandoning unified examinations for first, second and third graders. From the fourth grade up, only two exams – Chinese, mathematics or foreign languages – would be allowed per semester.
Teachers would be prohibited from recommending or selling course materials to students.
http://goo.gl/utC2L4

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CALENDAR
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USOE Calendar
http://tinyurl.com/5x9oh9

UEN News
http://www.uen.org

September 5-6:
Utah State Board of Education meeting
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspxpr

September 12:
Utah State Charter School Board meeting
250 E. 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://goo.gl/Mu36l

September 17:
Executive Appropriations Subcommittee meeting
1 p.m., 445 State Capitol
http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2013&com=APPEXE

September 18:
Education Interim Committee meeting
9 a.m., 30 House Building
http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2013&Com=INTEDU

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