Education News Roundup: Oct. 25, 2013

LunchEducation News Roundup

Today’s Top Picks:

Trib follows up on the NAEP-TIMMS linking study showing Utah students excelling in science.
http://goo.gl/d5CbTK  (SLT)
and http://goo.gl/rNKblz  (Utah Public Education) or a copy of the study
http://goo.gl/50C8h8  (NAEP)

Plenty of follow-up on the public-private partnership for preschool in Granite.
http://goo.gl/p1Af08  (SLT)
and http://goo.gl/WvAhfa  (DN)
and http://goo.gl/bSMcTd (KTVX)
and http://goo.gl/ns4KEh  (KSL)
and http://goo.gl/Jm9KY7  (KUER)

Utah school lunch: Good for local farmers, too.
http://goo.gl/YOkilh  (SLT)

Superintendent Menlove touts School Bus Safety Week with a ride on the bus to Foxboro Elementary in North Salt Lake.
http://goo.gl/Twn7MZ  (OSE)

Malcolm Gladwell discusses class size on Jimmy Kimmel Live. Yep. ENR is about to link to Jimmy Kimmel Live for the first time.
http://goo.gl/WCjMAV  (YouTube)
Utah’s median class size, by the way, ranges from 22-27 in the elementary schools.
http://goo.gl/vYAd4p  (USOE)

Secretary Duncan and AEI scholar Frederick Hess debate the Common Core at the University of Chicago (go Maroons).
http://goo.gl/PIve00  (Maroon)
or video of the debate
http://goo.gl/46ieKD (UofC)

Administr@tor magazine looks at the Common Core controversy.
http://goo.gl/aKwcnY  (Administr@tor)

————————————————————
TODAY’S HEADLINES
————————————————————

UTAH

Utah 8th graders top all but four countries in science International » ‘It is now a global marketplace.’

Getting a jump on life, one Utah preschooler at a time Preschools » County officials get a look at how their investment may pay future dividends.

Utah ranks No. 4 for local food served in schools Buy local » Apples, peaches and pears are students’ favorites.

State schools chief rides bus with North Salt Lake kids

Students Awareness May Help Stop Future School Shootings

Provo choir will mix it up with Foreigner in Halloween concert Music » Want to know what love is? Students get a history lesson.

Free screening of ‘Cafeteria Man’ in Park City Food » Improving school lunch panel will follow film.

Is Meatless Monday losing its Mojo?

Charter School Offers Community Opportunities

Mountain Crest football players host dinner for students with disabilities

Operation School Bell rings smiles in Southern Utah

Students of the Month Honored by St. George Exchange Club

OPINION & COMMENTARY

No need for school/faith law

Open schools to community

Five reasons to back bond

Educators should help kids in ninth grade avoid dropping out

Architectural safety requirements for schools

Debate: Are charter schools a legitimate alternative to public education?

The Public School Ownership Gap

Do American Schools Need to Change? Depends What You Compare Them To Compared to its own history, the U.S. education system may be doing fine. But compared to the rest of the world, it needs work—and quickly.

Education Reform: Not Complicated — but Seriously Difficult

I Am Woman, Watch Me Hack

Malcolm Gladwell on Jimmy Kimmel Live

NATION

Education secretary defends Common Core standards Duncan was joined by Frederick Hess, a scholar at the American Enterprise Institute, who argued against the standards.

Parents study up on how to improve college prospects for their children

Indiana Superintendent of Public Instruction Glenda Ritz lawsuit sets off ripples Attorney general acts to halt Ritz’s action against State Board of Education

Common Core Under Attack
Is the bottom falling out of the Core? As we get closer to implementation, more states are shying away.

Work on Common Core resuming immediately, Michigan education superintendent says

Six-Year High School Answer for Tomorrow’s Workers?

State education board member pitches private business at Capitol
Roberts: Marketing of math tutoring to Highland Park students a dig at Topeka senator

————————————————————
UTAH NEWS
————————————————————

Utah 8th graders top all but four countries in science International » ‘It is now a global marketplace.’

Utah 8th graders perform better in science than students in all but four Asian countries, a first-ever international study shows.
In math, Utah 8th graders outperformed all but seven countries, according to the new 2011 NAEP-TIMSS Linking Study.
http://goo.gl/d5CbTK  (SLT)

http://goo.gl/rNKblz  (Utah Public Education)

A copy of the study
http://goo.gl/50C8h8  (NAEP)

Getting a jump on life, one Utah preschooler at a time Preschools » County officials get a look at how their investment may pay future dividends.

Salt Lake County Mayor Ben McAdams and councilmen Sam Granato and Richard Snelgrove received first-hand evidence Thursday of the benefits stemming from a $350,000 county investment in a private/public partnership to boost preschool education.
At McAdams’ behest, the county council allocated the money to enable an additional 600 disadvantaged children to get into previously full Granite District preschools this fall. The county money is a triggering mechanism that will help the United Way to use $1 million in private funds from Goldman Sachs and the J.B. & M.K. Pritzker Family Foundation to expand preschools.
http://goo.gl/p1Af08  (SLT)

http://goo.gl/WvAhfa  (DN)

http://goo.gl/bSMcTd  (KTVX)

http://goo.gl/ns4KEh  (KSL)

http://goo.gl/Jm9KY7 (KUER)

Utah ranks No. 4 for local food served in schools Buy local » Apples, peaches and pears are students’ favorites.

Utah schools are among the top in the nation when it comes to serving local fruits, veggies, dairy and baked goods, according to a new survey by the U.S. Department of Agriculture.
Nine Utah school districts told the USDA they serve local food in their school lunches. In those districts, local food chews up 23 percent of the school food budget, or $3.5 million, according to the survey.
That percentage ranked the state at No. 4, behind Nevada at 44 percent, Oregon at 25 percent and Washington at 24 percent. Maryland was No. 5 at 21 percent. Nationally, schools spend $350 million on locally produced food.
The budget data is based on the 2011-2012 school year, and doesn’t include three more districts — Canyons, Emery and Washington — that told the USDA they began buying local food last school year.
http://goo.gl/YOkilh  (SLT)

State schools chief rides bus with North Salt Lake kids

NORTH SALT LAKE — Like most school days, Foxboro Elementary sixth-grader Emily Skuppin hopped onto the bus on Thursday morning, but unlike most mornings, this time she found herself sitting next to someone prominent.
State Superintendent Martell Menlove joined students on the bus ride in support of National School Bus Safety Week, held this week across the country.
“Everyone was really excited, wondering why he was on the bus,” said Skuppin. “He was really nice and asked us how we liked school.”
The state superintendent hopes to raise awareness for the safety of the state’s school buses.
http://goo.gl/Twn7MZ  (OSE)

Students Awareness May Help Stop Future School Shootings

When students are more aware of their surroundings at school it really helps the school when dealing with violence, according to the Utah Education Association. Student safety is once again a national topic after a 12 year old boy fatally shot his math teacher, Michael Landsberry, at Sparks Middle School in Nevada on Monday. He also wounded two other students before he took his own life. Mike Kelly with the Utah Education Association says that students can help stop violence by being more aware of their surroundings and reporting suspicious behavior when they notice it.
http://goo.gl/mD8R50  (MUR)

http://goo.gl/8YZlrz  (Public Service News)

Provo choir will mix it up with Foreigner in Halloween concert Music » Want to know what love is? Students get a history lesson.

When Provo High choral director Kenny Wiser received a call from the Covey Center for the Arts asking if he would be interested in having his singers perform with legendary rock band Foreigner on Halloween night, he immediately knew this was a huge opportunity.
That said, many of this students had never heard of Foreigner.
“Not many students were familiar with the band’s music when I announced the opportunity, but their parents got very excited for the kids to have the chance to perform with Foreigner. In fact, several have asked if they could sing with their kids, too.”
The choir will sing Foreigner’s 1984 power ballad hit “I Want to Know What Love Is” at the concert.
http://goo.gl/IstWiF  (SLT)

Free screening of ‘Cafeteria Man’ in Park City Food » Improving school lunch panel will follow film.

Park City residents will be talking about how to improve the quality of school lunch today, following a free screening of the documentary “Cafeteria Man.”
The 65-minute film, about one school district’s move towards a more nutritious and sustainable food program, begins at 7 p.m. will be followed by a panel discussion featuring Park City nutrition specialists and educators including:
http://goo.gl/71fM8a  (SLT)

Is Meatless Monday losing its Mojo?

An investigation by the Animal Agriculture Alliance has concluded that the Meatless Monday Campaign has grossly mis-represented actual levels of support for the campaign in the United States.
The Meatless Monday campaign urges people to adopt a vegetarian only diet every Monday, claiming that doing so will help their health and the environment.
However the Alliance says the campaign is pushing an extreme animal rights and environmental agenda that seeks to promote full-time vegetarianism and veganism by spreading false claims and misinformation about agriculture.

Similarly, at the Monroe Elementary School in Utah, Lisa Larson told the Alliance that the students “didn’t like the choices they were given,” which apparently included peanut butter and jelly sandwiches and salads.
April Young, a registered dietician with the Granite County School District in Utah echoed these concerns, noting there was already a vegetarian option available in the local schools.
“We made a conscious decision to end the program after participating for a little under two years,” said Young. “As a dietician I plan meals to accommodate students. Many students have their own dietary needs and those should be handled individually—not as part of a large-scale program.”
http://goo.gl/lGlyVM  (Beef Central)

Charter School Offers Community Opportunities

IRON COUNTY, UTAH – Gateway Preparatory Academy is inviting parents throughout Iron County looking for fun afterschool activities for their children, or for the whole family, to sign up at for GPAfterschool.
Program director Krista O’Connell said that community outreach is a prominent goal for GPA and it is her hope that by providing more afterschool activities for the community the school can successfully meet that goal.
http://goo.gl/jTq4o4  (KCSG)

Mountain Crest football players host dinner for students with disabilities

HYRUM — In the Mountain Crest High School cafeteria Wednesday night, a group of football players in orange jerseys gathered to form a triangle. Other football players lined the length of the room to form an alley.
http://goo.gl/Ss3jTa  (LHJ)

Operation School Bell rings smiles in Southern Utah

ST. GEORGE — Continuing its mission to provide children in need with new school clothes, the Assistance League of Southern Utah is in full swing with Operation School Bell.
http://goo.gl/yXpL8W (SGS)

Students of the Month Honored by St. George Exchange Club

ST. GEORGE, Utah – A new school year means a new crew of Student of the Month recipients honored by the St. George Exchange Club.
http://goo.gl/m3FeVO  (KCSG)

————————————————————
OPINION & COMMENTARY
————————————————————

No need for school/faith law
(Ogden) Standard-Examiner editorial

We have a question for readers. Are there incidents in Utah public schools in which someone’s faith is disrespected. Are there examples where expressions of faith are prohibited?
We don’t think so, but we’d be interested in hearing stories of faith-suppression in schools. State Sen. Todd Weiler, R-Woods Cross, has proposed a bill that would allow potential public expression of religious beliefs in public schools. He tailors the bill after a law passed in Mississippi. Weiler wants to protect the rights of students to wear religious clothing or jewelry, to allow students’ expression of faith at school events, to designate a process for such events, and allow religious content in coursework. There would also be a disclaimer that the school does not endorse or sponsor the expressions of faith.
Sen. Weiler is one of the brighter bulbs in the Utah State Senate, and we respect his concerns about religious freedom. However, as mentioned, we don’t see any threats in Utah public schools that address what he is proposing. To legislate this issue, to take up time debating it and passing a bill and sending it to the governor is a waste.
http://goo.gl/ge2z4e

Cal Grondahl editorial cartoon
http://goo.gl/OUGNwm

Open schools to community
(Logan) Herald Journal letter from Kerry Rood

I studied with interest a recent flyer from Cache County School District inviting residents to support the upcoming $129 million bond proposition. Let me state upfront that I am in support of this bond proposal but admit pausing again at the $129 million commitment.
Much has been said on the potential impact this effort might have on students (current and future), but the thought occurred to me, as a parent of teenage daughters, that there could be more to this than relieving overcrowding and upgrading aged infrastructure. Could these new high schools be joint community recreation centers?
http://goo.gl/eWMlso

Five reasons to back bond
(Logan) Herald Journal letter from Michelle Thompson

I will be voting in favor of the Cache County school bond, and here are a few reasons I hope you’ll join me:
http://goo.gl/auF3nM

Educators should help kids in ninth grade avoid dropping out Salt Lake Tribune letter from M. Donald Thomas

Re “Are Utah kids in school-to-prison pipeline?”: It is a masterpiece (“Don’t suspend kids for bahavior; it makes them drop out,” Opinion, Oct. 20). It should be mandatory reading for every educator.
An extensive study by the South Carolina Department of Education found that both suspension and failure rates at ninth grade strongly correlate with dropout rates. Most high schools have the most suspensions and the highest failure rate at ninth grade. Reducing both suspensions and failures in ninth grade would significantly increase graduation rates.
Both suspensions and failures can be reduced by carefully assigning teachers to ninth grade, providing stronger counseling services to grade 9 students and by immediate intervention by teachers to alleviate possible failure.
http://goo.gl/dZfe4f

Architectural safety requirements for schools
(Ogden) Standard-Examiner letter from Robert C. Wadman

It has been over 50 years since a school fire took the life of a Utah child. The threat of fire has been effectively prevented by architectural improvements in Utah schools. State and county building codes for school construction require school buildings to have sprinkler systems, fire alarms, lighted exit signs, and many other building code requirements to prevent the loss of life if a school fire occurs.
School administrators, teachers, and children learn how to safely exit a school building if a fire occurs. From fire drills to training sessions for schoolteachers, Utah fire prevention strategies to prevent the loss of life in a school fire have been successful.
In 2013, what is more likely — a school fire or a school shooting?
http://goo.gl/tRSoaD

Debate: Are charter schools a legitimate alternative to public education?
Scripps Howard News Service (via New York Newsday) commentary by columnists BEN BOYCHUK & JOEL MATHIS

Are charter schools the conservative movement’s version of Solyndra? Education reformers — mostly but not entirely on the right –have long peddled charter schools as a solution to the nation’s education woes.
Such schools, paid for from public funds but run by private and non-profit organizations, have more freedom to try different approaches to schooling. But trouble can pop up: In Philadelphia this week, the founder of three charter schools pleaded guilty to charges in connection with a federal fraud case that has ensnared other leaders in the city’s charter movement.
It’s just the latest prosecution against charter operators in the city.
Are charter schools a legitimate alternative to public schools? Or do they exist to profit off of taxpayers? Joel Mathis and Ben Boychuk, the RedBlueAmerica columnists, debate the issue.
http://goo.gl/pXkTjP

The Public School Ownership Gap
Education Week op-ed by T. Elijah Hawkes, co-principal at Randolph Union Middle/High School, in Randolph, Vt.

Universal free public schooling, a cornerstone of our modern democracy, is facing a quiet crisis. One that I call the ownership gap.
Medical advances, dual-earner households, urbanization, and many other social changes mean that Americans are living longer and having fewer children. Our nation has realized that demographic shifts like these have a big impact on our workforce, tax base, long-term health care, and Social Security. But what about on our public schools?
During the baby-boom era, a school-age child lived in nearly every other house on the block. Now, it’s different. According to the 2010 U.S. Census, children between the ages of 6 and 17 reside in less than 26 percent of households. Translation: The vast majority of American homes have an absence of school-age kids, which means that most folks paying for public schools have little, if any, direct contact with them. This is bad news.
It’s bad news for any enterprise, public or private, when the owners, funders, or majority stakeholders—taxpayers, in this case—are not properly informed and connected to the work. You’ll find no better recipe for accountability dysfunction, inefficient operations, and irrelevance.
http://goo.gl/cqHesR

Do American Schools Need to Change? Depends What You Compare Them To Compared to its own history, the U.S. education system may be doing fine. But compared to the rest of the world, it needs work—and quickly.
Atlantic commentary by WENDY KOPP, chief executive officer and co-founder of Teach For All and the founder of Teach For America

It’s no secret that America’s education debate is increasingly polarized and increasingly public. We see it every day on Twitter, in the headlines, and occasionally even on the picket line. The public discussion pits reformers who think that our education system is failing students against anti-reformers who think what’s wrong with our schools is the people trying to fix them. I’ve been immersed in American education for more than 20 years and have led a global education network for the last seven, and to me there’s no question that our school system must improve, and quickly. But today’s debate has become a distraction that keeps us paralyzed in old divisions and false debates, rather than uniting against common problems.
Two recent bestselling books on education, Diane Ravitch’s Reign of Error and Amanda Ripley’s The Smartest Kids in the World, shine light on the conflict—and why taking a step back and embracing a global perspective is necessary to move forward.
http://goo.gl/il8H0W

Education Reform: Not Complicated — but Seriously Difficult Huffington Post commentary by David M. Steiner, Klara and Larry Silverstein Dean, Hunter College School of Education

Given the highly favorable reviews and rave blurbs from such diverse figures as former New York City Schools Chancellor Joel Klein and American Federation of Teachers President Randi Weingarten, one might expect Amanda Ripley’s new book on international educational practices, The Smartest Kids in the World, to offer arresting revelations about how to improve America’s education system.
Currently, at least as measured by the Program for Student International Assessment (PISA), America’s students from each level of family income perform more poorly than students in the most educationally successful countries. Ripley thus sets out to draw lessons from Finland, South Korea, and Poland, which have achieved strong educational gains for their students. Certainly, as we digest — year after year — data on our own students that attests to their middling performance on international comparisons, tragic and persistent learning gaps among different segments of the population, and depressingly high college remediation rates, lessons from the best-performing countries in the world could not be more welcome.
What is thus surprising about Ripley’s book is how little it contains that is really news; instead, it serves to remind us in powerful terms that we simply haven’t acted on what we already know.
http://goo.gl/tdcCAy

I Am Woman, Watch Me Hack
New York Times Magazine commentary by economics reporter CATHERINE RAMPELL

When she was a little girl growing up in the Bronx, Nikki Allen dreamed of being a forensic scientist. As a teenager, she liked studying science in school, and she thought forensics offered a way to give back to her neighborhood. Not insignificant, the job also looked pretty cool — at least based on the many hours of “CSI” Allen had watched on TV with her aunt.
Allen, who is now 16, had considerably less interest in computer programming. But this spring, her chemistry teacher recommended that she apply for an eight-week computer-science program with Girls Who Code, a nonprofit that teaches middle- and high-school girls programming skills. At first, Allen told me, she was skeptical; she didn’t really understand what computer science was. The experience, however, got her hooked on coding, and she has even started to teach her sister how to write software. When Allen goes to college, she expects to major in the subject.
Computer science is an incredibly promising major, especially for a young woman. That and engineering are among the college degrees that can offer the highest incomes and the most flexibility — attributes widely cited for drawing many women into formerly male-dominated fields like medicine. Writing code and designing networks are also a lot more portable than nursing, teaching and other traditional pink-collar occupations. Yet just 0.4 percent of all female college freshmen say they intend to major in computer science. In fact, the share of women in computer science has actually fallen over the years. In 1990-91, about 29 percent of bachelor’s degrees awarded in computer and information sciences went to women; 20 years later, it has plunged to 18 percent. Today, just a quarter of all Americans in computer-related occupations are women.
One of the biggest challenges, according to many in the industry, may be a public-image problem. Most young people, like Allen, simply don’t come into contact with computer scientists and engineers in their daily lives, and they don’t really understand what they do.
http://goo.gl/uDEsGH

Malcolm Gladwell on Jimmy Kimmel Live
Jimmy Kimmel Live

Malcolm explains why kids can actually be worse off in smaller classes.
http://goo.gl/WCjMAV (YouTube)

————————————————————-
NATIONAL NEWS
————————————————————-

Education secretary defends Common Core standards Duncan was joined by Frederick Hess, a scholar at the American Enterprise Institute, who argued against the standards.
(University of) Chicago Maroon

United States Secretary of Education and Hyde Park native Arne Duncan explained the Common Core State Standards Initiative in a panel discussion held Thursday afternoon at International House. Duncan was joined by Frederick Hess, a scholar at the American Enterprise Institute, who argued against the standards.
Generally referred to as the Common Core, the initiative, designed by the National Governors Association and the Council of Chief State School Officers, sets fixed educational standards for K-12 students and teachers. The goal: to ensure that American students are prepared to either attend college or enter the workforce by the time they complete high school. So far, 45 states have chosen to adopt the Common Core.
According to Duncan, the system that preceded the Common Core has failed to set sufficient standards to adequately prepare students for their adult lives.
http://goo.gl/PIve00

Video of the debate
http://goo.gl/46ieKD  (UofC)

Parents study up on how to improve college prospects for their children NewsHour

While their elementary school-aged kids are being taught the basics of reading and math, some parents are learning how to prioritize their prospects for higher education. The NewsHour’s April Brown reports on the “Parent College” program that is working to improve graduation rates for underprivileged students in Los Angeles.
http://goo.gl/5uZbcL

Indiana Superintendent of Public Instruction Glenda Ritz lawsuit sets off ripples Attorney general acts to halt Ritz’s action against State Board of Education Indianapolis Star

State Superintendent of Public Instruction Glenda Ritz is standing her ground, but she’s willing to negotiate — to a point.
That might be her best option to settle her lawsuit against fellow State Board of Education members over her claim they violated the state’s Open Door Law when seeking help from a state agency to figure schools’ A-F grades for 2012-13.
At least that’s what Indiana Attorney General Greg Zoeller thinks. On Thursday, he asked the Marion Circuit Court to dismiss her lawsuit and said she — and department attorneys — didn’t have authority to file it. As the lawyer for state government, Zoeller said in a court filing only he can legally represent state officials and agencies when the lawsuit concerns their official duties.
Not so, said Ritz.
In yet another court brief late Thursday, she said exceptions exist to Zoeller’s statutory obligations to represent state officials and her case is one of them. The attorney general isn’t obligated to represent her, she said, because she initiated the action.
She said the Open Door law contemplates cases when one state official would sue another and consequently allows any person to sue. The attorney general can’t represent both sides so picking one would bar the other from seeking relief, the brief says.
http://goo.gl/kxZ7YD

Common Core Under Attack
Is the bottom falling out of the Core? As we get closer to implementation, more states are shying away.
Administr@tor

As you read this, at least five of the 45 states that signed on to adopt the new Common Core State Standards have opted not to offer the online assessments designed to measure student outcomes against the standards. Over the summer, a number of other states threw up their hands and said they can’t afford the assessment price tag. And in two bellwether states—Indiana and Florida—­legislators are getting an earful from grassroots critics who see Common Core as a federal takeover of state education policy. Some have even dubbed it “Obamacore.”
Why all the fuss now, two years after most states signed on to align with the national math and ELA standards? And how many more states can drop out before the “common” is lost from Common Core?
There’s still a year to go before the standards and assessment officially roll out. Most participating states are already deep into unpacking the standards and training teachers. Common Core is being heralded as a sea change in American education, shifting the focus toward independent thinking, inquiry, and problem solving while sifting diverse state curricula into common alignment.
To close observers, it’s no surprise that the debate over Common Core’s mission is heating up, given the odd alliances that have formed.
http://goo.gl/aKwcnY

Work on Common Core resuming immediately, Michigan education superintendent says MLive

LANSING — The Michigan Department of Education is resuming work on the Common Core State Standards after Thursday’s vote by the Michigan Senate, even though the language approved by the Senate does not match what the state House approved last month.
State Superintendent Mike Flanagan issued a directive to department employees to resume work that involves the Common Core standards. The department had halted most activities, including processing federal funds, after a budget provision halting funding for the standards took effect on Oct. 1. The legislature was required to give education officials permission to spend money on implementing the standards after Oct. 1, and the Senate’s vote Thursday means each house has approved language authorizing spending, although not the same language.
“I’d like to thank House Speaker Jase Bolger and Senate Majority Leader Randy Richardville for getting us to the point where we can continue to move forward,” Flanagan said in a statement. “To help all our students succeed, our collective work needs to be focused on having rigorous standards; effective and valuable assessments aligned to those standards; and high quality and effective educators.”
Gov. Rick Snyder, a supporter of the standards, also issued a statement Thursday afternoon thanking legislators for affirming the state’s adoption of the Common Core.
http://goo.gl/Tr5SMQ

Six-Year High School Answer for Tomorrow’s Workers?
(New York) WNYC

In a visit to Brooklyn Friday, President Obama will honor the innovative new education model at the Pathways in Technology Early College High School, P-Tech for short.
Students at the school earn a high school diploma and an associate’s degree over six years. The Obama administration says efforts like P-Tech will prepare the next generation of tech workers for jobs at companies like IBM, which sponsors the school.
This week on Money Talking, regular contributors Joe Nocera of the New York Times and Rana Foroohar of Time magazine discuss the promise of such schools, whether the president is right and what role business is playing in K-12 education.
http://goo.gl/arav0D

State education board member pitches private business at Capitol
Roberts: Marketing of math tutoring to Highland Park students a dig at Topeka senator Topeka (KS) Capital Journal

A Kansas State Board of Education member drew condemnation from four elected colleagues Thursday for passing out brochures promoting his mathematics tutoring business to high school students during a board meeting in the Capitol.
Board member Steve Roberts, who refers to himself as “Mr. X, Mentor of Mathematics,” distributed cards directing dozens of Highland Park High School students to an Internet website where clients could subscribe to a math instructional program for $15 per month. The site, but not the cards, say Kansans can access tutorials for free.
Two Republicans and two Democrats on the 10-person state board objected in separate interviews to Roberts pitching his private business to student guests during the October meeting.
Roberts, an Overland Park Republican elected last year to the board, said positioning himself at an exit and handing materials marketing mrxmath.com to the high school students was a spur-of-the-moment calculation.
http://goo.gl/ZFZCpo

————————————————————
CALENDAR
————————————————————

USOE Calendar
http://tinyurl.com/5x9oh9

UEN News
http://www.uen.org

November 7-8:
Utah State Board of Education meeting
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspxpr

November 14:
Utah State Charter School Board meeting
250 E. 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://goo.gl/Mu36l

November 19:
Executive Appropriations Subcommittee meeting
1 p.m., 445 State Capitol
http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2013&com=APPEXE

November 20:
Education Interim Committee meeting
9 a.m., 30 House Building
http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2013&Com=INTEDU

Related posts:

Comments are closed.