Education News Roundup: Oct. 31, 2013

Halloween 2013 at the Utah State Office of Education

Halloween 2013 at the Utah State Office of Education

Education News Roundup

Today’s Top Picks:

OK. So ENR had to attend a conference in Chicago (my kind of town, Chicago is) and is trying to catch up not only with work, but also the roundup. Here’s everything from the newspapers including the time ENR was gone. He hopes to get fully caught up — including the roundup — tomorrow.

Speaking of conferences, Davis Board looks at cost and attendance.
http://goo.gl/L8L7ml  (OSE)

Opposition to Jordan bond gets two stories in the D-News.
http://goo.gl/47yaAe  (DN)
and http://goo.gl/GyAC3y  (DN)

Trib touts Utah 8th grade science scores.
http://goo.gl/EwZshM  (Trib)

Sutherland’s Paul Mero wants to fix Prosperity 2020.
http://goo.gl/TdSw6w (DN)

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TODAY’S HEADLINES
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UTAH

Davis school officials debate expense of annual training trips

Study: Utah among states with math, science scores above international average

Cache County School District reports enrollment gain of 156 students over last year

Enrollment numbers down slightly in Logan school district

Group encourages people to vote no on $495M Jordan School District bond

Opposition to Jordan school bond fizzles at meeting

Cache County School District purchases land for future Millville high school

School district lowers bond interest rates

Senator looking to create statewide safe schools hotline

Utah advocates say anti-bullying law could ‘out’ LGBT kids Guidelines » They want Utah schools to talk to bullied students before notifying parents.

Davis School District offers frank discussions for parents about bullying, suicide

Brock’s Theorem: High school student discovers math formula

Ogden students learn how to research and write legislation

Logan schools to shoulder more of officers’ pay

Female teacher suspected of sex with Utah student Crime » Boy tells police Davis High School educator had sex with him when he was 15.

Grantsville High teacher faces lewdness charge

Coach accused of sexual relationship with student headed to trial

Substitute teacher found drunk outside of school

Eagle Mountain schools back to normal after nearby SWAT incident

Ogden High wins historic preservation award Historic » Ogden High was Utah’s first million-dollar school.

Community celebrates 100 years of Davis High School

Jordan Applied Technology Center counselor receives award

Ogden teacher surprised with funds for classroom iPads

Students and businesses help one another in Community of Caring

Ogden High club makes Halloween happen at Marshall White Center

Costumed Salt Lake City students hit the Halloween road

OPINION & COMMENTARY

Science scores a bright light for Utah schools Utah students excel in vital subjects

Is ‘moderate’ a dirty word in Heber City politics?

Business community needs to help fix Prosperity 2020

3 mayors: Jordan bond is premature, too large

Jordan District needs money from bond issue

Invest in our children now

A Bold Bid for Better Schools

What Schools Can Do to Help Boys Succeed If boys are restive and unfocused, we must look for ways to help them do better. Here are three suggestionsfall2013

Gender Gaps in college Enrollment: the Role of Gender Sorting Across Public High Schools

NATION

No U.S. Action, So States Move on Privacy Law

Warily, Schools Watch Students on the Internet

Many high school athletes at greater concussion risk than college counterparts: Report

CDC sets food allergy guidelines for schools Schools can help prevent dangerous food reactions in allergic students, CDC says

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UTAH NEWS
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Davis school officials debate expense of annual training trips

FARMINGTON – At least once a year, Davis school board members and select administrators travel to attend a national conference, though some board members say the money could be better spent elsewhere in the district.
A few weeks ago, four board members and six district administrators attended the National Federation of Urban and Suburban School Districts Conference in Greenville, S.C. Three board members did not attend, two of them saying they didn’t want to waste district funds.
“It’s very, very expensive to attend,” board member Peter Cannon said. “For example, we went to the NFUSSD conference in New Orleans a year ago, and when we came back, it occurred to me that they had spent way over $1,000 just to send me, not to mention the other six board members.
“I came back to the public board meeting and announced my apologies for spending citizens’ money that way and that I would not go again with those circumstances,” he said.
Cannon said the conference does provide important information for the board, but he would rather see just one board member and someone from administration attend, then report their findings to the board.
http://goo.gl/L8L7ml (OSE)

Study: Utah among states with math, science scores above international average

SALT LAKE CITY — Students in most U.S. states, including Utah, scored higher in mathematics and science in 2011 than their international peers, according to a new report.
The NAEP-TIMSS Linking Study places the education and performance of U.S. students in a global context by predicting how states would fare in the Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study based on their National Assessment of Educational Progress scores.
http://goo.gl/gBYgDz  (DN)

Cache County School District reports enrollment gain of 156 students over last year

The Cache County School District’s student enrollment numbers increased by 156 from last year’s count.
Each year, schools count their students Oct. 1 and send the numbers to the State Office of Education. These numbers determine the funding the school district gets in certain areas.
The district recorded having 16,038 students, up from last year’s count of 15,882. The biggest growth came from the lower grades at the elementary level. Kindergarten, second, fourth and fifth grade all saw increased numbers of students.
http://goo.gl/GMvQt2  (LHJ)

Enrollment numbers down slightly in Logan school district

Enrollment numbers are down slightly in the Logan City School District based on head counts taken Oct. 1.
http://goo.gl/lUpgvV  (LHJ)

Group encourages people to vote no on $495M Jordan School District bond

SOUTH JORDAN — A grass-roots effort is underway in the southwest end of the Salt Lake Valley to derail the Jordan School District’s efforts to encourage voters to pass a $495 million bond.
Erin Weist created the Facebook group Vote No for Jordan District Bond, saying it’s just too much money.
“We are seeing schools currently that are underutilized, so we are proposing this enormous bond looking to the future when currently we are under-enrolled,” Weist said. “And it seems unnecessary and excessive.”
Jordan officials say the district will need eight new elementary schools, two middle schools and one high school, as well as upgrades to existing schools by 2019 to handle growth in the district.
The $495 million bond would cost the average homeowner about $300 a year and the average business about $550 a year.
http://goo.gl/47yaAe  (DN)

Opposition to Jordan school bond fizzles at meeting

WEST JORDAN — Online hype indicated a group opposing a proposed $495 million bond for the Jordan School District was going to air their grievances to the school board, but they were absent at Tuesday’s board meeting.
Four of the five people who signed up to approach the board offered support for the bond and their willingness to sacrifice in order to fund better classroom conditions in the rapidly growing district.
At least one person in the small audience asked if she could address the board about the bond despite not signing up. She was encouraged to share her opinion by phone or email.
The lone voice of opposition, Alexandra Eframo, said she worries about the high amount the district is asking from taxpayers and questions whether that money would directly benefit each student. Instead, she suggested the board support legislation being drafted by state Sen. Pat Jones, D-Holladay, which would eliminate tax exemptions benefitting large families.
http://goo.gl/GyAC3y  (DN)

Cache County School District purchases land for future Millville high school

The Cache County School District has officially purchased a small strip of land by its future Millville high school site in order to increase accessibility. The district’s board of education approved the purchase Thursday during its regular meeting. The district and the landowners will close the deal today.
http://goo.gl/FrpsoR  (LHJ)

School district lowers bond interest rates

With the upcoming bond election in sight, the Cache County School District has refinanced a series of bonds issued in 2004 to a lower interest rate.
The district has seven years of payments left on the bond but secured a lower rate of 5.87 percent for the remaining life of the bond.
http://goo.gl/N7E1ci  (LHJ)

Senator looking to create statewide safe schools hotline

A state senator is looking at creating a new hotline that aims to help save Utah students’ lives.
Sen. Daniel Thatcher, R-West Valley City, told the Daily Herald on Monday that he is in the early workings of legislation that would create a state-funded hotline to alert officials that a student’s life may be in danger through suicide or other means.
“The idea is, basically if you hear a kid talking about suicide or hurting somebody then you call a tip line and somebody looks into it,” explained Thatcher.
http://goo.gl/bN5UUN  (PDH)

Utah advocates say anti-bullying law could ‘out’ LGBT kids Guidelines » They want Utah schools to talk to bullied students before notifying parents.

Layton » Christine D’Arco remembers high school as a place where she passed groups of people whispering about her, softball teammates wouldn’t let her change clothes alongside them in the locker room and everywhere kids said she was a lesbian.
“I felt like I was going into a little prison,” she said. “Suicide was in my mind every day. It was a very real thing for me, very real.”
But she never told her parents about the bullying, and she didn’t come out to her parents for years.
“I already felt like so much less; I didn’t want them to see that in me,” said D’Arco, now 24. If she came out, “I just felt like my relationship with my dad would have been strained.”
She didn’t confront the trauma from years of being bullied until after she attempted suicide at 21 and spent nine days in a hospital.
Now, if she told someone at school about the bullying, administrators would have to tell her parents, bound by a law passed this year by the Utah Legislature.
http://goo.gl/mRRWxJ  (SLT)

Davis School District offers frank discussions for parents about bullying, suicide

BOUNTIFUL — Davis School District hit two birds with one stone this week, following through with a new state law requirement and arming parents with further resources in dealing with the four leading dangers affecting kids at school.
Utah House Bill 298, passed this summer, requires school districts to offer an annual seminar to parents and include information on substance abuse, bullying, mental health, and Internet safety.
http://goo.gl/j0ZyTW  (OSE)

Brock’s Theorem: High school student discovers math formula

LEHI — Before he learned how to drive a car, Lehi High School student Brock Brown designed a simple way to solve binomial expansions.
Assistant Professor Ben Moulton from UVU’s Math Department is traveling with Brown on Nov. 1 to Anaheim, Calif., to present “Brock’s Theorem: An Alternate to the Binomial Theorem” at a math conference.
The American Mathematical Association of Two Year Colleges sponsor the annual event.
In many ways, Brock Brown is a typical teenager. He has an after school job, doesn’t like homework, and enjoys making music and spending time with friends.
Last spring, as a sophomore, he was sitting in his math class learning to use Pascal’s triangle to solve binomial expansions, and devised a quicker formula that according to Moulton is elegant and simple.
“It’s going to take a really long time on the homework if I do it this way,” Brown said he told himself.
Unlike his high school peers, Brown pondered the pattern he saw in Pascal’s triangle and found a short cut. Currently a junior at Lehi High School, he got his homework done faster, which was his intent, and also got the attention of university scholars.
http://goo.gl/symNrN  (PDH)

Ogden students learn how to research and write legislation

OGDEN — Ogden High School senior Josh Shackleford has a whole new respect for elected officials. He and his fellow classmates have spent the last three weeks researching, writing, presenting and debating bills in Jaci Durtschi’s U.S. government and civics class.
The students have been working with the district’s teacher librarians on the project, and have learned how to use Google apps, a new research tool the district provides to all students. With the tool, students can work simultaneously on projects in groups on separate computers but in the same document.
http://goo.gl/Yz8Fbk

Logan schools to shoulder more of officers’ pay

The Logan City School District has approved a plan to cover more of the costs of resource officers in the schools.
http://goo.gl/p9hND3  (LHJ)

Female teacher suspected of sex with Utah student Crime » Boy tells police Davis High School educator had sex with him when he was 15.

A Davis High School teacher has been arrested and is accused of having sex with a student.
Brianne L. Altice, 34, was booked into the Davis County Jail late Monday on suspicion of two counts of unlawful sexual activity with a minor. She was released Tuesday morning on $10,000 bail. Formal charges have not been filed.
The boy told the police about the sex, which allegedly occurred between the spring and August of 2012 when he was about 15 years old, said Kaysville Police Lt. Paul Thompson. A jail document says the alleged victim is now 17.
http://goo.gl/Kk1qYN  (SLT)

http://goo.gl/Nbx0Kk  (DN)

http://goo.gl/2EvGry (OSE)

Grantsville High teacher faces lewdness charge

A Grantsville High School teacher is accused of committing a sex act in front of a child in the steam room at a Murray gym.
In charges filed earlier this month, police wrote that Salvatore Degraffenreidt and another man went into the steam room Aug. 13 at 5445 S. 900 East, which is the Sports Mall in Murray. A 12-year-old was using the steam room at the time, police wrote.
http://goo.gl/6oNSda  (SLT)

http://goo.gl/mw0vpA  (DN)

Coach accused of sexual relationship with student headed to trial

FARMINGTON — A four-day trial is still a go for a former charter school basketball coach accused of having a sexual relationship with a student.
Stephen Paul Niedzwiecki, 34, of Kaysville, appeared in 2nd District Court on Monday. He is charged with eight counts of forcible sodomy, one count of attempted rape, all first-degree felonies; and two counts of forcible sexual abuse, second-degree felonies. He entered not guilty pleas to the charges in June.
His attorney, Cara Tangaro, said her office is ready to go forward with the trial.
The trial is set to run from Feb. 4 through Feb. 7.
http://goo.gl/ndAZSt  (OSE)

Substitute teacher found drunk outside of school

Logan » A substitute teacher in northern Utah has been arrested after school leaders spotted her outside of the school nursing a liquor bottle.
The Herald Journal of Logan reports that the 32-year-old woman was arrested Tuesday afternoon on suspicion of intoxication and open container violations. She has not yet been charged.
http://goo.gl/0EnKeP (SLT)

http://goo.gl/XEA7Lu  (OSE)

http://goo.gl/U7e7eZ (PDH)

http://goo.gl/L8F0Q9  (LHJ)

http://goo.gl/SCszGm  (SGS)

Eagle Mountain schools back to normal after nearby SWAT incident

EAGLE MOUNTAIN – Utah County Sheriff’s Office deputies went door-to-door this morning on Ruby Valley Drive in Eagle Mountain warning residents of a possible lock down after sparked by a domestic dispute.
After officials removed police barricades in the area, nearby schools are back to normal with children allowed to return home.
http://goo.gl/MdFdCv  (PDH)

Ogden High wins historic preservation award Historic » Ogden High was Utah’s first million-dollar school.

The $64 million renovation and preservation of iconic Ogden High has won the school and district a national honor.
The National Trust for Historic Preservation will honor Ogden School District, the school and its foundation Friday with one of 10 National Preservation Honor Awards.
http://goo.gl/uJ7S5c  (SLT)

http://goo.gl/MVvBqt  (OSE)

Community celebrates 100 years of Davis High School

KAYSVILLE — When students first started attending Davis High School after it was built 100 years ago, the educational environment was a far cry from today’s standards.
In the early 1900s, education was a bit askew, with 13 towns boasting their own school district, curriculum and teacher qualifications that varied wildly, and facilities that were wholly inadequate, according to narration given to students at Davis High School on Wednesday as they celebrated the school’s extensive history during a 100-year commemorative assembly.
http://goo.gl/iMGDRg  (OSE)

Jordan Applied Technology Center counselor receives award

WEST JORDAN — A Jordan Applied Technology Center counselor has received an award for his work.
Jamie Vargas has spent the past three years creatively promoting career and technical education courses and innovative practices throughout the Jordan School District, according to district officials. His work has earned him a regional Career Guidance Award from the Association for Career & Technical Education.
http://goo.gl/w7abXu  (DN)

Ogden teacher surprised with funds for classroom iPads

OGDEN — Teachers and administrators recently received $216,000 in classroom grants from the Ogden School Foundation.
One teacher at Taylor Canyon Elementary, however, received an extra bonus with her grant.
As members of the foundation’s board, as well as foundation director Janis Vause, entered teacher Claire Miller’s sixth-grade classroom with balloons and big smiles Wednesday morning, Miller got teary-eyed because she knew what was coming. She had received her $1,000 impact grant to help purchase iPads for her class.
http://goo.gl/55H2DW  (OSE)

Students and businesses help one another in Community of Caring

OGDEN — Mount Ogden Junior High students filled the walkways, stores and restaurants of Cedar Village Thursday to celebrate the school’s Community of Caring night. This is the ninth year the students have been partnering with the businesses in the strip mall located within the school population boundaries.
Pumpkins lined the walkways that were decorated and carved by students. Students recited memorized poems in Wisebird Bookery, students sang and played musical instruments in Javier’s Restaurant and student artwork was displayed in Great Harvest.
http://goo.gl/uabMEM  (OSE)

Ogden High club makes Halloween happen at Marshall White Center

OGDEN — The Marshall White Center held its annual Halloween Harvest Festival on Saturday, activities including face painting, pumpkin carving, mask making, a coloring contest, and a creepy Haunted Alley in the basement.
Students from Ogden High’s Family, Career, and Community Leaders of America club volunteered at the event; helping to set everything up on Friday and then returning on Saturday to induce scares in the Haunted Alley and help children make masks and carve pumpkins at the craft tables.
http://goo.gl/gQPlS8  (OSE)

Costumed Salt Lake City students hit the Halloween road

Many Utah schools hold a Halloween parade, but Bonneville Elementary students also take their show on the road. Led by the principal, they start in the school but then march around the block, allowing parents and neighbors to get a good viewing spot to see the costumes, according to Salt Lake City School District spokesman Jason Olsen.
http://goo.gl/rrkFB5  (SLT)

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OPINION & COMMENTARY
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Science scores a bright light for Utah schools Utah students excel in vital subjects Salt Lake Tribune editorial

It seems at times that gloom surrounds most reports on the status of public education in Utah. Graduation rates are significantly lower than the state once touted; the number of dropouts, especially among the growing Latino population, is alarmingly high.
And there are the perennial statistics that color the image of education in the Beehive State: largest class sizes and lowest per-pupil expenditure in the nation; underpaid teachers and a third of college freshmen needing remedial courses.
But last week, Utah’s eighth-graders gave education watchers a reason to celebrate.
In a study that links U.S. standardized-test results with testing done internationally, Utah’s middle-school students scored higher in science than students in all but five countries. And in math, Utah eighth-graders outperformed their peers in all but 10 countries and provinces.
The study looks at test results in 2011 in 38 countries and nine subnational entities, such as Canadian provinces.
Utah eighth-graders are in good company at the top of the rankings.
http://goo.gl/EwZshM

Is ‘moderate’ a dirty word in Heber City politics?
Salt Lake Tribune commentary by columnist PAUL ROLLY

I wrote in Monday’s column about how partisan politics has crept into the officially nonpartisan Holladay mayor’s race and have been getting examples of party participation in other city contests as well.
In Heber City, residents take it even further. You not only have to be a Republican to secure certain endorsements, you also have to be a “special” Republican.
The tea party has taken an active role in the City Council races there, with questions during the debates and in online forums consistent with tea party values.
Questions for council candidates include these doozies: “Do you align yourself more with Orrin Hatch or Mike Lee?” “Do you believe our government is a democracy or a republic?” “Do you consider yourself a moderate?” (That, apparently, is a bad thing.) “Do you support consensus?” (Another bad thing.)
One active group is “The Cornerstone of Freedom,” which is aligned with the Eagle Forum and has training seminars for mostly home-schooling moms to fight for certain causes — the passionate one of late is the battle against the Common Core.
http://goo.gl/UeEunX

Business community needs to help fix Prosperity 2020 Deseret News op-ed by Paul Mero, president of Sutherland Institute

Here’s the bad news: Utah’s highly touted Prosperity 2020 plan, which aims to have 66 percent of Utahns with college degrees, 90 percent of school kids proficient in reading and math, and Utah as a leader in science in technology, all by the year 2020, will fail as currently planned.
Here’s the good news: Prosperity 2020 can be turned around in time to get close to its lofty goals.
The current plan centers on massive amounts of new taxes streaming into the current public school system and hoping that more money will achieve big goals. It won’t work.
The current Prosperity 2020 vision is grounded in 20th-century methods and ideas that fail to effectively educate enough children in math and science. The rest of the world, including nearly every kid with a smartphone, has moved on — and so must Utah. I have grandchildren as young as 18 months old who can open an iPad, skip through the security panel and get into their favorite games. Using an iPad doesn’t mean you can build one, but it does mean youth today are more in tune with technology than any other generation in world history. In other words, this generation has a natural advantage on the road to technological proficiency.
To turn around Prosperity 2020, Utah’s business community needs to get serious about its objectives. If the goal is a well-educated future workforce in a high-tech age, Utah’s business community cannot command-and-control this political agenda from the top down — it needs to get its hands dirty in education.
First, Utah’s business community should focus on improving K-12 education. The real goals of Prosperity 2020 should be for high schools to elevate their courses to college-level learning and for elementary schools to focus on liberal arts.
http://goo.gl/TdSw6w

3 mayors: Jordan bond is premature, too large Salt Lake Tribune op-ed by Scott Osborne, mayor of South Jordan, Bill Applegarth, mayor of Riverton, Derk Timothy, mayor of Bluffdale

We in South Jordan, Riverton and Bluffdale have a significant tax burden. Additionally, we also have the responsibility to see our children and our grandchildren are well-educated. We recognize our cities’ futures will be directly affected by the quality of education our children receive.
Economic development will be directly impacted if we do not have adequate educational opportunities. Our neighborhoods will experience decline and property values will decrease if school facilities are not properly located and constructed.
That being said, we have substantial concerns with the current $495 million bond request from Jordan School District. The district has listened to the citizenry and started to develop several committees. If the school district is just starting the process of evaluation and study, the bond proposal seems premature.
The need for schools is critical; however, we must exercise great restraint when asking for nearly half a billion dollars. The passage of such a large bond would have a significant chilling effect on each city’s development community.
http://goo.gl/ktML33

Jordan District needs money from bond issue Salt Lake Tribune letter from Jennifer Boehme

Vote for the Jordan bond! Communities show what they value by where they spend their tax dollars. Jordan School District residents all benefit from increased property values, lower crime rates and economic development because of great schools (“Bonds, taxes and city consolidation are on Utahns’ ballots,” Tribune, Oct. 18).
Adequate facilities show children that the adults in the community want them to have a good education. As citizens, we want our children to gain the skills necessary to compete in the global market as well as the skills to be good citizens.
http://goo.gl/tB4v3b

Invest in our children now
(Provo) Daily Herald letter from Linda Smith

Three national polls conducted this summer (Gallup/Phi Delta Kappa, Education Next and Associated Press/NORC Center) show that a majority of Americans strongly support public investment in educational programs for young children.
Utah has made progress in early childhood education. However, many Utah children lack access to high quality early learning experiences. Quality early learning programs are difficult to find and afford. Many kindergarteners begin school lagging behind peers who experienced high-quality early learning programs and environments.
http://goo.gl/JdDPHj

A Bold Bid for Better Schools
New York Times commentary by columnist FRANK BRUNI

If there’s a key to this nation’s sustained competitiveness, it’s education. And if there’s a key to the kind of social mobility that’s integral to our country’s cherished narrative, to its soul, it’s giving kids from all walks of life teachers and classrooms that beckon them toward excellence. But like all aspects of American policy making these days, the push to improve public schools bucks up against factionalism, pettiness, lobbies that won’t be muted and sacred cows that can’t be disturbed. Progress that needs to be sweeping is anything but.
That’s why my eyes turn to Colorado. That’s why yours should, too.
The state is on the precipice of something big. On Election Day next Tuesday, Coloradans will decide whether to ratify an ambitious statewide education overhaul that the Legislature already passed and that Gov. John Hickenlooper signed but that voters must now approve, because Colorado law gives them that right in regard to tax increases, which the overhaul entails. Arne Duncan, the nation’s education secretary, has said that the success of Amendment 66, which is what voters will weigh in on, would make Colorado “the educational model for every other state to follow.”
It’s significant in many regards, especially in its creation of utterly surprising political bedfellows.
http://goo.gl/4tVlsx

What Schools Can Do to Help Boys Succeed If boys are restive and unfocused, we must look for ways to help them do better. Here are three suggestions Time commentary by Christina Hoff Sommers, author of The War Against Boys: How Misguided Policies Are Harming Our Young Men

Being a boy can be a serious liability in today’s classroom. As a group, boys are noisy, rowdy and hard to manage. Many are messy, disorganized and won’t sit still. Young male rambunctiousness, according to a recent study, leads teachers to underestimate their intellectual and academic abilities. “Girl behavior is the gold standard in schools,” says psychologist Michael Thompson. “Boys are treated like defective girls.”
These “defective girls” are not faring well academically. Compared with girls, boys earn lower grades, win fewer honors and are less likely to go to college. One education expert has quipped that if current trends continue, the last male will graduate from college in 2068. In today’s knowledge-based economy, success in the classroom has never been more crucial to a young person’s life prospects. Women are adapting; men are not.
Some may say, “Too bad for the boys.” The ability to regulate one’s impulses, sit still and pay attention are building blocks of success in school and in life. As one critic told me, the classroom is no more rigged against boys than workplaces are rigged against lazy or unfocused workers. That is absurd: unproductive workers are adults — not 5- and 6-year-old children who depend on us to learn how to become adults. If boys are restive and unfocused, we must look for ways to help them do better.
http://goo.gl/9MT7di

Gender Gaps in college Enrollment: the Role of Gender Sorting Across Public High Schools Educational Researcher analysis by Dylan Conger, George Washington University, and Mark C. Long, University of Washington

This article uses Florida administrative data to evaluate the role that public high schools play in the growing female advantage in college enrollment. We first show evidence of gender sorting across public high schools that is beyond what one would observe if students were randomly assigned to their schools. Using regression and decomposition techniques, we then find that across-school gender sorting explains 12% and 16% of females’ higher rates of enrollment among Hispanic and black students, respectively. this relatively large contribution of high schools to gender disparities in college enrollment among black and Hispanic students has implications for educators at all levels.
http://goo.gl/BRmhlL

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NATIONAL NEWS
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No U.S. Action, So States Move on Privacy Law New York Times

State legislatures around the country, facing growing public concern about the collection and trade of personal data, have rushed to propose a series of privacy laws, from limiting how schools can collect student data to deciding whether the police need a warrant to track cellphone locations.
Over two dozen privacy laws have passed this year in more than 10 states, in places as different as Oklahoma and California. Many lawmakers say that news reports of widespread surveillance by the National Security Agency have led to more support for the bills among constituents. And in some cases, the state lawmakers say, they have felt compelled to act because of the stalemate in Washington on legislation to strengthen privacy laws.
“Congress is obviously not interested in updating those things or protecting privacy,” said Jonathan Stickland, a Republican state representative in Texas. “If they’re not going to do it, states have to do it.”
http://goo.gl/6yXR3I

Warily, Schools Watch Students on the Internet New York Times

SAN FRANCISCO — For years, a school principal’s job was to make sure students were not creating a ruckus in the hallways or smoking in the bathroom. Vigilance ended at the schoolhouse gates.
Now, as students complain, taunt and sometimes cry out for help on social media, educators have more opportunities to monitor students around the clock. And some schools are turning to technology to help them. Several companies offer services to filter and glean what students do on school networks; a few now offer automated tools to comb through off-campus postings for signs of danger. For school officials, this raises new questions about whether they should — or legally can — discipline children for their online outbursts.
The problem has taken on new urgency with the case of a 12-year-old Florida girl who committed suicide after classmates relentlessly bullied her online and offline.
http://goo.gl/jahMAv

Many high school athletes at greater concussion risk than college counterparts: Report CBS

The Institute of Medicine and National Research Council report that in many sports, high school athletes have a higher risk of getting a concussion than college players.
In a joint report published on Oct. 30 by the research organizations, a panel of medical experts found that concussion rates were higher in high school-aged athletes who played football, baseball, men’s lacrosse and men’s soccer than for college athletes who play those sports.
For football in particular, college athletes experience an estimated 6.3 concussions per 1,000 athletic exposures, a number that includes all practices and games. High school rates were at 11.2 concussions per 1,000 athletic exposures.
Competitions also yield more concussions than practices, except for in cheerleading. The highest concussion rates during games were seen in football, ice hockey, lacrosse, wrestling, soccer and women’s basketball competitive events.
http://goo.gl/yWX4pm

http://goo.gl/i3vE92  (Reuters)

http://goo.gl/lHECEx   (OSE)

A copy of the report
http://goo.gl/zGbj4N  (IOM)

CDC sets food allergy guidelines for schools Schools can help prevent dangerous food reactions in allergic students, CDC says USA Today

For the first time, federal health officials are giving schools recommendations on how to handle food allergies in students.
The guidelines, released Wednesday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, are voluntary but they could make schools safer for millions of children, advocates say. They also could mean more classrooms will ban food rewards, snacks and party treats made with nuts, milk, eggs and other common allergens – changes kids without allergies are sure to notice, too.
Fifteen states and many school districts already have guidelines in place, but the CDC recommendations “are now the gold standard,” says John Lehr, chief executive officer of Food Allergy Research & Education, an advocacy group based in McLean, Va. The group was among those who worked on the guidelines with federal health officials.
CDC estimates that 4% to 6% of children have food allergies and that 88% of schools have at least one student with a food allergy.
http://goo.gl/SAHeXv

http://goo.gl/FPMdX0 (CSM)

A copy of the guidelines
http://goo.gl/uLbvUS  (CDC)

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CALENDAR
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USOE Calendar
http://tinyurl.com/5x9oh9

UEN News
http://www.uen.org

November 7-8:
Utah State Board of Education meeting
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspxpr

November 14:
Utah State Charter School Board meeting
250 E. 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://goo.gl/Mu36l

November 19:
Executive Appropriations Subcommittee meeting
1 p.m., 445 State Capitol
http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2013&com=APPEXE

November 20:
Education Interim Committee meeting
9 a.m., 30 House Building
http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2013&Com=INTEDU

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