Education News Roundup: Nov. 13, 2013

Education News Roundup

Whimsical Shape Portraits by South Elementary School, Beverley Taylor Sorenson Arts Learning Program

Whimsical Shape Portraits by South Elementary School, Beverley Taylor Sorenson Arts Learning Program

Today’s Top Picks:

Trib looks at potential changes for school grading.
http://goo.gl/7HZlY3  (SLT)

Governor’s Office begins work on the budget.
http://goo.gl/bvK3wp  (KUTV)

The UEA president has some advice on where to spend that budget.
http://goo.gl/y0Tk4w  (CVD)

11 percent of Davis students are taking advantage of Utah’s open enrollment and are attending schools that aren’t their home schools.
http://goo.gl/9mLXq4  (OSE)

It’s kinda nice to see Utah held up as the gold standard for AP tests for a California private school.
http://goo.gl/47HeSY  (Tahoe [CA] Daily Tribune)

Expanded preschool bill makes its debut in Congress.
http://goo.gl/6KIEpd (WaPo)
and http://goo.gl/RvcU1k  (Ed Week)

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TODAY’S HEADLINES
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UTAH

New grading system likely for Utah high schools for at-risk kids Legislature still wants to hold alternative schools accountable.

Governor Herbert Begins Budget Battle

UT educator: budget cuts = lower student performance

Variance requests down from a year ago in Davis School District

Students, parents now weigh in on teacher evaluations

Students can become reading ‘STARs’
Office of Education’s STAR reading program comes back to Summit County

Utah’s legislative task force on education speaks at WSU

Provo School District Purposes 90 Million Dollar Bond

Jordan High teacher receives family and consumer sciences award

Utah company’s ‘Safeboard’ aims to protect classrooms from school shooter Funding » The cost easily could become prohibitive to most schools and districts.

Utah Public School Enrollment Up This Fall

Hearing set on boundary changes for Woods Cross, North Salt Lake schools

Tooele County School District to host parent seminars on youth protection

Free workshop set to help families save for college

American Fork Marching Band to compete in Bands of America Grand Nationals

Lions Club honors Peace Poster winners

Custom Learning Academy students achieve superior results

Cool School: Granger High School

Literacy: Improve it or pay the price

OPINION & COMMENTARY

Public nixes bond for schools; child tax exemption limit next?

School kids need more class time

Thanks to all teachers

Why a school district changed its name

Why Isn’t Harvard Training More Teachers?
Students are attracted to Teach for America, but it’s hard to fight the perception that education programs are “beneath the dignity of an Ivy League school.”

In College Admissions, Social Media Can Be a Double-Edged Sword

Feds’ 3 Tentacles in the Common Core
Exclusive: Chuck Norris shares shocking revelations about new education standards

NATION

First Lady’s New Initiative: College, ‘Whatever It Takes’

Plan to expand preschool for 4-year-olds is barely bipartisan, with one GOP co-sponsor

NYC parents file suit against state Ed. Dept. over student data collection

Idaho House, Senate education chairs urge support for Idaho core standards

Common Core not likely to get Senate floor debate in regular session, says GOP leader

Florida teacher value-added data is public record, appeal court rules

Indiana education board comes to abrupt halt as feud with Glenda Ritz boils over

Getting schools up to 21st-century speed

Q&A with Anthony Kim: What will the next phase of blended learning look like?

Longer School Days in Store for Some in 5 States

Los Angeles school board looks at laptops after troubled iPad rollout

Teacher rejects pact, fired for unauthorized absence to go to religious meeting Flavell rejected a compromise agreement reached in special board meeting October 29

Experts Debate Role of Sports in U.S. High Schools

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UTAH NEWS
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New grading system likely for Utah high schools for at-risk kids Legislature still wants to hold alternative schools accountable.

The Utah Legislature likely will alter its new School Grades accountability system, and one thing is almost certain to change: the way alternative high schools are graded.
Students who are failing in traditional schools turn to alternative schools to help them catch up on credits to graduate. If that’s not possible, the schools help students earn a general education diploma (GED), or an adult education diploma, or move on to a trade school or even to college.
Senate President Wayne Niederhauser said there’s a growing consensus among lawmakers that the Legislature should change the way it grades alternative schools.
“Their objectives are different, so we need to narrow in on those,” said Niederhauser, R-Sandy. Still, he added, “There needs to be some accountability there.”
Alternative schools are on the agenda for a task force of lawmakers and education officials that meets regularly to discuss changes in School Grades, he said. No specific changes have yet been proposed, however.
http://goo.gl/7HZlY3  (SLT)

Governor Herbert Begins Budget Battle

Behind closed doors the chief business in Governor Gary Herbert’s office right now is making a budget for when the legislature meets in January.
The Budget Director Kristen Cox is helping prepare Governor Gary Herbert’s budget message for next month, and she says Utah will have more money to spend than it had last year.
Utah under calculated revenues last year, so if revenues will stay flat. Utah will have $240 million more next year than the legislature spent this year.
Utah has to run fast just to stay in the same place, for example the state needs $70 million dollars more for the growing number of children in Utah schools.
http://goo.gl/bvK3wp  (KUTV)

UT educator: budget cuts = lower student performance

SALT LAKE CITY – Utah’s student performance likely would improve if state lawmakers stopped underfunding education, according to the Utah Education Association.
UEA president Sharon Gallagher-Fishbaugh pointed to the latest National Assessment of Educational Progress – also known as “The Nation’s Report Card” – which shows only about half of Utah’s fourth- and eighth-grade students are proficient in math and reading. Gallagher-Fishbaugh said budget cuts made during the recession are taking a toll now.
“We left three years of student growth out of funding, so we’ve never caught up to pre-recession levels,” she said. “And we won’t at the rate that we are intending to fund public education, at least in Utah.”
http://goo.gl/y0Tk4w  (CVD)

Variance requests down from a year ago in Davis School District

FARMINGTON — Davis School District often gets asked if students have a choice when it comes to attending schools beyond a student’s boundaries.
According to Davis School District Superintendent Dr. Bryan Bowles, “We have parents who think we are not pro-choice, but we just quietly take care of those needs and move them accordingly.”
This year, the district has about 11 percent of their students attending a school other than the one in their residential boundaries. That is a total of approximately 7,290 students on a variance.
http://goo.gl/9mLXq4  (OSE)

Students, parents now weigh in on teacher evaluations

FARMINGTON – A complex teacher evaluation system put in place in Davis School District is entering a new phase and parents can be part of it by filling out surveys about their children’s teachers.
The survey is just one aspect of a new program made necessary by Senate Bill 64, passed by the Utah Legislature in February 2012, that requires more extensive teacher evaluations by principals, input from students and parents, and assessments by teachers themselves.
In a presentation to the Davis School Board on Tuesday, Nov. 5, Patti Brown, director of quality education, outlined the new system and what Davis School District has done to implement it.
http://goo.gl/09yUYY  (DCC)

Students can become reading ‘STARs’
Office of Education’s STAR reading program comes back to Summit County

For some students, being called on to read in class can be scary. That is why KSL, Utah Americorps and the Utah State Office of Education have come together to sponsor the STAR program, a reading initiative at several schools in Summit County.
Amber Siddoway, the Utah Americorps STAR program coordinator at McPolin Elementary School, said the program offers students a “safe place to read without fear of judgment or failure.”
STAR, which stands for Student Tutoring Achievement for Reading, “is designed to be used in one-on-one tutoring with adult volunteers or paraprofessionals as reading practice, not intervention.”
Volunteers can participate in the program at McPolin Elementary School, Trailside Elementary School and South Summit Middle School. Siddoway said volunteers are needed at McPolin, because there are only three volunteers and at least 30 more students at need.
http://goo.gl/NQZ48C  (PR)

Utah’s legislative task force on education speaks at WSU

A task force of members of the Utah Legislature paid campus a visit on Tuesday. Meeting to talk about the future of education, the Legislative Task Force on Education in Utah was sponsored by the Olene S. Walker Institute of Politics.
The representatives met for a discussion with Speaker Rebecca Lockhart, Senate President Wayne Niederhauser, Sen. Stephen Urquhart, Sen. Gene Davis and Rep. Francis Gibson, with Nolan Karras of the Walker Institute’s board of directors acting as moderator for the panel.
“One of the purposes of our education task force (was to) talk about where education needs to go in the next 10 years,” Niederhauser said. “Legislatures by nature are reactive. They tend to kick the can down the road . . . but we have tried to do more planning, more long-term, but a lot more work needs to be done in that area.”
Lockhart agreed. “One of the motivations behind this task force is what really is the role of the legislature, what is the role of the state board, what is the role of all of these organizations in this system?”
http://goo.gl/bJpys2  (Signpost)

Provo School District Purposes 90 Million Dollar Bond

The Provo School District is asking voters to consider a 90 million dollar bond.
The funds will cover the cost to fix or rebuild several schools built before seismic standards went into effect.
http://goo.gl/b1CHDR  (KUTV)

Jordan High teacher receives family and consumer sciences award

SANDY — A Jordan High family and consumer sciences teacher was recently named Teacher of the Year.
Natalie Hancock received the award from the Utah Association of Family and Consumer Sciences. The organization recognized her for infusing her curriculum with education technology, math and science — even social media platforms — to help kids make connections between her classes, math, science and the real world.
http://goo.gl/kcGsoz DN)

Utah company’s ‘Safeboard’ aims to protect classrooms from school shooter Funding » The cost easily could become prohibitive to most schools and districts.

As parents and school officials search for peace of mind in the wake of recent shootings, a Centerville-based manufacturer thinks armored classrooms might be a safer alternative to armed teachers.
International Armoring Corp. says it was approached last year by two school districts, including one in northern Utah, to create inconspicuous doorway barriers that were sturdy enough to stop bullets from an assault rifle. Their answer: Safeboard, a tracked panel that can slide over a doorway and be locked from the inside. When it’s not fighting crime, it’s a slightly inelegant whiteboard.
“We’re not trying to incite fear in people,” says Andrew Burton, Safeboard project administrator. “It’s kind of like an insurance policy. … It will save lives in those attacks.”
http://goo.gl/gzfrf6  (SLT)

Utah Public School Enrollment Up This Fall

NEW STATE FIGURES SHOW, THERE ARE NEARLY 12,000 MORE STUDENTS ENROLLED IN PUBLIC SCHOOLS THIS FALL…A 2 PERCENT INCREASE OVER LAST YEAR.
THERE ARE 612,000 PUBLIC SCHOOL STUDENTS ACROSS UTAH.
http://goo.gl/yybQrd  (KNRS)

Hearing set on boundary changes for Woods Cross, North Salt Lake schools

FARMINGTON — The Davis Board of Education will hold a public hearing on Tuesday, Nov. 19, to receive input regarding a boundary change for elementary schools in the southern end of the county.
http://goo.gl/VtV5pO  (DN)

Tooele County School District to host parent seminars on youth protection

TOOELE — The Tooele County School District will host parent seminars on protecting youths.
The youth protection seminars will discuss substance abuse prevention, Internet safety, positive mental health and bully prevention.
http://goo.gl/amIQNp  (DN)

Free workshop set to help families save for college

OGDEN — Cottages of Hope is inviting the public to a free workshop to help families save for college.
The workshop will be from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. Tuesday at the Mound Fort Junior High School library, 1396 Liberty Ave., Ogden.
http://goo.gl/tJNokQ  (OSE)

American Fork Marching Band to compete in Bands of America Grand Nationals

Salt Lake City — It’s a major accomplishment for one local band.
In just one day, the American Fork Marching Band and Color Guard will be heading to Indianapolis to compete in the Bands of America Grand Nationals.
http://goo.gl/AUb3HK  (KTVX)

Lions Club honors Peace Poster winners

CEDAR CITY — Members of the Cedar City Lions Club are circulating through the local middle schools this week, handing out awards to winners of the club’s 26th annual Peace Poster contest.
http://goo.gl/j3NZ7p  (SGS)

Custom Learning Academy students achieve superior results

TRUCKEE, Calif. — High school students at Custom Learning Academy took 11 different Advanced Placement (AP) tests in subjects from calculus, literature to history, allowing them advanced standing or credit at many colleges.
In addition to testing core areas, the Iowa Tests of Basic Skills (ITBS) also tests social studies and science achievement for grades first through 11th. A composite score is formed by blending the results from reading, writing, mathematics, social studies, and science for each student that represents a grade level skill level.
For the fifth consecutive year, Custom Learning Academy had students outperform California and other participating general student averages on IOWA and AP tests.
According to the National Board for Education Statistics, Utah was the leading state at a 67.1 percent pass rate on AP Tests in 2012/2013. CLA surpasses the leading U.S. AP average score by 1.9 percent. Furthermore, tests results at CLA indicate students are performing two-three grade levels higher.
http://goo.gl/47HeSY  (Tahoe [CA] Daily Tribune)

Cool School: Granger High School

Big Budah visited Granger High School Wednesday to highlight FOX 13′s Cool School of the week.
http://goo.gl/pMQoxm  (KSTU)

Literacy: Improve it or pay the price

The 2013 Nation’s Report Card from the National Assessment of Education Progress showed only 35 percent of U.S. fourth-graders read proficiently, according to scores posted last week. Thirty-two percent scored below basic reading levels, meaning they are functionally illiterate.
http://goo.gl/L6seYN  (DN)

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OPINION & COMMENTARY
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Public nixes bond for schools; child tax exemption limit next?
Salt Lake Tribune letter from Michael Hampton

The public recently voted down a large bond proposal to fund education (schools) for the future in the Jordan School District (“$495M Jordan school bond loses big in Tuesday election,” Tribune, Nov. 6).
The area’s predominant religious group continues to promote and expect large families, which place increased strain on education. No one with a large family wants to talk about limiting the tax exemptions for dependent children to raise tax revenue for education. It will be interesting to see what happens now.
http://goo.gl/G79alC

School kids need more class time
(Ogden) Standard-Examiner letter from Kelly Howard

The editorial “Absenteeism starts early” from Tuesday, Oct. 15, cites a study by the University of Utah supporting the importance of attendance and success in school. The study states that patterns of attendance in early years have an impact on children later in life. I completely agree with the study; our children should be in school learning responsibility, learning new concepts, and being stretched by new environments.
Ogden City School District also seems to agree. As a parent of children in the Ogden City School District, I noticed much emphasis placed on attendance in newsletters I received and phone calls made from the schools, especially in September.
The month of October, however, seemed to contradict this study. In the entire month, there was not one full, regular week of school. With parent-teacher conference half days, fall break, and data dives, my children did not have the opportunity to attend school, if they wanted to. What is the pattern being set for our children?
http://goo.gl/sIzRjJ

Thanks to all teachers
(Ogden) Standard-Examiner letter from Amy Cassil

It’s that time of year when our thoughts turn towards that for which we are thankful. I have so much to be thankful for, it’s overwhelming, but I wanted to publicly say, “thank you” to all the amazing teachers out there!
My children have had many extraordinary teachers. I am so grateful for all the countless hours they put in on their behalf. My dad has been an elementary school teacher for 34 years and I have personally witnessed the time, compassion, patience and dedication it takes to educate young children, not just about school subjects, but how to become successful contributors to society.
http://goo.gl/etuHE2

Why a school district changed its name
Washington Post commentary by columnist VALERIE STRAUSS

The 12,000-student school district in the northwestern Pennsylvania city of Erie is no longer calling itself the Erie School District.
Instead, officials are rebranding the district as Erie’s Public Schools, designed to promote the idea that the public owns the schools. Matthew Cummings, the district’s director of communications, was quoted by the Erie Times-News as saying:
“As part of our goal to involve the community in the education process, we thought that apostrophe was extremely important.”
At a time when the public education system is being increasingly privatized by school reformers who call public schools “government schools” and want public tax dollars to pay for private school tuition, Erie’s move is refreshing.
http://goo.gl/Ye7dyM

Why Isn’t Harvard Training More Teachers?
Students are attracted to Teach for America, but it’s hard to fight the perception that education programs are “beneath the dignity of an Ivy League school.”
Atlantic commentary by columnist ELEANOR BARKHORN

About one in five Harvard seniors applies to Teach for America. However, only a “minuscule” percentage of the class actually studies education, according to Harvard Graduate School of Education Dean James Ryan.
What accounts for this difference? Why are so many of America’s brightest students apparently interested in teaching but not availing themselves of the training their school has to offer?
Part of what’s to blame is a long-standing institutional snobbery toward teaching. As Walter Isaacson put it at this year’s Washington Ideas Forum, there’s a perception that “it’s beneath the dignity of an Ivy League school to train teachers.”
Teach for America has helped change that perception. “I think TFA has done a lot in terms of elevating the profession of teaching and elevating the importance of public education and education generally,” said Randi Weingarten, president of the American Federation of Teachers, in conversation with Isaacson, CEO of The Aspen Institute, and Ryan.
But Harvard and other schools like it haven’t made it a priority to encourage students to pursue teaching—and so students are looking for opportunities elsewhere. As Ryan put it, “There’s a tremendous demand for teacher training—and the main outlet is TFA.”
http://goo.gl/NY2vmv

In College Admissions, Social Media Can Be a Double-Edged Sword New York Times commentary by columnist NATASHA SINGER

When I wrote my Technophoria column this weekend about how some college admissions officers have occasionally identified social media posts that negatively affected applicants’ chances of acceptance, I assumed the phenomenon would not come as news to the parents of high school students.
After all, I came up with the idea for the piece after learning from a friend that her child, a high school senior who is applying for early admission to college this week, had recently taken a pseudonym on Facebook — a common phenomenon at certain schools.
In fact, the column pointed out that colleges don’t vet applicants’ personal social networking pages as a routine practice; the admissions officials I interviewed said they typically scrutinized social media only if outside sources alerted them to extreme posts like hate speech.
But, on Facebook and Twitter, scores of principals, guidance counselors, teachers and parents took the piece as an opportunity to caution teenagers who bare and publicly share their heartstrings.
http://goo.gl/nDCxEx

Feds’ 3 Tentacles in the Common Core
Exclusive: Chuck Norris shares shocking revelations about new education standards WND commentary by Chuck Norris

In 2007, a group of governors and state educating chiefs got together to try and remedy the declining and degraded U.S. public academic system. Their goal was to establish a new set of standards that better prepared kids for college, careers and their ever-changing, hyper-connected and globally competitive world.
In short, as a result, the Common Core State Standards Initiative, or CCSS, was born.
http://goo.gl/ogXD9B

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NATIONAL NEWS
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First Lady’s New Initiative: College, ‘Whatever It Takes’
New York Times

WASHINGTON — Michelle Obama urged high school students on Tuesday to increase the opportunities available to them by pursuing higher education as she kicked off an initiative that seeks to increase the number of low-income students graduating from college and signaled her plans to focus more on administration policy during the president’s second term.
Opening up to high school sophomores gathered in an auditorium at Bell Multicultural High School in Washington, Mrs. Obama spoke of her struggles as an underprivileged student in Chicago, taking a long bus ride across town to attend a better school and dreaming of the diploma from Princeton University that she eventually earned. The first lady told students they could write their own success stories if they focused on going to college.
“No matter what path you choose, no matter what dreams you have, you have got to do whatever it takes to continue your education after high school,” she said.
The decision to talk to sophomores was a deliberate one. The first lady’s new initiative is part of the Obama administration’s push for the United States to rank first in the world in the percentage of college graduates by 2020, the year current high school sophomores will graduate.
http://goo.gl/G6i0Sp

http://goo.gl/f4BVCw  (WaPo)

Plan to expand preschool for 4-year-olds is barely bipartisan, with one GOP co-sponsor Washington Post

Months after President Obama proposed a new federal initiative that would expand preschool to every 4-year-old in the country, members of Congress unveiled legislation Wednesday morning that would accomplish it.
The measure was presented as bipartisan, although just one Republican, Rep. Richard L. Hanna (N.Y.), joined top Democrats in the House and Senate to craft the legislation. In addition to Hanna, the authors include Sen. Tom Harkin (D-Iowa), chairman of the Senate education committee, and Rep. George Miller (D-Calif.), the ranking member of the House education panel.
“Decades of research tell us that from infants and toddlers to preschoolers, early learning is the best investment we can make to prepare our children for a lifetime of success,” said Harkin, whose bill was endorsed by 10 Democratic senators and one Independent, Bernie Sanders (Vt.), but no Republicans.
“Today, 39 states and the District of Columbia offer state-funded early learning programs, but without stronger investments, millions of children will continue to go without access to these crucial programs” said Harkin, who plans hearings on the bill early next year. “No child should be denied this opportunity because of family income or where they live.”
http://goo.gl/6KIEpd

http://goo.gl/RvcU1k  (Ed Week)

NYC parents file suit against state Ed. Dept. over student data collection Poughkeepsie (NY) Journal News

A dozen New York City parents have gone to court to try to stop the state Education Department from uploading detailed student records to a privately run database.
Lawyers for the parents filed a lawsuit this morning in New York State Supreme Court in Albany that seeks a restraining order to prevent the state from releasing personal student information to inBloom, a nonprofit group funded by the Gates Foundation.
The suit was filed against the state Board of Regents and Education Commissioner John King, who have faced tremendous criticism in recent months over their database plans, student testing tied to the Common Core learning standards, and other state initiatives.
http://goo.gl/pJ4A3L

Idaho House, Senate education chairs urge support for Idaho core standards Spokane (WA) Spokesman-Review

Idaho House and Senate education chairman Rep. Reed DeMordaunt, R-Eagle, and Sen. John Goedde, R-Coeur d’Alene, have penned a joint “Open Letter to Idaho Legislators” they distributed to Idaho newspapers, among others, this afternoon, urging that the state stick with its new Idaho Core Standards for student achievement in math and English. “We urge you to stay the course,” the two write. “We have raised our academic standards in Idaho and increased expectations for every student to make sure they graduate from high school prepared to be successful. Now is not the time to go backwards.”
http://goo.gl/TzVz5h

Common Core not likely to get Senate floor debate in regular session, says GOP leader Alabama Media Group

MONTGOMERY, Alabama – Senate President Pro Tem Del Marsh said legislative efforts to repeal the Common Core education standards likely won’t make it to the Senate floor in the upcoming legislative session.
“I’ve made it very clear, I’m not bringing Common Core into the body,” Marsh, R-Anniston, said in an interview Tuesday about the legislative session that begins in Jan. 14.
Marsh, R-Anniston, said the complicated and contentious debate over exactly what the Common Core standards do — and don’t do — should not be thrust into the midst of a busy regular legislative session.
http://goo.gl/DOQQmJ

Florida teacher value-added data is public record, appeal court rules
(Jacksonville) Florida Times-Union

Florida’s controversial value-added teacher data are public record, according to a ruling released Tuesday by the 1st District Court of Appeal.
The Times-Union sued the state in February for the data’s release. Tuesday’s decision reverses a lower circuit court ruling in March, which concluded the data were exempt from public inspection.
According to state law a teacher’s evaluation is not subject to disclosure under the public records law until a year following the school year in which the evaluation was given, but “it does not follow that any information or data used to prepare the evaluation is likewise exempt from disclosure,” the appeal court ruled.
The value-added data is “only one part of a larger spectrum of criteria by which a public school teacher is evaluated; it is not, by itself, the ‘employee evaluation,’ ” the court wrote.
http://goo.gl/2tqlRM

A copy of the ruling
http://goo.gl/VCslPa  (Florida 1st District Court of Appeal)

Indiana education board comes to abrupt halt as feud with Glenda Ritz boils over Indianapolis Star

Tensions at the Indiana State Board of Education meeting heightened into disarray Wednesday as state schools chief Glenda Ritz abruptly adjourned the meeting and the rest of the board sought legal guidance on whether the meeting could continue.
Only confusion remained as months-long squabbles between Ritz, a Democrat, and other board members — all appointed by Republican governors — boiled over into meltdown.
Other members stuck around for a while to try to determine whether they could continue to meet without Ritz but ultimately adjourned in frustration. Meantime, Ritz’s staff removed the podium and Internet recording equipment from the meeting room.
The feud reached a boiling point when the board attempted to act on a motion that would have allowed an entity in addition to Ritz’s Department of Education to develop expert advice on academic standards for math and language arts.
http://goo.gl/MLQn2E

Getting schools up to 21st-century speed Washington Post

When a student at Elliston Elementary in rural Montana logs onto her laptop for a remote lesson over the Internet, Tressa Graveley must ration the Web for the rest of her tiny school. The teacher tells other students to shut down their browsers and stop streaming video or there won’t be enough bandwidth for the eighth-grader’s lesson.
Elliston Elementary is on the wrong side of a new digital divide in this country. The school, decked out with laptops and whiteboards, hoped to harness the power of the Internet to break out of its isolation. But its connection is too slow to allow the 15 students and two teachers to fully use everything the digital world offers — videos, music, graphics, interactive programs.
But it’s not just rural school systems that are cut off from the digital world. An estimated 72 percent of public schools — in the countryside, suburbs and cities — lack the broadband speeds necessary to fully access the Internet, according to Education Superhighway, a nonprofit organization that wants to improve digital access in schools.
http://goo.gl/7Aop9v

Q&A with Anthony Kim: What will the next phase of blended learning look like?
Hechinger Report

Blended learning, when students learn both from a teacher and from online programs, has become a popular choice for schools around the country. In 2009, 3 million k-12 students took and online course, up from 45,000 nine years prior, according to a report by the Clayton Christensen Institute for Disruptive Innovation. In large urban districts and rural schools alike, teachers and principals are turning to computers and iPads to give students a chance to work through material at their own pace.
Now that blended learning is more common place, what’s next for the trend? The Hechinger Report talked to Anthony Kim, CEO and founder of Education Elements, a group that helps schools and districts apply blending learning models, to find out.
http://goo.gl/hbNtZ5

Longer School Days in Store for Some in 5 States Associated Press

HARTFORD, Conn. — Thousands of students in five states will be spending more time at school.
More than 9,000 students are attending select, high-poverty schools in Connecticut, Colorado, Massachusetts and New York that have developed expanded school schedules as part of the TIME Collaborative, or Time for Innovation Matters in Education. Some of those schools are already using the extra time for additional instruction and enrichment.
http://goo.gl/21GM7K

Los Angeles school board looks at laptops after troubled iPad rollout Reuters

The Los Angeles school board, in the middle of a troubled $1 billion plan to equip each student with an iPad, has voted to try laptops at some high schools before deciding whether to give all its 650,000 pupils a tablet.
The Los Angeles Unified School District technology rollout is the largest of its kind for any U.S. public education system. It comes as education officials in other parts of the country experiment with ways to give students mobile computers.
The landmark project ran into problems at the start of this school year when about 300 high school students among an initial 25,000 pupils to get the iPad bypassed its security protocols to access social networking and other websites blocked to them.
As a result of that breach, Superintendent John Deasy has temporarily forbidden students from taking the iPads home.
http://goo.gl/mM0gLd

Teacher rejects pact, fired for unauthorized absence to go to religious meeting Flavell rejected a compromise agreement reached in special board meeting October 29 Kearney (NE) Hub

KEARNEY — A Kearney teacher who took unauthorized time off to attend a religious meeting is out of a job after rejecting a compromise with Kearney Public Schools.
Candace Flavell, a former English language learners instructor at Central Elementary School, saw her contract canceled by the KPS Board of Education at its Monday meeting after she rejected a compromise agreement reached in a special board meeting Oct. 29.
Flavell said she planned to speak with her attorney, Rick Wade of Lincoln, before saying why she refused to accept the agreement.
http://goo.gl/9J0DAj

Experts Debate Role of Sports in U.S. High Schools Education Week

Do sports belong in U.S. high schools? That depends on whom you ask.
On Tuesday evening, the New America Foundation held a panel to discuss the pros and cons of sports in U.S. high schools.
Amanda Ripley, the author of the new book The Smartest Kids in the World, and Kevin Carey, the director of the New America Foundation’s education policy program, argued for kicking sports out of high school. On the “Leave sports alone!” side were Kerry J. Donley, a former athletic director of T.C. Williams High School in Alexandria, Va., and Louisa Thomas, a sportswriter for Grantland.com and a fellow at the New America Foundation.
http://goo.gl/dICwoP

Video of the debate
http://goo.gl/HNxnY1  (New America Foundation)

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CALENDAR
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USOE Calendar
http://tinyurl.com/5x9oh9

UEN News
http://www.uen.org

November 14:
Utah State Charter School Board meeting
250 E. 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://goo.gl/Mu36l

November 19:
Executive Appropriations Subcommittee meeting
1 p.m., 445 State Capitol
http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2013&com=APPEXE

November 20:
Education Interim Committee meeting
9 a.m., 30 House Building
http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2013&Com=INTEDU

November 22:
Education Task Force meeting
8:30 a.m., 445 State Capitol
http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2013&com=TSKEDU

December 6:
Utah State Board of Education meeting
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspxpr

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