Education News Roundup: Dec. 4, 2013

Foxboro Elementary School bus

Foxboro Elementary School bus

Education News Roundup

Today’s Top Picks:

Governor recommends increasing per-pupil funding by $100.
http://goo.gl/jUXe21  (SLT)
and http://goo.gl/A9Fpe3  (DN)
and http://goo.gl/bu8J7z (UP)
and http://goo.gl/ksA8Bd  (PDH)
and http://goo.gl/b3F2Us  (SGS)
and http://goo.gl/dhKQl8  (KUTV)
or budget highlights
http://goo.gl/4aSjGN  (Office of the Governor) or full budget recommendations (education brief begins on page 45) http://goo.gl/D16tMo  (Office of the Governor)

U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan will be at Salt Lake City’s Northwest Middle School tomorrow.
http://goo.gl/IqhaP1  (ED)

Politico and Ed Week take a look at ALEC’s education agenda for the upcoming year.
http://goo.gl/Vk1sc5  (Politico)
and http://goo.gl/fgxpk9  (Ed Week)

New version of the SAT is delayed until 2016.
http://goo.gl/rDDQTj  (Inside Higher Ed)

Ed Week does an entire package on American Indian education.
http://goo.gl/HZo3UA  (Ed Week)

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TODAY’S HEADLINES
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UTAH

Utah gov seeks money for education, prisons, air quality Utah budget » No new taxes, more money for schools, air-quality initiatives.

‘We have no accountability measures’ for parents, says lawmaker of education

Alliance seeks music lovers to help support Utah schools Music education » Alliance provides lessons, instruments, training for teachers to bridge a school funding gap.

New My Math curriculum in place across the district Now in accordance with CORE standards recently adopted

Rural Utah teens bucking culture and buckling up Road safety » After years of fatalities, the driving culture in Utah’s rural areas is shifting for the better.

Logan City School District still looking to utilize property, avoid demolition of houses

U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan to Visit Northwest Middle School in Salt Lake City as Part of Partners in Progress Tour Highlighting America’s Best Ideas in Education

Juan Diego policy debate team named No. 1 in state

Students help decorate Utah governor’s Christmas tree

Choreographer & High School Counselor Paul Winkelman

Spanish Fork PE Teacher Charged With Misdemeanor

Deputy’s suicide prompts Tooele County school lockdown

Fumes from broken down car briefly evacuate Ogden school

Singing in the holidays

New restaurant offers preview of menu while benefiting Erin Kimball Foundation, area schools

U.S. scores stagnant on global test; other nations surge ahead

Home-school culture shifting away from religious ties

OPINION & COMMENTARY

U.S. schools still separate and unequal

Speaking of notables

Watch over our students; don’t let that middle finger escalate

The Human Wealth of Nations
The latest Program for International Student Assessment global education scores are a warning to both parties.

Let’s Call Off the Education Arms Race
Yes, the latest international scorecard didn’t look good for the U.S. But playing catch-up with China isn’t the solution.

What You Need to Know About the International Test Scores

79 Ideas for (Re)Designing Schools

NATION

New STEM push from ALEC

The High School Guidance Counselor Shortage Huge caseloads, scant training and budget constraints have made quality college counseling a scarce commodity in public schools

Delay for New SAT

Common Core delay wins BESE approval

Chilling 911 tapes of Sandy Hook massacre released

Running in Place
Like many Native American students, Legend Tell Tobacco, a 10-year-old on South Dakota’s Pine Ridge reservation, must outrun the odds against his educational success

“We’re tired of you saying that you don’t have money for our public schools”:
Talking education with MAE President Joyce Helmick and NEA Secretary-Treasurer Becky Pringle

Hempstead students say principal tried to ban them from speaking Spanish

Gates, Zuckerberg chip in to fund broadband in schools

One or two hours of sports each day best for teens

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UTAH NEWS
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Utah gov seeks money for education, prisons, air quality Utah budget » No new taxes, more money for schools, air-quality initiatives.

Orem • Gov. Gary Herbert presented his annual budget blueprint Wednesday, asking legislators to boost public education spending by about $100 per pupil, expand the state prison in Gunnison, give more state support to colleges and provide a small raise to state employees.
Herbert is also recommending putting state money into air quality, seeking $1.8 million for research, $1.3 million in grants to help small businesses reduce emissions, and $14 million to convert school buses to alternative fuels.
The governor’s budget request is the first step in crafting a $13.3 billion state budget for the coming year. Legislators will do the detailed work of putting together the final budget plan, which may look very different.
Overall, the budget is about $200 million higher than lawmakers approved last year, due largely to renewed growth in income-tax collections.
The governor’s proposal would pay to educate the 10,300 additional students anticipated in Utah’s public schools next year, at a cost of $64 million. On top of that, Herbert is seeking $61.6 million to boost Utah’s last-in-the-nation per pupil spending by 2.5 percent.
That $61.6 million spread across the 623,000 students in the school system translates to an increase of just under $100 per pupil.
http://goo.gl/jUXe21  (SLT)

http://goo.gl/A9Fpe3  (DN)

http://goo.gl/bu8J7z  (UP)

http://goo.gl/ksA8Bd  (PDH)

http://goo.gl/b3F2Us  (SGS)

http://goo.gl/dhKQl8  (KUTV)

Budget highlights
http://goo.gl/4aSjGN  (Office of the Governor)

Full budget recommendations (education brief begins on page 45) http://goo.gl/D16tMo  (Office of the Governor)

‘We have no accountability measures’ for parents, says lawmaker of education

SALT LAKE CITY — A Utah lawmaker says compulsory education in Utah wrongly places too much emphasis on attendance and not on outcomes, and he now plans to introduce three bills in the upcoming legislative session to shift the focus.
“We have no accountability — no meaningful accountability measures — on parents and students when it comes to the educational outcome,” said Sen. Aaron Osmond, R- South Jordan on Tuesday.
http://goo.gl/L5pb4s  (KSL)

Alliance seeks music lovers to help support Utah schools Music education » Alliance provides lessons, instruments, training for teachers to bridge a school funding gap.

Legacy Music Alliance, a Utah nonprofit, is looking for 1,500 music lovers willing to donate $35 this holiday season to help give the gift of music to school children.
The nonprofit, founded by northern Utah entrepreneur Gaylen Rust, aims to provide lessons to 1,600 students, new or refurbished instruments to 40 schools, and access to singers, songwriters and conductors at 50 schools.
To help spread the word, “A Musical Christmas” will air Sunday, Dec. 8, on ABC 4 from 5 p.m. to 6 p.m. and on CW30 from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. Performers on the one-hour show will include The Jets, Nathan Osmond, pianist William Joseph, Jessie Funk, Crescent Super Band, We Are the Strike, and Jason Scheff, lead singer of Chicago.
http://goo.gl/p2BXb2 (SLT)

New My Math curriculum in place across the district Now in accordance with CORE standards recently adopted

Some people say they are math and science people while others say they use the other side of their brain and master English and literature. Park City School District math coach Kris Weiss said she wants to make that saying a thing of the past with the new math curriculum the district has adopted and begun using this school year.
“We all grew up with that math anxiety, but the truth is all students can learn mathematics. I’ve had many conferences where parents have said, ‘Oh, I couldn’t do math,’ but then look at their kids and say they will be able to,” Weiss said. “We want parents to know what their children are learning and give them a ‘we can figure this out’ message instead.”
My Math is a McGraw-Hill math program the district decided to use to adapt to the new Utah CORE Standards that were put in place just last year. Weiss said an adoption committee spent the previous year looking at textbooks and piloting several different programs before teachers chose the My Math curriculum.
http://goo.gl/A4r5ft  (PR)

Rural Utah teens bucking culture and buckling up Road safety » After years of fatalities, the driving culture in Utah’s rural areas is shifting for the better.

Delta » Michael Lefevre was an exceptionally tall sophomore at Delta High — 6-foot-6 — with aspirations of playing college and professional basketball.
But after midnight on April 24, 2010, he still had not come home from his friend’s house. His parents got nervous and tried calling him, but his phone went straight to voice mail. Lefevre’s father went looking for him. He was a mile outside of town when he saw the flashing police lights and his son’s car in a field.
The car was on top of him.
“I ran toward the crash site, but a policeman grabbed me and said, ‘Don’t go over there, he’s already gone, you don’t want to see him this way,’” his father wrote in a memorial.
Lefevre’s parents say he always wore his seat belt, but he was not the night he died.
Since 2005, the Utah Highway Safety Office has compared how many rural versus urban Utahns were wearing a seat belt at the time of a crash. From 2006 to 2008, rural Utahns were twice to three times more likely to not have their seat belt on, according to the reports.
But that’s changing.
http://goo.gl/oqa98S  (SLT)

Logan City School District still looking to utilize property, avoid demolition of houses

The Logan City School District is still looking for interested parties who would be willing to move two houses so that the district can utilize the property the homes rest on.
http://goo.gl/HDhZIx  (LHJ)

U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan to Visit Northwest Middle School in Salt Lake City as Part of Partners in Progress Tour Highlighting America’s Best Ideas in Education

U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan will visit Northwest Middle School in Salt Lake City on Thursday, Dec. 5, to listen to students, teachers and community leaders discuss the encouraging progress they have made, the challenges they have overcome and their goals for the future. The visit is part of Secretary Duncan’s Partners in Progress tour, which highlights America’s ingenuity in education at work. Northwest Middle School is a School Improvement Grant (SIG) recipient, and Duncan will recognize the promising gains that students have made and engage in a roundtable with members from the school community, as well as statewide leaders, to learn about their efforts.
http://goo.gl/IqhaP1  (ED)

Juan Diego policy debate team named No. 1 in state

DRAPER — The Juan Diego policy debate team was named No. 1 in the state at the 2013 Utah Debate Coaches Association Speech Arts Championship Nov. 8-9.
http://goo.gl/OecWXK  (IC)

Students help decorate Utah governor’s Christmas tree

It’s beginning to look a lot like Christmas at the Governor’s Mansion — with the snow outside and the holiday tree inside.
In fact, third- and fourth-graders from Stewart Elementary, a Chinese immersion school in Centerville, helped decorate the first family’s Christmas tree Tuesday morning.
The youngsters also performed a Christmas carol in Chinese for Gov. Gary Herbert and first lady Jeanette Herbert, according to a news release.
http://goo.gl/ycOHGT  (SLT)

http://goo.gl/62O820  (DN)

http://goo.gl/VaZ0fQ  (KUTV)

http://goo.gl/wSwxgj  (KTVX)

http://goo.gl/bvKXN0  (MUR)

http://goo.gl/5G6ITv  (USOE’s photostream)

Choreographer & High School Counselor Paul Winkelman

Paul Winkelman was the assistant choreographer for the opening and closing ceremonies of the Olympics in both Salt Lake City and Athens, Ga., field directed the 2009 Super Bowl halftime show and was the assistant choreographer for High School Musical 3. These days, he prefers to spend his time around (non-Disney) teens as a school counselor, but that hasn’t stopped him from leaving his name all over the arts in Utah. His latest project was directing a cast of hundreds in The Wiz at Hillcrest High School.
http://goo.gl/Oh5q6C  (SLCW)

Spanish Fork PE Teacher Charged With Misdemeanor

The Spanish Fork City attorney’s office filed a misdemeanor charge of disorderly conduct against a Spanish Fork Junior High School teacher accused of kicking one of his students. Meanwhile Utah State School Board members are considering beefing up teacher discipline standards.
Eighth grader Colton Brown told KUER he was in a push-up position during gym class on October 7th when Physical Education teacher Monte Morgan kicked him in the ribs. The school district responded by placing Morgan on administrative leave and filing a complaint with Spanish Fork Police on October 9th. That’s when the Browns learned that Morgan was already under investigation for a similar incident.
http://goo.gl/fHj38d  (KUER)

Deputy’s suicide prompts Tooele County school lockdown

Stansbury Park schools were put on lockdown Tuesday after a Tooele County sheriff’s deputy shot and killed himself.
Dispatchers confirmed that a shots fired call came in around noon from the area of 745 Country Club, just across the street from Stansbury Park Elementary School. Schools in the area were put on lockdown while authorities investigated the shooting.
A 37-year-old deputy who lived in the area had shot himself, according to a news release from the Tooele County Emergency Management Director Bucky Whitehouse.
http://goo.gl/4vUKds  (SLT)

http://goo.gl/8YBVv3  (DN)

http://goo.gl/orSfRR  (OSE)

http://goo.gl/6LZqhq  (PDH)

http://goo.gl/b3XZgP  (CVD)

http://goo.gl/op8c1G  (KTVX)

http://goo.gl/QtSNjR  (KSL)

http://goo.gl/QoRPgv  (KSTU)

http://goo.gl/r8SB3d  (MUR)

Fumes from broken down car briefly evacuate Ogden school

About 280 strudents at Ogden’s St. Joseph’s Elementary School were briefly evacuated Wednesday morning due to fumes from a broken-down car.
School spokeswoman Carol Layman said no students were injured and classes had resumed by 9:30 a.m., less than an hour after Ogden firefighters responded and cleared the scene.
The fumes wafted into the school at 2980 Quincy Ave., when a car outside blew its transmission.
http://goo.gl/FocDNj  (SLT)

http://goo.gl/Q0q658  (OSE)

http://goo.gl/qAKZCV  (KSTU)

Singing in the holidays

Madeleine Choir School second-graders participate in the “Lights On” tree-trimming tradition at the Zions Bank Avenues branch on Dec. 2. Students from about 60 elementary schools in Utah and Idaho will participate in Zions Bank’s “Lights On” celebrations this year, a 43-year tradition. The bank contributes $200 to each participating school; the Madeleine Choir School chose to donate the money it received to the Utah Food Bank.
http://goo.gl/USOUeR  (IC)

New restaurant offers preview of menu while benefiting Erin Kimball Foundation, area schools

ST. GEORGE – Habit Restaurants, LLC, a California-based restaurant company, is opening its third Habit Burger Grill in Utah on Dec. 6, at 15 South River Road in St. George, in Red Rock Commons.
The public can get a sneak peek of the tasty menu during fundraisers on Wednesday and Thursday, Dec. 4 and 5, when The Habit will donate 100 percent of all proceeds to three local non-profits.
Wednesday: The Habit will open for lunch, 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m., benefiting the Erin Kimball Memorial Foundation, which assists domestic violence survivors. Dinner will be held from 5-7 p.m. and will aid nearby Pine View High School’s fine arts department.
Thursday: Lunch will again be held from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m., with proceeds going to support the Dixie High School winter sports teams.
http://goo.gl/LS5fKy  (SGN)

U.S. scores stagnant on global test; other nations surge ahead

The academic performance of U.S. students is holding steady on a key international test, but no one is celebrating. New results show that the U.S. is slipping in global test rankings as such nations as Latvia and Poland move up. Japan, China, Singapore and South Korea continue to hold top spots in the test rankings.
http://goo.gl/7agsaA  (DN)

Home-school culture shifting away from religious ties

Eric Peschel and his family have different reasons for home-schooling.
http://goo.gl/pLf2bk  (DN)

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OPINION & COMMENTARY
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U.S. schools still separate and unequal
Deseret News editorial

Few things generate more debate and controversy than attempts to measure educational achievement. It should come as no surprise that the release this week of the latest Programme for International Student Assessment results (or PISA) by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development was immediately parsed, diced and manipulated to fit the agendas of dozens of interest groups and organizations.
The reason is that students in the United States once again scored poorly against their peers in other nations of the world. U.S. results, in fact, haven’t budged on these tests in a decade, despite a patchwork quilt of reform efforts from coast to coast.
It would be wrong to overreact to these results, but it would be worse to cast them aside as meaningless. They offer a candid look at public education that doesn’t fit neatly into any one interest group’s agenda. Everyone can find a reason to feel uncomfortable.
http://goo.gl/hK79nd

Speaking of notables
Salt Lake Tribune commentary by columnist Paul Rolly

East High’s Class of 1951 recently had a reunion to celebrate the classmates’ 80th birthdays in 2013.
Here are some of those classmates:
Former U.S. Sen. Jake Garn; former U.S. Sen. Bob Bennett; former Rep. Jim Hansen; first counselor in the LDS Church First Presidency Henry Eyring; noted surgeon Gary Maxwell; former Dixie College President Doug Alder; and former Salt Lake County Commissioner John Preston Creer.
The classmates celebrated posthumously late Utah Supreme Court Justice Dan Stewart and beloved BYU and Utah Valley State College professor Eugene England.
East must have had some good teachers that year.
http://goo.gl/HcbbfO

Watch over our students; don’t let that middle finger escalate
(Ogden) Standard-Examiner commentary by columnist Meg Sanders

In fifth grade I suddenly became keenly aware of my middle finger.
I blame my much older sister (which everyone mistakes as my younger sister). Liz was 18 around that time, so she had attitude like a Hilton sister only she wore pant suits to high school and attended church meetings regularly.
http://goo.gl/Pto74m

The Human Wealth of Nations
The latest Program for International Student Assessment global education scores are a warning to both parties.
Wall Street Journal editorial

Are the schools that serve the world’s leading economy really only as good as those in Hungary, Lithuania, Vietnam and Russia? That’s the conundrum posed by Tuesday’s news of one more mediocre U.S. showing on international educational progress. If the findings land amid exaggerated angst about national decline, they still suggest that both Washington and the 50 states ought to be less complacent about prosperity and human capital.
Since 1998, the Program for International Student Assessment, or Pisa, has ranked 15-year-old kids around the world on common reading, math and science tests. The U.S. brings up the middle—again—among 65 education systems that make up fourth-fifths of the global economy. The triennial Pisa report also shows—again—that East Asian countries like Hong Kong, Japan and South Korea produce the best outcomes.
U.S. performance hasn’t budged in a decade.
http://goo.gl/ojNtC1

Let’s Call Off the Education Arms Race
Yes, the latest international scorecard didn’t look good for the U.S. But playing catch-up with China isn’t the solution.
Wall Street Journal op-ed by WENDY KOPP, CEO and co-founder of Teach For All

On Tuesday, the highly anticipated results of the Program for International Student Assessment were released—and like clockwork, out came a barrage of media stories hyping the results. The PISA exam, which tests the proficiency of half a million 15-year-olds around the world in math, science and reading every three years, has become a trusted gauge of which national economies are set to fire on all cylinders and which will sputter to a halt. This year’s theme: Asian students continue to trounce Americans.
Competition and competitive rhetoric can be healthy. It’s what drove the United States to pursue the Soviet Union into space, creating countless innovations along the way. Indeed, President Obama has encouraged Americans to seize this “Sputnik moment” in education, reminding us that billions of people around the world “are working every day, to out-educate and out-compete us.”
But competition can also lead Americans to cast a suspicious eye toward other countries’ success, rather than joining forces with them.
http://goo.gl/hX2DMM

What You Need to Know About the International Test Scores Huffington Post commentary by Diane Ravitch, historian, NYU professor

The news reports say that the test scores of American students on the latest PISA test are “stagnant,” “lagging,” “flat,” etc.
The U.S. Department of Education would have us believe — yet again — that we are in an unprecedented crisis and that we must double down on the test-and-punish strategies of the past dozen years.
The myth persists that once our nation led the world on international tests, but we have fallen from that exalted position in recent years.
Wrong, wrong, wrong.
Here is the background history that you need to know to interpret the PISA score release, as well as Secretary Duncan’s calculated effort to whip up national hysteria about our standing in the international league tables.
The U.S. has never been first in the world, nor even near the top, on international tests.
Over the past half century, our students have typically scored at or near the median, or even in the bottom quartile.
http://goo.gl/iH0fXj

79 Ideas for (Re)Designing Schools
Education Week commentary by columnist Amy Wickner

“School design” can mean anything from a technology strategy to safety planning to a curriculum design or “pathways” approach. Yet another kind of school design is in the spotlight in The Third Teacher: 79 Ways You Can Use Design to Transform Teaching & Learning (Abrams, 2010), a collaboration between OWP/P Architects (a Chicago firm specializing in schools and hospitals), VS Furniture (furniture design-builders based in Germany), and Bruce Mau Design (a graphic design firm). The Third Teacher looks at the built – or architectural – environment in education and how it influences the various other facets of school design.
The “79 ways” of the book’s subtitle are a set of maxims for school design. Within eight chapters that progress topically from “Basic Needs” to “Sustainable Schools” to “Learning for All” (and more), the “79 ways” include:
http://goo.gl/4kUBnq

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NATIONAL NEWS
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New STEM push from ALEC
Politico

ALEC’S STEM PUSH: ALEC will unveil a new subcommittee focusing on STEM education this week at its annual States & Nation Policy Summit in Washington. The group has found tremendous interest in science, technology, engineering and math education from ALEC members, potential for public-private partnerships, and bipartisan lawmaking on STEM issues, ALEC Education Director Lindsay Russell told Morning Education. There are currently three education subcommittees: digital learning, higher education, and K-12 reform.
—Also on the agenda: Education legislation slated to be discussed by members of the American Legislative Exchange Council over the course of the week include a bill that would create cloud-based achievement data “backpacks” for students, a bill expanding online learning and two early intervention bills. Two model school choice bills, including one that creates education savings accounts similar to those available in Arizona and another that targets foster children, may be amended as well. Members will discuss the bills in ALEC subcommittees but vote on them later in the week, after which the passed bills become model ALEC legislation.
http://goo.gl/Vk1sc5

http://goo.gl/fgxpk9  (Ed Week)

The High School Guidance Counselor Shortage Huge caseloads, scant training and budget constraints have made quality college counseling a scarce commodity in public schools Time

Campbell High School counselor Jamie Ryder’s determined cheer interrupts the half-asleep, early morning silence of a dozen ninth-graders crammed into a small classroom as she launches into a 90-minute talk about their future.
The challenges facing Ryder soon become clear. When she asks about her students’ goals, one hand goes up. Then a low voice in the back of the room wisecracks, “Be a drug dealer.” A while later, when the students sit at computers and fill out a questionnaire to help determine what courses of study and careers would be good for them, several struggle with the words on the screen. This is probably the only time that many of these students will see her or any other counselor for at least a year.
Campbell High, in Smyrna, Georgia, a fast-growing city about 20 miles northeast of Atlanta where one in five children under 18 lives in poverty, is trying to counteract a vexing but largely unseen problem facing public schools across the country: There is a shortage of competent counselors at a time when getting into college is more expensive, more confusing and more important than ever.
A public school counselor in the U.S. now has an average caseload of 471 students, according to the American School Counselor Association, or ASCA. And the situation is getting worse.
http://goo.gl/hZBa6v

Delay for New SAT
Inside Higher Ed

The new SAT will not be arriving until 2016, one year later than originally announced.
A brief statement released by the College Board’s press office said that “this change in the timing of the redesign will serve our members in higher education by providing two years to plan for the redesigned exam and it will allow students to take the revised PSAT/NMSQT before the revised SAT. Our goal is to deliver an assessment system that is focused, useful and clear. Member input will continue to be integral to this work and we look forward to sharing additional information regarding the revision of our exams in the spring.” (The new PSAT will start in 2015.)
In an email sent to high school guidance counselors, David Coleman, the president of the College Board, said: “We heard clearly from our members — including our Board of Trustees, national and regional councils, the SAT committee, attendees at our national forum, and particularly those in higher education — that you need more time, and we listened.”
http://goo.gl/rDDQTj

Common Core delay wins BESE approval
New Orleans Times-Picayune

The state Board of Elementary and Secondary Education on Tuesday overwhelmingly approved Superintendent John White’s plan to delay many consequences of Common Core’s tougher mathematics and English standards for two years. The committee vote, likely to be ratified by BESE on Wednesday, followed months of anxiety from educators who feared losing their jobs and their schools’ good letter grades, and some criticism that the changes have come too fast.
In September, a Louisiana Democratic Party spokeswoman went so far as to call the rollout a “train wreck.” But the tenor of Tuesday’s discussion was far removed from the intensity of BESE’s October meeting, when advocates and parents testified about Common Core for five hours. In fact, some of White’s toughest critics praised the latest developments.
Louisiana schools are already teaching to the Common Core State Standards, which spell out what students should be able to accomplish at the end of each grade. Updated tests aligned with the standards start this school year. The scores on those tests affect teacher evaluations, student promotion to high school and the letter grades that determine whether schools can be taken over by the state.
When students took Common Core tests in Kentucky and New York, the average grade dropped — leading educators to wonder what could happen here.
http://goo.gl/1r7IXt

Chilling 911 tapes of Sandy Hook massacre released USA Today

NEWTOWN, Conn. – Emergency dispatchers at the Newton Police Department warned a panicked teacher to protect herself and her students, urged another staffer to apply pressure to a gunshot wound to her leg and told the school custodian to take cover as the Sandy Hook Elementary massacre unfolded.
The advice came via 911 exchanges between school staffers and 911 dispatchers minutes after gunman Adam Lanza shot and killed 20 students and six staffers with a semi-automatic assault rifle before taking his own life. Earlier that day, Lanza, 20, shot his mother, Nancy, at their Newtown home.
Tapes of the 911 calls were released Wednesday afternoon, nearly a year after the Dec.14 massacre rocked this genteel community. Officials said they would not release the names of the dispatchers, whose response to an incoming flood of calls was calm, deliberate and reassuring even as gunshots are audible in the background.
http://goo.gl/4lOyRE

http://goo.gl/GRZw24 (Reuters)

http://goo.gl/qBDVPv (AP)

Running in Place
Like many Native American students, Legend Tell Tobacco, a 10-year-old on South Dakota’s Pine Ridge reservation, must outrun the odds against his educational success Education Week

Ten hours after leaving in the dark for the 15-mile ride to Loneman School, Legend Tell Tobacco bounds down the steps of the yellow school bus and runs back home.
He takes off in a full sprint, black hair flopping, down Tobacco Road, a half-mile-long stretch of dirt named for his family. He slows to a trudge when the rutted road rises steeply to reach his house on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, a place where the promise of youth is often stifled by the probabilities of failure.
Legend just turned 10 and is in the 4th grade, and yet, he must constantly confront obstacles that could cause him to stumble into one of the grim statistical categories for which Pine Ridge—like much of the nation’s Indian Country—is well known:
High school dropout.
Unemployed.
Dead before 50.
Legend grins widely when announcing that he reads the same “chapter books” as 7th and 8th graders. He likes math, too, especially multiplication.
“Most of all,” he says, “I love to run.”
http://goo.gl/HZo3UA

“We’re tired of you saying that you don’t have money for our public schools”:
Talking education with MAE President Joyce Helmick and NEA Secretary-Treasurer Becky Pringle Rethink Mississippi

Many of Mississippi’s schools struggle to attract and retain qualified teachers. Nearly one-third of the state’s districts fall within “critical shortage areas” that must rely heavily on unlicensed teachers to fill their classrooms. Mississippi has one of the lowest average starting teacher salaries in the country, and schools in the state have been underfunded by an estimated $1 billion in the past four years alone. For years, the Mississippi Association of Educators (MAE), a state affiliate of the National Education Association (NEA), the largest teachers union in the country, has championed efforts to raise teacher salaries and provide more funding for schools.
In late November, Becky Pringle, the secretary-treasurer of NEA and Joyce Helmick, president of MAE, toured schools Mississippi to celebrate American Education Week and promote their new Raise Your Hand initiative. Rethink Mississippi teamed up with The Hechinger Report to speak with Pringle and Helmick about their efforts to improve conditions for teachers and students in the state.
http://goo.gl/K3JgYN

Hempstead students say principal tried to ban them from speaking Spanish (Houston, TX) KHOU

HEMPSTEAD, Texas – A language controversy is brewing at Hempstead Middle School over an announcement that was made by the school’s principal.
Students said Principal Amy Lacey told kids over the intercom that they could no longer speak Spanish while in class.
KHOU 11 News has learned that Lacey is now on paid administrative leave while the district investigates.
http://goo.gl/XTEJHC

Gates, Zuckerberg chip in to fund broadband in schools Washington Post

Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg and Microsoft founder Bill Gates are among several philanthropists who have pledged $9 million to a nonprofit organization that is trying to bring the Internet to public school classrooms around the country.
Over the next two years, Zuckerberg has pledged to give $3 million and Gates has promised to give $2 million to Education Superhighway, a San Francisco-based nonprofit. A smattering of other, smaller foundations have agreed to give $4 million to the organization, said its chief executive, Evan Marwell.
http://goo.gl/UJkObv

http://goo.gl/CBF2Tn  (AP)

http://goo.gl/wYDKuv  (Ed Week)

One or two hours of sports each day best for teens Reuters Health

Playing sports is known to have a positive impact on teenagers, and a new study suggests one to two hours of playing time each day may be optimal for young people’s well-being.
Researchers found adolescents tended to be worse off if they played sports for only a couple of hours per week, or if they practiced close to three hours each day or more.
“Overtraining has not only a well-known impact on the body, but also on the brain and therefore on emotions, thoughts and mood,” Dr. Arnaud Merglen said.
“The mechanism of low activity and very high activity is probably not the same, but the results appear quite similar,” he told Reuters Health in an email.
http://goo.gl/3venft

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CALENDAR
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USOE Calendar
http://tinyurl.com/5x9oh9

UEN News
http://www.uen.org

December 5-6:
Utah State Board of Education meeting
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspxpr

December 10:
Education Task Force meeting
8:30 a.m., 445 State Capitol
http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2013&com=TSKEDU

Executive Appropriations Committee meeting
1:30 p.m., 445 State Capitol
http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2013&com=APPEXE

December 12:
Utah State Charter School Board meeting
250 E. 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://goo.gl/Mu36l

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