Education News Roundup: March 11, 2014

Latinos in Action students from Treasure Mountain Junior High School visited the 2014 Legislative Session.

Latinos in Action students from Treasure Mountain Junior High School visited the 2014 Legislative Session.

Education News Roundup

Today’s Top Picks:

Speaker Lockhart’s ed tech initiative is a victim of budget negotiations.
http://go.uen.org/s6  (SLT)
and http://go.uen.org/s7  (DN)
and http://go.uen.org/s8  (UP)
and http://go.uen.org/sv  (OSE)
and http://go.uen.org/sz  (PDH)
and http://go.uen.org/sC  (KUTV)
and http://go.uen.org/sE  (KTVX)
and http://go.uen.org/sH  (KSL)
and http://go.uen.org/sK  (KSTU)
and http://go.uen.org/sN  (KCPW)
and http://go.uen.org/sO  (KUER)
or budget changes as of March 10
http://go.uen.org/sw  (Legislature)

Sen. Adams discusses proposed changes to school grading.
http://go.uen.org/sP  (Senate Site)

Senate advances bill on anonymous tip line for Utah schools.
http://go.uen.org/s9  (SLT)
and http://go.uen.org/rv  (DN)

Floor debate gets personal in Senate over sexual abuse education bill.
http://go.uen.org/si  (SLT)
and http://go.uen.org/so  (DN)
and http://go.uen.org/t0  (UP)
and http://go.uen.org/sJ  (KSTU)

South Jordan split appears less likely now.
http://go.uen.org/sc  (DN)
and http://go.uen.org/sF  (KSL)

Wall Street Journal looks at competency-based education.
http://go.uen.org/s5  (WSJ)

California may toughen truancy laws for elementary students.
http://go.uen.org/sf  (LAT)
and http://go.uen.org/sQ  (Reuters)

————————————————————
TODAY’S HEADLINES
————————————————————

UTAH

With Lockhart ed-tech plan out, lawmakers make budget deal

Gas, property tax hikes declared dead
Proposals » House Speaker Becky Lockhart says House will not consider them.

Elevator Pitch: School Grading Revisions

Senate OKs hotline for anonymous reports in schools

After emotional testimony, Senate OKs sexual abuse program

House passes bill blocking schools from asking about gun ownership

House passes bill allowing State School Board to sanction districts for accepting federal funds

Box Elder Rep. Ronda Menlove won’t seek re-election

Hundreds of Utah school buses adding to air pollution in the state

South Jordan mayor says idea to split Jordan School District ‘losing momentum’

SITLA Board of Trustees Meets to Discuss Business Projects in Beaver, Iron, and Uintah Counties

Ogden high school students fight it out for Shakespeare

Author Brandon Mull visits Nibley Elementary sharing importance of reading, imagination

USU’s Emma Eccles Jones College of Education and Human Services ranked in top 30 nationally

One-third of school threats come through social media, study shows

Mom finds answer to daughter’s learning struggles after vision disorder diagnosis

Student winners recognized at Capitol for idle-free project

Salt Lake school kids given the gift of sight

Olympian Noelle Pikus-Pace speaks to students at Northridge High

Free expression in schools: new cases show administrators should study the Constitution

Battle over charter schools in New York pits mayor against governor in political civil war

OPINION & COMMENTARY

Missed opportunity

High hopes for College Board’s new SAT format

Navigating school bus is worst distracted driving

My HB41 bill can help clean Utah’s air

Gates Foundation fights polio, malaria, supports Common Core

The technology ‘squirrel’

The top 5 #EdInnovations to watch

Your High School Transcript Could Haunt You Forever How big data could create an inescapable “permanent record”

Schoolhouse Commercialism Leaves Policymakers Behind

NATION

Shaking Up the Classroom
Some Schools Scrap Age-Based Grade Levels, Focusing on Mastery of Material

Testing Skeptics Aim to Build Support for Opt-Out Strategy

Atty. Gen. Kamala Harris proposes new anti-truancy laws for California

EdTech, Student Privacy, Too Much Testing? Q&A With The Department Of Education

Food fight starting early over school lunch rules

Schools across the country offering universal free lunch

Ex-teacher on FBI’s Most Wanted List gets 25 years for child porn

————————————————————
UTAH NEWS
————————————————————

With Lockhart ed-tech plan out, lawmakers make budget deal

House Speaker Becky Lockhart said she pulled the plug on her proposed $200 million initiative to put digital learning devices in the hands of every Utah school student when it became evident the Senate was unwilling to offer more than the “change out of the couch cushions.”
Lockhart said during negotiations last week she made repeated offers, each smaller than the last, but the Senate Republican leaders were unwilling to give ground on her top policy objective.
“It finally became apparent that the House was trying to make history. The Senate was trying to make a deal,” Lockhart said Monday. “We were unwilling to take the deal that they presented. So we chose to back away from the initiative.”
http://go.uen.org/s6  (SLT)

http://go.uen.org/s7  (DN)

http://go.uen.org/s8  (UP)

http://go.uen.org/sv  (OSE)

http://go.uen.org/sz  (PDH)

http://go.uen.org/sC  (KUTV)

http://go.uen.org/sE  (KTVX)

http://go.uen.org/sH  (KSL)

http://go.uen.org/sK  (KSTU)

http://go.uen.org/sN  (KCPW)

http://go.uen.org/sO  (KUER)

Budget changes as of March 10
http://go.uen.org/sw  (Legislature)

Gas, property tax hikes declared dead
Proposals » House Speaker Becky Lockhart says House will not consider them.

Proposed increases on gasoline tax and property tax were declared dead Monday by House Speaker Becky Lockhart.
“They won’t be heard on the House floor,” she told reporters, even though bills to raise those taxes have passed the Senate.
That comes, in part, because Lockhart’s $200 million initiative to improve technology was killed in budget negotiations. She said she viewed the tax increases as attempts by the Senate to fund her initiative without forcing cuts elsewhere.
So with her initiative now dead after budget negotiations, she made clear that the tax hike proposals are also dead.

Also, the Senate had passed SB111 by Sen. Aaron Osmond, R-South Jordan, to raise property taxes.
His bill originally proposed the plan to even out revenue for rich and poor school districts by freezing a state property tax rate — known as the minimum basic tax rate. Currently, that rate goes down as property values rise. Keeping the rate constant would allow more money to be collected as property values rise.
Fiscal analysts predict that would raise $12 million the first year, $41 million the second year, rising eventually to $100 million a year — where it would have been kept to equalize funding.
Senators amended the bill to direct the money to Lockhart’s education technology initiative, but she quickly spoke out against a tax hike.
http://go.uen.org/sm  (SLT)

Elevator Pitch: School Grading Revisions

In this episode of Elevator Pitch, we learn about SB 209, Senator Stuart Adam’s revisions to Utah’s school grading program.
http://go.uen.org/sP  (Senate Site)

Senate OKs hotline for anonymous reports in schools

A bill that passed the Senate Monday on its way to the House would create a hotline for students, parents or public school employees to anonymously report unsafe activities including someone talking about suicide.
SB232s1’s sponsor, Rep. Daniel Thatcher, R-West Valley City, said an anonymous reporting statewide hotline is needed for students who are afraid of being reported to law enforcement to their parents. If the caller volunteers their name, however, social workers answering the hotline would be required to report that, Thatcher said.
http://go.uen.org/s9  (SLT)

http://go.uen.org/rv  (DN)

After emotional testimony, Senate OKs sexual abuse program

After emotional debate — in which two senators acknowledged publicly for the first time they were sexually assaulted as children — the Senate gave preliminary approval to a bill requiring development of a school program to teach children about sexual abuse.
“We need to take a stand on this and teach children how to protect themselves,” said Sen. Aaron Osmond, R-South Jordan, who told colleagues he was abused by a non-family member as a child.
Osmond said the curriculum would give children “tools to say you can push back against an adult, you can say it’s wrong.”
Osmond and Sen. Daniel Thatcher, R-West Valley City, each said they had been abused or assaulted and a third lawmaker, Sen. Todd Weiler, R-Woods Cross, told of a Boy Scout leader who had inappropriate contact with him.
http://go.uen.org/si   (SLT)

http://go.uen.org/so  (DN)

http://go.uen.org/t0  (UP)

http://go.uen.org/sJ  (KSTU)

House passes bill blocking schools from asking about gun ownership

SALT LAKE CITY — School officials would be banned from asking students if their parents own firearms under the terms of a bill passed Monday by the Utah House.
The bill’s sponsor, Rep. Dana Layton, R-Orem, said she was motivated to propose HB397 after learning of a smartphone application that mapped out the gun owners in a neighborhood from user-provided information.
“I can’t control the information people are turning in on their neighbors, but we can at least prevent schools from doing it,” Layton said.
http://go.uen.org/sa  (DN)

House passes bill allowing State School Board to sanction districts for accepting federal funds

SALT LAKE CITY — A bill allowing the State School Board to sanction school districts for going behind its back to the federal government passed the House on Monday.
HB425, sponsored by Rep. Steve Eliason, R-Sandy, would empower the State School Board to restrict state funds allocated to a local school or school district for failing to receive board approval before entering into a funding agreement with the U.S. Department of Education.
Eliason said the bill allows state education officials to “repel any unwanted federal intrusion.” He said there have been instances in other states where federal officials have circumvented the wishes of state leadership to contract with local school administrators.
During his presentation of the bill, Eliason provided lawmakers with a letter from Rep. Rob Bishop, R-Utah, in which the congressman warned of federal intrusion in local matters. Eliason said his bill remedies many of Bishop’s concerns by putting Utah in a position to restrict federal activities.
http://go.uen.org/sb (DN)

Box Elder Rep. Ronda Menlove won’t seek re-election

BRIGHAM CITY — Five-term Utah House veteran Ronda Menlove, R-Garland, is not seeking reelection, which should add interest to this fall’s races.
http://go.uen.org/su (OSE)

Hundreds of Utah school buses adding to air pollution in the state

SALT LAKE CITY — Hundreds of Utah’s public school buses could be contributing to the state’s already polluted air.
Of the 2,821 school buses owned by the state of Utah, 1,000 have been retrofitted for cleaner emissions thanks to grants from the Environmental Protection Agency. However, the Utah Office of Education reports that 739 buses built before 2001 don’t qualify for upgrades, which means they don’t meet standards set by the EPA.
http://go.uen.org/sI (KSL)

South Jordan mayor says idea to split Jordan School District ‘losing momentum’

SOUTH JORDAN — The Jordan School Board and South Jordan city officials met Monday to question whether options to split the school district should be investigated, but the discussion never got that far.
South Jordan Mayor Dave Alvord said he called the meeting to establish communication between the Jordan School Board and city officials about the idea, but the nearly three-hour discussion stalled on concerns over local development, criticism of some of the board’s past decisions and the need to improve communication.
“I think support for the split is losing momentum,” Alvord acknowledged during a recess.
http://go.uen.org/sc  (DN)

http://go.uen.org/sF (KSL)

SITLA Board of Trustees Meets to Discuss Business Projects in Beaver, Iron, and Uintah Counties

SALT LAKE CITY, Utah – The School and Institutional Trust Lands Administration (SITLA) Board of Trustees meets at 9 a.m. Thursday, March 20 in the SITLA Main Office located at 675 East 500 South in Salt Lake City.
http://go.uen.org/sM  (KCSG)

Ogden high school students fight it out for Shakespeare

OGDEN — It looked like the police should be called. Students from Ogden High and Ben Lomond High were throwing punches and chocking each other, slapping faces and pulling each other’s hair. One student was thrown to the ground, and another dragged about 20 feet across the floor.
The students weren’t actually beating on each other — they were participating in a stage combat class offered by the Utah Shakespeare Festival’s Shakespeare-in-the-Schools program.
http://go.uen.org/sx  (OSE)

Author Brandon Mull visits Nibley Elementary sharing importance of reading, imagination

Students at Nibley Elementary School learned the importance of reading and imagination when Utah author Brandon Mull came to visit Monday. Mull, who lives in Alpine, Utah, is the author the “Fablehaven” series, a New York Times best selling fantasy series, as well as several other books.
http://go.uen.org/sA (LHJ)

USU’s Emma Eccles Jones College of Education and Human Services ranked in top 30 nationally

LOGAN —“U.S. News and World Report” magazine has again named the graduate programs in Utah State University’s Emma Eccles Jones College of Education and Human Services among the top tier of colleges of education in the nation.
In the 2015 edition of “America’s Best Graduate Schools,” the magazine ranked the college 28th in the nation overall against all graduate colleges of education. Of significant note, the college was ranked seventh in the nation in total research dollars received by a college, with faculty and staff securing $41.8 million in funded research dollars. It is the only school of education in Utah to place in the top 50.
http://go.uen.org/sB  (CVD)

http://go.uen.org/sX  (USN&WR)

One-third of school threats come through social media, study shows

SALT LAKE CITY — A recent study shows a large number of school threats come through social media. So, what can educators do to monitor threats they might see online?
Researchers from Cleveland added up all the threats of bombs, shootings and hoaxes over a six-month period from late 2013 to 2014. Researchers said one-third of those threats came through social media sites.
So, what can be done about it?
http://go.uen.org/sG  (KSL)

Mom finds answer to daughter’s learning struggles after vision disorder diagnosis

PLEASANT GROVE — It’s a condition that one in four children have, but some of the signs can be mistaken for learning disorders such as Attention Deficit Disorder.
It took one Provo family months before they discovered that their daughter, Savannah Heideman had Binocular Vision Disorder.
“When I finally found the answer I have to admit I sat and cried because I thought, ‘oh finally a relief,’” said Savannah’s mother, Lynette Heideman.
Savannah struggled in school.
“We didn`t know what was wrong — we had her in private tutoring and everything we could think of,” Heideman said.
http://go.uen.org/sL  (KSTU)

Student winners recognized at Capitol for idle-free project

SALT LAKE CITY — At the end of last year, Luke Parker decided to do something about all the cars idling at Upland Terrace School in Millcreek.
Luke, 12, made a poster to remind parents to turn off their cars while waiting in the school parking lot. Every day, he’d look in the newspaper and update the poster to reflect the air quality that day, whether it was green, yellow or red.
He also walked around a few times a week to tell parents about the harm idling creates.
http://go.uen.org/ss  (DN)

Salt Lake school kids given the gift of sight

SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH – Students from all over Salt Lake are being given the gift of sight. One Sight, a charitable foundation travels all over the United States and is in Salt Lake for the next three days.
Representatives from One Sight say being able to see and read is an important aspect of a child’s education and the sooner a student struggling to see gets help the better. ” What we know about children is that about 80% of what they learn is visual and one in four children, according to the Optometric Association, go undiagnosed with a vision problem,” said Dawn Yager, project manager for One Sight.
Yager tells ABC 4 Utah Tuesday alone 95% of the students they see will need glasses and identifying who those children are only sets them up for success. “Their in a classroom maybe their sitting in the back of a classroom if they cant see the lesson plan on the board their not going to be successful. Who knows what will happen as far as their learning ability, but lets identify it while their young while we’re here at an elementary school,” said Yager.
The foundation works with the Salt Lake School District in identifying students who need their eyesight tested.
http://go.uen.org/sD  (KTVX)

Olympian Noelle Pikus-Pace speaks to students at Northridge High

LAYTON — An Olympic medalist Utahn brought her message of hard work and perseverance along with fighting child hunger to high school students on Monday morning.
Noelle Pikus-Pace, of Eagle Mountain, visited Northridge High School to speak to students and talk about ending child hunger in an event sponsored by Kellogg’s.
http://go.uen.org/sp  (DN)

http://go.uen.org/sy  (OSE)

Free expression in schools: new cases show administrators should study the Constitution

This year has seen federal courts rule several cases involving student expression at school, each favoring students. The cases coincide with the anniversary of a 1969 Supreme Court ruling, Tinker v. Des Moines, that recognized students do not “shed their constitutional rights to freedom of speech or expression at the schoolhouse gate.”
http://go.uen.org/sq  (DN)

Battle over charter schools in New York pits mayor against governor in political civil war

New York’s new Mayor Bill de Blasio is in a crossfire over education, having essentially declared war on charter schools during the recent campaign, and he’s now facing protesting parents in the streets and a hostile Democratic governor upstate.
http://go.uen.org/sr  (DN)

————————————————————
OPINION & COMMENTARY
————————————————————

Missed opportunity
(St. George) Spectrum editorial

A plan that would have truly put Utah at the forefront of public education has died for lack of leading lawmakers being able to act like adults. In essence, our House speaker and governor decided they would take their toys and go home instead of working out a compromise.
The plan came from House Speaker Becky Lockhart, who proposed putting tablets in the hands of nearly every Utah public education student. The argument is that technology needs to be embraced, and teachers should have that avenue at their disposal to help our state’s school children learn everything from reading to math to science.
The price tag is a hefty $200 million to $300 million. And then there are replacement costs. So this plan doesn’t come cheaply. But that money would go to buy the devices, improve wireless networks in schools and train teachers.
http://go.uen.org/sZ

High hopes for College Board’s new SAT format Deseret News commentary by columnist Lois M. Collins

My daughter has been taking practice SAT tests periodically since the beginning of the year, hoping she’ll do well when she sits down for the real thing. To get a great score, she once told me, she’d have to be a genius or very lucky. Barring that, she’d need teachers who happened to teach her exactly the right things or parents who could afford some serious prep classes.
Like a hefty portion of middle-class kids, she doesn’t qualify for programs that help children in low-income families get ready for college tests — and those do not seem uniformly available to kids, although they exist at our high school. The professional prep classes offered by a $4.5 billion-a-year industry are not in the budget for many families with kids who would nonetheless make good college students.
http://go.uen.org/sn

Navigating school bus is worst distracted driving Salt Lake Tribune commentary by columnist Robert Kirby

I passed a school bus on the freeway last week. In the back the kids were carrying on and hanging from the ceiling. When I got to the front of the bus, the driver looked catatonic.
On my Top 10 Jobs I Couldn’t Get Paid Enough to Do list, school bus driver is No. 8, right after road construction flagger and just before food server.
http://go.uen.org/sj

My HB41 bill can help clean Utah’s air
(Ogden) Standard-Examiner op-ed by Rep. Stephen G. Handy

Although the 2014 Utah legislative session draws to a close this Thursday at midnight, sine die, there are still many issues yet to be finalized, including several groundbreaking efforts at cleaner air.
It’s critical that we balance the budget, and we will. It’s vital that we provide for increases to public and higher education — that will get done, too.
But the public has also repeatedly expressed its desires that the legislature do what it can to help clean Utah’s notoriously dirty air. There are a series of at least 25 initiatives moving through the Legislature that have promise including HB41, Clean Fuel School Buses and Infrastructure, that I am sponsoring.
http://go.uen.org/sd

Gates Foundation fights polio, malaria, supports Common Core Salt Lake Tribune letter from David Draper

In his letter to The Tribune Public Forum, M. Donald Thomas asserts that the Common Core initiative is merely a ploy to “control public education and to ridicule schools,” supported by scurrilous special interest groups such as the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation (“Common Core supporters providing misinformation,” March 7).
Yep, if a group like the Gates Foundation that spends billions of dollars working to eradicate polio and malaria from the face of the planet is behind it, you can be assured that Common Core is an initiative with evil intent.
http://go.uen.org/sl

The technology ‘squirrel’
Deseret News letter from Brian Halladay

“Squirrel!”
Technology in the classroom is the new squirrel up on the hill. Everyone’s chasing it. It’s fun, it’s hip and it’s done all in the name of what’s best for kids.
Let’s look down the road. What happens when the new technology students get now becomes outdated in three years? Three years ago the iPad was just invented. Three years before that the iPod Touch came out. What if we had iPod Touches in all our schools? These would be considered outdated by today’s standards.
With education, there is a place for technology, but as with many things, a balance is needed.
http://go.uen.org/st

The top 5 #EdInnovations to watch
Hechinger Report commentary by columnist Anya Kamenetz

The benefit of a big conference like SXSWEdu is a sort of ambient exposure to trends. Here are five concepts that everyone (or at least key, smart people) were talking about at last week’s conference, and that bear keeping an eye on for the future.
http://go.uen.org/sV

Your High School Transcript Could Haunt You Forever How big data could create an inescapable “permanent record”
Atlantic commentary by VIKTOR MAYER-SCHÖNBERGER, professor at the Oxford Internet Institute at Oxford University, & KENNETH CUKIER, data editor of the Economist

Arizona State University, like many colleges across the United States, has a problem with students who enter their freshman year ill prepared in math. Though the school offers remedial classes, one-third of students earn less than a C, a key predictor that they will leave before getting a degree. To improve the dismal situation, ASU turned to adaptive-learning software by Knewton, a prominent edtech company. The result: Pass rates zipped up from 64% to 75% between 2009 and 2011, and dropout rates were cut in half.
But imagine the underside to this seeming success story. What if the data collected by the software never disappeared and the fact that one had needed to take remedial classes became part of a student’s permanent record, accessible decades later? Consider if the technical system made predictions that tried to improve the school’s success rate not by pushing students to excel, but by pushing them out, in order to inflate the overall grade average of students who remained.
These sorts of scenarios are extremely possible. Some educational reformers advocate for “digital backpacks” that would have students carry their electronic transcripts with them throughout their schooling. And adaptive-learning algorithms are a spooky art.
http://go.uen.org/sW

Schoolhouse Commercialism Leaves Policymakers Behind National Education Policy Center analysis

The Sixteenth Annual Report on Schoolhouse Commercializing Trends finds that, in a context of fierce corporate opposition to regulation, lack of concern in the education sector about commercialism, and a general assumption by stakeholders that school participation in marketing programs is a constructive way to raise money little state or federal legislation related to school commercialism was signed into law in 2012 or 2013. Advocacy groups within the United States and internationally are, however, increasingly aware of the threats that marketing programs pose to children, especially in the areas of nutrition and privacy. The report outlines the threats that commercializing activities in schools pose to the health and well-being of students and to the integrity of schools’ educational programs, and recommends that policymakers ban them outright unless an independent entity certifies that a proposed commercializing activity will cause no harm to children or otherwise undermine the quality of their education.
http://go.uen.org/sh

————————————————————-
NATIONAL NEWS
————————————————————-

Shaking Up the Classroom
Some Schools Scrap Age-Based Grade Levels, Focusing on Mastery of Material Wall Street Journal

LINDSAY, Calif.—There are no seventh-graders in the Lindsay Unified School District.
Instead, in the “Content Level 7″ room at Washington Elementary, 10 students, ages 11 to 14, gather around teacher Nelly Lopez for help in writing essays. Eight sit at computers, plowing through a lesson on sentence structure, while a dozen advanced students work on assignments in pairs.
The 4,100-pupil district at the base of the Sierra Nevada range is part of an experiment shaking up classrooms across the country. Called competency-based learning, it is based on the idea that students learn at their own pace and should earn credits and advance after they master the material—not just because they have spent a year in a certain class.
http://go.uen.org/s5

Testing Skeptics Aim to Build Support for Opt-Out Strategy Education Week

Riding what they see as a wave of anti-testing sentiment among parents, opponents of high-stakes assessments believe a strategy known as opt-out—having parents refuse to let their children take state-mandated tests—could force policymakers to take note of their cause.
Once considered a rarity, the opt-out push has prompted high-profile boycott efforts and meetings in large districts such as Chicago and led more parents nationwide to join forces with anti-testing advocates in arguing that the assessments are unnecessary, excessive, and, in some cases, even harmful to students.
Such efforts come at a time when states across the country are preparing to field-test assessments aligned with the Common Core State Standards, and when controversy over the common core in many statehouses has reignited the debate over testing overload.
http://go.uen.org/sT

Atty. Gen. Kamala Harris proposes new anti-truancy laws for California Los Angeles Times

SACRAMENTO — Warning that elementary school truancy in California has reached a crisis level, state Atty. Gen. Kamala D. Harris and lawmakers on Monday proposed a package of bills aimed at improving the tracking of absenteeism and the evaluation and use of measures to keep kids in school.
Harris estimated that 1 million elementary school students are truant each year and 250,000 of them miss 18 or more school days costing school districts $1.4 billion. In all, 30% of elementary school students were truant during the 2012-2013 school year, she said.
“California’s Constitution guarantees our children the right to an education, yet our elementary schools face a truancy crisis,” Harris said. “When children in kindergarten through sixth grade miss school, they fall behind and too many never catch up.’’
A child is truant after missing or being tardy by more than 30 minutes without a valid excuse on three occasions during a school year. Missing classes in elementary school sets the stage for problems later, Harris said.
http://go.uen.org/sf

http://go.uen.org/sQ  (Reuters)

EdTech, Student Privacy, Too Much Testing? Q&A With The Department Of Education Forbes

A few weeks ago, I wrote this article as a follow up to Common Sense Media’s Student Privacy Zone summit. Immediately following the summit, the U.S. Department of Education laid out some guidance and best practices through their Privacy Technical Assistance Center (PTAC).
There are a ton of questions we need to ask about edtech, privacy, and student data. A lot of those questions are in my inbox–from the thousands of readers who have sent me feedback and comments to the article I mentioned above. It was clear that the conversation needed much more attention.
So I reached out to Jim Shelton, acting deputy secretary at the U.S. Department of Education, who was panelist at the Student Privacy Zone Summit. The following is an unedited Q&A exchange between myself and Shelton. We cover a lot of ground: edtech in general, standardized testing, privacy, and more.
http://go.uen.org/sg

Food fight starting early over school lunch rules Politico

Keeping intact a 2010 rewrite of a law that dictates what kids eat in school — from the number of carrots to the amount of salt in their shepherd’s pie — could be a major challenge as some in Congress are already angling for a rollback.
Many of the changes included in the 2010 Healthy Hunger-Free Kids Act have yet to be implemented, and reauthorization of the law is more than a year away. But the food industry and school associations are already lobbying to eliminate key provisions that have been perpetually under contention, such as sodium limits and minimum fruit requirements.
The time is ripe: Several major supporters of the updated standards are set to retire and the political climate for 2015 remains foggy.
http://go.uen.org/se

Schools across the country offering universal free lunch MSNBC

Hunger crises do their greatest damage to those who are already most vulnerable: The poor, the elderly, the disabled, and, of course, children. As a result of America’s present hunger crisis, one-fifth of all households with children are classified as food insecure by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, which which defines food security as “access … to enough food for an active, healthy life.”
In total, 8.3 million children in this country are not getting the food they need. At the same time, food stamp cuts have put extraordinary strain on both public and private anti-hunger programs, to the point where even many food pantries and soup kitchens are unable to meet the basic needs of their clients. The food security safety net is fraying to the breaking point.
But there is one notable exception to the overall trend. Even as Congress signs off on billions of dollars in food stamp cuts, the federal government is dramatically expanding its free school meals program. Thanks to a 2010 law championed by first lady Michelle Obama, a growing number of schools across the country are offering free meals to all of their students, regardless of whether those students’ parents applied for the program.
http://go.uen.org/sY

Ex-teacher on FBI’s Most Wanted List gets 25 years for child porn Reuters

WASHINGTON – A former Washington schoolteacher who was put on the FBI’s Ten Most Wanted List for producing child pornography was sentenced to 25 years in prison on Tuesday.
Eric Toth, 32, had pleaded guilty to pornography charges stemming from photographs and videos that he took of children while working as a camp counselor in Wisconsin, as a teacher at the capital’s private Beauvoir School and at a Maryland home.
U.S. District Court Judge Rudolph Contreras sentenced Toth to 25 years in prison and lifetime supervision after his release, the U.S. Attorney’s office said in a statement.
http://go.uen.org/sR

http://go.uen.org/sS  (AP)

————————————————————
CALENDAR
————————————————————

USOE Calendar
http://tinyurl.com/5x9oh9

UEN News
http://www.uen.org

March 13:
Utah State Charter School Board meeting
9 a.m., 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://goo.gl/IaQntl

Executive Appropriations Committee meeting
4:10 p.m., 210 Senate Building
http://le.utah.gov/Interim/2014/html/00002777.htm

April 3-4:
Utah State Board of Education meeting
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspxpr

Related posts:

Comments are closed.