Education News Roundup: April 1, 2014

Education News Roundup

Today’s Top Picks:

Governor Herbert stands up for Common Core in Utah and Indiana.
http://go.uen.org/DW  (CVD)
and http://go.uen.org/DY  (Indianapolis [IN] Star)

KSL shows what’s up with the new SAGE spring tests for Utah students.
http://go.uen.org/DG  (KSL)

Canyons District names three superintendent finalists.
http://go.uen.org/Du  (SLT)
and http://go.uen.org/Dz  (DN)
and http://go.uen.org/E1  (Canyons School District)

Annie E. Casey Foundation’s new report chronicles differences between majority and minority children in Utah and across the nation.
http://go.uen.org/De  (SLT)
and http://go.uen.org/DA  (DN)
and http://go.uen.org/DC  (CVD)
and http://go.uen.org/DJ  (Reuters)
and http://go.uen.org/DP  (Ed Week)
or a copy of the report
http://go.uen.org/Df  (Annie E. Casey Foundation)

Ogden School District letting 17 teachers go.
http://go.uen.org/Dd  (KTVX)

Congratulations to Park City High on the Governor’s AP Award.
http://go.uen.org/Dh  (DN)
and http://go.uen.org/Dt  (SLT)

New PISA assessment shows U.S. students above average in problem solving.
http://go.uen.org/Dj  (Ed Week)
and http://go.uen.org/Dk  (NYT)
and http://go.uen.org/Dl (HuffPo)
and http://go.uen.org/Dm  (Toronto, CTV)
or a copy of the U.S. results
http://go.uen.org/Dn  (OECD)

Teacher tenure takes the spotlight as we await word on the California lawsuit aimed at tenure laws there.
http://go.uen.org/DS  (NewsHour)
and http://go.uen.org/DT  (Stateline)
or http://go.uen.org/DU  (Forbes commentary)

ENR is dusting off his resume to see if there are any PR jobs open at the Centinela Valley Union High School District in California. Pay scale there looks pretty good.
http://go.uen.org/Dr  (LAT)

Kids like this one remind ENR of the old Tom Lehrer joke: By the time Mozart was my age, he had been dead for 18 years.
http://go.uen.org/DK  (Reuters)
and http://go.uen.org/DM  (New York, Newsday)

And since it is April Fools, Fordham has put out a parody of “House of Cards” based on education policy.
http://go.uen.org/Dq  (YouTube)

————————————————————
TODAY’S HEADLINES
————————————————————

UTAH

Gov. Herbert stresses education funding and Common Core

Indiana standards mirror Common Core, says Utah governor

3 things parents should know about new year-end tests

Canyons district names three superintendent finalists Education » Two candidates from Utah, one from Illinois.

Minority kids don’t fare as well as whites in Utah Education » National study shows minority kids fare worse than whites, but there’s more to story.

Seventeen teachers to be let go by Ogden School District at end of school year

The Deputy Secretary of Education is talking technology in Salt Lake City

Republican field narrows in race for U.S. House seat Election » Jennifer Johnson drops out days after filing as candidate for 4th District seat.

School board hopefuls talk issues

Gov. Herbert honors Advanced Placement students at Park City High School

Technology helps growing number of hearing impaired students

Society of Women Engineers engages high schoolers Event planners seek to show girls that engineering is more than math problems

Syracuse High students learn about being passionate about a career

University of Utah professor honored for creating children’s program

OPINION & COMMENTARY

Utah earns digital learning excellence

Preschool isn’t enough — Talk to your babies

Sutherland releases 2014 Legislative Scorecard and Lifetime Legislator Scores

To the Utah Board of Education: Don’t Rush to Replace Menlove

Both parties need to grow up in discussing early education

What I’ve Learned Teaching Charter Students One seventh grader asked me, ‘Why are so many people mad at us if we are doing so well?’

Tracking Common-Core Backlash in State Legislatures

Common Core Documentary Makes Hazy Case Against Standards

Keep the ‘public’ in public school boards CEO’s call for privatization a disservice to communities

Map: The education gap between Asians and other minorities is huge in every state

Schoolhouse of Cards

NATION

U.S. Students Score Above Average on First PISA Problem-Solving Exam

Teacher tenure rules are in state of flux across the nation

What Does the Republican Education Agenda Look Like?
Republicans are campaigning on economic mobility and opportunity, but the policies that deliver it are harder to come by.

As popularity rises, so does risk of being bullied

Startups in Education Set Record, Raising $500 Million in First Quarter

Superintendent’s pay in South Bay district called ‘excessive’
The superintendent of the small Centinela Valley Union High School District, Jose Fernandez, made $674,559 last year, far more than the New York and Los Angeles school district heads.

New York high school student accepted at all eight Ivy League schools

First Census of Mexico’s Schools Finds Problems

————————————————————
UTAH NEWS
————————————————————

Gov. Herbert stresses education funding and Common Core

It’s all over and Utah Governor Gary Herbert said once again it was a frustrating process for 104 strong personalities to come together during the 45-day session of the Utah legislature to learn and then do what the people of Utah want them to do.
During his monthly “Let Me Speak to the Governor” statewide radio broadcast, Herbert said during the recent session legislators spent a great deal of time prioritizing, determining education to be a top priority and then funding education.
http://go.uen.org/DW  (CVD)

Indiana standards mirror Common Core, says Utah governor

With a stroke of a pen last week Gov. Mike Pence formally removed Indiana from adhering to Common Core. But whether the state actually has distanced itself from the national education standards remains uncertain, and words from a fellow governor now have added to the debate.
Utah Gov. Gary Herbert, a Republican, told journalists last week that new Hoosier educational standards still are almost mirroring exactly the national standards that Pence eschewed.
As Herbert talked about Utah controlling its decisions over academic standards, he was asked whether the state would legislate a split from Common Core, as Indiana did.
“I’ve talked to Gov. Pence about what they’re doing there,” Herbert said. “In essence, they’re saying they’re creating what’s called the Indiana Core. It’s not the Common Core … but their standards are almost mirroring exactly what is commonly referred to as the Common Core standards.”
http://go.uen.org/DY  (Indianapolis [IN] Star)

3 things parents should know about new year-end tests

SALT LAKE CITY — Every Utah student will take new year-end tests this year that measure what they’ve learned. Educators say there are three things every parent should know.
First, there are no No. 2 pencils or bubbles to fill in. These are all computer tests. In fact, they’re not even standardized, because the tests are adaptive and change based on how students answer.
http://go.uen.org/DG  (KSL)

Canyons district names three superintendent finalists Education » Two candidates from Utah, one from Illinois.

Canyons School District leaders announced Monday three finalists for the job of superintendent, including two Utah educators and one from outside the state.
Finalists include James Briscoe, superintendent of DeKalb Community Unit School District No. 428 in DeKalb, Ill.; Craig Hammer, executive director of secondary schools, Washington County School District in St. George; and Kathryn McCarrie, assistant superintendent and chief performance officer for the Canyons School District.
The Canyons board chose the three finalists after three days of interviews with candidates from across the nation. The board plans to conduct additional interviews with the finalists before choosing a new superintendent to begin work July 1. Whomever the board chooses will take the spot left open by the district’s first superintendent David Doty, who resigned in June to lead an education reform organization.
http://go.uen.org/Du  (SLT)

http://go.uen.org/Dz  (DN)

http://go.uen.org/E1  (Canyons School District)

Minority kids don’t fare as well as whites in Utah Education » National study shows minority kids fare worse than whites, but there’s more to story.

Minority children fare worse in Utah than their white counterparts, but there are plenty of challenges — poverty, and poor access to health care and education — to go around, according to a new national study.
The study, “Race for Results: Building a Path of Opportunity for All Children” is being released Tuesday by the Annie E. Casey Foundation’s Kids Count project.
For nearly two decades, the foundation has joined with Voices for Utah Children to research the well-being of Utah children.
The new study, however, is the first time there’s been a close look at how children fare by ethnic group, said Terry Haven, deputy director for Voices for Utah Children.
http://go.uen.org/De  (SLT)

http://go.uen.org/DA  (DN)

http://go.uen.org/DC  (CVD)

http://go.uen.org/DJ  (Reuters)

http://go.uen.org/DP  (Ed Week)

A copy of the report
http://go.uen.org/Df  (Annie E. Casey Foundation)

Seventeen teachers to be let go by Ogden School District at end of school year

OGDEN, Utah — Seventeen teachers have been asked not to come back to the Ogden School District next year. Seventeen teachers that now have to find a new job.
“It is shocking because that’s a lot of teachers,” said Tia Paxton.
Tia Paxton has a son in 8th grade at Highland Junior High School. The junior high will see six new teachers next year. The school has the highest amount of non-renewals in the district.
“I sat through five different non renewals on Friday it was hard. It was hard to see folks be told that they are not going to come back and do what they love,” said Matt Ogle the Executive Director of Ogden Weber Uniserv.
ABC 4 Utah asked Ogden School District Communications Director Zac Williams if the teachers were let go because they could not do the job.
“Ah, basically that could be true in some cases,” said Williams. “They just either aren’t fitting into the school’s plan for next year or perhaps there is some performance issues. We take our performance very, very serious.”
http://go.uen.org/Dd  (KTVX)

The Deputy Secretary of Education is talking technology in Salt Lake City

The U.S. Deputy Secretary of Education is in Salt Lake City talking about maximizing technology in our classrooms. Doctor Libby Doggett will speak at 4:15 Tuesday at the Hilton Salt Lake Center.
Doctor Doggett says it’s important to get technology in the hands of students early. Doctor Doggett’s presentation is free and open to the public. This morning she stopped by Good Morning Utah for a preview.
http://go.uen.org/DE  (KTVX)

Republican field narrows in race for U.S. House seat Election » Jennifer Johnson drops out days after filing as candidate for 4th District seat.

A surprise Republican candidate for Utah’s only open U.S. House seat has decided to step aside.
Jennifer Johnson, a member of the state Board of Education, filed to run in the 4th Congressional District on March 20, the last possible day. Since then, she has talked with family, friends and political insiders and decided not to seek the office now held by Rep. Jim Matheson, D-Utah.
“The timing is just not right,” Johnson said Monday, the day she planned to formally exit the race.
Her decision leaves Republicans to choose between Mia Love and Bob Fuehr, both of whom have been in the race for months. On the Democratic side, the candidates are Doug Owens and Bill Peterson.
http://go.uen.org/Db  (SLT)

http://go.uen.org/Dc  (DN)

School board hopefuls talk issues

ST. GEORGE — Competing for the District 6 seat in the upcoming Washington County School Board race, incumbent Kelly Blake is running against Peato “Pat” L. Ena.
http://go.uen.org/DD  (SGS)

Gov. Herbert honors Advanced Placement students at Park City High School

PARK CITY — While listing the Advanced Placement courses she’s taken, Park City High School senior Kayla Guillory got stalled around No. 9.
“I need a transcript,” she said, counting out the various subjects on her fingers and asking a friend nearby what she had left out.
The Stanford-bound student who intends to study mechanical engineering was able to remember 11 and was fairly confident she had named them all: calculus AB and BC, physics B and C, geography, world civilizations, chemistry, English language, English literature, U.S. government and U.S. history.
Not all of her courses will count toward a major at Stanford, Guillory said, but the combined result of those tests translates to roughly one year of college academic credit, all earned during high school.
“It’s something that challenges you, and I think that is something that every student needs,” she said.
Guillory is in good company. During the 2012-13 school year, 36.7 percent of students enrolled at Park City High School took and passed an Advanced Placement test, earning the school the highest success rate in a state that ranks seventh in the nation for AP performance.
http://go.uen.org/Dh  (DN)

http://go.uen.org/Dt  (SLT)

Technology helps growing number of hearing impaired students

LEHI, Utah – The number of hearing impaired Americans doubled in the past 30 years according to a National Center for Health Statistics report. That includes children in Utah schools. To help those kids learn, teachers are using new audio devices.
Willowcreek Middle School in the Alpine School School District is one of Utah’s schools excelling at helping that student population so they can excel socially and educationally.
http://go.uen.org/DF (KTVX)

Society of Women Engineers engages high schoolers Event planners seek to show girls that engineering is more than math problems

Engineering has long been a male-dominated field, but the Society of Women Engineers aims to change that. One of its initiatives toward this end was to hold an Engineering Extravaganza for local high school girls on Saturday.
“Much of our culture and society doesn’t see women in the same light as men,” said Bailey Swanson, treasurer of SWE. “Straight from childhood, they have the distinction of Legos and Barbies. We work to help girls see they can be a Lego kind of person as well.”
http://go.uen.org/DX  (Utah Statesman)

Syracuse High students learn about being passionate about a career

SYRACUSE – Nearly 600 Syracuse High School students got a chance to think about their futures last week during their school’s Business Day with a lineup of experts to advise them about networking, utilizing social media, and exploring career options.
http://go.uen.org/DB  (OSE)

University of Utah professor honored for creating children’s program

SALT LAKE CITY — A University of Utah professor has been recognized for her work with children who have disabilities. Hester Henderson, associate professor of exercise and sports science, received the U.’s Distinguished Faculty Service Award for creating the student-led program U-FIT for children with disabilities and their families.
Established in 2000 and serving 140 children each semester, U-FIT provides physical activities in a noncompetitive atmosphere to help build friendships, increase self-esteem and improve motor skills and physical fitness.
http://go.uen.org/Dx  (DN)

————————————————————
OPINION & COMMENTARY
————————————————————

Utah earns digital learning excellence
Deseret News editorial

For the second year in a row, Utah received the No. 1 ranking — among all 50 states — on the Digital Learning Report Card, a national initiative of the Foundation for Excellence in Education. The report card measures and grades primary and secondary educational policies among the states against the foundation’s 10 elements of high-quality digital learning.
Far too frequently, many in the education establishment criticize Utah for its large class sizes and low per-pupil spending. In 2012 the median size for a high school geometry class was 31, and despite spending 48.9 percent of its budget on public education last year, Utah still spent the least per pupil in the nation.
On the report card, however, Utah emerges as the vanguard of the nation, with a 92.3 percent score, because the state has opportunities for students in all grades to access online courses, because it requires credit to be based on mastery of skills and content rather than on seat time, and because of its “Student Achievement Backpack,” which creates a portable education record that follows the student from school to school — and gives parents the right and ability to securely access those records.
http://go.uen.org/Dg

Preschool isn’t enough — Talk to your babies Deseret News op-ed by Diane Mangum, a Holladay Preschool teacher

I support preschool. I’ve taught preschool for 16 years and believe that a good preschool experience enriches children’s lives and helps prepare them for later success. But it is not enough.
If we are serious about helping every child do well in school, and in life, we have to start at the beginning.
Research on children and what helps them succeed in school shows that parents have a crucial role long before the school years begin.
http://go.uen.org/Dv

Sutherland releases 2014 Legislative Scorecard and Lifetime Legislator Scores Sutherland Institute commentary by Director of Communications Dave Buer

SALT LAKE CITY – Sutherland Institute released today its 2014 Legislative Scorecard. Using 17 pieces of legislation considered during the 2014 legislative session for the Senate and 18 for the House (not all bills overlap between chambers), Sutherland produced an individual score for each legislator and an overall score for each body. In 2014, the Utah Senate scored 79 percent on average (79 percent in 2013 and 81 percent in 2012) while the Utah House came in at 75 percent (58 percent in 2013 and 75 percent in 2012).
http://go.uen.org/DH

To the Utah Board of Education: Don’t Rush to Replace Menlove Utah.Politico.Hub commentary by columnist DANIEL BURTON

Utah’s State Superintendent of Public Instruction Martell Menlove is retiring, and the questions raised by his exit from the State Office of Education don’t have anything to do with the LDS mission he may serve with his wife.
Selected unanimously by the state school board after just ninety minutes of deliberation in 2012, the process of Menlove’s appointment was seen as less than thorough by some legislators, though none criticized the selection itself.
Menlove is well-regarded throughout Utah, with Governor Gary Herbert and former State Superintendent Patti Harrington thanking him for his service.
With the vacancy as Menlove retires, the state board has the opportunity to conduct a more thorough candidate selection process than in the past.
http://go.uen.org/E0

Both parties need to grow up in discussing early education Washington Post op-ed by Rahm Emanuel, a Democrat, mayor of Chicago

When I was young, I would accompany my father, a pediatrician, on his rounds at hospitals across Chicago. He routinely gave parents of the children he examined a short booklet he had written on how to be an involved parent. While it included many tips, his central point was that parents needed to read to their children. The earlier they started, he stressed, the better.
I am reminded of this as I observe the stale and senseless debate in Washington over the value of early education.
Too many Republicans today ridicule the value of early education. That would come as a shock to their parents, many of whom, no doubt, read to them when they were young and made sure they had many educational experiences. Democrats, on the other hand, want universal early education and are willing to spend whatever is required. But more money for more slots will not automatically achieve the goal of preparing children to learn.
Largely missing from this debate are the essential role that parents play in their children’s education and the importance of the quality of a child’s early learning experience.
http://go.uen.org/DI

What I’ve Learned Teaching Charter Students One seventh grader asked me, ‘Why are so many people mad at us if we are doing so well?’
Wall Street Journal op-ed by NICHOLAS SIMMONS, a mathematics teacher at Success Academy Harlem West Middle School

I’m a seventh-grade math teacher at Success Academy Harlem West, a public charter school. On April 30 and May 2, 3, the 272 students at my school, along with some 480,000 other New York City public school children, will sit for the state math exam. Last year, 89% of my seventh-graders and 83% of our sixth-graders passed the test, more than half scoring at the highest level.
But only 29% of all sixth-grade public-school students in the city passed the New York State Mathematics Test last year. Among sixth-grade black and Latino kids, only 15% and 17% passed, respectively. Among my sixth-graders, 97% are African-American or Latino, and three out of four of them are from low-income families.
Many teachers and parents—as well as New York City’s school chancellor and the mayor, have said there is too much emphasis on testing. But at Success Academy, we believe internal assessments and the results from state exams are essential feedback for how well we as teachers have done our job in the classroom. Students and teachers embrace academic rigor and take pride in having some of the top math scores in the city, in many cases outperforming the city’s gifted and talented programs.
http://go.uen.org/Di

Tracking Common-Core Backlash in State Legislatures Education Week commentary by columnist Andrew Ujifusa

With all of the debate, noise, and passion surrounding the Common Core State Standards, how are state legislatures actually treating them? For the second year, I’ve put together an interactive graphic tracking the course of state legislation to pause, delay, or repeal the common core. Last year, my common-core “bill tracker” only included legislation to repeal the common core. However, this year, I’ve included legislation that is less direct than “repeal” bills, but still seeks to hedge or delay the impact of the common core in states, or the standards themselves.
In addition, the 2014 version of the tracker includes executive orders signed by governors to nominally assert more state control over the standards, rename them, or take other actions. The actual impact of these orders is debatable, but they’re worth considering when discussing the state-level environment for common core.
http://go.uen.org/DN

The interactive tracking site
http://go.uen.org/DO  (Ed Week)

Common Core Documentary Makes Hazy Case Against Standards Education Week commentary by columnist Mark Walsh

A group wary of the Common Core State Standards Initiative has released a documentary film about the effort.
“Building the Machine” was produced by the Home School Legal Defense Association, based in Purcellville, Va., and directed by Ian Reid.
The film is not a one-sided, conservative screed against the common core. In fact, it presents quite a few voices on both sides of the debate, and in the end, it comes off as damning the standards with faint praise, even though that may not have been the intent.
The home-schooling group says in press materials that the 40-minute film grew out of its effort to understand how the common core might trickle down to affect private schools and home-schooling families. The group says it was struck by how quickly 45 states had adopted the standards by 2010, but that as of last year a Gallup Poll showed that 62 percent of Americans had never even heard of the common core.
http://go.uen.org/DQ

Keep the ‘public’ in public school boards CEO’s call for privatization a disservice to communities San Francisco Chronicle op-ed by Josephine Lucey, president of the California School Boards Association

Netflix CEO Reed Hastings spoke recently at the California Charter Schools Association conference to advocate for the end of locally elected school boards. Hastings said the “fundamental problem” with school districts is that they “don’t get to control their boards.” He suggested that the democratically elected school boards are the problem with public education and they should be replaced by privately held corporations.
The California School Boards Association has another perspective for Hastings and wants to set the record straight about the role and impact of local school boards.
Public oversight of local government is the foundation of American democracy. Nowhere is this more evident than in our public schools, where voters entrust boards of education with the education of our youth.
If Hastings thinks local school boards should be replaced, does he also believe that we should get rid of all other locally elected bodies, including city councils and county boards of supervisors? Does he not think that voters are capable of deciding who is best to represent and serve their best interests? I beg to differ.
http://go.uen.org/Ds

Map: The education gap between Asians and other minorities is huge in every state Washington Post commentary by columnist NIRAJ CHOKSHI

Asian Americans, along with whites, outperform other minority groups on educational success by large margins across states, a new report finds.
That disparity was measured using the newly introduced Race for Results Index, created by the Annie E. Casey Foundation, which for a quarter century has collected data on educational achievement by race and state. The new index is based off 12 measures, such as early-childhood enrollment, test scores throughout childhood, poverty, and degree achievement. Nationally, Asians scored highest, followed relatively closely by whites. Latinos were a distant third, followed by American Indians and blacks.
“Differences in opportunity are evident from the earliest years of a child’s life,” the report’s authors write. “Too often, children of color grow up in environments where they experience high levels of poverty and violence. Such circumstances derail healthy development and lead to significant psychological and physiological trauma.”
Blacks are falling behind in nearly every state, with the lowest scores belonging to states in the South and Midwest. The states with the highest-achieving blacks students are Hawaii, New Hampshire, Utah and Alaska — all states with a relatively small black population.
http://go.uen.org/DZ

Schoolhouse of Cards
“House of Cards” parody on education policy by Fordham Institute

http://go.uen.org/Dq  (YouTube)

————————————————————-
NATIONAL NEWS
————————————————————-

U.S. Students Score Above Average on First PISA Problem-Solving Exam Education Week

U.S. 15-year-olds scored above average on a first-of-its-kind international assessment that measured creative problem-solving skills.
However, their mean scores were significantly lower than those earned in ten of the 44 countries and economies that took the Program for International Student Assessment (PISA) 2012 problem-solving assessment.
The assessment, which was the subject of an Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) report released Tuesday, defined creative problem-solving as the ability to “understand and resolve problem situations where a method of solution is not immediately obvious.” Worldwide, a representative sample of 85,000 students took the exam, including 1,273 U.S. students in 162 schools.
The OECD introduced the exam based on the belief that today’s high school students will enter an economy in which on-the-job problem solving has gotten progressively more complex because computers have replaced many of the human employees whose jobs once consisted of completing simple tasks.
http://go.uen.org/Dj

http://go.uen.org/Dk  (NYT)

http://go.uen.org/Dl  (HuffPo)

http://go.uen.org/Dm  (Toronto, CTV)

A copy of the U.S. results
http://go.uen.org/Dn  (OECD)

Teacher tenure rules are in state of flux across the nation NewsHour

NewsHour Weekend’s piece on a lawsuit filed by nine California students against the teacher tenure system tells the story of just one battle in a war being waged across the country.
More than a dozen states have changed their tenure laws in the last few years. The Education Commission of the States found that as of 2011, 18 state legislatures had modified their tenure laws and that trend continues.
In 2011 Florida eliminated continuing contracts for teachers. South Dakota got rid of tenure for new hires but will grandfather those hired until 2016 into the previous tenure system. Idaho gave school districts the option of forgoing tenure, but voters overturned that decision in a referendum.
Today, the Education Commission of the states keeps a database on its website to inform teachers, parents, administrators and legislators of changes and the status of related lawsuits.
http://go.uen.org/DS

http://go.uen.org/DT  (Stateline)

http://go.uen.org/DU  (Forbes commentary)

What Does the Republican Education Agenda Look Like?
Republicans are campaigning on economic mobility and opportunity, but the policies that deliver it are harder to come by.
National Journal Magazine

The GOP’s 2014 economic message is mobility. It’s an extension of the by-your-bootstraps ideology that’s been baked into the party’s self-image for decades. When you ask Republicans how Americans can make their way up the economic ladder, they reply, “Better education,” knowing that it’s a winning message for voters of all stripes in a campaign year, especially one as economically fraught as this.
Look no further than the party’s own recommendations for reviving its brand, and you’ll see Republicans embracing mobility and education as twin tenets of their policy approach. “The Republican Party must be the champion of those who seek to climb the economic ladder of life,” GOP strategists said when delivering recommendations for broadening the party’s appeal. “Perhaps no policy demonstrates the depth of our party’s commitment to all Americans as strongly as school choice—our promise of ‘equal opportunity in education’ to all children regardless of color, class, or origin.”
They are correct in recognizing mobility and opportunity as dependent on education. The promises made in 2013, after the party’s embarrassing presidential defeat, could have been the perfect prelude to a series of robust ideas about changing education. But that hasn’t happened. While school choice is talked about among a small number of GOP lawmakers, the truth is, Republicans aren’t actually doing much of anything to improve the schooling and training that Americans need to climb, compete, and excel economically.
“It’s tricky. Republicans usually feel like they need to say something about K-12 education, because voters care about it. But it’s easy to do more harm than good,” said Mike Petrilli, executive vice president of the Thomas B. Fordham Institute, a conservative education-reform organization.
http://go.uen.org/DV

As popularity rises, so does risk of being bullied USA Today

Adolescents are often targeted for bullying because of their appearance, sexual orientation or loner status. But not all bullying victims fit that profile.
New research suggests that as students become more popular and climb the social hierarchy of middle and high school, they are at increased risk for gossip, harassment and even physical attacks from rivals competing for status.
And the adverse consequences of that bullying — including increased depression, anxiety and anger, and decreased school attachment — are magnified the more popular the victim, according to the paper published in April’s American Sociological Review.
It argues that high-status students “may have more to lose than someone who already occupies a position of relative social isolation, or perhaps (they) are more unsuspecting victims than those on the periphery, and therefore react particularly strongly.”
This type of victimization is “a distinct pattern of bullying that’s often not thought of as bullying” and consequently goes unaddressed, says Robert Faris, an associate professor of sociology at the University of California-Davis and study co-author.
http://go.uen.org/Do

http://go.uen.org/Dy  (DN)

A copy of the study
http://go.uen.org/Dp  (American Sociological Association)

Startups in Education Set Record, Raising $500 Million in First Quarter Education Week

It’s already been a banner year for ed-tech startups, and we’ve only closed the first quarter.
Ninety-nine startups in education have raised more than $500 million, a record in the past five years, according to TechCrunch, citing statistics from its CrunchBase database of technology companies, people, and investors.
That compares to 20 companies raising more than $64 million during the same period five years ago. However, it’s not the greatest number of companies to be funded in a given quarter. Over the past five years, that happened in the second quarter of 2013, when 120 companies raised a total of $319 million.
http://go.uen.org/DR

Superintendent’s pay in South Bay district called ‘excessive’
The superintendent of the small Centinela Valley Union High School District, Jose Fernandez, made $674,559 last year, far more than the New York and Los Angeles school district heads.
Los Angeles Times

New York City Chancellor Carmen Farina oversees more than a million students, 1,700 schools and a budget the size of many states. Her pay: $412,193.
Los Angeles Unified Supt. John Deasy has half a million students, 1,000-plus schools, a $7-billion budget — and made $393,106 last year.
Supt. Jose Fernandez’s South Bay school district has just 6,600 students, five high schools and a $70-million budget.
His earnings: $674,559 last year.
http://go.uen.org/Dr

New York high school student accepted at all eight Ivy League schools Reuters

NEW YORK – Decisions, decisions.
A high school senior on Long Island has been accepted at all eight of the elite Ivy League schools – Brown, Columbia, Cornell, Dartmouth, Harvard, Yale, Princeton and the University of Pennsylvania, he told Reuters between classes on Tuesday.
“I got into my second-to-last school – Yale – and I was just astounded,” said Kwasi Enin. “And then Harvard sent me an email and I was just so grateful.”
Now it’s time for 17-year-old to decide where to enroll. He said he has all of April to choose a school.
http://go.uen.org/DK

http://go.uen.org/DM  (New York, Newsday)

First Census of Mexico’s Schools Finds Problems Associated Press

MEXICO CITY — Mexican officials say the first census of the country’s education system found at least a third of public schools have infrastructure problems and there are thousands of school workers who can’t be identified.
The census taken last year at public pre-schools, elementary and middle schools and made public Monday said 41 percent of Mexico’s 207,682 schools have no sewage system and 31 percent have no potable water.
http://go.uen.org/DL

————————————————————
CALENDAR
————————————————————

USOE Calendar
http://tinyurl.com/5x9oh9

UEN News
http://www.uen.org

April 3:
Utah State Board of Education meeting
4 p.m.: 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

April 4:
Utah State Board of Education meeting
8:15 a.m.: 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

April 10:
Utah State Charter School Board meeting
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://goo.gl/IaQntl

May 20:
Executive Appropriations Committee meeting
1 p.m., 445 State Capitol
http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2014&Com=APPEXE

Related posts:

Comments are closed.