Education News Roundup: May 15, 2014

2013 Living Traditions Festival

2013 Living Traditions Festival

Education News Roundup

Today’s Top Picks:

Rep. Anderegg looks to bolster student data privacy laws in Utah.
http://go.uen.org/125  (PDH)

Sen. Hatch looks at the same issue federally.
http://go.uen.org/12l  (NYT)
and http://go.uen.org/13Q (PC World)
and http://go.uen.org/13R  (Ed Week)

Politico looks at student data privacy generally, including what’s going on commercially, not just in schools.
http://go.uen.org/12m  (Politico)
and http://go.uen.org/12n  (The Wire)
and http://go.uen.org/13P  (Politico)

Salt Lake District Board Member Michael Clara wants more minority participation in selection of principals.
http://go.uen.org/124 (SLT)
and http://go.uen.org/12k  (DN)

Standard looks at the employment and reemployment of new teachers.
http://go.uen.org/12L (OSE)
and http://go.uen.org/12h (OSE)

Higher ed’s advice to high school students: Take four years of math.
http://go.uen.org/129  (SLT)
and http://go.uen.org/13e  (KSL)
or a copy of the recommendations:
http://go.uen.org/12a  (Utah System of Higher Education)

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TODAY’S HEADLINES
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UTAH

Law would control data collected by school districts

Clara: Salt Lake City minority parents left out of principal selection
Education » Salt Lake City School Board member files civil rights action.

Non-renewed Ogden teachers question the system

New Utah teachers ‘on the bubble’

Aiming for college? Take 4 years of math, Utah educators say
The new approach intends to help students avoid remedial math, boost graduation rates.

Utah Public Schools Chief Apologizes for Political Endorsement on USOE Blog

School board talks adult education, new elementary

Laws Impacting School Children Go Into Effect Tuesday

Utah County could see nearly 1 million new residents by 2050

American Leadership Academy ranked among Utah’s top five high schools

Teen mom prepares for high school graduation

CHS senior excels in two art forms

Student critical after stabbing at Utah high school

Teacher accused of touching students ordered to surrender passport

Sandy school bus driver investigation now extends to Draper

Utah man charged with bilking high school bands
Allegations » Travel agent allegedly took Arkansas, Missouri band funds.

Threats, drugs prompt Ogden High lockdown drill

Bluff Ridge Elementary evacuated

Gas leak forces evacuation of Uintah County elementary school

‘Safety is utmost’: Wilson Elementary School stages evacuation drill

Easy changes will improve school safety, Sandy Hook parent says

Utah architect uses dome design to create safe school buildings

Northridge clicks-it for Creamies

Mother who lost son is fighting to get him an honorary high school diploma

Woodruff Elementary teacher dies unexpectedly from brain aneurysm

Pertussis outbreak reported at SSHS

Hartvigsen School principal wins disabilities advocate award

East High student wins national essay contest

Longview Teacher Named Huntsman Excellence in Education Winner

Study: Utah Taxpayers Get a Great Return on Their Investment

Teacher accused of touching students ordered to surrender passport

Program immerses high school students in business world

High school senior creates and stars in his own production

Turning over a new leaf — Utah adopts the aspen as its state tree
Symbol » Say goodbye to the Colorado blue spruce, the official tree for over 80 years.

Kaysville sixth-graders headed to national history contest

Logan Schools Foundation presents surprise scholarships to Logan High School students

PHS students serve their community
Area teens help beautify Parowan

Student honored as Safety Patroller of Year

Juan Diego’s “Speaking Eagle” Soars Above Other High School Newspapers

Students with special needs enjoy fishing day

Utah Students Discover ‘We All Live Downstream’

Ron Sharp is the new Assistant Principal at Desert Hills Middle School

Are teacher evaluations telling us what we need to know?

‘Character education’ growing within schools

OPINION & COMMENTARY

Grades are more than competency

Salt Lake has a chance to shrink class sizes
A chance to make them smaller.

Rights & Rallies

There’s a worm in common core

USOE Negotiated $5.4M SAGE Contract with Florida without Board Knowledge or Legal Counsel Review

Official State Office Of Education Blog Endorses Candidates

A timely tool for teaching the law to our kids

Food allergies are a silent killer

Seeking a new Superintendent of Public Instruction

Harmony kicked in the teeth again

STEM/STEAM helps students solve problems

Gale was right about STEM education

Churches seek influence over schools

The Plots to Destroy America

Common Core: Obamacare for Education
Making every kid a left-wing zealot.

The 8 Most Ridiculous Attacks On Public Education In Glenn Beck’s New Book

Moms, make kids more ‘mathletic’
Like soccer, mothers can help their children embrace mathematics at an early age.

Read, Kids, Read

U.S. Students from Educated Families Lag in International Tests
It’s not just about kids in poor neighborhoods

Expanding the Education Universe: A Fifty-State Strategy for Course Choice

Time for Teachers

Whole Child Snapshots
Measuring Whole Child Success Across the States

NATION

Data mining your children

Are student files private? It depends.

Senators Intend to Amend Federal Student Privacy Law

Education Agency Cautions U.S. Charter Schools on Special Needs

2+2 What? Parents Rail Against Common Core Math

Report: Preschool enrollments decline

Public School Still Segregated
In its 1954 Brown v. Topeka Board of Education ruling, the Supreme Court ruled separate is not equal, and segregation by race is unconstitutional. But 60 years later, segregation is still widespread in America’s public schools.

60 Years After Brown, School Diversity More Complex Than Ever

Publisher buys school news channel

Schooled
Cory Booker, Chris Christie, and Mark Zuckerberg had a plan to reform Newark’s schools. They got an education.

Official: Freeing Nigerian Girls a Top US Priority

NJ students attend Mormon Prom for a ‘modest’ celebration

Mahopac school board president resigns after calling parent ‘chubby’

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UTAH NEWS
————————————————————

Law would control data collected by school districts

Rep. Jacob Anderegg is looking to give greater protection to student data collected by Utah’s public education institutions.
Anderegg has opened a bill file for legislation called the “Student Privacy Act” which would provide parents more control of the information that schools collect on their students.
“Basically, it sets up the policy and protocol and how a student’s information is shared,” Anderegg said.
http://go.uen.org/125 (PDH)

Clara: Salt Lake City minority parents left out of principal selection
Education » Salt Lake City School Board member files civil rights action.

As the Salt Lake City School District hired new principals this spring, it wrongly excluded minority parents from the process, a district board member alleges in a complaint to the U.S. Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights.
It’s an allegation district leaders have refuted, saying no policies were violated.
Michael Clara, a member of the school board, sent the complaint Monday after questioning the hiring of new principals at Parkview Elementary and other west-side schools at a board meeting last week.
Clara alleges the district left parents out of the hiring process in violation of its own practices and agreements. In the complaint, he notes that most of the families at the schools he represents are racial minorities.
He claims it’s part of a larger pattern of racism on the part of district leaders toward minority parents and students on the district’s west side. He was the only board member to vote against hiring the principals May 6.
http://go.uen.org/124  (SLT)

http://go.uen.org/12k  (DN)

Non-renewed Ogden teachers question the system

OGDEN — Jennifer Claesgens’ resume boasts a Ph.D. in science and mathematics education, with an emphasis in chemistry, experience teaching high school, and four years as an assistant professor at Northern Arizona University’s Center for Science Teaching and Learning. When she married a man from Ogden, Claesgens left the university to become the new chemistry teacher at Ogden High School.
Before the school year was over, Claesgens received notice that her contract with Ogden School District was not going to be renewed for the coming year. She was stunned.
“I actually looked at them and said, ‘This is the first I’ve heard that there was a problem,’ ” she recalled, thinking back to a meeting with her principal and other district administrators. “I asked, ‘What’s the basis of this?’ and they said ‘goodness of fit.’ ”
Claesgens is one of 17 provisional teachers who received notices from Ogden School District that their contracts would not be renewed. Provisional teachers are new hires, essentially working on a trial basis. Many are new teachers, fresh out of college, but some are experienced teachers who are new to a district. Principals may choose to renew a provisional teacher’s contract each year for up to three years (five years, in some cases), or opt for non-renewal. The number of non-renewals in Ogden School District raised eyebrows when most of the teachers were told at the end of March.
“It would be one thing if it was just me being fired for ‘not a good fit,’ but where there’s a pattern, as a scientist, you look for reasons behind the patterns,” Claesgens said.
Looking for reasons why the teachers were let go is not easy.
http://go.uen.org/12L  (OSE)

New Utah teachers ‘on the bubble’

Teaching isn’t an easy profession.
When the Utah State Office of Education checked the data on newly licensed teachers who were hired in 2007, only 65 percent of them were still employed as teachers in Utah four years later.
“That’s pretty consistent with national data regarding teacher retention rates, which around five years is 60 percent,” said Travis Rawlings, educator licensing coordinator for USOE.
There are a number of reasons to explain the loss of new teachers, from not liking the pay or the culture of schools, to moving out of state when a spouse is transferred or quitting to care for a family member. Of course there are those who wish they could continue teaching, but their contracts are not renewed.
http://go.uen.org/12h  (OSE)

Aiming for college? Take 4 years of math, Utah educators say
The new approach intends to help students avoid remedial math, boost graduation rates.

Taylorsville • Angela Malae never has liked math.
In high school, “I just did what I needed to pass it and then got out,” she said. Now the 31-year-old is laboring through algebra again after returning to Salt Lake Community College to become a physical therapist. She’s trying to teach her children, ages 7 and 8, to stick with arithmetic.
“I want to make sure they focus on math and keep going,” she said. “I want them to enjoy the harder math classes … to be excited to go in and make it, and not have anything hold them back.”
Malae likes a new recommendation for college-bound high school students from the Utah System of Higher Education that they take four years of math instead of the required three. The guidelines represent a more vocal approach by higher education leaders who hope to boost the state’s six-year college graduation rates, which a recent report ranked lowest in the country.
http://go.uen.org/129  (SLT)

http://go.uen.org/13e  (KSL)

A copy of the recommendations:
http://go.uen.org/12a  (Utah System of Higher Education)

Utah Public Schools Chief Apologizes for Political Endorsement on USOE Blog

Utah’s superintendent of public schools is apologizing for a political endorsement that was posted earlier this week on the state office of education blog. An official with the lieutenant governor’s office says the endorsement is a criminal offense, but the office doesn’t plan to pursue charges.
The Utah State Office of Education sometimes republishes on Utah Public Education.org, State School Board Member Kim Burningham’s personal blog posts about education. But State School Superintendent Martel Menlove says this time, the office made a mistake.
http://go.uen.org/13l (KUER)

School board talks adult education, new elementary

ST. GEORGE — A presentation about the Southwest High School’s continued successful presence in Washington County topped the agenda at the Tuesday Washington County School Board meeting.
With about 1,000 students enrolled at the adult-education high school in the district, the plan is to expand its reach to all areas of the county, Jim McKim, the district’s director of alternative education, said.
“We want this opportunity for adult education at all ends of the county,” McKim said. “We’re not there yet but we will be next year.”
http://go.uen.org/12X  (SGS)

Laws Impacting School Children Go Into Effect Tuesday

352 new laws go into effect in Utah Tuesday. Many of the laws impact children in the school system.
A new law allowing elementary schools to instruct parents and kids on preventing child abuse goes into effect Tuesday. The bill was pushed by kidnap victim Elizabeth Smart and abuse victim Deondra Brown, of the Five Browns Piano Group.
Starting Tuesday, all schools must have carbon monoxide detectors. This law was pushed after students and teachers were made sick from a carbon monoxide leak.
Utah’s State Tree is turning over a new leaf. Thanks to some elementary school children, the state tree is now the Quaking Aspen.
http://go.uen.org/133  (KUTV)

Utah County could see nearly 1 million new residents by 2050

Utah County is primed for a huge population explosion during the next 30 years.
In a presentation to the Utah County Commission on Tuesday, representatives with Envision Utah, a public-private partnership created to strategically create planning strategies in the state, estimated Utah County could increase in population by as much as 840,000 residents by 2050.
“You may be in the face of a population tsunami,” said Robert Grow, president and CEO of Envision Utah. “You are sitting on a powder keg of growth here.”
http://go.uen.org/126  (PDH)

http://go.uen.org/13p  (MUR)

American Leadership Academy ranked among Utah’s top five high schools

SPANISH FORK — American Leadership Academy was recently named the fifth-best high school in Utah by U.S. News & World Report.
The ranking is based on scores from Advanced Placement language and math tests and student-to-teacher ratios. Of more than 31,000 public high schools in the nation, 38 from Utah made the best high schools list, and ALA was awarded a silver medal.
http://go.uen.org/12N  (PDH)

Teen mom prepares for high school graduation

ST. GEORGE — Along with the support of her parents, sister and 4-year-old son, Isabel Picasso, 18, is preparing to don her cap and gown and graduate alongside her peers at Millcreek High School on May 22.
Graduating from high school wasn’t always something Picasso said she thought she’d be able to accomplish, especially after taking a year off from school and raising her young son — she got pregnant at 13.
http://go.uen.org/12U  (SGS)

CHS senior excels in two art forms

CEDAR CITY — When Cedar High School senior Morgan Downs found herself at the beginning of the school year in a ceramics class she had not signed up for, she had no idea how much she would enjoy it or how much talent she had.
Downs said she soon learned that she “had a knack” for doing sculpture work. When she completed her first sculpture for the class, her teacher, Brandon Wainwright, told her she had a lot of potential in ceramics and that she should keep working at it.
http://go.uen.org/12V  (SGS)

Student critical after stabbing at Utah high school

A Duchesne High School student is in critical condition after he was reportedly stabbed by a classmate.
About 11 a.m. Wednesday, two students started fighting on the football field at the school, located at 155 W. Main St. in Duchesne. The fight continued into the old gym locker room, and sometime during the fight, one of the students was stabbed, according to a Duchesne County Sheriff’s Office news release.
Deputies administered first aid and called for help.
The 17-year-old victim was taken to Uintah Basin Medical Center in critical condition, according to the release. The 18-year-old suspect was taken into police custody.
http://go.uen.org/12t  (SLT)

http://go.uen.org/12u  (DN)

http://go.uen.org/12v  (Uintah Basin Standard)

http://go.uen.org/132  (KUTV)

http://go.uen.org/134  (KTVX)

http://go.uen.org/139  (KSL)

http://go.uen.org/13g  (KSTU)

http://go.uen.org/13m  (KNRS)

http://go.uen.org/13o  (MUR)

Teacher accused of touching students ordered to surrender passport

KAMAS — A former South Summit Middle School teacher accused of inappropriately touching four female students was ordered to hand over his passport and wear a GPS ankle monitor.
Rory Bowen, 35, is charged in 3rd District Court with four counts of aggravated sexual abuse of a child, a first-degree felony.
During a court hearing on Monday, a motion by the state to increase Bowen’s bail to $150,000 was denied. But the court did order him to turn in his passport and get an ankle monitor by the end of the week.
A preliminary hearing was scheduled for June 16.
http://go.uen.org/12w  (DN)

http://go.uen.org/13a  (KSL)

Sandy school bus driver investigation now extends to Draper

DRAPER — Police in Draper are now investigating whether a former school bus driver under investigation in Sandy for allegations of child sex abuse on the bus may have also committed crimes in their jurisdiction.
The bus driver, who has since resigned, worked for the Canyons School District and drove preschool children to a special education program at Altara Elementary School, 800 E. 11000 South.
After a complaint was made by a parent to the school district, the district contacted Sandy police. Investigators reviewed three months of surveillance video from the bus and have presented their case to the Salt Lake County District Attorney’s Office for possible charges. As of Wednesday, the man had not been arrested or charged.
http://go.uen.org/12y  (DN)

http://go.uen.org/12H  (DN)

http://go.uen.org/12z  (SLT)

http://go.uen.org/135  (KTVX)

http://go.uen.org/138  (KSL)

http://go.uen.org/13d  (KSL)

http://go.uen.org/13h  (KSTU)

http://go.uen.org/13i  (KSTU)

http://go.uen.org/13n  (MUR)

Utah man charged with bilking high school bands
Allegations » Travel agent allegedly took Arkansas, Missouri band funds.

A Utah man has been arrested on charges he took hundreds of thousands of dollars from two high school bands to book trips for them to Hawaii, then used the money for such things as gambling in Las Vegas and trips to Samoa and Disneyland.
Travel agent Calliope “Ope” Rocky Saaga, 39, Saratoga Springs, was arrested on a 15-count indictment out of Missouri and three counts from Arkansas.
He is being held in the Weber County Jail.
Saaga, owner of Performing Hawaii Tours and Present America Tours, faces charges of wire fraud and money laundering for allegedly taking funds from the Willard High School Band of Willard, Mo., and the Southside High School Band of Fort Smith, Ark.
http://go.uen.org/12x  (SLT)

Threats, drugs prompt Ogden High lockdown drill

OGDEN – Increased police presence and a lockdown drill were ordered at Ogden High School this week after threats of a fight on campus and growing concern of marijuana use among students.
Principal Stacey Briggs said there were rumors on social media and from some students that a fight may be planned at the school and so she and other administrators thought it would be a good time to run a lockdown drill.
“When the sun comes out and it’s springtime we get sloppy attendance and this is also a way to remind students that we still have school,” Briggs said.
It was a “mini lock down” where teachers are instructed to close and lock their doors and not let students in unless they can show their valid student identification. Students must always wear student identification throughout the day.
“We wanted to clear the halls and have an extensive (police) presence outside,” Briggs said. Police also made more drive-bys and checked up on the school. “We were being watched and taken care of,” Briggs said.
Even though the threat of a fight was only a rumor, it’s something the school takes very seriously, Briggs said.
http://go.uen.org/12J  (OSE)

Bluff Ridge Elementary evacuated

SYRACUSE — Bluff Ridge Elementary School was evacuated this morning after a report of fire.
About 8:30 a.m., teachers and students were ushered outside of the school, at 2680 S 775 West, Syracuse.
Reports of smoke and a possible electrical problem in a classroom were given by school personnel. Firefighters soon determined the source of the problem was an overheated air conditioning unit.
Students and teachers were allowed back into classes by 9:30 a.m.
http://go.uen.org/12I  (OSE)

Gas leak forces evacuation of Uintah County elementary school

NAPLES, Uintah County — A natural gas leak forced the evacuation Tuesday of Davis Elementary School.
Questar Gas crews were conducting a routine safety check at the school, 4101 S. 2500 East, just before noon when their sensors detected gas on the building’s east side.
“We never had any gas in the building, but anytime we have gas even close to a building, we’re going to make sure and evacuate,” Questar operations manager DeeRay Wardle said.
http://go.uen.org/12F  (DN)

http://go.uen.org/13b  (KSL)

‘Safety is utmost’: Wilson Elementary School stages evacuation drill

Wilson Elementary School participated in an evacuation drill on Wednesday that relocated all students and faculty to a nearby LDS Church building. Parents then had to come and check their students out before taking them home.
http://go.uen.org/12Q  (LHJ)

Easy changes will improve school safety, Sandy Hook parent says

SALT LAKE CITY — The parents of a little girl killed in the Sandy Hook shooting are turning their tragedy into training.
Emilie Parker, 6, was one of 20 young victims struck down in Newtown, Connecticut, on Dec. 14, 2012. Since then, her parents, Robbie and Alissa Parker, have been on a mission to make schools safer.
http://go.uen.org/13f  (KSL)

Utah architect uses dome design to create safe school buildings

LOCUST GROVE, Okla. — Unusual new schools are popping up all over the country and the architect, contractors and technology come from Utah. The schools are topped with giant domes that look a bit sci-fi.
“I’m sure out-of-towners think, ‘what in the world were those people thinking?’ ” said a parent in Locust Grove, standing in front of one of the new elementary schools. Superintendent David Cash said they were thinking safety first.
http://go.uen.org/13c  (KSL)

Northridge clicks-it for Creamies

LAYTON – Officers of the student body and the highway patrol stopped students on Monday afternoon, but they weren’t handing out tickets – they had Creamies ice cream.
On Friday, Northridge High School will be rewarded in another way when it will get a check for $1,000 from the Zero Fatalities campaign for having 90 percent of students buckle up – the highest this year for participating high schools.
http://go.uen.org/12K (OSE)

Mother who lost son is fighting to get him an honorary high school diploma

Stansbury Park – She lost her husband and her youngest child in a tragic accident and now a Tooele County mother is fighting to get her son an honorary high school diploma.
Nanci McConnell’s husband Steven and son Matthew were killed by carbon monoxide poisoning while ice fishing at Flaming Gorge Reservoir on February 17, 2014.
Matthew was a senior honor student at Stansbury High and also a member of Future Farmers of American, the ROTC and the Stallions Varsity Baseball team. He was just 1.2 credits short of graduating when he died, credits Nanci says he would have easily earned in his final three months of high school. Mrs. McConnell says she was told by school and district officials that giving a family member Matthew’s honorary diploma would put a damper on the school’s commencement ceremony.
“They felt that was a downer for the kids. It was memorializing Matt,” Mrs. McConnell told ABC 4 News. “They didn’t want that to happen. That’s when the whole thing started with not doing the honorary diploma.”
On Monday night, Mrs. McConnell held up Matthew’s graduation portrait as she addressed the Tooele County School Board at their monthly meeting.
http://go.uen.org/137  (KTVX)

Woodruff Elementary teacher dies unexpectedly from brain aneurysm

Woodruff Elementary School is in mourning after the unexpected death of one of their teachers.
http://go.uen.org/12S  (LHJ)

Pertussis outbreak reported at SSHS

Students attending South Sevier High School who are not up-to-date on vaccinations have been asked to stay home from school following a pertussis outbreak. The school has been identified as recently having two or more cases of pertussis, more commonly known as whooping cough, which is defined by Utah State and local health departments as an outbreak. Central Utah Public Health has asked students and staff who are not current on pertussis vaccinations to be excluded because of potential exposure. Pertussis is a highly contagious bacterial infection that causes severe coughing fits and can lead to vomiting from coughing and/or spells of difficulty breathing. The disease can often be fatal for children under the age of one.
http://go.uen.org/13r  (MUR)

Hartvigsen School principal wins disabilities advocate award

TAYLORSVILLE — A school administrator has received a statewide award for her work with students who have disabilities.
Hartvgisen School Principal Janice Wayman was selected by the Utah State Office of Education’s Special Education Department to receive the 2014 Significant Disabilities Advocate of the Year award.
http://go.uen.org/12B  (DN)

East High student wins national essay contest

SALT LAKE CITY — A Salt Lake high school student has earned the top prize in a national essay contest.
Bonnie Bennett, an East High School student, is the national winner for the Daughters of the American Revolution Essay Contest. Bonnie was the nominee of East High for the organization’s Good Citizen Award for her dedication to service and patriotism, according to the Salt Lake City School District.
http://go.uen.org/12C  (DN)

Longview Teacher Named Huntsman Excellence in Education Winner

Karen Huntsman congratulates Longview fifth-grade teacher Tina Nilsson on winning the Huntsman Award for Excellence in Education, during the surprise announcement in Nilsson’s classroom on April 30.
In the midst of teaching her fifth-grade class, Karen Huntsman walks into Tina Nilsson’s Longview Elementary classroom, introduces herself and compliments her teaching, adding that Nilsson is a recipient of the Huntsman Award for Excellence in Education.
http://go.uen.org/13S  (Murray Journal)

Study: Utah Taxpayers Get a Great Return on Their Investment

A study says Utah taxpayers get the 9th best return on their investment.
Website Wallet Hub says Utah’s tax rate is 14th in the nation, while the state’s government services come in at 5th.
http://go.uen.org/127  (UP)

A copy of the report
http://go.uen.org/128  (Wallet Hub)

Program immerses high school students in business world

LOGAN — Looking for something educational for your teenager to do this summer? Utah Business Week will celebrate its 33rd year of immersing high school juniors and seniors into the world of business.
Originally launched in the 1980s, Utah Business Week is a weeklong business boot camp that exposes young people to all aspects of business. Students spend the week at Utah State University attending classes taught by some of state’s most prominent business professionals.
http://go.uen.org/12D  (DN)

High school senior creates and stars in his own production

SALT LAKE CITY – Not many high school students can claim they wrote, directed, and starred in an original theatrical production, but senior from Springville did exactly that.
Kristian Huff attends Merit College Preparatory Academy.
http://go.uen.org/136 (KTVX)

Turning over a new leaf — Utah adopts the aspen as its state tree
Symbol » Say goodbye to the Colorado blue spruce, the official tree for over 80 years.

If the decision were up to Marita Tewes-Tyrolt, Utah’s new state tree would not be the quaking aspen.
Tewes-Tyrolt, horticulture director at Red Butte Garden and Arboretum, said she has nothing against the quaking aspen, a native Utah tree, but prefers the white fir.
“I just think it appears to me to be a more proud tree,” she said.
But aspen it is, as of Tuesday.
That’s when SB41 takes effect, capping the efforts of some fourth-graders from Monroe Elementary who turned to their local lawmaker, state Senate Majority Leader Ralph Okerlund, for help in getting legislation passed.
http://go.uen.org/12g  (SLT)

http://go.uen.org/13q  (MUR)

Kaysville sixth-graders headed to national history contest

KAYSVILLE – Two Burton Elementary sixth-graders are planning an unexpected trip Washington, D.C. to represent Utah as one of two teams qualified from the state to attend the National History Day competition in June.
The project that launched Hailey and Hayden Liddell, fraternal twins from Kaysville, to the top of the district, regional, and state competitions was their website with information and personal stories involving downwinders in Utah, people affected by nuclear testing done by the government in Nevada during the1950s and ’60s.
The siblings wanted to determine if the government had the right to conduct the tests without informing citizens of the dangers. And then when people were contaminated, whether the government has a responsibility to pay for the damages the testing caused.
http://go.uen.org/12M  (OSE)

Logan Schools Foundation presents surprise scholarships to Logan High School students

A small group of students gathered in the attendance office at Logan High School on Tuesday morning, chatting nervously because none of them knew why they had been called there. When it was then announced that each student would be receiving a scholarship from the Logan Schools Foundation, smiles and cheers broke out among the seniors.
http://go.uen.org/12R  (LHJ)

PHS students serve their community
Area teens help beautify Parowan

PAROWAN — Parowan High School students fanned out throughout the surrounding community and campus Wednesday afternoon to provide their services.
http://go.uen.org/12T  (SGS)

Student honored as Safety Patroller of Year

ST. GEORGE — Sunset Elementary School fifth-grader Brea Bulkley, 11, was promoted to the rank of captain on Tuesday — captain of the safety patrol, that is.
Bulkley was honored during a safety patrol assembly as the AAA School Safety Patroller of the Year for Nevada and Utah for assisting in making it safer for her classmates to cross the street as they walked to and from school each day.
http://go.uen.org/12W  (SGS)

http://go.uen.org/13k  (KCSG)

Juan Diego’s “Speaking Eagle” Soars Above Other High School Newspapers

The 17-member senior staff of Juan Diego Catholic High School’s “The Speaking Eagle” newspaper recently accepted accolades as the top 1A to 3A high school newspaper in the state from the Utah Press Association.
http://go.uen.org/13O  (Draper Journal)

Students with special needs enjoy fishing day

Utah County students who have special needs enjoyed a Fishing Day on Tuesday. The students went out angling at Salem Pond, and Fresh Market prepared lunch for the more than 1,300 children.
http://go.uen.org/12G  (DN)

http://go.uen.org/12O  (PDH)

Utah Students Discover ‘We All Live Downstream’

Hogle Zoo is hosting its 9th annual “We All Live Downstream” event this week.
Zoo officials say “The more we’re aware all the little things that we do like recycling, proper garbage disposal, and just making sure only rain goes down the drain is better for the environment and for all of us.”
http://go.uen.org/131  (KUTV)

Ron Sharp is the new Assistant Principal at Desert Hills Middle School

ST. GEORGE, Utah – The Washington County School District is pleased to announce the selection of Ron Sharp as the Assistant Principal of Desert Hills Middle School. Ron will replace Brad Bench who was recently promoted to the position of Principal at Snow Canyon Middle School.
http://go.uen.org/13j  (KCSG)

Are teacher evaluations telling us what we need to know?

Just over a decade ago, improving teacher quality meant stacking up paper credentials. President George W. Bush’s signature No Child Left Behind program, for example, created incentives for schools to hire more teachers with post-secondary education or certification in subject areas.
In the Obama years, the tide has shifted, notes a new study released by the Brookings Institution. Teachers are increasingly being paid, measured and promoted on the basis of classroom performance rather than credentials.
And yet, the report argues, far too little is known about whether these teacher evaluation systems are telling us what we really need to know.
http://go.uen.org/12A  (DN)

‘Character education’ growing within schools

In the attempt to gauge educational achievement by “real-world standards,” educators are trying to instill in their students “grit.”
http://go.uen.org/12E  (DN)

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OPINION & COMMENTARY
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Grades are more than competency
(Ogden) Standard-Examiner editorial

There is a movement in Utah to grade students based solely on a student’s competency of the subject. A student’s behavior, or attendance, or going beyond what is required in class, would not be considered as part of the grade. In fact, issues such as respect, behavior, or seeking extra credit would be factors toward a student’s conduct, rather than academic achievement.
That’s a misguided idea. School is more than just teaching a student how to answer questions, write responses, or meet deadlines.
http://go.uen.org/12b

Salt Lake has a chance to shrink class sizes
A chance to make them smaller.
Salt Lake Tribune editorial

The Salt Lake City School District board has a chance to make a lasting difference in the lives of children who attend elementary school in the capital city.
Because of decreasing debt payments, the board will have $6.8 million more in its budget next year. It is considering several ways to use the money, including shrinking class sizes in fourth through sixth grade. While the other options – making all-day kindergarten more widely available, giving employees a 1 percent raise or giving the money back to taxpayers – all have their appeal, creating more teachable classes is the best choice.
http://go.uen.org/13N

Rights & Rallies
Salt Lake City Weekly commentary by columnist Katharine Biele

Maybe it’s an exercise in futility, but it’s a futile exercise worth doing. Two young women—Brittany Plothow and Erin Page—organized a rally at the Capitol to raise awareness about 276 Nigerian schoolgirls who were kidnapped in April. It started with Twitter and the hashtag #BringBackOurGirls, but it has grown into international anguish over the treatment of girls and women in general. Sold as wives and into slavery? Denied an education? Too many cultures condone this kind of treatment of half of the world’s population. First lady Michelle Obama is tweeting her disdain, and now Utah has joined the call for action, although the Deseret News appears to be the only local newspaper to cover it. No, tweeting is not action, but it does create pressure and, as we’ve seen in foreign countries, can effect change. If someone pays attention.
http://go.uen.org/12j

There’s a worm in common core
(Provo) Daily Herald op-ed by Pamela Romney Openshaw, author of “Promise of the Constitution”

Utah’s education has recently been up for sale. Teachers divide sharply over the new Common Core federal educational standards.
Educators who want the nation “on the same page” will tolerate bigger government to get it. Others see this as ominous and think the federal government should stick to its legally assigned duties, none of which involve education. They see a rotten core in this apple.
Common Core is touted as a grassroots, state-led movement that started with educators, but the money trail says otherwise. States can “tweak” their particular program, which fools the unsuspecting, but this octopus was nationally born.
http://go.uen.org/12P

USOE Negotiated $5.4M SAGE Contract with Florida without Board Knowledge or Legal Counsel Review
Utah PoliticoHub commentary by columnist DANIEL BURTON

In recent weeks, the Utah Board of Education faced a strange situation when Judy Park, an assistant superintendent, negotiated a contract estimated to be worth $5.4 million with Florida to share SAGE questions. The State Office of Education did not give full disclosure to the Board until after the fact, admitted that it lacked expertise in negotiating the contract, and did not conduct the negotiation with the advise of counsel.
http://go.uen.org/12Z

Official State Office Of Education Blog Endorses Candidates
Utah PoliticoHub commentary by columnist DANIEL BURTON

Monday, Utah Board of Education blog posted member Kim Burningham’s endorse two candidates for the Davis County school board and a candidate for the Utah legislature.
On Monday, UBOE Member Kim Burningham sent out a message to his extensive email list supporting certain candidates for political office, including two for the school board in Davis County and a candidate for Burningham’s home legislative district.
http://go.uen.org/130

A timely tool for teaching the law to our kids
St. George News op-ed by Bryan Hyde, co-host of the Perspectives talk show on Fox News 1450 AM 93.1 FM

More than 350 new laws took effect in Utah this week. Few of these laws rolled back the power of the state over the people. It was interesting to watch people actually celebrate the fact that the state now has increased its power over more areas of their lives.
That kind of enthusiastic genuflection is expected in a controlling society. It seems a bit peculiar for a society that claims to value its freedom. How do so many people learn to embrace the statist idea that whatever is not under the control of the state must be out of control?
It starts with what they were taught as children.
Whoever said that the victors write the history books was telling the truth.
Government-run schools have successfully trained successive generations to have a highly favorable view of the state’s current power structure. That’s why it shouldn’t be surprising that students of the public school system grow up to regard ever-increasing government power as the norm.
http://go.uen.org/12Y

Food allergies are a silent killer
Salt Lake Tribune op-ed by Michelle Fogg, president and founder of the Utah Food Allergy Network

Pizza, pretzels, birthday cake, brownies, doughnuts. Popular and seemingly harmless foods loved by children everywhere, right? Wrong!
Lying dormant beside the sugar-laden and processed ingredients usually found in these foods is a much less familiar threat. Who has the power to provoke this sleeping giant to wreak havoc, you ask? Take a good look around you. One in 13 of our children do. Almost 70,000 Utah children with food allergies! But, unlike a fairy tale, these stories don’t always have a happy ending.
http://go.uen.org/12r

Seeking a new Superintendent of Public Instruction
Utah Senate Site commentary

From the Utah State Board of Education’s website:
The Utah State Board of Education approved the following announcement of the opening for Utah State Superintendent of Public Instruction on May 9, 2014.
The Board also approved sending out a request for proposals (RFP) seeking an executive recruiting firm to provide a minimum of six qualified and interested candidates for the position. The RFP will be announced later this month, and the Board will still need to approve a contract.
http://go.uen.org/13s

Harmony kicked in the teeth again
Commentary by Charter Solutions President Lincoln Fillmore

At last week’s State Charter School Board Meeting, two schools, both on warning status for operating distance education programs not authorized by their charters, announced that they were ending their relationship with Harmony Education Services.
“It’s a predatory company and we are the victims,” Richard Wolfgramm, president of the board at Mana Academy, told the state charter board. “I’m fully aware this is taxpayer money we’re dealing with. It hasn’t been used wisely.” OUCH!
“The school may have to repay the state,” Marlies Burns said, because it improperly claimed some children as students last fall. DOUBLE OUCH!
http://go.uen.org/13t

STEM/STEAM helps students solve problems
Salt Lake Tribune letter from Pam Dahlkamp

Re “STEM education is good, but not good enough,” Don Gale column in the May 10 Tribune. Very few educators would argue with that. A balanced approach will lead to a well educated child indeed.
However, Mr. Gale has underestimated the value of STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) and STEAM (add arts). As a veteran educator, I have incorporated STEM/STEAM into my curriculum and seen the positive results.
http://go.uen.org/12o

Gale was right about STEM education
Salt Lake Tribune letter from Janet Coleman Thomas

It is not often that we have the opportunity to read a column based on reason, integrity and logic. Don Gale has written such a column. (“STEM education is good, but not good enough,” Tribune, May 10.)
As Gale states, the problem with science, technology, engineering and math education (STEM) is that it does not deal with the more important aspects of learning: understanding the wonders of nature, the love of learning and the appreciation of human complexities.
http://go.uen.org/12q

Churches seek influence over schools
Salt Lake Tribune letter from Norine Peebles

Charles Ashcraft’s letter of May 10 expressing disapproval of Steve Green’s efforts to have Bible courses taught in Oklahoma schools was amusing.
Does he also (like many of us non-Mormons) find the teachings of the LDS Church at every Utah senior high school upsetting too? O.K., so they are across the street and elective, but just another example to me of the lack of separation of church and state here. The predominate religion exerts its influence not only in our schools, but in our legislative, processes as well.
http://go.uen.org/12p

The Plots to Destroy America
Newsweek commentary by columnist Kurt Eichenwald


Conspiracy theories have been woven into the fabric of American society since before the signing of the Constitution. But what was once dismissed as the amusing ravings of the tin-foil-hat crowd has in recent years crossed a threshold, experts say, with delusions, fictions and lunacy now strangling government policies and creating national health risks. “These kinds of theories have the effect of completely distorting any rational discussion we can have in this country,’’ says Mark Potok, a senior fellow at the Southern Poverty Law Center who recently wrote a report on the impact of what is known as the Agenda 21 conspiracy. “They are having a real impact now.”
Experts say the number and significance of conspiracy theories are reaching levels unheard-of in recent times, in part because of ubiquitous and faster communications offered by Internet chat rooms, Twitter and other social media. “Conspiracy narratives are more common in public discourse than they were previously,’’ says Eric Oliver, a professor of political science at the University of Chicago who has published research on the phenomenon. “We seem to have crossed a threshold.”

“The reason we should worry about conspiracy theories and misinformation is that they distort the debate that is crucial to democracy,’’ says Brendan Nyhan, an assistant professor in Dartmouth’s government department who has conducted research on conspiracy theories. “They divert attention from the real issue and issues of concern that public officials should be debating.”
That is what has happened with the issue known as Common Core standards in public education. They were developed by the National Governors Association, working with an organization of state school superintendents, with the intent of advancing educational standards and identifying the math and literacy skills that every student at each grade level should have. The standards are now being implemented in 44 states.
There are strong reasons to support or oppose Common Core, and whether it is the right way to improve the nation’s school system is open for debate by well-meaning participants. Legitimate questions exist about whether the standards have been appropriately tested or whether teachers should be judged based on the performance of their students on Common Core exams. Unfortunately, that discussion has been derailed by conspiracy theories about the standards, built on falsehoods, misunderstandings and beliefs in ominous, secret plots.
http://go.uen.org/13x

Common Core: Obamacare for Education
Making every kid a left-wing zealot.
American Spectator commentary by columnist Jeffrey Lord

Common Core. Rutgers and Condi Rice. Brandeis and Ayaan Hirsi Ali. Smith College and Christine LaGarde. Glenn Beck, Jeb Bush, and Chris Christie.
Amid all the swirling controversies over campus commencement speakers, seemingly in a separate corner of the political universe another controversy swirls over Common Core. In fact? They are the same controversy. Not to mention the battle for the 2016 GOP presidential nomination. You could, in fact, call Common Core Obamacare for Education.
http://go.uen.org/13L

The 8 Most Ridiculous Attacks On Public Education In Glenn Beck’s New Book
Media Matters for America commentary by columnist HILARY TONE

Glenn Beck released a new book last week on everything that is supposedly wrong with education in America. The title, Conform: Exposing the Truth about Common Core and Public Education, gives most of it away.
Most people know Glenn Beck from his previous stint on Fox News or from the various media outlets associated with Conform Book Coverhis network, The Blaze. His co-author Kyle Olson, on the other hand, appears to be up-and-coming in the right-wing media sphere. Currently, he is the publisher, founder, and CEO of EAGnews.org, a “news service dedicated to education reform and school spending research, reporting, analysis and commentary.” He is also a contributor to Townhall, and just last week launched a new conservative website called Progressives Today with “Dumbest Man on the Internet” Jim Hoft.
In Conform, Beck and Olson take on everything from teachers unions’ to the Common Core State Standards to school lunches to abortion in a book characterized by anecdotal evidence, sweeping generalizations, and quotes from anonymous bloggers. The focus of their ire is what they call the “controllists,” defined as “the teachers’ unions and their progressive friends in the media and the state legislatures.” In 222 pages, Beck and Olson lob a number of outlandish attacks against the various evils they perceive in public education, relying on such conservative actors as Michelle Malkin, the Heritage Foundation, National Review, The Wall Street Journal, and the Heartland Institute to do so.
Here are the eight most ridiculous attacks from Conform:
http://go.uen.org/13M

Moms, make kids more ‘mathletic’
Like soccer, mothers can help their children embrace mathematics at an early age.
USA Today op-ed by Laura Overdeck, an astrophysicist, mother of three, and the founder of Bedtime Math

Over a decade ago, the phrase “soccer mom” came into the language to describe super-busy, middle-class suburban women who — often with careers outside the home — logged long hours shuttling school-age children to soccer team practice and games and other activities.
These mothers didn’t introduce soccer to the nation, but their support of children playing the sport may account, in part, for the fact that soccer is now the fourth-ranking team sport favored by high school boys and the third among high school girls.
Mothers also can be instrumental in helping their children at an early age embrace, love and master math — one of the single most important factors in predicting their later academic achievement.
But getting moms to love math may be a bigger task.
http://go.uen.org/13C

Read, Kids, Read
New York Times commentary by columnist Frank Bruni


But about books, I’m steady. Relentless. I’m incessantly asking my nephews and nieces what they’re reading and why they’re not reading more. I’m reliably hurling novels at them, and also at friends’ kids. I may well be responsible for 10 percent of all sales of “The Fault in Our Stars,” a teenage love story to be released as a movie next month. Never have I spent money with fewer regrets, because I believe in reading — not just in its power to transport but in its power to transform.
So I was crestfallen on Monday, when a new report by Common Sense Media came out. It showed that 30 years ago, only 8 percent of 13-year-olds and 9 percent of 17-year-olds said that they “hardly ever” or never read for pleasure. Today, 22 percent of 13-year-olds and 27 percent of 17-year-olds say that. Fewer than 20 percent of 17-year-olds now read for pleasure “almost every day.” Back in 1984, 31 percent did. What a marked and depressing change.
http://go.uen.org/12i

U.S. Students from Educated Families Lag in International Tests
It’s not just about kids in poor neighborhoods
Education Next analysis by Eric A. Hanushek, Paul E. Peterson and Ludger Woessmann

“The big picture of U.S. performance on the 2012 Program for International Student Assessment (PISA) is straightforward and stark: It is a picture of educational stagnation…. Fifteen-year olds in the U.S. today are average in science and reading literacy, and below average in mathematics, compared to their counterparts in [other industrialized] countries.”
U.S. secretary of education Arne Duncan spoke these grim words on the bleak December day in late 2013 when the international tests in math, science, and literacy were released. No less disconcerting was the secretary’s warning that the nation’s educational problems are not limited to certain groups or specific places. The “educational challenge in America is not just about poor kids in poor neighborhoods,” he said. “It’s about many kids in many neighborhoods. The [test] results underscore that educational shortcomings in the United States are not just the problems of other people’s children.”
http://go.uen.org/13K

Expanding the Education Universe: A Fifty-State Strategy for Course Choice
Fordham Institute analysis

After twenty years of expanding school-choice options, state leaders, educators, and families have a new tool: course choice, a strategy for students to learn from unconventional providers that might range from top-tier universities or innovative community colleges to local employers, labs, or hospitals.
In Expanding the Education Universe: A Fifty-State Strategy for Course Choice, Fordham’s Michael Brickman outlines policy questions and options to weigh when designing course-choice programs, including issues of student eligibility, course providers, funding, quality control, and accountability.
Louisiana is not the only state with a course-choice program (others include Arizona, Florida, Georgia, Michigan, Minnesota, Texas, Utah, and Wisconsin), but it is the farthest along in making such options widely accessible—and the way it has handled any challenges posed by these programs make it an ideal exemplar. Read about barriers that State Superintendent John White and other leaders have had to overcome in designing and implementing course choice.
http://go.uen.org/12c

Time for Teachers
National Center on Time & Learning analysis

Time for Teachers: Leveraging Time to Strengthen Instruction and Empower Teachers examines 17 high-performing and fast-improving schools around the country that have taken advantage of expanded school schedules to provide students with more time for engaging academic and enrichment classes and teachers with more time to collaborate with colleagues, analyze students data, create new lesson plans, and develop new skills. On average, U.S. teachers spend approximately 80 percent of their time on instruction, while the international average for countries reporting data to the OECD is 67 percent. Meanwhile, teachers in the schools featured in Time for Teachers spend 60 percent of their expanded school schedule on direct instruction with 40 percent of their time on collaboration, coaching, one-on-one support, and other activities.
http://go.uen.org/12d

Whole Child Snapshots
Measuring Whole Child Success Across the States
Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development analysis

To be fully prepared for their futures, the nation’s children need personalized support, safe environments, good health, and challenging learning opportunities. How well are we, as a nation, supporting the whole child?
ASCD’s 50-state whole child snapshots begin to answer that question by featuring data that provide a more comprehensive picture of child performance and well-being.
Each snapshot also has initial ideas for how families, educators, and communities can make targeted and innovative improvements to support the whole child and help students become productive adults and engaged citizens.
http://go.uen.org/12e

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NATIONAL NEWS
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Data mining your children
Politico

The NSA has nothing on the ed tech startup known as Knewton.
The data analytics firm has peered into the brains of more than 4 million students across the country. By monitoring every mouse click, every keystroke and every split-second hesitation as children work through digital textbooks, Knewton is able to find out not just what individual kids know, but how they think. It can tell who has trouble focusing on science before lunch – and who will struggle with fractions next Thursday.
Even as Congress moves to rein in the National Security Agency, private-sector data mining has galloped forward — perhaps nowhere faster than in education. Both Republicans and Democrats have embraced the practice. And the Obama administration has encouraged it, even relaxing federal privacy law to allow school districts to share student data more widely.
The goal is to identify potential problems early and to help kids surmount them. But the data revolution has also put heaps of intimate information about school children in the hands of private companies — where it is highly vulnerable to being shared, sold or mined for profit.
A POLITICO examination of hundreds of pages of privacy policies, terms of service and district contracts — as well as interviews with dozens of industry and legal experts — finds gaping holes in the protection of children’s privacy.
http://go.uen.org/12m

http://go.uen.org/12n  (The Wire)

Are student files private? It depends.
Politico

Every week, local school officials bombard the U.S. Department of Education with dozens of questions about student privacy. The department responded by recently releasing a 14-page list of common queries.
The answers to two of them: “It depends.”
Privacy laws governing data collection for students are fraught with ambiguity.
The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act prohibits disclosure of personally identifiable information from student education records to third parties without written parental consent.
That may sound iron-clad. But there federal officials and privacy lawyers point out several loopholes.
http://go.uen.org/13P

Senators Intend to Amend Federal Student Privacy Law
New York Times

In an effort to beef up protections for the personal details about students that schools may share with app developers and other companies, two prominent senators said on Wednesday that they intend to modernize a decades-old federal education privacy law.
The law, called the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Right Act of 1974, or FERPA for short, generally requires schools that receive public financing to obtain parents’ permission before sharing intimate details about their children with third parties. It also gives parents the right to review their children’s educational records and request corrections to them.
But an exception in the law allows schools to outsource school functions, like data processing and analytics, to companies without obtaining parental consent. The kinds of information schools share with third parties may include details like a student’s name, disciplinary history, disabilities, family relationships, home address, test scores and attendance records.
Now Senator Edward J. Markey, the Massachusetts Democrat, and Senator Orrin G. Hatch, the Utah Republican, say that law needs to be amended to keep pace with the proliferation of student data that has
resulted from increased technology use in schools.
http://go.uen.org/12l

http://go.uen.org/13Q  (PC World)

http://go.uen.org/13R  (Ed Week)

Education Agency Cautions U.S. Charter Schools on Special Needs
Bloomberg

U.S. charter schools must provide special-education services and avoid discrimination in admissions, academic services and athletics whether or not they receive federal funding, the Education Department said today.
In a “Dear Colleague” letter, the department’s Office for Civil Rights reminded charter school operators of their obligations under federal civil rights laws. Charter schools, which are privately run public schools, are barred from discriminating on the basis of race, sex, national origin or disability.
“Federal civil rights laws, regulations and guidance that apply to charter schools are the same as those that apply to other public schools,” Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights Catherine Lhamon said in the letter. The department “is committed to supporting the establishment of high-quality public charter schools from which all students can benefit.”
http://go.uen.org/13u

http://go.uen.org/13v  (WaPo)

A copy of the guidance
http://go.uen.org/13w  (ED)

2+2 What? Parents Rail Against Common Core Math
Associated Press

An Iowa woman jokingly calls it “Satan’s handiwork.” A California mom says she’s broken down in tears. A Pennsylvania parent says it “makes my blood boil.”
What could be so horrible? Grade-school math.
As schools around the U.S. implement national Common Core learning standards, parents trying to help their kids with math homework say that adding, subtracting, multiplying and dividing has become as complicated as calculus.
They’re stumped by unfamiliar terms like “rectangular array” and “area model.” They wrestle with division that requires the use of squares, slashes and dots. They rage over impenetrable word problems.
http://go.uen.org/13D

Report: Preschool enrollments decline
Washington Post

Enrollment in state-funded preschool programs nationally declined for the first time in more than a decade, reflecting lingering effects of the economic downturn, according to a national survey released Tuesday.
Across the country, 4,000 fewer children attended state pre-kindergarten programs in 2012-2013 than the year before. Most of the reductions were concentrated in large states, including California, Florida, Illinois and Pennsylvania.
“Our nation has emerged from the recession, but preschool age children are being left to suffer the effects,” said Steve Barnett, director of the National Institute for Early Education Research, based at Rutgers University, which publishes the annual report.
http://go.uen.org/13y

A copy of the report
http://go.uen.org/13z  (NIEER)

Public School Still Segregated
In its 1954 Brown v. Topeka Board of Education ruling, the Supreme Court ruled separate is not equal, and segregation by race is unconstitutional. But 60 years later, segregation is still widespread in America’s public schools.
USA Today

Segregation is still widespread at American public schools, 60 years after the landmark Brown v. Topeka Board of Education ruling, a new report shows.
And it no longer impacts just black and white students.
Black and Latino students are more likely to attend schools with mostly poor students, while white and Asian students are more likely to attend middle-class schools, according to a report released Thursday by the Civil Rights Project at UCLA.
In New York, California and Texas, more than half of Latino students are enrolled in schools that are 90% minority or more. In New York, Illinois, Maryland and Michigan, more than half of black students attend schools where 90% or more are minority, the report shows. Latinos are now the largest minority in public schools.
Black student attendance at majority-white schools steadily increased since the civil rights era but has been on the decline since the early 1990s. In 2011, only 23% of black students attended a majority white school — the same percentage as in 1968, according to the report.
Although segregation is most serious in large cities, it’s also “severe” in the suburbs, the report points out. In particular, Latino students are “significantly more” segregated than black students in suburbia.
http://go.uen.org/13A

http://go.uen.org/13I  (CSM)

http://go.uen.org/13E  (AP)

A copy of the report
http://go.uen.org/13B  (UCLA)

60 Years After Brown, School Diversity More Complex Than Ever
Education Week

American schooling will reach a milestone next fall when white students, for the first time, make up fewer than half of all children enrolled in public schools, according to federal projections.
Black enrollment, holding fairly steady in recent years, will hover between 16 percent and 17 percent.
Hispanic enrollment, meanwhile, will continue to surge, with its share of the K-12 population expected to hit 30 percent within the next decade. And the proportion of Asians and Pacific Islanders in public schools is also expected to be on the uptick, though much less dramatic than the rise for Latinos.
But even with such ground-shifting demographic changes in the nation’s public schools, the schools in many communities continue to be highly segregated 60 years after the U.S. Supreme Court, on May 17, 1954, struck down the principle of “separate but equal” education.
http://go.uen.org/13H

Publisher buys school news channel
Boston Globe

Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, a Boston company with a long history of publishing textbooks, said it has acquired Channel One News, a 25-year-old company that now transmits daily news programs to nearly 5 million upper elementary, middle, and high school students across the United States.
Terms of the acquisition are not being disclosed.
In recent years, Houghton Mifflin has been looking to build off its textbook heritage as it shifts into a digital education company.
The acquisition of Channel One News, Houghton said, represents a strategic investment “in the continued development of high-quality digital content for students, teachers, and parents across multiple modalities, and will bring significant video and cross-media production capabilities in-house.”
http://go.uen.org/12f

Schooled
Cory Booker, Chris Christie, and Mark Zuckerberg had a plan to reform Newark’s schools. They got an education.
New Yorker

Late one night in December, 2009, a black Chevy Tahoe in a caravan of cops and residents moved slowly through some of the most dangerous neighborhoods of Newark. In the back sat the Democratic mayor, Cory Booker, and the Republican governor-elect of New Jersey, Chris Christie. They had become friendly almost a decade earlier, during Christie’s years as United States Attorney in Newark, and Booker had invited him to join one of his periodic patrols of the city’s busiest drug corridors.
The ostensible purpose of the tour was to show Christie one of Booker’s methods of combatting crime. But Booker had another agenda that night. Christie, during his campaign, had made an issue of urban schools. “We’re paying caviar prices for failure,” he’d said, referring to the billion-dollar annual budget of the Newark public schools, three-quarters of which came from the state. “We have to grab this system by the roots and yank it out and start over. It’s outrageous.”
http://go.uen.org/13J

Official: Freeing Nigerian Girls a Top US Priority
Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Freeing 276 Nigerian girls from the terrorist group Boko Haram is now one of the U.S. government’s top priorities, U.S. officials declared Thursday, issuing warnings about the militant group’s expanding reach and growing capacity for more sophisticated and deadlier terror attacks.
At the same time, the officials lamented limitations on U.S. cooperation and intelligence sharing with the Nigerian military due to human rights concerns and legal restrictions. They also expressed concern about the Nigerian government’s commitment and army’s ability to combat the group.
http://go.uen.org/13G

NJ students attend Mormon Prom for a ‘modest’ celebration
Newark (NJ) Star-Ledger

Hundreds of teens from North Jersey gathered in Morristown Saturday for a night celebrating modesty — the eighth annual “Mormon Prom.”
The event — open to any students ages 16 to 18, regardless of religious affiliation — was unlike most hosted by high schools across the state.
For starters, its organizers traded a pricey venue for a transformed basketball court at the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Morristown.
The prom was also free to attend, but under one stipulation: Teens were required to sign a pact agreeing to dress and behave modestly, to dance “appropriately” and to abstain from using alcohol or drugs.
“This prom is unique in that it emphasizes wholesome conduct and dress,” says Marcia Stornetta, director of public affairs for the Morristown Church of Latter-day Saints.
But, she insists, it’s not at the expense of fun.
http://go.uen.org/12s

Mahopac school board president resigns after calling parent ‘chubby’
(White Plains, NY) Lower Hudson Journal News

MAHOPAC – Board of Education President Ray Cote has resigned from the school board after community outrage at statements he made about a parent’s weight during a public meeting, a district lawyer announced Tuesday night.
Applause broke out as the announcement was made at a Board of Education meeting. School board Vice President Michael Sclafani will take over as president.
Cote also withdrew his candidacy for re-election, leaving only two incumbents and possible write-in candidates to run for the three open slots, district lawyer Ralph DeMarco said.
http://go.uen.org/13F

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CALENDAR
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USOE Calendar
http://tinyurl.com/5x9oh9

UEN News
http://www.uen.org

May 20:
Executive Appropriations Committee meeting
1 p.m., 445 State Capitol
http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2014&Com=APPEXE

May 21:
Education Interim Committee meeting
2 p.m., 30 House Building
http://le.utah.gov/Interim/2014/html/00003010.htm

June 5-6:
Utah State Board of Education meeting
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

July 10:
Utah State Charter School Board meeting
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://goo.gl/IaQntl

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