Education News Roundup: May 28, 2014

2013 Healthy STEM 5K and STEM Fair

2013 Healthy STEM 5K and STEM Fair

Education News Roundup

Today’s Top Picks:

Rep. Lockhart’s one-to-one device program may have life yet.
http://go.uen.org/1ak  (SLT)
and http://go.uen.org/1al  (DN)
and http://go.uen.org/1aS  (KSL)

Stan Lockhart discusses teachers.
http://go.uen.org/1aM  (Utah PoliticoHub)

Whither the Gates Foundation?
http://go.uen.org/1an  (NYT)

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TODAY’S HEADLINES
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UTAH

Utah’s one-to-one school device proposal likely to return Education » Task force discusses bringing Lockhart-backed bill back.

Trying tech to reach middle schoolers with math ‘‘A lot of this is figuring out how to reach them,’’ award-winning Utah teacher says.

‘Absolutely incredible’ student honored by local businesses

Dr. Ron Tolman named as new superintendent of Box Elder School District

Former Utah bus driver charged with child sex abuse appears in court Letter » Draper parents say Canyons School District failed to alert them, police of abuse allegations.

Safety ‘net: Children trained to be cautious online

Some lawmakers want schools to opt out of Federal Healthy Lunch program

Cache High School Graduate Profile: Deaf since infancy, Trisdan Smith to graduate early

Mountain Crest High School Graduate Profile: Triplets thrive after rough beginnings

InTech grad Erasmo Cortes puts career on different path

Beaver High School Student Earned $5,000 Renewable Scholarship from the First Wind Scholars Program

Utah offers free kids’ summer reading tool

Free, tonight: Hearing-loss technology has Utah theater debut Free movie » Tower Theater to test assisted listening device at free movie screening.

Longtime educators retire from Nebo School District

Third grade teacher chosen as new Woodruff Elementary principal

Adult mentors critical to at-risk teen students, study shows

A sticky situation: Canyon Elementary students cover principal in ice cream as reading reward

Summer free lunch program to start at Mount Logan Middle School

U.S. Bank employees support Junior Achievement program

Quiz: Are you smarter than a 4th grader?

Schools use texting to help kids get to college

Join the discussion: Are content warnings good or bad for education?

OPINION & COMMENTARY

Today’s graduates show more class

Monticello Elementary School, built in 1959, to be demolished this week

Do Teachers Matter?

Mayor’s response to bullying is naïve

Report: States have room to improve in school accountability efforts

NATION

As His Foundation Has Grown, Gates Has Slowed His Donations

Common Core becomes pivotal issue in Alabama Republican primary

E-Rate Is Billions Short on Meeting Schools’ Wireless-Network Needs, Analysis Finds

Finns beat U.S. with low-tech take on school

States Intervene When School Districts Hit Financial Trouble

Wisconsin school choice debate turns on the numbers

Arts Program Shows Promise in Special Ed. Classes

N.M. Court Orders Halt on Common-Core Testing Contract Until Appeal Is Heard

IPS to offer free breakfast, lunch for all in 2014-15 session

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UTAH NEWS
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Utah’s one-to-one school device proposal likely to return Education » Task force discusses bringing Lockhart-backed bill back.

Utah lawmakers hope to reboot a pricey proposal next year to put mobile devices in the hands of all Utah students despite the measure’s failure this past legislative session.
The Legislature’s Education Task Force spent Tuesday morning discussing the failed bill, HB131, and why it’s still important moving forward.
“It creates a better learning environment, and it gives every student access to new and emerging technologies,” said outgoing House Speaker Becky Lockhart, who was behind the earlier push. “This actually has an incredible equalizing power for our students.”
Lockhart’s proposal went down last session amid concerns about its $200 million to $300 million price tag and whether such devices would actually improve education.
The Senate had offered to fund the bill at $26 million, but Lockhart rejected that offer, saying, “The only thing worse than not doing it at all is doing it wrong.”
Lockhart, R-Provo, said Tuesday that legislative fiscal analysts plan to examine the cost again before next session, including how to possibly spread it out over several years.
http://go.uen.org/1ak  (SLT)

http://go.uen.org/1al  (DN)

http://go.uen.org/1aS  (KSL)

Trying tech to reach middle schoolers with math ‘‘A lot of this is figuring out how to reach them,’’ award-winning Utah teacher says.

As eighth-graders at Northwest Middle School reviewed for end-of-year math tests, they had to figure out the length of a ladder using the Pythagorean Theorem. They also had to figure out the volume of corn in a silo that was part cylinder and part cone.
They used pencils and paper, T1-Nspire hand-held computers and student response “clickers” to let teacher Roger Haglund know their answers.
Haglund could tell by glancing at his Smart Board who was and was not getting it — an assessment that would have taken much longer if he’d had to look at all their papers.
“Anthony and George, come on. Let’s go!” he said, noticing that two students had not yet “clicked” in their answers.
“This is a 30-second question. When the next Pythagorean Theorem comes up, you’ve got one minute to answer it.”
It’s not hard to picture Haglund as he used to be, a swimming instructor who would push kids to do what they thought they couldn’t. Now he blends his coach-style cajoling — “Stop saying, ‘I don’t know how!’ ” — with electronic devices to engage seventh- and eighth-graders in math and science.
http://go.uen.org/1as  (SLT)

‘Absolutely incredible’ student honored by local businesses

SALT LAKE CITY — On Wednesday, Granite Park Junior High student Syeda Hashmi stood in front of her cheering peers as she was handed flowers, chocolates, a new laptop and a series of checks that escalated in both size and value.
As this year’s recipient of Granite School District’s “Absolutely Incredible Kid Award,” Hashmi received $1,700 from local businesses during a school assembly that took the ninth-grade student by surprise.
“I never expected this,” Hashmi said. “My dreams are coming true. I’m so happy.”
Hashmi’s family immigrated to the United State from Pakistan roughly two years ago, school officials said. Since that time, Hashmi has maintained a 3.9 grade point average and involved herself in a number of extra-curricular activities, including the school’s Mathematics, Engineering, Science Achievement — or MESA — club, science Olympiads and yearbook staff.
http://go.uen.org/1aw  (DN)

Dr. Ron Tolman named as new superintendent of Box Elder School District

The Box Elder School District has a new superintendent. Dr. Ron Tolman has been chosen to replace current superintendent Ron Wolfe who is retiring on July 1. Tolman has been serving as superintendent of the Jefferson School District in Rigby, Idaho.
http://go.uen.org/1aK  (CVD)

Former Utah bus driver charged with child sex abuse appears in court Letter » Draper parents say Canyons School District failed to alert them, police of abuse allegations.

A former Canyon School District bus driver charged with sexually abusing a Sandy child made a brief initial court appearance Wednesday afternoon.
John Martin Carrell, 61, was charged last week in 3rd District Court with 23 counts of aggravated sexual abuse of a child, a first-degree felony. Each count carries a sentence of 15 years to life in prison.
Carrell’s next hearing will be on June 30 at the West Jordan courthouse.
Richard Mauro, who is representing the accused bus driver, told news reporters that his client is “devastated” but maintains his innocence.
Carrell is at the Salt Lake County jail, in lieu of $3 million cash-only bail.
The abuse allegedly occurred from late February to late April. The investigation began after a 5-year-old Sandy girl mentioned the alleged abuse to a relative, according to the charges.
http://go.uen.org/1at  (SLT)

http://go.uen.org/1aB  (DN)

http://go.uen.org/1aC  (PDH)

http://go.uen.org/1aN  (KUTV)

http://go.uen.org/1aO  (KTVX)

http://go.uen.org/1aT  (KSL)

http://go.uen.org/1aU  (KSTU)

Safety ‘net: Children trained to be cautious online

SALT LAKE CITY — A child shrieked in mock fright as classmate Carson Maddocks pulled his meanest bad guy face.
After that, the fourth-grader and his classmate Rehema Uwamahoro each ripped through a green sheet of paper. They were posing as Internet bad guys during an assembly Tuesday at North Star Elementary School, 1545 N. Morton Drive. Utah Attorney General Sean Reyes, a guest at the assembly, told the children the paper was a symbol of how easy it would be for an Internet perpetrator to hurt a child if the child were the only one on the lookout.
http://go.uen.org/1ax  (DN)

Some lawmakers want schools to opt out of Federal Healthy Lunch program

HOLLADAY, Utah – The 2010 Nutrition Bill that mandated healthier lunches faces criticism from some conservative lawmakers who want to allow some school districts to opt out of the federal plan. Tuesday, First Lady Michele Obama took on those critics.
The federal guidelines mandate healthier lunch options for kids. They can choose a half cup of a fruit or vegetable. They have to take one, but they don’t have to try it. So that means a lot of extra waste.
A student that would want four carrot sticks might need to take a half a cup of carrots. They still might only want four, so the rest are thrown away,” said Granite School District Food Services Director Rich Prall.
It is that waste that has some lawmakers demanding changes. Tuesday, First Lady Michele Obama said no.
http://go.uen.org/1aP  (KTVX)

Cache High School Graduate Profile: Deaf since infancy, Trisdan Smith to graduate early

Graduating a year early is quite a feat in itself, but for Trisdan Smith it’s a bigger accomplishment than meets the eye. Smith had meningitis as a baby, which left him completely deaf. He received his first cochlear implant in his right ear at age 6 or 7. He received another one in his left ear only a few months ago.
http://go.uen.org/1aF  (LHJ)

Mountain Crest High School Graduate Profile: Triplets thrive after rough beginnings

Eighteen-and-a-half years ago, Cache Valley residents followed the story of the Parkinson triplets, born three months early and fighting for life at a hospital in Salt Lake City. Today Nicole, Ryan and Braiden Parkinson will graduate from Mountain Crest High School to the cheers of friends and family.
http://go.uen.org/1aE  (LHJ)

InTech grad Erasmo Cortes puts career on different path

InTech Collegiate High School is known for its focus on producing the next generation of scientists, engineers and mathematicians. Graduate Erasmo Cortes is also a InTech success story but for a completely different career path.
http://go.uen.org/1aJ  (LHJ)

Beaver High School Student Earned $5,000 Renewable Scholarship from the First Wind Scholars Program

BOSTON, Mass. – First Wind, an independent U.S.-based renewable energy company announced that three students from high schools in Utah will be awarded a scholarship through the company’s signature First Wind Scholars program. The 2014 recipients were selected from a large pool of applicants and represented project host communities at our operating and construction projects as well as our corporate location. First Wind is marking the fifth year of its successful community program and will commit a total of $68,000 in scholarship dollars nationwide this year alone.
The First Wind Scholars program offers one-time, $3,000 college scholarships to high school seniors in communities where the company has a project in operation, construction or in an advanced stage of development. Students must display strong potential for a successful post-secondary experience, as well as interest in pursuing studies focused on the environment, energy or the sciences. One $5,000 scholarship, renewable for four years, is awarded to a stand-out applicant from the competitive pool. A student from Beaver, UT, was this year’s winner of the renewable scholarship.
“All of us at First Wind are very proud to recognize these students. We look forward to seeing the future innovation and advancements made by this year’s scholarship recipients in the fields of energy, science and technology,” said Carol Grant, Senior Vice President of External Affairs for First Wind. “As we continue to foster and develop a more sustainable future, we are happy to give back to the host communities where we have developed renewable energy projects. We are pleased that the First Wind Scholars program has been so successful during its first five years.”
The two-phase, 306 MW Milford Wind farm in Beaver and Millard counties is Utah’s largest utility-scale operating wind farm. High school seniors from Beaver, Delta, and Milford will receive scholarship awards this year:
• Kasen Hutchings from Beaver and a graduate of Beaver High School will receive the First Wind Scholars renewable $5,000 award. He is class Valedictorian, President of the Math Club, and has received numerous awards from school such as the National Football Foundation Leader-Scholar-Athlete award. He will be serving on a church mission until the Fall of 2016, and upon his return he will be attending Southern Utah University to pursue a degree in Biology.
• Chandler Rose of Milford, who attended Milford High School, plans to pursue a science and technology degree at Northwest College in Powell, WY. She is active on the school’s volleyball and basketball teams and has received awards for both. She is also on the track team and is Milford High School’s Computer Technology Sterling Scholar Representative.
• Michael Stephenson, a resident of Delta and graduate of Delta High School, will enroll at Brigham Young University to pursue a degree in physics.
http://go.uen.org/1aW  (KCSG)

Utah offers free kids’ summer reading tool

Long days spent away from school this summer don’t have to mean watching your child’s brain melt like so much ice cream left in the sun.
The State Office of Education, in partnership with MetaMetrics, is offering a free tool to help parents keep their kids reading this summer.
As part of the “Utah Reads: Find a Book” initiative, parents can go online to find lists of books suited to their children’s interests and abilities. The website will present recommendations based on a child’s Lexile score, or if that’s not known, parents can answer a few questions to get the lists. Parents may then use the website to check the availability of the books at local stores, libraries and online.
http://go.uen.org/1ar (SLT)

http://go.uen.org/1aV (KCSG)

Free, tonight: Hearing-loss technology has Utah theater debut Free movie » Tower Theater to test assisted listening device at free movie screening.

Foxes have excellent hearing and can detect when a rodent is scurrying underground or beneath several feet of snow.
So it’s perhaps fitting that the stop-motion animation film “Fantastic Mr. Fox” will be the first movie in Utah screened with sound-enhancing “looping” technology.
Hearing loops wirelessly (electromagnetically) pipe sound into a hearing aid or cochlear implant, cutting out the peripheral noise that can make it hard for people with hearing loss to enjoy movies or concerts.
Though popular in Europe, looping has been slow to catch on in the U.S., where demand is high for smaller, cosmetically appealing hearing aids that often don’t work with the technology, said Marilyn Call, director of Utah’s Division of Services to the Deaf and Hard of Hearing.
http://go.uen.org/1au  (SLT)

Longtime educators retire from Nebo School District

Friday will be the last day of school for students at Wilson Elementary School in Payson, but for one fifth-grade teacher it will be her last day teaching forever.
Julie Tracy will say goodbye to the faculty, parents, friends, her class and Wilson, where she has taught for the past 30 years.
http://go.uen.org/1aD  (PDH)

Third grade teacher chosen as new Woodruff Elementary principal

Woodruff Elementary has a new principal. During a closed session of Logan City School District Board of Education on Friday, Spencer Holmgren was appointed to fill the position.
http://go.uen.org/1aI  (LHJ)

Adult mentors critical to at-risk teen students, study shows

SALT LAKE CITY — Recent studies are shedding more light on how important it is for teens to have adult mentors in school. Researchers say a lack of mentors is a big factor in why many students drop out of school.
http://go.uen.org/1aR  (KSL)

A sticky situation: Canyon Elementary students cover principal in ice cream as reading reward

HYRUM — Principal Kelly Rindlisbacher found himself in a sticky situation Tuesday after Canyon Elementary students covered him in ice cream, chocolate syrup, caramel, sprinkles and cherries as part of a reward to students for reaching a reading goal.
http://go.uen.org/1aG  (LHJ)

Summer free lunch program to start at Mount Logan Middle School

Families within the Logan City School District can enjoy free lunch from June 9 to July 23 at Mount Logan Middle School. The LCSD announced the sponsorship of the Summer Food Service Program on Friday. Any child between the ages of one to 18 years old can receive a free lunch.
http://go.uen.org/1aH  (LHJ)

U.S. Bank employees support Junior Achievement program

U.S. Bank employees in the Salt Lake City area supported local youths and Junior Achievement of Utah on Tuesday by volunteering for “JA for a Day.” Volunteers visited Newman Elementary School in Salt Lake City for the program.
http://go.uen.org/1aA  (DN)

Quiz: Are you smarter than a 4th grader?

SALT LAKE CITY — Each year thousands of fourth grade students across the state learn about Utah’s history and geography. Take this quiz to prove once and for all that you are actually smarter than a fourth grader.
http://go.uen.org/1aQ  (KSL)

Schools use texting to help kids get to college

In an attempt to avoid losing students between high school graduation and the first day of freshman year, schools are using text messaging to keep them on track.
http://go.uen.org/1ay  (DN)

Join the discussion: Are content warnings good or bad for education?

College students from the University of California, Santa Barbara; Oberlin College; and Rutgers University, among others, have been calling for content warnings on novels read for class. Some consider these trigger warnings necessary and overdue, but others claim they are counterproductive to a learning experience.
http://go.uen.org/1az (DN)

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OPINION & COMMENTARY
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Today’s graduates show more class
(St. George) Spectrum commentary by columnist Todd Seifert

I attended my first graduation ceremony in many, many years on Wednesday, when I crammed into the Burns Arena with what seemed like 4,000 other people for commencement exercises for Desert Hills High School.
I attend quite a few events there, but I don’t know that I’ve seen the arena at Dixie State University that full since the 2012 state basketball championship doubleheader featuring Desert Hills and Snow Canyon in the girls’ game and Desert Hills and Hurricane in the boys’ game. The difference this time around was that the only tears I saw came from joy.
http://go.uen.org/1aL

Monticello Elementary School, built in 1959, to be demolished this week San Juan Record commentary by columnist Scott Boyle

This week, the old Monticello Elementary School building will be torn down to reveal a beautiful new school.
The new school has been built immediately behind the old. It has been mostly hidden from view until this week.
http://go.uen.org/1b4

Do Teachers Matter?
Utah PoliticoHub commentary by STAN LOCKHART

As we near the end of another school year, my thoughts turn to our teachers. Those men and women on the front lines of K-12 education preparing our children for their future.
Maybe I think of teachers at this time of year because I was raised in a home where my parents were educators. My dad took the administrative track and my mom taught K-3. I was taught there is a certain nobility in teachers. That there is a special place in Heaven for teachers who influence the lives of young people for good. And that teachers “change the world” in the process.
Some may think that in this day and age where technology is all around us that all they need to know is at their fingertips; that maybe they don’t need teachers anymore. In a world of smartphones, iPads and a myriad of other digital devices. In a world of Apple, Intel and Samsung or Facebook, Twitter and YouTube. Or maybe a world of Khan Academy.
http://go.uen.org/1aM

Mayor’s response to bullying is naïve
Davis County Clipper commentary by columnist BRYAN GRAY

When it comes to bullying, there is no partisan divide. Almost all of us would agree that bullying is not acceptable anywhere and at any time; most of us would also agree that bullying is a problem in our public schools where children can be cute Р and cruel!
So I was interested to read of two responses from parents, a mother in Utah and a city mayor in California. One of these responses is troublesome and naive.
http://go.uen.org/1b3

Report: States have room to improve in school accountability efforts Education Commission of the States analysis

DENVER – States are struggling to create school accountability systems that are easy to find, meaningful to parents and filled with the data experts recommend, according to a review of school report cards in the 50 states and the District of Columbia.
The Education Commission of the States released the report Rating States, Grading Schools: What Parents and Experts Say States Should Consider to Make Accountability Systems Meaningful after a three-part analysis that included:
* Assigning experienced online researchers to find school accountability reports in each state.
* Asking parents to rate a school report card in each state on overall usefulness.
* Convening experts to select the essential indicators for any school accountability system.
The report is intended to help states policymakers create accessible, useful and effective school accountability systems. In January, ECS released a 50-state database that found more states are moving to A-F grades for schools. Today’s ECS report shows it take more than a letter grade to be transparent.

ECS identified nine states using and reporting all five indicators: California, Kentucky, New Mexico, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Utah and Wyoming.
http://go.uen.org/1ao

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NATIONAL NEWS
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As His Foundation Has Grown, Gates Has Slowed His Donations New York Times

Bill Gates, who as the richest American has become one of the foremost advocates of philanthropy, has reduced the pace of his own giving to the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation over the last decade.
After starting the foundation with gifts of $356 million from 1994 to 1997, Mr. Gates, the co-founder of Microsoft, vastly expanded it into the nation’s largest with a burst of gifts totaling $24.6 billion over the next four years.
Since then, however, he has dialed back this giving. From 2002 to 2012, he gave $3.7 billion, according to foundation disclosures and data from a Gates spokesman. In that same period, he sold an estimated $22 billion in Microsoft stock.
The pullback reflects the foundation’s rapid growth — to a size that has tested its ability to give away money at the pace required both by law and by the fast-rising contributions of another donor, Warren E. Buffett.
John Pinette, a spokesman for Mr. Gates, declined to address specific reasons for the change of pace in giving, but he did point to the challenges of distributing large amounts of money where it can be most effective. Giving away $3.9 billion, as the foundation did in 2012, “is a massive task and a big responsibility,” Mr. Pinette said.
At $40.2 billion, the Gates foundation is more than triple the size of the No. 2 Ford Foundation, according to a tally by the Foundation Center, which tracks philanthropy. Such foundations generally must spend 5 percent of their assets in grants and expenses each year to maintain their tax-exempt status.
http://go.uen.org/1an

Common Core becomes pivotal issue in Alabama Republican primary Associated Press via AL.com

MONTGOMERY, Alabama — Sen. Dick Brewbaker was one of the first Alabama politicians to sound an alarm against the Common Core State Standards. These days, he has some misgivings.
“What I do regret is that it has morphed from an education issue into something else,” said Brewbaker, a Republican from Montgomery. “I don’t see how you get back to the point where you have some kind of rational discussion.”
Few Alabamians had even heard of the Common Core, a multi-state set of academic standards designed to put schools across the country on the same page academically, when Brewbaker first came out against them in 2010.
But as the June 3 primary elections approach, Common Core has emerged as the one issue that every Republican candidate must address.
http://go.uen.org/1aq

E-Rate Is Billions Short on Meeting Schools’ Wireless-Network Needs, Analysis Finds Education Week

An estimated $3.2 billion in new funds are needed to realize President Barack Obama’s goal of providing all students with high-speed wireless Internet connections inside their schools and libraries by 2018, concludes a new analysis by two prominent education-technology organizations.
That staggering sum represents a needed investment above and beyond the $2.4 billion currently directed to schools and libraries each year as part of the federal E-rate program. It does not include the additional billions needed to provide schools and libraries with broadband connections to the outside world, nor does it account for the estimated $1.6 billion annually it would take to maintain new in-school wireless networks once they are built.
The new projections come from the Washington-based Consortium for School Networking, or CoSN, and EducationSuperHighway, based in San Francisco. On Wednesday, the nonprofit groups jointly submitted a first-of-its-kind analysis to the Federal Communications Commission, which is currently overhauling the E-rate, designed to subsidize schools’ and libraries’ telecommunications costs with fees raised from telecommunications companies.
http://go.uen.org/1aZ

Finns beat U.S. with low-tech take on school Politico

HELSINKI — At the start of morning assembly in the state-of-the-art Viikki School here, students’ smartphones disappear. In math class, the teacher shuts off the Smartboard and begins drafting perfect circles on a chalkboard. The students — some of the highest-achieving in the world — cut up graphing paper while solving equations using their clunky plastic calculators.
Finnish students and teachers didn’t need laptops and iPads to get to the top of international education rankings, said Krista Kiuru, minister of education and science at the Finnish Parliament. And officials say they aren’t interested in using them to stay there.
That’s in stark contrast to what reformers in the U.S. say. From President Barack Obama on down, they have called education technology critical to improving schools. By shifting around $2 billion in existing funds and soliciting $2 billion in contributions from private companies, the Obama administration is pressing to expand schools’ access to broadband and the devices that thrive on it.
http://go.uen.org/1b2

States Intervene When School Districts Hit Financial Trouble Stateline

Pushed to the brink of financial ruin, the Normandy School District in Missouri will officially breathe its last breath on June 30.
The district’s finances buckled this year under the weight of a state law that requires school districts that fail to meet certain academic standards to pay tuition and transportation costs for students who want to transfer to other districts. Normandy, which lost its state accreditation in 2013, saw about 1,000 students, or 25 percent, of the district’s students move to other schools this year at a price tag of about $8 million.
Normandy is not alone among school districts struggling with serious financial problems. Each year, a handful of school systems across the country fall into such deep financial or academic trouble that states step in to help – or even take over entirely. The number remained steady in the first few years after the recession, despite fears that it would increase.
http://go.uen.org/1b0

Wisconsin school choice debate turns on the numbers Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

Depending on your perspective, approximately 3,000 students who applied for taxpayer-funded vouchers to attend private schools across the state this fall means one of two things:
1. There’s great demand for the new statewide voucher program launched last year. The enrollment cap of 1,000 seats for students this fall should be lifted.
2. There’s little demand for the program, and most of it is from kids already attending private schools. If the program has to exist at all, the enrollment cap should stay put.
Last week’s release of the statewide voucher program application numbers for the 2014-’15 school year has prompted parties in different camps to use the same data — or different parts of the same data — to support their positions.
http://go.uen.org/1ap

Arts Program Shows Promise in Special Ed. Classes Education Week

New York – Each of the visual arts, music, and dance activities Elizabeth Rosenberry engages in daily with her 2nd graders has a critical underlying goal: eye contact.
The veteran teacher opens class by crouching in front of a student and gently clutching his arms. “Zachary, look at me,” she sings, matching his wide-open eyes with her own. The two paraprofessionals assisting in the classroom at the public school, P4Q @ Skillman, encourage the other five students, also seated in the semicircle, to watch the interaction and sing along.
Ms. Rosenberry is one of 240 teachers in New York City’s District 75—a geographically dispersed collection of schools and programs serving students with the most severe cognitive and behavioral needs—to have received training in an initiative called Everyday Arts for Special Education, or EASE.
http://go.uen.org/1aX

N.M. Court Orders Halt on Common-Core Testing Contract Until Appeal Is Heard Education Week

A judge in New Mexico has ordered state officials to review a protest filed by a research and testing organization alleging an unfair and biased bidding process before going forward with a potentially lucrative, multistate contract for online common-core testing work.
The major contract award was made to Pearson to provide a broad scope of services, including test delivery and item development, to states belonging to PARCC, one of the two main consortia designing assessments linked to the Common Core State Standards.
But the ruling issued Tuesday by Judge Sarah M. Singleton of the Santa Fe First Judicial District raises questions about how that work will be carried out, unless the protest and related legal action are resolved in favor of New Mexico officials, who oversaw the bidding process on behalf of PARCC states.
The judge decided that the protest of the bidding process, filed by the American Institutes for Research, based in Washington, was submitted in an appropriate and timely fashion. She overruled the objections of New Mexico officials, who had argued that the protest was turned in too late.
http://go.uen.org/1aY

IPS to offer free breakfast, lunch for all in 2014-15 session Indianapolis Star

All Indianapolis Public Schools students will get a free breakfast, lunch and snack of fresh fruit or vegetable starting this fall and continuing for the next four years under a federal program the School Board voted Tuesday to join.
Superintendent Lewis Ferebee said providing every student with a meal will improve health and increase focus in the classroom. Too many IPS families, he said, lack access to fresh food in their neighborhoods.
http://go.uen.org/1b1

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CALENDAR
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USOE Calendar
http://tinyurl.com/5x9oh9

UEN News
http://www.uen.org

June 5-6:
Utah State Board of Education meeting
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

June 17:
Executive Appropriations Committee meeting
1 p.m., 445 State Capitol
http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2014&Com=APPEXE

June 18:
Education Interim Committee meeting
2 p.m., 30 House Building
http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2014&Com=INTEDU

July 10:
Utah State Charter School Board meeting
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://goo.gl/IaQntl

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