Education News Roundup: June 2, 2014

2014 USU Physics Day at Lagoon

2014 USU Physics Day at Lagoon

Education News Roundup

Today’s Top Picks:

Incumbent Utah State Board of Education Member Michael Jensen clears the first hurdle for making it on the November ballot.
http://go.uen.org/1dO  (SLT)

Latino students boost the graduation rate at Highland High.
http://go.uen.org/1d3  (SLT)
and http://go.uen.org/1dI  (MUR)

Jordan District speaks out against another potential split.
http://go.uen.org/1db  (SLT)

Nationally, the Office of Management and Budget looks at the cost of migrant children.
http://go.uen.org/1d6  (Politico)

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TODAY’S HEADLINES
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UTAH

Utah school board incumbent still in running

Latino students boast Highland High’s top graduation rate Latinos aren’t singled out by special programs; rather, programs help all students and emphasize relationships and inclusiveness.

Jordan School District fights possible split Education » District says children would lose access to programs; at least one city council member disagrees.

Utah high school graduates panel talks about plans, challenges

Horizonte Grads Work to Put College Scholarships to Use

Canyons educators approve 2014-15 teacher contract

Ogden ukulele whiz kid fixes them and teaches too

Lehi teacher nominated for national awards

West High School and Tesoro partner to enhance STEM education

Greenville Elementary earns first Utah Green School Award in Cache County

Utah architect designing dome schools that keep kids healthy, safe

Q & A: New Woodruff Elementary principal Spencer Holmgren discusses plans

Jordan School District honors outstanding classified employees

Inspirational Fremont cheerleader succumbs to rare disease

Saturday run to benefit Bingham football player

Preschool for kids on the autism spectrum expands

Flowers donated to replace stolen foliage at Ogden school

Too late now, but your mom was right: Your high school GPA mattered

California students sue to overturn teacher protection laws

LaVar Burton raises 1 million dollars in 11 hours for ‘Reading Rainbow’ comeback

Join the discussion: Should the government mandate healthy eating?

OPINION & COMMENTARY

Thumbs up, thumbs down

Don’t punish young women for being what they are

Modesty no excuse for altering yearbook photos

About Utah: He’s leaving them wanting more; Paul Watson leaving remarkable teaching career

Partnership Provides Hands-On Experience for Tomorrow’s Innovators

Ivory a man of integrity, and that’s why we chose him

Utah’s war with America for public land

Technology in education

If we’re calling the fashion police …

Yearbook flap is not unique to Utah

Live theaters could do more for hearing-impaired

Learn empathy

High School Makes Girls’ Yearbook Photos Less Sexy

How to Get Girls Into Coding

How charters and rivals may get together

The education-reform movement is too white to do any good

NATION

OMB: Child migrants to cost U.S. $2.3 billion

Policy, Leadership Direction at Stake in Chiefs’ Contests

529 College-Savings Plans Show Continued Asset Growth and Sustained Investor Preference for Diversified Investments, According to Morningstar Research

Immigrant parents less likely to read to their children: study

Bill To Allow Armed Missouri Teachers Draws Praise, Potshots

Inside colleges’ pursuit of a future star The Courting of Marvin Clark

A litany of ‘thou shalt nots’: Catholic teachers challenge morality clause

Evolution of education: Middle schools in Israel to begin teaching Darwin’s theory

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UTAH NEWS
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Utah school board incumbent still in running

A governor-appointed committee has decided to keep at least one incumbent in the running for state school board in its first decision of the day Monday.
The 12-member committee, tasked with nominating and recruiting state school board candidates, voted Monday morning to forward four candidates to Utah Gov. Gary Herbert for consideration. The governor will now choose two of the candidates to appear on the November ballot.
The committee voted on District 3, which includes Tooele and part of Salt Lake County, recommending: Jeffrey D. Meservy, a Brigham Young University educator and seminary teacher with The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints; incumbent and Department of Veterans Affairs employee Michael G. Jensen; Garrick A. Hall, a manager with the Utah Farm Bureau Federation; and former Utah PTA officer Linda B. Hansen.
The vote came after nearly two hours of public interviews with seven candidates for the seat. Committee members asked candidates to talk about their feelings about charter schools, new Common Core State Standards and the role of the board, among other things.
http://go.uen.org/1dO  (SLT)

Latino students boast Highland High’s top graduation rate Latinos aren’t singled out by special programs; rather, programs help all students and emphasize relationships and inclusiveness.

Vanessa Lagunas hopes to become the first member of her immediate family to go to college.
As junior class president and a cheerleader, Lagunas is well on her way to both graduating from Salt Lake City’s Highland High and entering college to pursue her dream of becoming a nurse.
“What my parents wanted was to give me a better life than what they had,” Lagunas said. “I wanted to become something bigger and help them out.”
It’s not an unusual sentiment among teens across Utah. What is uncommon is that at Highland, Latino students as a group have the highest graduation rate in the school. It’s a rare feat across the state and the nation.
http://go.uen.org/1d3  (SLT)

http://go.uen.org/1dI  (MUR)

Jordan School District fights possible split Education » District says children would lose access to programs; at least one city council member disagrees.

The Jordan School District is fighting back against the threat of a possible split from South Jordan City.
Children in South Jordan could lose out on high quality curriculum, special education and career and technical education programs if city leaders decide to split from the Jordan District, according to a statement posted Friday on the district’s website.
“The big losers in a district split are the children,” the district statement says. “South Jordan City students would lose access to many Jordan School District programs and courses available to its students.”
They’re all claims at least one South Jordan City councilman refutes.
http://go.uen.org/1db  (SLT)

Utah high school graduates panel talks about plans, challenges

SALT LAKE CITY — This week more than 40,000 Utah seniors graduated from high school.
They’re from a generation where information is instant and expectations are high.
We gathered a panel of graduates from across the valley to ask this generation of thinkers what’s on their minds.
http://go.uen.org/1dF KSL)

Horizonte Grads Work to Put College Scholarships to Use

Every year, Horizonte Instruction and Training Center, an alternative high school in Salt Lake City awards college scholarships to dozens of graduates. And every year, many of those scholarships go unused. A new partnership between Horizonte and Salt Lake Community College helps grads stay the course and enroll in college, despite the obstacles.
It’s the last day of class for Horizonte bridge students at Salt Lake Community College. The group is gearing up for graduation next Tuesday by trying on the honorary medals they just received for completing the course. It introduces alternative high-school graduates who’ve been awarded a college scholarship to college rigors. But it’s not just about academics says Horizonte Principal Mindi Homdahl.
http://go.uen.org/1dG

Canyons educators approve 2014-15 teacher contract

SANDY — Canyons Education Association members voted Tuesday to approve a new teacher contract for 2014-2015.
The Canyons Board of Education approved the proposed contract agreement that increases teacher compensation by $4.25 million in a public meeting.
http://go.uen.org/1do  (DN)

Ogden ukulele whiz kid fixes them and teaches too

OGDEN — Elijah Priest and Laura Anderson sometimes switch roles in their sixth-grade class at Taylor Canyon Elementary School — he becomes the teacher, and she becomes the student.
“He’s really good at teaching us how to play the ukulele,” said student Kip Conger.
Priest, 12, became the class ukulele teacher when Anderson mentioned that her husband had given her one of the small, four-stringed instruments. Priest remembered that his third grade teacher had tried to teach his class to play ukulele, and wondered if the instruments might still be in the school.
http://go.uen.org/1du  (OSE)

Lehi teacher nominated for national awards

LEHI — Using florist’s tape to decorate pens with fake flowers, Lisa Clement helped students create unique personal pens Thursday for yearbook signing. The award-winning Willowcreek Middle School agriculture science teacher turned an otherwise laid-back class period into a timely craft project using leftover materials from one of her floral design class assignments.
Seizing every opportunity to share a learning moment is one of the teaching talents that makes Clement’s classes favorites with students. It has also earned her recognition on both state and national levels.
Clement was recently nominated for three national awards by the Utah Association of Agricultural Educators. She has been nominated as National Agriscience Teacher of the Year, Outstanding Teacher of the Year, and as an advisor of an Outstanding Program. She will go on to represent the state as the Utah nominee in the National Association of Agricultural Educators competition in all three categories.
http://go.uen.org/1dz  (PDH)

West High School and Tesoro partner to enhance STEM education

SALT LAKE CITY — Representatives from the Tesoro Corp. refinery gifted West High School with an $80,000 check Friday as part of a new partnership to introduce students to careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics.
The $80,000 grant is the first award in what is expected to be 10 years of support by Tesoro, including in-class and on-site demonstrations by professionals in the oil industry.
http://go.uen.org/1dn  (DN)

http://go.uen.org/1dE  (KSL)

Greenville Elementary earns first Utah Green School Award in Cache County

NORTH LOGAN — Greenville Elementary is officially green. The school received the Utah Green School Award from the Utah Society of Environmental Education on Thursday after spending last year developing programs that helped promote environmental practices.
http://go.uen.org/1dA  (LHJ)

http://go.uen.org/1dP  ([Pocatello] Idaho State Journal)

Utah architect designing dome schools that keep kids healthy, safe

LOCUST GROVE, Okla. — Unusual new schools are popping up all over the country and the architect, contractors and technology come from Utah.
The schools are topped with giant domes that look a bit like something in science fiction.
http://go.uen.org/1dq  (DN)

http://go.uen.org/1dH  (MUR)

Q & A: New Woodruff Elementary principal Spencer Holmgren discusses plans

Starting next school year, third grade teacher Spencer Holmgren will be the new principal at Woodruff Elementary in Logan. Holmgren was appointed by the Logan City School District Board of Education to replace Darryl Guymon, who is moving on to work at the district level. Holmgren received his bachelor’s and master’s degrees at Utah State University and has worked at Woodruff his entire career. He sat down with The Herald Journal to discuss his plans.
http://go.uen.org/1dB  (LHJ)

http://go.uen.org/1dD  (CVD)

Jordan School District honors outstanding classified employees

WEST JORDAN — The Jordan Education Foundation has named the recipients of the Outstanding Classified Employee Awards.
The honorees are Karen Allen, Valley High; Brady Bartholomew, Copper Hills High; Alice Clark, Jordan Applied Technology College; Clark Cone, South Jordan Elementary; Rebekka Friant, testing support coordinator; Kevan Sprague, Copper Mountain Middle School; and Pam Overson, West Hills Middle School.
http://go.uen.org/1dp  (DN)

Inspirational Fremont cheerleader succumbs to rare disease

PLAIN CITY – Kennedy Hansen, the 16-year-old Fremont High cheerleader who inspired many with her story, died from complications of Juvenile Batten Disease. Hansen died peacefully early Friday, May 30.
Kennedy started having symptoms of the disease about five years ago. Juvenile Batten Disease is a disorder that affects the nervous system progressively causing vision loss, intellectual and motor disability, speech difficulties and seizures. An official diagnosis was not given to the Hansen family until June 5, 2013.
http://go.uen.org/1dt  (OSE)

Saturday run to benefit Bingham football player

Bingham High football player Riley Culley’s life changed forever March 27 when he was diagnosed with Ewings Sarcoma, a rare form of bone cancer. He helped the Miners win the 5A championship and had planned on playing football at Dixie State.
Instead, Culley will spend the next nine to 12 months in and out of Primary Children’s Hospital undergoing chemo treatments and surgery.
To honor the player and raise funds for him, a benefit run is scheduled Saturday from 7:30 a.m. to noon at Bingham High School.
http://go.uen.org/1dd  (SLT)

Preschool for kids on the autism spectrum expands

A preschool program at Utah State University for children on the autism spectrum will expand the number of Cache Valley families it serves, adding an additional session to accommodate those children.
http://go.uen.org/1dC  (LHJ)

Flowers donated to replace stolen foliage at Ogden school

OGDEN – It wasn’t long after word got out that flowers had been stolen right out of the ground at James Madison Elementary before Principal Vincent Ardizzone started getting offers of donations to replace the pilfered goods.
Blane Jackman, a reading specialist at the school, had planted the flowers originally with the students. He is the one who noticed the flowers were missing last week and alerted Ardizzone. Ardizzone then checked his surveillance cameras and saw that a woman had been stealing the flowers when she thought no one was looking – about 20 to 30 flowers in all. Jackman’s sister quickly bought more flowers to replace the stolen ones because the project is so close to Jackman’s heart.
But Ardizzone was touched and a bit surprised by the outpouring of concern and offers of help from the community. He had a call as far away as Sandy from a woman who had several extra flowers from a project at her church. “She said we could just come by and pick them up,” Ardizzone said.
http://go.uen.org/1dw  (OSE)

Too late now, but your mom was right: Your high school GPA mattered

Mom was right. A new study published in Eastern Economic Journal finds a strong correlation between high school GPA and earnings later in life. Not altogether surprising, but the strength of the connection is very strong.
http://go.uen.org/1dj  (DN)

California students sue to overturn teacher protection laws

After two years of delay, a nonprofit advocacy group representing a handful of California students is finally getting a trial on its challenge to California statutes that, critics say, protect teachers’ jobs and seniority at the expense of student learning.
http://go.uen.org/1dm  (DN)

LaVar Burton raises 1 million dollars in 11 hours for ‘Reading Rainbow’ comeback

Just 11 hours after announcing his Kickstarter campaign, “Reading Rainbow” host LeVar Burton reached his goal of raising 1 million dollars to bring the show to the Internet and classrooms.
http://go.uen.org/1di  (DN)

Join the discussion: Should the government mandate healthy eating?

If we want to have healthy children we need to regulate school lunches, according to a recent op-ed by Michelle Obama in the New York Times. Others have responded to the article by saying that regulating what students eat is overstepping government boundaries, leading to a debate on the merits of healthy foods versus the ability to choose your foods.
http://go.uen.org/1dl  (DN)

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OPINION & COMMENTARY
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Thumbs up, thumbs down
(Ogden) Standard-Examiner editorial

Thumbs up: To the first graduates of Ogden High School International Baccalaureate program. The school district has a 10-year commitment with IB and we congratulate the students and teachers.
Thumbs down: To the suicide rate in Utah. It’s one of the highest in the nation. We urge persons thinking of suicide to seek help at the Statewide Crisis Line at (801) 587-3000. Also, members of the community need to talk more about this issue.
Thumbs up: To three-sport athlete Cortney Porter of Bonneville High. Porter plays softball, volleyball and basketball in high school, and is now signed to play basketball at the U.S. Air Force Academy.
Thumbs down: To a so-called blossom burglar, who has been caught by security cameras stealing bright, colorful flowers outside James Madison Elementary School in Ogden. It’s not only illegal, it’s a very tacky thing to do.
http://go.uen.org/1dx

Don’t punish young women for being what they are Salt Lake Tribune commentary by columnist George Pyle

“The Force is strong with this one.” — Darth Vader
Wandering through the shopping area of The Gateway, which stands between The Salt Lake Tribune offices and its primary provisioner — Starbucks — one often encounters, on a summer afternoon, many attractive young women nonchalantly dressed in shorts up to there and tops down to almost there.
A wise old companion, torn between remaining politely aloof and feeling it would be rude not to notice the wonder of nature that had just passed before him, would softly remark, “They’re cute at that age.”
Indeed.
Except, perhaps, at Wasatch High School.
There, helping to fulfil the annual quota of Stupid Administrator Tricks that often multiply around graduation time, somebody in authority ordered some of the yearbook photos of that school’s young women to be altered.
Through the wonders of digital photography, sleeveless dresses grew sleeves. Relatively low-cut tops got higher. Tattoos were obliterated.
http://go.uen.org/1dc

Modesty no excuse for altering yearbook photos
(Ogden) Standard-Examiner commentary by columnist MARK SAAL

Smile and say “Cheesy.”
Administrators at a high school in Heber City have been taking heat for digitally altering the photographs of some of their female students.
Last week, several students at Wasatch High School complained to the media after opening their yearbooks and finding that they weren’t wearing what they thought they’d worn on school picture day. Apparently, someone involved with the yearbook digitally altered a few of the students’ portraits, adding computer-generated sleeves to cover bare shoulders, as well as higher necklines to cover … well, I suppose the lower parts of necks. And in at least one case, a student’s tattoo — ironically reading “I am enough the way I am” — was digitally removed.
All this, done in the name of “modesty.”
http://go.uen.org/1dv

About Utah: He’s leaving them wanting more; Paul Watson leaving remarkable teaching career Deseret News commentary by columnist Lee Benson

SALT LAKE CITY — With the kind of timing only a true virtuoso might fully appreciate, Paul Watson is exiting stage left this week.
When he closes the door to the music room at Wasatch Junior High School this Thursday afternoon, that will be it for a 30-year performance. Done. Over. C’est fini.
Paul doesn’t look much like a retiree. He’s only 55, and there’s hardly an ounce of fat on him because of all the bicycling he does.
But he’s qualified for his pension and he long ago paid back Utah State University the year he owed them for the education scholarship they once gave him, so he’s decided to go out, as he puts it, “When I’m at the top of my game, so to speak.”
http://go.uen.org/1dk

Partnership Provides Hands-On Experience for Tomorrow’s Innovators Utah Policy commentary by Elenor Heyborne of USTAR

To ensure that Utah leads the life science and engineering business sectors, those who enter the workforce must be appropriately trained and educated well beyond the classroom.
BioInnovations Gateway (BiG), a life science incubator supported by the Utah Science Technology and Research initiative (USTAR) and the Granite Technical Institute, is leading the way for the next generation of scientists and engineers by providing resources and access to life science companies. The ultimate goal for the collaboration between Granite School District and BiG is to partner curious students with entrepreneurs and innovators.
Recently, students from Cyprus High School teamed up with two companies, nView and Stat Slate, that are utilizing BiG’s incubation space or consulting services to develop product prototypes. nView is developing a portable CT scanner, while Stat Slate is developing a disposable clip-on card to be used by emergency medical personnel to record triage data in an emergency event.
http://go.uen.org/1d4

Ivory a man of integrity, and that’s why we chose him Salt Lake Tribune op-ed by Demar Dahl, Elko County commissioner, Doug Heaton, Kane County commissioner, and Grant Gerber, Elko County commissioner

Apparently, with management difficulties at the Salt Lake Tribune, their capacity to verify basic facts appears to have been diminished. Paul Rolly’s May 24, article titled “Lawmaker’s constitutional causes earn him money” is a prime example.
As the founders of the American Lands Council (ALC), we’d like to set the record straight about how and why ALC is leading the charge to transfer control of federally mismanaged public lands to the states under the leadership of Rep. Ken Ivory who serves tirelessly as the president of ALC.
Local, state and national organizations, including Jordan School District and the National Association of Counties, to name just a few, have passed resolutions supporting the transfer of public lands. We invite people of goodwill everywhere to investigate the facts about this issue at www.AmericanLandsCouncil.org which presents the only solution big enough to fund education, better care for the environment, protect public access, and grow the economy locally and nationally.
http://go.uen.org/1d5

Utah’s war with America for public land
(Ogden) Standard-Examiner op-ed by Jack Allen, a member of the Weber County Coffee Party

The civil war between Utah and the United States of America has reached a new dimension. They don’t say it’s a war against America, but only against the federal establishment that governs America. The latest manifestation of the war is a number of recent events that, when taken together, are being used to further justify the demand that the federal government turn over its public lands to the state lands owned by all Americans to what will actually be a select few.
No one should be misled by the use of any other term other than “select few.” Virtually all members of the Republican-controlled Legislature, promoters of the mining and drilling industry, commercial real estate developers, and rural communities that want the land for their own local use, have all argued for an agenda that will result in precisely that control by a “select few.”
http://go.uen.org/1dy

Technology in education
Deseret News letter from Kristin Hadley

House Speaker Lockhart said “too many new teacher graduate from Utah’s colleges and universities with an education degree, but little to no understanding of how to effectively implement technology in the classroom.” She also said, “They have no idea how to use technology to enhance the learning process.” She describes the situation as “horrific.”
A quick perusal of the websites and course requirements for elementary and secondary education majors at Utah State, Weber State, University of Utah and Utah Valley University indicated that all students must take an educational technology course to graduate and obtain a teaching license.
http://go.uen.org/1dr

If we’re calling the fashion police …
Salt Lake Tribune letter from Debra Sjoblom

Regarding “Edited yearbook photos draw student complaints” (May 29), I believe whoever is responsible for editing the pictures of these lovely young women should bear the financial burden to have the yearbooks reprinted.
Do shoulders or a neck suggest anything whatsoever that is inappropriate? Our first lady is often seen with bare, beautiful arms; is she inappropriate?
http://go.uen.org/1de

Yearbook flap is not unique to Utah
Salt Lake Tribune letter from Christopher Stout

Not surprising at all, but it seems as though that Utahns keep getting confused about what appears to be Wasatch High School’s misogynist administration and Utah’s crazy, mixed up, religious politics. If it’s happening here in Utah, it’s probably happening somewhere else, regardless of religious affiliation.
http://go.uen.org/1df

Live theaters could do more for hearing-impaired Salt Lake Tribune letter from Joan Proctor

The Tribune had an article May 28 concerning the installation of TeleCoil in the Tower Theater. The Broadway has also added a hearing assist which can be worn by those with hearing aids and has the TeleCoil feature. Century 16 movie theater has had individual closed-captioning devices available at the box office for some time, which can be easily read while watching a film.
These steps show an awareness and a concern for an almost unnoticed disability. But unfortunately there are no live theater venues that I am aware of which offer anything more that a clumsy and inefficient hearing assist.
http://go.uen.org/1dg

Learn empathy
Deseret News letter from Jared Buhanan-Decker

As a school counselor at a middle school, I find many skills can be useful to adolescents. The most important thing I try to teach my students is empathy.
http://go.uen.org/1ds

High School Makes Girls’ Yearbook Photos Less Sexy Satire from The Onion

Wasatch High School in Utah is facing criticism after several female students discovered the yearbook staff had altered their photos by digitally adding sleeves and higher necklines, changes officials said were made to comply with the school’s dress code. What do you think?
http://go.uen.org/1dh

How to Get Girls Into Coding
New York Times op-ed by NITASHA TIKU, co-editor of Valleywag

WHEN I was 7 years old, I knew the capitals of most major countries and their currencies. I had to, if I wanted to track down a devious criminal mastermind in the computer game “Where in the World Is Carmen Sandiego?” On screen, the ACME Detective Agency would spit out clues like notable landmarks to help players identify the city where Carmen’s globe-trotting henchmen were hiding out. I wouldn’t learn how to pronounce Reykjavik for more than a decade, but I could tell you that its currency was called the krona.
I was the child of Indian immigrants, and like any begrudging Bengal tiger cub, I penciled in fill-in-the-blank maps and memorized multiplication tables after dinner. I was much more motivated to learn about geography by chasing Carmen Sandiego on the family Macintosh Plus. I couldn’t confidently point to Iceland on a map. But I did become a technology reporter.
A huge nationwide push is underway, funded by the nonprofit Code.org’s corporate and billionaire donors, from Amazon and Google to Bill Gates and Mark Zuckerberg, to introduce American schoolchildren to coding and to redefine it as a basic skill to be learned alongside the three R’s. Code.org’s curriculum has been adopted by 20,000 teachers from kindergarten to 12th grade.
But if coding is the new lingua franca, literacy rates for girls are dropping: Last year, girls made up 18.5 percent of A.P. computer science test-takers nationwide, a slight decrease from the year before.
http://go.uen.org/1d2

How charters and rivals may get together Washington Post commentary by columnist Jay Mathews

Elliott Witney, a brilliant reading teacher, was one of the six people who launched KIPP, now the nation’s largest charter school network, in a Chicago hotel conference room 14 years ago. He eventually became principal of KIPP’s flagship school in Houston. So, why has this hero of the charter movement taken an administrator job in a traditional Houston area district full of bureaucratic annoyances charters were created to eliminate?
That is one of the many surprising questions asked and answered in Richard Whitmire’s intriguing new book, “On the Rocketship: How Top Charter Schools Are Pushing the Envelope.” It is the best account yet of what is happening with charters. Both those who hate the independent public schools and those who love them should read it.
Whitmire does not hide charter struggles and mistakes. The Rocketship charter network at the center of his story soars, then sputters, then twists and turns. Whitmire is as sympathetic to the parents and educators opposed to Rocketship as he is to the entrepreneurs and educators who created the network.
http://go.uen.org/1dJ

The education-reform movement is too white to do any good Washington Post op-ed by Andre Perry, founding dean of urban education at Davenport University in Grand Rapids, Mich.

At this point, it seems like everyone agrees what “education reformer” means. The phrase conjures Teach for America: messianic, white Ivy Leaguers wearing thick-rimmed glasses and speaking in questions, or the Maggie Gyllenhaal vehicle “Won’t Back Down.” For some, the hallowed education reformer battles the forces that are reluctant to change — which, in too many minds, looks like black and brown families under the hallucinogenic spell of labor unions, unwittingly fighting against their own interests.
This is ludicrous. There’s not quite yet an internecine war within the current crusade, but black education reformers are beginning to revolt. A group of us convened on the 60th anniversary of Brown v. Board of Education this month to identify the most pressing challenges in the reform movement — and to reclaim the brand and identity of “reformer.”
Let’s stipulate that, yes, change is badly needed. Call it “reform” if you like: Charter schools, curriculum changes (Common Core), testing, and accountability are not inherently bad things. They can bring justice.
But let’s also stipulate that overwhelmingly white movements pursuing change for black and brown communities are inherently paternalistic.
http://go.uen.org/1dN

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NATIONAL NEWS
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OMB: Child migrants to cost U.S. $2.3 billion Politico

New White House estimates show that the projected costs of caring for and resettling child migrants from Central America could reach $2.28 billion next year — well over double what the administration asked for in its 2015 budget just months ago.
The numbers were sent to Congress on Friday in a letter from the Office of Management and Budget to the leadership of the House and Senate appropriations committees.
The $2.28 billion number compares with the $868 million requested by the administration in its budget submitted in March. That translates to a $1.4 billion, or 163 percent, increase, the scale of which confirms — even exceeds — internal estimates reported last week by POLITICO.
Moreover, OMB adds a warning in its letter that U.S. border and immigration agencies — which first interact with the child migrants — will also need an additional $166 million to cover their costs.
http://go.uen.org/1d6

Policy, Leadership Direction at Stake in Chiefs’ Contests Education Week

Along with a crowded slate of gubernatorial and legislative elections this year, several races for state schools chief could lead to big changes in K-12 leadership and serve as test cases for the durability of such contentious issues as the Common Core State Standards and school choice.
The top K-12 spot is up for grabs in Arizona, California, Georgia, Idaho, Oklahoma, South Carolina, and Wyoming, which represent seven of the 12 states that elect their superintendents, according to the National Association of State Boards of Education. Among those with elections this year, all but California, which is under Democratic control, have legislatures and governorships controlled by Republicans.
Four of the states—Georgia, Idaho, South Carolina, and Wyoming—feature races in which the current office-holder isn’t seeking re-election.
http://go.uen.org/1dL

529 College-Savings Plans Show Continued Asset Growth and Sustained Investor Preference for Diversified Investments, According to Morningstar Research Morningstar

CHICAGO—Morningstar Inc., a leading provider of independent investment research, today published its annual study of U.S. 529 college-savings plans. The report evaluated 84 U.S. plans, which had nearly $200 billion in total assets under management as of Dec. 31, 2013, a 20 percent increase over Dec. 31, 2012.
http://go.uen.org/1d7

Immigrant parents less likely to read to their children: study Reuters

NEW YORK – Minority children often lag behind their peers in language development when they start preschool. According to a new study, some of that disparity in school readiness may be due to differences in the frequency of “book sharing” among families.
The study found that parents in Hispanic or Asian immigrant families in California were less likely to read or look at picture books with their young children than non-Hispanic white parents.
“I think there’s enough research that reading to children early on prepares them better for school,” senior author Dr. Fernando Mendoza told Reuters Health. “Early reading enlarges vocabulary and becomes a tool for many other kinds of learning later on in school.”
http://go.uen.org/1dK

Bill To Allow Armed Missouri Teachers Draws Praise, Potshots (St. Louis) KWMU

A bill sitting on Gov. Jay Nixon’s desk that would authorize Missouri school personnel to carry guns has at least one teachers group up in arms.
The sponsor of the provision says it’s designed to help protect schools in areas where police response to a shooting may take too long to be effective.
Nixon, who came out strongly against guns in the classroom after the shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Connecticut in 2012, isn’t saying what he’ll do with the legislation that awaits his action. It contains numerous provisions affecting the state’s concealed-carry law.
But there is no shortage of opinion on both sides.
http://go.uen.org/1dM

Inside colleges’ pursuit of a future star The Courting of Marvin Clark Chronicle of Higher Education

MARVIN CLARK JR. was sold. Fresh off a recruiting visit to the University of Oregon two years ago, he was convinced he wanted to play there.
He loved the Ducks’ fast-paced offense, the team needed a player at his position, and one of his youth coaches had played for an Oregon assistant. That was the type of edge that could help in a battle for playing time.
The campus wowed him. Everywhere he looked, he saw the Nike swoosh. The company’s co-founder, a big Oregon donor, had helped finance some of the nicest facilities in the country. For a kid who had spent time in homeless shelters, it seemed like nirvana.
A year ago, Mr. Clark made it official, committing to the Pac-12 program over more than a dozen other suitors. Around the same time, he had surgery to repair a fractured foot, forcing him to miss several months on the court.
He was prepared to graduate from high school last year, but Oregon’s coaches had encouraged him to spend a year at a prep school. The week he returned to the court, two Oregon coaches visited him there. It was his first game back, and it showed. After the game, he says, the coaches started to walk out of the gym without offering a word.
That night Mr. Clark hardly slept, fearing that he had lost his scholarship. The next day he called one of his coaches, who had been in touch with Oregon. Mr. Clark’s instincts were right—Oregon had moved on.
Mr. Clark, who had turned down offers from Arkansas, Iowa, and other universities, now had only a few months to prove himself to recruiters. Would any of the spurned suitors still want to take a chance on that foot?
http://go.uen.org/1d9

A litany of ‘thou shalt nots’: Catholic teachers challenge morality clause CNN

If you want to teach at a Catholic school in the Archdiocese of Cincinnati, regardless of your religion, you must be willing to sign a detailed morality clause that critics say focuses on “pelvic issues.”
The revised contracts forbid teachers from — among other things — living together or having sex outside of marriage, using in-vitro fertilization, a gay “lifestyle,” or publicly supporting any of those things.
The system’s 2,200 current teachers must sign the agreement to stay on the job.
“It is an embarrassment and a scandal, and will drive even more Catholics away from an institution so out of touch with its times,” said Robert Hague, a high school English teacher for 50 years.
He’s leaving his job rather than sign because he’s opposed to “the language, the intent, and the tone of this contract,” he says.
The revised morality clause goes beyond more general standard language requiring teachers — Catholic or not — to adhere to Catholic doctrine.
First, the 2014-15 contract adds the title “ministers” to all teachers — from geography to gym class — a move seen as a legal maneuver to try to protect the archdiocese from discrimination lawsuits.
http://go.uen.org/1da

Evolution of education: Middle schools in Israel to begin teaching Darwin’s theory Jerusalem Post

The Israeli education system has joined the majority of the Western world in introducing the theory of evolution to middle-school pupils beginning in the next academic year, it was announced on Sunday.
The professional committee in the Education Ministry made the decision to introduce the theory of evolution to seventh grade through ninth grade pupils across the education system – in secular stateschools, state-religious schools and Arab schools.
“For years, since the 1980s, evolution was only touched upon in some middle schools, depending on if the teacher felt comfortable tackling such a heavy subject,” committee chairwoman Prof. Nava Ben-Zvi told The Jerusalem Post on Sunday.
To date, the Education Ministry has not officially incorporated Darwin’s theory in its middle-school sciences curriculum; only high school students pursuing a matriculation certificate in biology, a small fraction of the student population, were exposed to the subject.
The decision would introduce the theory of evolution to pupils as part of the general science and technology curriculum and not as an “anchor subject,” but rather through the study of ecology.
http://go.uen.org/1d8

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CALENDAR
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USOE Calendar
http://tinyurl.com/5x9oh9

UEN News

http://www.uen.org

June 3:
Commission on Federalism meeting
9 a.m., 415 State Capitol
http://le.utah.gov/Interim/2014/html/00003285.htm

June 5:
Utah State Board of Education meeting
4 p.m., 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

Utah State Board of Education Superintendent Search Committee meeting
8 p.m., 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

June 6:
Utah State Board of Education meeting
7:30 a.m., 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

June 17:
Executive Appropriations Committee meeting
1 p.m., 445 State Capitol
http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2014&Com=APPEXE

June 18:
Education Interim Committee meeting
2 p.m., 30 House Building
http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2014&Com=INTEDU

July 10:
Utah State Charter School Board meeting
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://goo.gl/IaQntl

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