Education News Roundup: June 4, 2014

Summer Food Service ProgramEducation News Roundup

Today’s Top Picks:

 

Committee sends its Utah State Board of Education picks to Gov. Herbert who will have to pick two per race for November’s ballot. All incumbents made it to the Governor for consideration.

http://go.uen.org/1et (SLT)

and http://go.uen.org/1ev (DN)

and http://go.uen.org/1eS (Utah PoliticoHub)

 

Summer food program gets underway.

http://go.uen.org/1eW (KTVX)

 

We’re still not in the post-Wasatch High yearbook era, but ENR has high hopes for it happening soon.

http://go.uen.org/1eP (OSE)

and http://go.uen.org/1eQ (PDH)

and http://go.uen.org/1eV (KUTV)

and http://go.uen.org/1eY (KSL)

and http://go.uen.org/1eZ (KSTU)

and http://go.uen.org/1f4 (MUR)

 

More children are crossing the border without parents.

http://go.uen.org/1ey (NYT)

or a copy of the report

http://go.uen.org/1ez (U.S. Customs and Border Protection)

 

 

 

 

 

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TODAY’S HEADLINES

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UTAH

 

Amid criticism, committee narrows Utah state school board field Education » Candidates move to the governor, who will choose two candidates for each seat to appear on the ballot.

 

Utah’s takeover of federal lands — lawsuit not in near future

 

New summer food program to help feed Utah kids

 

Utah Education Official bats for Technology in Schools

 

Autism in Utah

 

Fremont Elementary School students release trout

 

Cedar school receives grant for guest artist

 

Trial set for former Davis High teacher facing sex abuse charges

 

Inside The Story: Student & Sudan Refugee Soars

 

Teen Leaves Polygamist Town, Graduates From Brighton High

 

Students Burned By Ruptured Coolant Pipe

 

Wasatch High officials apologize for altering yearbook photos

 

Live stream: Class of 2014 graduation ceremonies — Horizonte Instruction and Training Center

 

Military academies continue to attract Judge grads

 

Utah Virtual Academy to host in-person graduation on June 5 Noted American economist, best-selling author to speak to graduates

 

North Logan Summer Reading Program kicks off

 

Magna school celebrates 50 years

 

 

 

OPINION & COMMENTARY

 

High five, Highland High, for high Latino grad rate Individual focus brings rare results.

 

In the Whirled: The end of education

 

Talk to students before acting

 

The greatest cover-up at Wasatch High

 

Segregation by Ability

 

Labor Targets Education Reformer

 

If You’re Born Poor, You’ll Probably Stay That Way

 

Are ‘Tiger Moms’ Better Than Cool Moms?

A study says high-school students can be successful with or without a lot of parental pressure.

 

 

 

NATION

 

Wave of Minors on Their Own Rush to Cross Southwest Border

 

Behind the school lunch fight

 

What Does A Good Common Core Lesson Look Like?

 

Wyoming scientists: Reconsider science standards

 

Seth Walsh case settled for $750,000

 

Proposed constitutional amendment would change how Michigan’s state board of education is elected

 

As Banks Open In Schools, A Chance For Students To Learn To Save

 

 

 

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UTAH NEWS

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Amid criticism, committee narrows Utah state school board field Education » Candidates move to the governor, who will choose two candidates for each seat to appear on the ballot.

 

Amid continuing criticism that it lacks diversity and doesn’t represent the public, a governor-appointed committee tasked with helping select state school board members wrapped up its work Tuesday.

The 12-member committee selected a total of 21 candidates for six seats to move forward in the process, including all four interested incumbents, after interviewing dozens of contenders. It will now be up to the governor to choose two candidates for each seat to appear on the ballot.

Though many were pleased to see the incumbents move forward — something that hasn’t always been the case in past years — several current school board members expressed their continued displeasure with the process itself.

http://go.uen.org/1et (SLT)

 

http://go.uen.org/1ev (DN)

 

http://go.uen.org/1eS (Utah PoliticoHub)

 

 

 

Utah’s takeover of federal lands — lawsuit not in near future

 

The Dec. 31 deadline Utah set for the federal government to turn over millions of acres of public lands to the state will come and go with no transfer of ownership, no solid plan of action — and no lawsuit.

Assistant Utah Attorney General Tony Rampton on Tuesday told the state’s Commission on Federalism that it would be unwise to press forward with litigation, or even to push a specific proposal because there are too many unanswered questions and lots of fact-finding and coalition-building to be done.

Even Rep. Ken Ivory, R-West Jordan, the main force behind Utah’s Transfer of Public Lands Act (HB148), acknowledged that the Dec. 31 deadline was more a goal than a line in the sand.

http://go.uen.org/1er (SLT)

 

 

 

 

New summer food program to help feed Utah kids

 

SALT LAKE CITY, Utah –  Thousands of Utah school kids out on summer break will now have a mealto eat thanks to the Utah Food Bank and the U.S. Department of Agriculture. From June 2nd to August 15th, 49,000 meals will be served at various sites throughout the summer months.

The summer program is an extension to the Utah Food Banks Kids Café and with all the summer food programs already available this is one more to help prevent Utah kids from going hungry.

According to the Utah Food Bank 1 in 5 kids in the state of Utah will go without a meal each day, but with help from the Utah Food Bank and the Utah Department of Agriculture’s new summer food program that could change.

http://go.uen.org/1eW (KTVX)

 

 

 

 

Utah Education Official bats for Technology in Schools

 

Observing the absence of digital devices in preschool classrooms, a U.S. Department of Education deputy secretary on Tuesday said that the students can have immense benefit of digital technology and absence of such equipments from the schools is a concerning issue in Salt Lake City.

Libby Doggett, Head of early-childhood education office in Obama administration, visited the Granite School District’s innovative preschool program. Following the day-long visit, Doggett spoke about the gloomy condition of the schools at an event sponsored by the Waterford Institute.

http://go.uen.org/1fd (Utah People’s Post)

 

 

 

Autism in Utah

 

One in 54 Utah children have Autism Spectrum Disorder, and that’s higher than nearly everywhere else in the US. So the obvious question is why? Researchers have yet to identify a cause, so we can’t find easy answers in our environment or in our genetics. But Utah has been ahead of the curve on research, and it has a vibrant activist community with support from educators and lawmakers.

http://go.uen.org/1f3 (KUER Radio West)

 

 

 

 

Fremont Elementary School students release trout

 

Suzzette Wilson’s fifth grade class sits at the edge of the city’s Urban Fish Hatchery pond surrounded by city officials.  The day has finally come to release a homegrown batch of trout into the world.

Last September, Fremont Elementary School in Sandy started a program in conjunction with the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources. The YMCA Trout Unlimited program teaches kids the biology of aquatic life through a hands on approach.  The children have been feeding the fish and watching them grow since they first hatched from eggs.

http://go.uen.org/1fg (Universe)

 

 

 

Cedar school receives grant for guest artist

 

CEDAR CITY – Cedar Middle School art students have a special treat awaiting them next spring when Donna Pence, a Salt Lake City artist and teacher known for her work in stained glass and mosaics, comes to the school to work on art projects with them.

Pence’s visit to CMS is being funded by a grant in the amount of $2,856 from the Utah Division of Arts and Museums.

http://go.uen.org/1fb (SGS)

 

 

 

Trial set for former Davis High teacher facing sex abuse charges

 

BOUNTIFUL — A trial date was set Tuesday for a former Davis High School teacher accused of having a sexual relationship with a student after a judge denied her request to dismiss the charges Tuesday.

Brianne Land Altice, 34, was ordered to stand trial on three counts of rape and one count of forcible sodomy, first-degree felonies, following a hearing on the evidence against her in February. The former Davis High School teacher is accused of engaging in sexual intercourse with a student between March and June 2013, when the teenager was between 16 and 17 years old.

http://go.uen.org/1eJ (DN)

 

http://go.uen.org/1eO (OSE)

 

http://go.uen.org/1e4 (KUTV)

 

http://go.uen.org/1eX (KSL)

 

http://go.uen.org/1fh (HuffPo)

 

http://go.uen.org/1ff (New York Daily News)

 

http://go.uen.org/1fe ([London] Daily Mail)

 

 

 

 

Students Burned By Ruptured Coolant Pipe

 

Two elementary school students suffered burns on their bus ride home Tuesday afternoon.

The kids were picked up from Emerson Elementary and were on their way home. A coolant pipe ruptured, causing fluid to leak inside the back of the bus.

Two students were burned on their legs and feet.

http://go.uen.org/1eU (KUTV)

 

 

 

Wasatch High officials apologize for altering yearbook photos

 

HEBER CITY — Some Utah high school students who cracked their yearbooks to find sleeves digitally added to their tank tops and a tattoo erased say school officials have apologized to them.

Wasatch High School administrators in recent days offered at least one student the chance to return her yearbook and get back her $50.

But sophomore Shelby Baum opted to keep the memento.

http://go.uen.org/1eP (OSE)

 

http://go.uen.org/1eQ (PDH)

 

http://go.uen.org/1eV (KUTV)

 

http://go.uen.org/1eY (KSL)

 

http://go.uen.org/1eZ (KSTU)

 

http://go.uen.org/1f4 (MUR)

 

 

 

 

Inside The Story: Student & Sudan Refugee Soars

 

A West Jordan High teen and Sudan refugee who hasnat seen his family in eight years graduates Wednesday winning the Jaguar award.

Kuku, 18, hails from the war-torn African country of Sudan. Growing up, he would walk three hours just to get to school in Kenya. He arrived in Utah two years ago.

http://go.uen.org/1fc (KUTV)

 

 

 

Teen Leaves Polygamist Town, Graduates From Brighton High

 

Three years after he fled the polygamist town of Colorado City on the other side of the Arizona border, Carl Holm, 18, received his high school diploma from Brighton High School. “I never dreamed I’d be here,” he said afterward.  The teen had his cousins in the audience cheering him on.  His parents and seven siblings were hundreds of miles away in Colorado City unable to make the trip.

Holm had only a third grade education when he arrived at Brighton High as a sophomore.  In his junior year, he met teacher and mentor Stephanie Isley who says Carl was far behind his peers – even a year after he arrived at Brighton.  Carl knew he had a lot of catching up to do.  “He had goals. He was going to learn and be the best that he could be,” she said.  Isley said Holm stayed after school every day for the last two years.  His efforts paid off.  Holm not only got his high school diploma, but a college scholarship.  “I think he is going to have a wonderful future, be an amazing man,” she said.

http://go.uen.org/1eT (KUTV)

 

 

 

Live stream: Class of 2014 graduation ceremonies — Horizonte Instruction and Training Center

 

The Deseret News is providing live streams from the class of 2014 graduation ceremonies for several high schools in Utah.

http://go.uen.org/1eM (DN)

 

 

 

 

Military academies continue to attract Judge grads

 

SALT LAKE CITY — Since 2000, 11 Judge Memorial Catholic High School graduates have accepted appointments to the nation’s military academies.

This year, Kendrick Nafus will join that list, having accepted an appointment to the United States Naval Academy in Annapolis.

http://go.uen.org/1fa (IC)

 

 

 

Utah Virtual Academy to host in-person graduation on June 5 Noted American economist, best-selling author to speak to graduates

 

SALT LAKE CITY — About 80 high school seniors who learned online will turn the tassel on June 5 at an in-person graduation ceremony in Salt Lake City for Utah Virtual Academy, a public online school serving students in grades K–12.

http://go.uen.org/1f9 (PR Newswire)

 

 

 

North Logan Summer Reading Program kicks off

 

NORTH LOGAN — The North Logan Summer Reading Program started out with a bang as members of the community came to the city’s library Tuesday to enjoy carnival rides, food and fun. The kick-off was the first of many activities at the library that will take place over the summer geared toward families.

http://go.uen.org/1eR (LHJ)

 

 

 

 

Magna school celebrates 50 years

 

MAGNA, Utah — Lake Ridge Elementary School held an open house Monday in celebration of its 50 year anniversary.

http://go.uen.org/1f0 (KSTU)

 

 

 

 

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OPINION & COMMENTARY

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High five, Highland High, for high Latino grad rate Individual focus brings rare results.

Salt Lake Tribune editorial

 

A big graduation cheer is in order for Latino seniors at Highland High School and the educators who helped them.

The Salt Lake City school reports that 84 percent of Latino seniors will graduate this week. (Latinos are roughly a quarter of the whole class.) Not only is that well above the statewide average of 68 percent for Latino students, but it’s also above the 82 percent rate for white students at Highland. That just doesn’t happen very often in this state or in the nation.

Principal Paul Schulte has invested in a targeted approach that finds and helps drifting students. “I don’t necessarily always buy into that I have to have a special focus on the Latino kids or the Polynesian kids,” Schulte said. “I’ve always kind of run the school [thinking] if you just do the right thing for kids, for the school, it takes care of everybody.”

And taking care of everybody means riding their butts, especially in the early high school years.

http://go.uen.org/1es

 

 

 

 

In the Whirled: The end of education

Deseret News commentary by Tiffany Gee Lewis, the mother of four boys

 

This week, our beloved little elementary school closed down.

Because of financial struggles, the school that has single-handedly saved the learning of my three oldest boys had to shutter its doors.

This isn’t the first time we’ve had to upend our school plans, and I’m sure it won’t be the last. These days, you can’t have school-age children without expecting to bump up against all types of struggles.

http://go.uen.org/1eK

 

 

 

Talk to students before acting

Salt Lake Tribune letter from Heather Camille Worthington

 

I am a 17-year-old student, and I attend both Bingham High School and the Jordan Applied Technology Center. Being enrolled in the Tech Center has been a great opportunity and is helping me gain experience in the career I’ve always dreamed of having.

Decisions recently made in education boards are changing the structure of applied technology programs. Through budget cuts, superfluous regulations, and increased required pre-tests and post-tests, students’ educational experiences are being limited and impeded.

Education boards need to consider the implications of their actions, and consult with the students being affected before they rid them of the opportunity to obtain the experience the school districts expect from public education.

http://go.uen.org/1eE

 

 

 

 

The greatest cover-up at Wasatch High

Salt Lake Tribune letter from Kenneth L. Zimmerman

 

School officials at Wasatch High School have pulled off perhaps the greatest cover-up since Watergate by using Photoshop to cover up some plunging necklines among some of its female students in the school yearbook.

This was wrong for several reasons.

http://go.uen.org/1eF

 

 

 

Segregation by Ability

New York Times commentary by Halley Potter, Frederick M. Hess, Darrick Hamilton, and Bruce Sacerdote

 

New York City’s schools chancellor, Carmen Farina, who as a principal eliminated her school’s gifted classrooms, created a bit of stir recently by downplaying the importance of the city’s “gifted and talented” programs. Earlier this year, she said she would like to see neighborhood schools “provide gifted practices to all students.”

Should public schools offer these programs?

http://go.uen.org/1eA

 

 

 

 

Labor Targets Education Reformer

Wall Street Journal commentary by columnist ALLYSIA FINLEY

 

Unions have been mostly quiescent this primary season in California due to the lack of contentious ballot measures and competitive statewide races. One exception is Tuesday’s primary for State Superintendent of Public Instruction, where the California Teacher Association has spent $4 million to fend off a challenge by school-reform Democrat Marshall Tuck.

Unlike other primary contests, the putatively “non-partisan” superintendent’s race will be an open-and-shut-case if any candidate receives more than 50% of the vote. Otherwise, the top-two finishers will go to a November runoff. This significantly ratchets up the stakes of Tuesday’s primary.

Democratic incumbent Tom Torlakson has cozied up to the union by rejecting White House incentives to link teachers evaluations with student performance. Mr. Tuck, on the other hand, ranks among their top enemies. He served as president of the flourishing Green Dot charter network in Los Angeles (which is unionized) and supports eliminating seniority-based firing and tenure. Backing him are education reformers and philanthropists such as Eli Broad and Bill Bloomfield.

Republican Lydia Gutierrez is also running, though she lacks financing and a coherent ideology. To wit, she supports tenure but opposes Common Core. Hence, teachers unions and Mr. Torlakson have spent most of their ammunition shooting down Mr. Tuck.

http://go.uen.org/1ew

 

 

 

 

If You’re Born Poor, You’ll Probably Stay That Way Mother Jones commentary by columnist Stephanie Mencimer

 

In 1997, before The Wire made him a household name, then-Baltimore Sun reporter David Simon published The Corner: A Year in the Life of an Inner-City Neighborhood, a book about an open-air drug market at West Fayette and Monroe Streets in Baltimore. The book painted a grim portrait of the urban ghetto and the people trapped there. It was hailed as a landmark work of immersion journalism.

But Simon can’t hold a candle to Karl Alexander, a Johns Hopkins sociologist who followed nearly 800 people from the neighborhoods surrounding Simon’s corner since they started first grade in 1982. Alexander and his Hopkins colleagues are now publishing the final results of that 30-year study, their own version of The Corner, called The Long Shadow: Family Background, Disadvantaged Urban Youth And the Transition to Adulthood. What they’ve found isn’t quite as grim as what Simon described, but it’s not much more encouraging.

Alexander set out to look at how family influences the trajectory of a low-income child’s life. Thirty years later, he’s decided that family determines almost everything, and that a child’s fate is essentially fixed by how well off her parents were when she was born.

Alexander’s findings conflict with the sort of Horatio Alger stories of American mythology, but not with other social science research on upward mobility. His are especially dispiriting. Of the nearly 800 school kids he’s been following for 30 years, those who got a better start—because their parents were working or married—tended to stay better off, while the more disadvantaged stayed poor.

http://go.uen.org/1eB

 

http://go.uen.org/1eC (Johns Hopkins)

 

 

 

 

Are ‘Tiger Moms’ Better Than Cool Moms?

A study says high-school students can be successful with or without a lot of parental pressure.

Atlantic commentary by columnist JULIA RYAN

 

Social science has weighed in on the “tiger mom” debate, and it looks like everyone is right: Both overprotective and laid-back mothers can raise successful children.

Three years after Yale law professor Amy Chua’s controversial article, “Why Chinese Mothers Are Superior,” in the Wall Street Journal, Stanford researchers Alyssa Fu and Hazel Markus have published a study examining the effectiveness of the strict, high-pressure parenting Chua advocates and the more permissive style common in European-American culture.

They found both parenting styles can be effective; the key is in how the child views his or her relationship with the mother. In Asian-American culture, children are often expected to rely on their families, but European-American families tend to value and encourage independence. Parental pressure provokes different reactions in each culture: Asian-American students said they felt like parent involvement in their lives is a form of support, while European-American children resented the pressure to perform.

http://go.uen.org/1f7

 

A copy of the study

http://go.uen.org/1f8 (Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin)

 

 

 

 

 

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NATIONAL NEWS

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Wave of Minors on Their Own Rush to Cross Southwest Border New York Times

 

SAN PEDRO SULA, Honduras — After a decade apart, 13-year-old Robin Tulio was finally heading to the border to be with his mother. A maid, living illegally in Baltimore, she had decided the time was right to smuggle her son into the United States.

Like so many others across Central America, Robin said his mother believed that the Obama administration had quietly changed its policy regarding unaccompanied minors and that if he made it across, he would have a better shot at staying.

She hired a smuggler, but Robin didn’t make it.

“It’s too hard,” he said after being caught in Mexico recently and sent home to Honduras. But his aborted journey helps explain why there has been a rush of migration of unaccompanied minors so severe that the United Nations declared it a humanitarian crisis akin to refugees’ fleeing war.

Since Oct. 1, a record 47,017 unaccompanied children have been apprehended at the southwest United States border, most traveling from Central America, part of a larger wave that includes some youngsters accompanied by their parents and some traveling alone.

Many say they are going because they believe that the United States treats migrant children traveling alone and women with their children more leniently than adult illegal immigrants with no children.

The Obama administration says the primary cause of the influx of children is rising crime and ailing economies in Central America, not policy changes in the United States.

http://go.uen.org/1ey

 

A copy of the report

http://go.uen.org/1ez (U.S. Customs and Border Protection)

 

 

 

 

Behind the school lunch fight

Politico

 

First lady Michelle Obama and school lunch ladies used to be on the same team, but now they’re locked in a political war against each other.

For the first three years of Obama’s Let’s Move! campaign, the School Nutrition Association, a powerful group that represents 55,000 cafeteria professionals, was a close ally in the White House push to get kids to eat healthier.

The group helped lobby for the legislation at the center of the debate: the 2010 Healthy Hunger-Free Kids Act, a law championed by the first lady that mandates more fruits and vegetables, whole grains and less sodium in exchange for more federal funding on meals.

Fast-forward to today: SNA is standing shoulder to shoulder with House Republicans, pushing to grant schools waivers from the requirements if they are losing money and aiming to relax the standards when the law is reauthorized next year.

“The current direction is very isolationist,” said Kevin Concannon, the Agriculture Department’s undersecretary for food and nutrition, in an interview. “It’s inexplicable and very unfortunate. Somehow their leadership decided that they’re just going to swing for the fences.”

The story behind the school lunch flip-flop is a complicated web of lobbying change-ups, industry influence and partisan posturing inside the Beltway. It also casts a spotlight on how difficult it is to make the economics of school meals work — and just how much resistance there can be to Washington directing nationwide change.

http://go.uen.org/1eI

 

 

 

 

What Does A Good Common Core Lesson Look Like?

NPR

 

As we’re detailing this week, teachers and school leaders have a lot of work to do to adopt curricula aligned with the new Common Core State Standards.

In the Internet era, the best resources should be able to easily leap political boundaries and get into the hands of teachers across the country. But reading and digesting the standards and determining what lessons best fulfill them is a big, big job. And as a result, the media discussion of the Common Core — and thus its political chances — has been influenced by a few pieces of math homework that weren’t, frankly, particularly high quality, or necessarily well-aligned.

Some folks are taking it upon themselves to independently review and rate individual high-quality Core-aligned lessons and make them easier to find. The experts we talked to pointed in particular to three such efforts: a project called EQUIP (Educators Evaluating Quality Instructional Products), that’s an initiative of Achieve, a nonprofit involved in writing the standards; EngageNY, run by the New York State Department of Education; and the instructional materials review from Louisiana’s Department of Education.

Each of these efforts is on the small side — EQUIP features just 22 exemplar units or lessons, all open-licensed and free to use — and it doesn’t have the marketing muscle of the curricula designed by the big textbook companies. But what it does have is the informed opinions of teachers and former teachers.

“The bottom line is that there is not a ton out there that is truly aligned, rigorous and high quality,” said Kate Gerson, who works with EngageNY as a research fellow and is a former classroom teacher. “So you have to be very, very careful about what you use.”

http://go.uen.org/1f1

 

 

 

 

Wyoming scientists: Reconsider science standards Casper (WY) Star-Tribune

 

A group of Wyoming educators has asked state education leaders to rethink their stance on a controversial set of science standards.

The 36-page paper, which was sent to the state Board of Education last week, is titled, “Why the Critics of the Next Generation Science Standards are Wrong.” It is signed by 46 current and former science and math educators at the University of Wyoming.

The professors say the state board is working under difficult constraints, having been prohibited by a last-minute budget footnote from adopting the Next Generation standards, a set of K-12 benchmarks developed by 26 states and several national science education agencies. Ten states have so far adopted the standards.

http://go.uen.org/1f6

 

 

 

Seth Walsh case settled for $750,000

Bakersfield Californian

 

The mother of a gay 13-year-old Tehachapi student who hung himself in 2010 after being bullied at school has accepted a settlement with the Tehachapi Unified School District for $750,000.

Wendy Walsh, whose son Seth died after two years of bullying at Jacobsen Middle School, had initially sought more than $6 million.

The settlement was reached in March before a scheduled pretrial hearing on April 7.

http://go.uen.org/1f5

 

 

 

Proposed constitutional amendment would change how Michigan’s state board of education is elected MLive

 

LANSING — A big shake-up could be in store for the Michigan State Board of Education if a proposed constitutional amendment makes it to the ballot.

Rep. Ed McBroom (R-Vulcan) is sponsoring a joint resolution in the Michigan House to amend the state constitution to change how the board is elected.

Currently, board members are elected by a statewide vote, but McBroom’s proposed amendment would instead establish eight districts, one for each seat on the board.

http://go.uen.org/1eD

 

 

 

 

As Banks Open In Schools, A Chance For Students To Learn To Save NPR Morning Edition

 

Wearing a red Union Bank polo shirt, high school senior Jerry Liu politely helps a peer with a bank deposit. With a waiting area and even a decorative plant on the table, this could be any bank branch — but right outside this island of adulthood are the hallways of Lincoln High School in Los Angeles.

This is one of three student-run Union Bank branches in California. They’re all located in low-income, immigrant-heavy neighborhoods. You can only bank here if you’re a student, teacher or parent, but these are real accounts handling real money.

Liu is one of 12 student bankers at Lincoln High School.

“It taught me a lot of new things,” Liu says. “I was really worried about finances [before] I go off to college, and it opened my eyes to a lot of the new world.”

http://go.uen.org/1f2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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CALENDAR

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USOE Calendar

http://tinyurl.com/5x9oh9

 

 

UEN News

http://www.uen.org

 

 

June 5:

Utah State Board of Education meeting

4 p.m., 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

 

Utah State Board of Education Superintendent Search Committee meeting

8 p.m., 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

 

 

June 6:

Utah State Board of Education meeting

7:30 a.m., 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

 

 

June 17:

Executive Appropriations Committee meeting

1 p.m., 445 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2014&Com=APPEXE

 

 

June 18:

Education Interim Committee meeting

2 p.m., 30 House Building

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2014&Com=INTEDU

 

 

July 10:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://goo.gl/IaQntl

 

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