Education News Roundup: July 1, 2014

"Summer Break" by Ohsohappytogether/CC/flickr

“Summer Break” by Ohsohappytogether/CC/flickr

Education News Roundup

Today’s Top Picks:

Rep. Bishop talks federal land and school funding in Logan.
http://go.uen.org/1qP (LHJ)

So, ENR asks, what have you done with your life? “Utah High School Grad Gets Over $2 Million In Scholarship Offers”
http://go.uen.org/1qr (KUTV)

Congrats to Logan’s Matthew Richards, runner-up in the National High School Musical Theater Awards.
http://go.uen.org/1qy (AP)

Board Member Jennifer Johnson offers ideas on how to make the Utah State Board of Education more friendly.
http://go.uen.org/1qp (Utah PoliticoHub)

New poll finds district superintendents mostly say Common Core will improve education.
http://go.uen.org/1qz (Ed Week)

or a copy of the poll
http://go.uen.org/1qA (Gallup)

Another poll finds educators nervous about all the online testing.
http://go.uen.org/1qB (Education Week)

or a copy of the survey
http://go.uen.org/1qC (Software & Information Industry Association)

LA School District: iPads … no, wait, laptops. Yeah. Laptops.
http://go.uen.org/1qk (LAT)
and http://go.uen.org/1qE (Ed Week)
and http://go.uen.org/1qM (C/NET)

Bill Gates on the hurdle to improving education: “The one thing we have a lot of in the United States is unmotivated students.”
http://go.uen.org/1qx (AP)

ENR would share more with you, but right now he’s got to go take a 15-minute free-time break to keep up his concentration levels.
http://go.uen.org/1qI (Atlantic)

————————————————————

TODAY’S HEADLINES

————————————————————

UTAH

Rep. Bishop visits Logan, talks transportation, air quality

School board member’s discrimination complaint dismissed by U.S. Department of Education

80% of Utah’s Piute County residents live in “poverty areas”

U.S. census study » In Piute County, more than 80% of residents live in such areas.

Utah High School Grad Gets Over $2 Million In Scholarship Offers

‘Glee-type’ Music Contest Crowns Winners in NYC

Critics rap using Utah questions for FCAT replacement exam

Getting to the Core of Common Core

Utah Piloting Copia Digital Learning Platform for Statewide OER Science Curriculum

Police arrest teens after chase, accused of breaking into junior high

Preschool registration now open in Logan

Red on red: The Republicans education civil war?

OPINION & COMMENTARY

How to Make the State School Board More Friendly

When the School Board must put students first

Problem not Utah

How Teachers Unions Use ‘Common Core’ to Undermine Reform Instituting new standards has opened the door for attempts to gut teacher evaluations and ‘suspend’ accountability.

Weighing Common-Core Math Complaints

How to Trick Your Kids Into Reading All Summer Long Don’t bother taking away the iPad or setting minimum page counts. Instead, find sneaky ways to leave your children alone with books—and then see what happens.

How Finland Keeps Kids Focused Through Free Play An American teacher in Helsinki questions the national practice of giving 15 minute breaks each hour—until he sees the difference it makes in his classroom.

NATION

Changing from Common Core would cost $25.2 million over five years, superintendent says

Common Core Will Improve Education, Most District Chiefs Say

Survey Reveals Worries About Schools’ Readiness for Online Testing

U.S. employers face difficulty finding STEM workers: study

Waiverless Washington State Wants Out of Key NCLB Requirement

LAUSD shifts gears on technology for students

Gates Says Fixing Education Toughest Challenge

Asian Immersion Schools Surge in Popularity to Meet Demand

For rural school districts, where is new tech training available? Online, of course

A “super” decision from the state Board of Education

Hearing examiner rules against boy who chewed his pastry into a gun shape

Preschoolers Outsmart College Students In Figuring Out Gadgets

————————————————————

UTAH NEWS

————————————————————

Rep. Bishop visits Logan, talks transportation, air quality

Rep. Rob Bishop was in Cache Valley on Monday, making his first stop at the Cache Valley Transit District transit center for a question-and-answer session with residents that touched on air pollution and federal lands.

“You said you want an update on Washington,” he said. “Washington sucks.”

With that geography, Bishop talked about the desire for federal lands to switch to state ownership.

The majority of what he’s working with, he said, are lands in Southern Utah. There is a large area that can be kept as federally protected land for preservation purposes, while another large portion can be used for outdoor recreation like fishing, biking and camping. And, he feels many areas should be open to development.

North Dakota gets a billion dollars in extra revenue for their education system every year now thanks to development, he said, and Utah can get that same revenue.

“The resources that Utah could get from that development would be phenomenal,” he said.

http://go.uen.org/1qP (LHJ)

School board member’s discrimination complaint dismissed by U.S. Department of Education

SALT LAKE CITY — The U.S. Department of Education has dismissed a complaint accusing the Salt Lake City School District of discriminatory hiring practices.

The complaint, which was filed in May by Salt Lake School Board member Michael Clara, alleged that district officials had unfairly excluded the input of parents during the hiring of a principal for a west-side school.

The Department of Education effectively sided with the school district, acknowledging that different hiring procedures had been followed in the selection of principals but that those procedures were justified as part of the district’s school improvement efforts.

http://go.uen.org/1qe (DN)

80% of Utah’s Piute County residents live in “poverty areas”

U.S. census study » In Piute County, more than 80% of residents live in such areas.

A new map of “concentrated poverty” areas in America has one unfortunate, intensely colored spot in Utah: tiny, rural Piute County.

It shows that more than 80 percent of Piute residents live in what the census calls “poverty areas,” where the poverty rate is 20 percent or higher, for data collected between 2008 and 2012.

In 2000, fewer than 10 percent of Piute County residents lived in such poverty areas. Piute County Commissioner Rick Blackwell isn’t surprised that a new census report released on Monday shows such a big, bad change over that decade.

http://go.uen.org/1qg (SLT)

http://go.uen.org/1qt (MUR)

A copy of the report

http://go.uen.org/1qh (Census)

Utah High School Grad Gets Over $2 Million In Scholarship Offers

Valerie Sanchez wasn’t sure how many schools would want her, so she applied to 26 colleges and universities – just in case.

She was surprised when the acceptance letters and offers rolled in. Fourteen schools said “yes” and offered full ride opportunities for college. Choosing a school was stressful. “I had to stop myself and say ‘Valerie you are so lucky to have the opportunity to make these choices, ‘” she said.

In the end, she settled on Georgetown University and its School of Foreign Service.

http://go.uen.org/1qr (KUTV)

‘Glee-type’ Music Contest Crowns Winners in NYC Associated Press

NEW YORK — A teenager from suburban Chicago who sang an aching Jason Robert Brown song and another from Georgia who chose to sing “Raise the Roof” – and almost did so – have won top honors at the National High School Musical Theater Awards.

Atlanta resident Jai’Len Josey was named best actress and Jonah Rawitz, from the Chicago suburb of Buffalo Grove, got the best-actor crown Monday night at the sixth annual “Glee”-like competition, nicknamed the Jimmy Awards after theater owner James Nederlander.

“I can’t emphasize enough how humbled I am to be within this crowd of such amazing actors and individuals. I’ve made so many amazing friends. I feel like I’m part of a family,” said Rawitz. He also thanked him family, especially his mother, who he said taught him to be honest and “how to believe every word that I’m saying.” Josey, who is going into her junior year at Tri-Cities High School, said it was “a dream come true.”

Each will receive a $10,000 scholarship award, capping a months-long winnowing process that began with 60,000 students from 1,500 schools and ended at the Minskoff Theatre, the long-term home of “The Lion King,” which doesn’t perform on Mondays.

The 56 teens who made it to New York this year – 28 girls and 28 boys – got a five-day theatrical boot camp fueled by pizza at New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts, complete with scrambling to learn an opening and closing group number, performing their medley numbers, advice on their solo songs, plus a field trip to watch “Kinky Boots.”

The four runners-up, who each received $2,500, were: Mekahi Lee from Charlotte, North Carolina; Matthew Richards from Logan, Utah; Brooke Solan from Las Vegas; and Sophia Tzougros from Madison, Wisconsin. Andy Karl, from the Broadway musical “Rocky,” stopped by and the whole cast helped him sing “Keep on Standing.”

http://go.uen.org/1qy (AP)

Critics rap using Utah questions for FCAT replacement exam

When students take a new standardized exam next year, many of the questions they’ll tackle will come from Utah — despite a push for a “test specifically designed for Florida’s needs.”

Florida will spend more than $5 million to lease test questions from Utah. The deal will help the state roll out its new Florida Standards Assessment as planned next spring — a timeline officials concede would be hard to meet if they had to develop and then field test their own questions.

But the decision has prompted critics to suggest Florida is moving too quickly to replace FCAT.

Florida is leasing questions because of a “rushed, compressed time frame,” said Kathleen Oropeza of Fund Education Now, an Orlando-based parent group. “It’s not a thoughtful, careful transition. … It’s not in the best interests of children.”

Some superintendents also questioned how test items created for Utah would work in Florida, which has a demographically different school population.

http://go.uen.org/1qN (Orlando [FL] Sentinel)

Getting to the Core of Common Core

Since the Common Core curriculum has been accepted and implemented throughout the State of Utah, there has been a lot of confusion about what Common Core is, how it affects Utah, who funded it and why it was implemented in the first place.

Common Core is a list of learning objectives that encourage teachers to help students find deeper meaning and engage them on more levels of learning in subjects such as mathematics, reading, and language arts.

http://go.uen.org/1qf (Weber Sentinel)

Utah Piloting Copia Digital Learning Platform for Statewide OER Science Curriculum

A statewide open educational resources program in Utah is piloting digital learning content for science instruction in grades 3-12.

Utah’s State Office of Education has partnered with Copia Interactive to deploy the company’s Copia digital learning platform in school districts across the state. The Copia platform provides a library of content sources stemming from primary and supplementary providers as well as interactive digital classroom tools, allowing teachers to “engage students, monitor student achievement in real time, and … react to their students’ needs and adjust their instruction accordingly,” according to a press release.

http://go.uen.org/1qO (THE Journal)

Police arrest teens after chase, accused of breaking into junior high

WEST VALLEY CITY, Utah – Two teens are facing charges after allegedly breaking into Valley Junior High over the weekend.

West Valley City police said the teens set off an alarm at about 4:30 p.m. Sunday.

Officers said the teens ran out when police arrived.

Police arrested the teens after a short chase when they gave up and dropped to the ground.

http://go.uen.org/1qs (KSTU)

Preschool registration now open in Logan

Title 1 Preschool Registration for is currently ongoing until enrollment is filled and the registration location for all schools is at the Logan School District Office, 101 West Center in Logan.

http://go.uen.org/1qo (CVD)

Red on red: The Republicans education civil war?

The Republican civil war on education is over, said Libby Nelson at Vox. Now it’s Jeb Bush and the Chamber of Commerce against the rest of the party.

http://go.uen.org/1qn (DN)

————————————————————

OPINION & COMMENTARY

————————————————————

How to Make the State School Board More Friendly Utah PoliticoHub commentary by Utah State Board of Education Member JENNIFER JOHNSON

This is a Hub Debate on the role of boards of education. For more background, read this. Participate in the comments or submit a response for publication to UtahPoliticoHub@gmail.com. The question is: “Who do you think the board should serve? Parents? Students? Why?

Good policy options generally are not universal solutions for all geographies and situations. For public education, final policy decisions should reflect the informed desire of parents in their area. That is why I believe in greater power and choices for parents at the school level – whether we are talking about charter schools or district schools. I also think there is a great need for better communication with parents.

Parents represent their kids (unless relieved of that duty by lawful determination). All policy-makers affecting public education ought to make decisions based upon what is good for students as determined by their parents. That is the meaning of one of the basic overriding legal principles for public education: in loco parentis (acting in the place of parents for the instruction, discipline, and protection of children).

Beyond this and an acknowledgment of the influences stemming from how a board member is selected, I think it best adds to the current coverage of this subject to review what interests tend to be heard and felt by board members. I do this because parents’ interests must compete with others in order to be heard by the Utah State Board of Education. And, Utah parents are not a monolithic body.

http://go.uen.org/1qp

When the School Board must put students first Utah PoliticoHub commentary by JASON WILLIAMS

Many excellent posts here at The Hub over the past week trying to answer the question of who should matter most the school boards: parents or students.

One of my favorites was this, suggesting that it needn’t be a choice between the two. The interests of parents and the importance of education for students shouldn’t be contradictory, and for parents truly focused on the best education for their child, there is much that can be accomplished at the board level that serves both parents and students directly.

But for some parents there is little common ground, and there are reasons. Yeah, I’m about to make the argument that if the school board is your child’s enemy, the problem may be you, the parent.

http://go.uen.org/1qq

Problem not Utah

Price Sun-Advocate letter from Fred Richardson

In two recent opinion pieces the publisher of the Sun Advocate, Richard Shaw commented on the Utah Legislature. I agree with a lot of what he said about the lopsided politics in Utah; but I would remind him that we, in Carbon County, have experienced some of that ourselves for a long time.

The problem in Utah schools is not the number of students; it’s the Common Core. The state of Indiana got rid of it. What’s wrong with our Utah lawmakers?

http://go.uen.org/1qQ

How Teachers Unions Use ‘Common Core’ to Undermine Reform Instituting new standards has opened the door for attempts to gut teacher evaluations and ‘suspend’ accountability.

Wall Street Journal op-ed by ERIC A. HANUSHEK, co-author of “Endangering Prosperity: A Global View of the American School”

This year’s battle over the introduction of Common Core standards in public schools has diverted attention from a more important but quieter battle led by teachers unions to eliminate school accountability and teacher evaluations. These two measures are the real engines that will drive educational improvement, and it’s critical that attempts to do away with them be blocked.

The Common Core was designed to replace the hodge-podge of standards in place in the individual states with a national proclamation of what all students should know in each subject and grade. The standards were developed under the auspices of the National Governors Association and strongly backed by the U.S. Department of Education. Over the past five years, 44 states adopted them, although ordinary citizens and even many people in the schools didn’t know much about them. The new standards also have led to a related movement to develop new tests of student performance planned for the 2015-16 school year. The Common Core standards were designed to move American students, who generally score below the developed-country average in math and science, up to world-class achievement.

A coalition generally consisting of conservatives called the Common Core into question, and some states have retreated from adopting them. One argument against the Common Core was that there was undue pressure on states to use them, in part because they were a requirement for states that wanted to get federal “race to the top” money. Education is the province of the states, critics say, and the federal government is prohibited from being involved in school curricula. Another argument is that the Common Core standards are in reality less rigorous than the standards in a number of states.

But this fight is not the real story. Declaring what students should know is far different than having them actually know it.

http://go.uen.org/1qi

Weighing Common-Core Math Complaints

Education Week commentary by columnist Liana Heitin

The New York Times just published an article with a litany of reasons that parents (and other stakeholders) are “stumbling” with the Common Core State Standards in mathematics.

Among the arguments mentioned for why the common math standards are supposedly problematic:

The article is a lot to take in at once. Are the standards too hard or too easy? Do they ask students to do too much drawing or too much explaining? Is the sequence in which concepts are introduced to blame for student misunderstanding, or is it poorly aligned resources and confused teachers?

And the question that jumped out to me first: Should the way parents learned have any bearing on the way students learn? (That is, should instruction stay the same simply so parents can help kids with their homework?) http://go.uen.org/1qG

How to Trick Your Kids Into Reading All Summer Long Don’t bother taking away the iPad or setting minimum page counts. Instead, find sneaky ways to leave your children alone with books—and then see what happens.

Atlantic commentary by DANIEL WILLINGHAM, author of the forthcoming Raising Kids Who Read

As the school year ends, students’ thoughts turn to summer vacation staples like swimming, camp, and popsicles. Teachers—and most parents—would like them to think about reading, too. School and district officials offer summer reading lists, hoping that specific recommendations will move students away from video games and toward books. But most will ignore these worthy suggestions, and indeed will read very little. How can parents nudge kids toward books this summer?

The natural strategies most parents would think of first should not be the ones they actually try first. One is to offer rewards for reading. Rewards may get kids reading in the short term, but research shows there’s a danger they will like reading less once the rewards stop. A reward comes bundled with an implicit message: “Your guess that reading is not fun must be right. That’s why they’re paying you.” The same holds for a second strategy, the daily reading target. If reading were fun (as parents claim), they wouldn’t need to set minimum goals. Parents feel no need to say “I want to see you on that swing set for twenty minutes every day, mister. And swing like you mean it.” But if you don’t reward or coerce your child, what would make him freely choose to read?

An alternative is to change your home so that reading is the most appealing activity available when your child is looking for something to do. An easy way to start is to put books in places where your child gets bored. Put a basket of books in the minivan. Put a basket of books in the bathroom. Encourage older kids to put an ebook reader on their phones; any time they are stuck waiting in a line, they will have a book with them.

http://go.uen.org/1qH

How Finland Keeps Kids Focused Through Free Play An American teacher in Helsinki questions the national practice of giving 15 minute breaks each hour—until he sees the difference it makes in his classroom.

Atlantic commentary by TIM WALKER, an American teacher at a public school in Helsinki, Finland

Like a zombie, Sami—one of my fifth graders—lumbered over to me and hissed, “I think I’m going to explode! I’m not used to this schedule.” And I believed him. An angry red rash was starting to form on his forehead.

Yikes, I thought. What a way to begin my first year of teaching in Finland. It was only the third day of school and I was already pushing a student to the breaking point. When I took him aside, I quickly discovered why he was so upset.

Throughout this first week of school, I had gotten creative with my fifth grade timetable. Normally, students and teachers in Finland take a 15-minute break after every 45 minutes of instruction. During a typical break, students head outside to play and socialize with friends while teachers disappear to the lounge to chat over coffee.

I didn’t see the point of these frequent pit stops.

http://go.uen.org/1qI

————————————————————-

NATIONAL NEWS

————————————————————-

Changing from Common Core would cost $25.2 million over five years, superintendent says New Orleans Times-Picayune

Changing course on Common Core would cost Louisiana an additional $25.2 million over five years, according to documents that state Education Superintendent John White released Monday. His disclosure came in response to a request from Gov. Bobby Jindal’s administration, as the high-level head-butting over national academic standards in Louisiana moves from news conferences to a committee room, possibly on its way to the courthouse.

The state Board of Elementary and Secondary Education convenes in Baton Rouge on Tuesday to discuss its next steps, including a possible lawsuit. The board backs Common Core, but Jindal — once a supporter — declared in June that he wanted the Legislature and BESE to reconsider. He is trying to block the Education Department’s purchase of a new, multi-state standardized test aligned with Common Core and developed by the Partnership for the Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers.

http://go.uen.org/1qj

Common Core Will Improve Education, Most District Chiefs Say Education Week

About two-thirds of district superintendents said they believe the Common Core State Standards will improve the quality of education in their communities, while 22 percent said the standards will have no effect, according to the results from a new poll.

The survey, one of several conducted by the Gallup polling organization in partnership with Education Week over the last year, also found that two out of three superintendents believe the common standards are “just about right” in terms of difficulty for students. Fourteen percent, which cover English/language arts and mathematics, said the standards are too challenging, and just 5 percent said the standards are not challenging enough.

Meanwhile, 43 percent of respondents strongly disagreed when asked whether they were receiving “adequate support” from the federal government to implement the common core.

http://go.uen.org/1qz

A copy of the poll

http://go.uen.org/1qA (Gallup)

Survey Reveals Worries About Schools’ Readiness for Online Testing Education Week

Atlanta – While schools’ access to technology continues to increase, roughly 60 percent of K-12 officials surveyed by an industry group do not feel their schools have the bandwidth or devices to make them ready for summative, online testing.

The results are based on an Internet survey completed by about 1,000 K-12 officials nationwide. The survey was sponsored by the Software & Information Industry Association and released here at the ISTE 2014 conference.

The Vision K-20 survey, as it is called, is not based on random sampling and is not meant to be a “formal sample” of the entire education marketplace, but the SIIA says the trends it shows have generally been reliable in the years since it was first conducted in 2009. About half the respondents to the survey identified themselves as teachers or instructors of some kind.

Overall, the results of the survey show “really slow, steady progress,” in districts’ adoption of technology, including the adoption of bring-your-own-device programs, Karen Billings, the vice-president of SIIA’s education division, told Education Week.

http://go.uen.org/1qB

A copy of the survey

http://go.uen.org/1qC (Software & Information Industry Association)

U.S. employers face difficulty finding STEM workers: study Reuters

WASHINGTON – U.S. companies are finding it difficult to find skilled workers in science, technology, engineering and math, and need to advertise longer to fill positions in so-called STEM fields, a study released on Tuesday found.

STEM jobs that require a doctoral degree are advertised an average of 50 days, compared with 33 days for non-STEM jobs, according to the Brookings Institution. STEM jobs requiring a master’s degree take an average of 21 days to fill, compared with 11 days for non-STEM jobs, while for bachelors and associates degrees the difference is five and seven days.

“Hiring difficulty is a serious problem for many employers seeking workers with STEM skills,” Jonathan Rothwell, an associate fellow at the Brookings Metropolitan Policy Program, said in a statement.

http://go.uen.org/1qv

A copy of the study

http://go.uen.org/1qw (Brookings Metropolitan Policy Program)

Waiverless Washington State Wants Out of Key NCLB Requirement Education Week

Earlier this year, Washington state became the first to lose its No Child Left Behind Act waiver, which had allowed the Evergreen State to get out of many of the mandates of the outdated law.

The loss of the waiver means the state has to go back to the NCLB law, and its signature yardstick, Adequate Yearly Progress, which calls for all students to be nearing proficiency on state tests by the 2013-14 school year.

Schools that don’t make AYP for more than year have to allow students to transfer to a better performing public in the district, and after two years, they must offer students free tutoring. The system has been widely criticized as an ineffective, one-size-fits-all way to improve struggling schools. Waiver states are allowed to use a more targeted system that calls for deeper interventions at fewer schools, and are having varying degrees of success with that.

Now, Randy Dorn, the state superintendent of public instruction, wants to get out of one the requirements of the older system: Asking schools that don’t make AYP to send letters to parents notifying them of the school’s status. He’s asked the U.S. Department of Education to let Washington state off the hook when it comes to this requirement.

Dorn’s reasoning? Nearly every school in the state won’t make AYP this year, and will therefore have to send a letter. Plus, the whole point of the letters is to allow students to attend a better performing public school in the district, but that choice would be essentially moot if all schools are missing achievement targets.

http://go.uen.org/1qD

http://go.uen.org/1qL (Seattle Times)

LAUSD shifts gears on technology for students Los Angeles Times

Los Angeles school district officials have allowed a group of high schools to choose from among six different laptop computers for their students — a marked contrast to last year’s decision to give every pupil an iPad.

Contracts that will come under final review by the Board of Education on Tuesday would authorize the purchase of one of six devices for each of the 27 high schools at a cost not to exceed $40 million.

In the fall, administrators, teachers and students at those schools will test the laptops to determine whether they should be used going forward.

What they learn will affect the future of an ongoing effort to provide computers for all students in the nation’s second-largest school system.

http://go.uen.org/1qk

http://go.uen.org/1qE (Ed Week)

http://go.uen.org/1qM (C/NET)

Gates Says Fixing Education Toughest Challenge Associated Press

LOS ALAMOS, N.M. — Microsoft co-founder and philanthropist Bill Gates says eradicating malaria, tuberculosis and polio is easier than fixing the United States’ education system. But what he says he really wishes he could do is write a check to eliminate biological, chemical and nuclear weapons.

Gates made the comments in a 45-minute talk Monday to a packed auditorium of employees at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Gates, his son Rory and a friend were in northern New Mexico for a private tour of the nation’s premier nuclear weapons facility, which also does a wide-range of cutting-edge research across all fields, including an HIV vaccine, which the Bill and Melinda Gates foundation helps fund.

Gates talked about his foundation’s work improving and distributing vaccines across the world. But he says making advances in education is the foundation’s hardest challenge.

“You name it, we have been passed by,” Gates said of the country’s math and science programs.

New technology to engage students holds some promise, but Gates says it tends to only benefit those who are motivated.

“And the one thing we have a lot of in the United States is unmotivated students,” Gates said.

http://go.uen.org/1qx

Asian Immersion Schools Surge in Popularity to Meet Demand NBC

Growing up in Palo Alto, California, Mika Tanner remembered her mother’s insistence on speaking to her exclusively in Japanese.

“She’d watched so many of her friends’ children lose their Japanese and was terrified that would happen to me,” Tanner said. “If I didn’t speak in Japanese, she would just pretend that she didn’t hear me. Which was really effective.”

Now a mother to nine-year-old Maya and six-year-old Kenzo, Tanner wants to ensure that her family’s first language is passed along to her children. But instead of using her mother’s strategy, she has another resource available: Yujin Gakuen, a Japanese dual immersion elementary school in their town of Eugene, Oregon.

“I can pack the kids Japanese lunches and they’re not embarrassed…Japan is cool, which is very different from when I was growing up.”

Tanner’s family is one of many American families opting into this educational opportunity. According to the Center for Applied Linguistics, dual language immersion programs began in the United States in 1971, with         Spanish and French dominating as the most common languages. But in recent years, Asian language programs have surged in popularity, initially with Japanese and Hawaiian, and now Mandarin, Korean and Vietnamese.

http://go.uen.org/1qK

For rural school districts, where is new tech training available? Online, of course Hechinger Report

ATLANTA – For teachers in rural areas, technology training for classrooms can be elusive. It’s one reason why swarms of teachers, smartphones in hand, crowded around a small table covered in bar coded stickers at the annual International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE) conference, eager to learn.

They listened intently on Sunday as Terra Graves, a district technology specialist from Washoe County, N.V., explained how to scan quick response (QR) codes for a new massive open online course (MOOC) debuting this August, using Google Hangouts and Google Plus.

“Having it online, being able to have them connect with other educators that teach their content really broadened their horizons,” said Graves, one of hundreds of educators who are gathering at ISTE in Atlanta to swap tips and solutions on digital learning.

http://go.uen.org/1qF

A “super” decision from the state Board of Education Charleston (WV) MetroNews

CHARLESTON, W.Va. – It is official. West Virginia has a new state Superintendent of Schools. The state Board of Education met — some in person, others by phone — on Tuesday to cast their votes for Dr. Michael Martirano. Board President Gayle Manchin called for the question.

“All those in favor please say ‘aye,’” asked Manchin.

“Aye!”

“All those opposed? Then the motion passes unanimously,” said the board president.

This brought to an end a year and a half national search for the perfect person to lead the West Virginia Department of Education into the future. Lloyd Jackson, one of the board members, said Dr. Martirano was the perfect fit for the position.

The board also voted on a salary for the new superintendent. He will be paid $230,000 a year. That’s a sizable increase from what former Superintendent Dr. Jim Phares was earning.

http://go.uen.org/1qJ

Hearing examiner rules against boy who chewed his pastry into a gun shape Washington Post

A hearing examiner affirmed the suspension of an Anne Arundel County boy who chewed his breakfast pastry into the shape of a gun in what many have come to know as “the Pop-Tart case.”

In a 30-page opinion, hearing examiner Andrew W. Nussbaum supported a principal’s assertion that the suspension was based on a history of problems, not the pastry episode. “The evidence is clear that suspension is used as a last resort,” Nussbaum wrote.

The boy’s family asked to have his school records cleared of the incident, which occurred early last year, when he was 7 years old and in second grade. The findings and recommendation will go to the county Board of Education for a decision.

The case dates to a time of heightened sensitivity to guns after the mass shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn. The boy’s punishment drew national attention and was one of several D.C.-area suspensions involving imaginary or toy guns.

http://go.uen.org/1qu

Preschoolers Outsmart College Students In Figuring Out Gadgets NPR Morning Edition

Ever wonder why children can so easily figure out how to work the TV remote? Or why they “totally get” apps on your smartphone faster than you? It turns out that young children may be more open-minded than adults when it comes to solving problems.

Researchers at the University of California, Berkeley have found that 4- and 5-year-olds are smarter than college students when it comes to figuring out how toys and gadgets work.

http://go.uen.org/1ql

A copy of the study

http://go.uen.org/1qm (NIH)

————————————————————

CALENDAR

————————————————————

USOE Calendar

http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

UEN News

http://www.uen.org

July 10:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://go.uen.org/1pn

July 15:

Executive Appropriations Committee meeting

1 p.m., 445 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2014&Com=APPEXE

July 16:

Education Interim Committee meeting

2 p.m., 30 House Building

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2014&Com=INTEDU

July 17:

Utah State Board of Education meeting

4 p.m. 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

Related posts:

Comments are closed.