Education News Roundup: July 7, 2014

OgdenThroughtheWinshield by arbyreed/flickr

OgdenThroughtheWinshield by arbyreed/flickr

In today’s Education News Roundup:

Former Utah Teacher of the Year Lily Eskelsen Garcia is the new president of NEA.
http://go.uen.org/1rP (Politico)
and http://go.uen.org/1rQ (Ed Week)
and http://go.uen.org/1sx (SLT)
and http://go.uen.org/1s8 (OSE)

Ogden offers “Summer Soar” program “where kids can come three days a week to get math and reading help, plus spend some time on the computer.”
http://go.uen.org/1s7 (OSE)

What do Utah teachers do during the summer? Some sell fireworks.
http://go.uen.org/1sb (OSE)

NEA seeks resignation of Secretary Duncan.
http://go.uen.org/1sn (AP)
and http://go.uen.org/1sq (Ed Week)

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TODAY’S HEADLINES
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UTAH

Ogden elementary students beating summer lag

Utah County kids read more than average

Utah program helps deaf babies to hear

Area teachers saying selling fireworks a good summer job

Utah school bus driver charged in death of student Courts » He failed to activate red lights, signals and stop sign, according to charges.

Provo High teacher accused of sexual abuse headed to trial

Payson teacher receives statewide arts award

Canyons School Board hosting public meetings with new superintendent

Morgan High seeking funds for a new marquee

Layton students and parents raise funds to build school in Ghana

Common Core accused of leaving special-needs students behind

To help or not to help: The homework question

Why your doctor wants you to read aloud to your toddler

OPINION & COMMENTARY

The Common Core state standards are what we need

3 myths power effort to give federal lands to Utah

Is Utah really the best managed state? What would the poor say?

Education importance

School lunch

Lacrosse as sport

Stop the Sprucewood geyser

Is Florida nuts to pay Utah $5 million for test questions?

Segregation and peers’ characteristics in the 2010–2011 kindergarten class
60 years after Brown v. Board

NATION

Next NEA leader’s first task: Win back public

NEA Wants Duncan’s Resignation

Obama Highlights Push for Better Skilled Teachers

Lawsuit Challenges New York’s Teacher Tenure Laws

For Vergara Ruling on Teachers, Big Questions Loom

Texas Starts to Have Company in Position on Common Core

Year-Round Schools Get Fresh Look in Congressional Report

What We Don’t Know About Summer School

Latinos say education is top priority
New poll finds under a third of Latino voters consider immigration ‘extremely important’

GOP senator: FCC program hurting rural schools

First Lady Bucks GOP on School Lunch Rules

Blue Bird Recalls School Buses for Steering Issue

Shaping a School System, From the Ground Up

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UTAH NEWS
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Ogden elementary students beating summer lag

OGDEN – Seven-year-old Lundi Ferrier grinned from ear to ear as she told Horace Mann Instructional Coach Jileen Boydstun she read 119 pages in her chapter book. She then excitedly told Boydstun about what she had read and then whizzed past a large group of math flashcards.

Ferrier is participating in the school’s “Summer Soar” program where kids can come three days a week to get math and reading help, plus spend some time on the computer. This is the second year for the program that Boydstun put together for the students at the school.Boydstun and Principal Ross Lunceford were trying to figure out how to get students up to grade level more quickly and doing better on tests when they return to school in fall.

“This is kind of a brainchild I guess,” Boydstun said of the program.She and a few other staff assistants that work year-round in the school spend three mornings a week with students who choose to come. Everything they do is based on their grade level and the goal is to have them beyond ready to start the next grade. Students are tracked on the progress weekly and earn rewards based on their progress.

http://go.uen.org/1s7 (OSE)

Utah County kids read more than average

Students in Utah have read the highest percentage of e-books on a computer reading program in the Mountain West region, and Utah County students are making a large contribution to that statistic.
The program Raz-Kids was launched in 2006, and students in Utah’s early grades have read more than 14 million e-books since then. The Raz in the name Raz-Kids stands for Reading A-Z, which is part of Learning A-Z, a division of Cambium Learning Group.
http://go.uen.org/1sc (PDH)

Utah program helps deaf babies to hear

SALT LAKE CITY — When Genevieve “Evie” Shawcroft came into the world just over a year ago, she likely didn’t hear much of what was going on.
The sandy-haired, blue-eyed baby girl was born with mild-to-moderate hearing loss, giving her what doctors said was little chance of normal development without the help of hearing aids.
But the estimated $3,000 to $5,000 cost for the unexpected equipment and additional doctor visits was almost more to bear than the diagnosis itself, said Evie’s mom, Ashley Shawcroft.
http://go.uen.org/1sA (DN)

Area teachers saying selling fireworks a good summer job

ROY — Teacher wages are notoriously low, leading many to look for summer jobs. But finding a good summer job isn’t all that easy.
“We’re professionals, we’re educated, but unfortunately during the summer, unless you have a relationship built up, most companies don’t want to hire someone for three months,” said Aaron Hutchison, a mathematics teacher at NUAMES High School in Layton. “They don’t want to go through all of the training, and expense of setting up an employee, just to have them quit a few months later.”
So Hutchison and his wife Cari, a second grade teacher at Quest Academy charter school in West Haven, sell fireworks during the summer. They run the Phantom Fireworks concession at 3500 W. 5600 South, in Roy.
http://go.uen.org/1sb (OSE)

Utah school bus driver charged in death of student
Courts » He failed to activate red lights, signals and stop sign, according to charges.

A former Jordan School District bus driver was charged Thursday with misdemeanor counts of reckless endangerment and failure to signal in connection with the death of a 10-year-old South Jordan girl earlier this year.
The driver, Troy Edward Daniels, 44, of Kearns, has been summoned to appear in 3rd District Court in Salt Lake City on Sept. 3.
The victim, Seleny Crosby, was riding on Daniels’ bus on the afternoon of April 30, when he pulled over on the shoulder of 4000 West to let students off at Cedar Wood Lane (10570 South), according to South Jordan police.
When the girl exited the southbound bus, she immediately ran in front of Daniels’ bus to cross 4000 West, and was hit by a second southbound bus, police said.
She died two days later at a hospital.
http://go.uen.org/1rX (SLT)

http://go.uen.org/1s2 (DN)

http://go.uen.org/1si (KUTV)

http://go.uen.org/1sj (KTVX)

http://go.uen.org/1sk (KSL)

http://go.uen.org/1sl (KSTU)

Provo High teacher accused of sexual abuse headed to trial

PROVO – A trial date has been set for a Provo High School teacher accused of sexually abusing a 17-year-old student.
Donald Bills, 54, has been charged with one count of forcible sodomy and three counts of object rape, all first-degree felonies; and two counts of forcible sexual abuse, a second-degree felony.
During a court hearing Thursday afternoon, a five-day trial was scheduled for December.
http://go.uen.org/1se (PDH)

Payson teacher receives statewide arts award

SPANISH FORK — Nebo School District teacher Perry Ewell has been recognized as the Outstanding Arts & Education Educator in Utah by the Artistic Resource for Teachers and Students Inc.
http://go.uen.org/1s1 (DN)

Canyons School Board hosting public meetings with new superintendent

SANDY — The Canyons Board of Education will host public meetings in July through September to give students, parents, employees and the community a chance to meet new Canyons Superintendent Jim Briscoe.
http://go.uen.org/1s0 (DN)

Morgan High seeking funds for a new marquee

MORGAN — Morgan High School’s student body officers are getting lessons in fundraising and tenacity this summer as they attempt to raise $30,000 to replace their school’s marquee.
http://go.uen.org/1s9 (OSE)

Layton students and parents raise funds to build school in Ghana

LAYTON ─ A four-hour van ride out of Ghana’s capitol city, Accra, sits Abomosu.
Most people haven’t heard of Abomosu, a village in West Africa. Neither had a group of student volunteers and their parents until they raised the funds to build a school there. For the past three years, several students from Layton and Northridge high schools, their parents, and students from surrounding areas have raised $42,000 to build and furnish a kindergarten school. On June 5, they flew to Ghana to dedicate it.
http://go.uen.org/1sa (OSE)

Common Core accused of leaving special-needs students behind

There are 6.5 million special-education students in the U.S. today, and most are falling further behind their peers under Common Core standards.
http://go.uen.org/1rT (DN)

To help or not to help: The homework question

Traditionally, part of good parenting is helping your kids with their homework, but new research says that might be detrimental to your child’s academic performance.
http://go.uen.org/1rY (DN)

Why your doctor wants you to read aloud to your toddler

Head Start may be too late. The iconic federal preschool program targets low-income kids between 3 and 5, but the brain forms critical language connections in its first thousand days, experts say.
http://go.uen.org/1rZ (DN)

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OPINION & COMMENTARY
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The Common Core state standards are what we need
(Provo) Daily Herald op-ed by Marne Isakson, a reading consultant

Among college freshmen, 30 percent do not return the second year, resulting in millions of dollars lost and dreams dashed.
One reason is they feel defeated by heavy reading loads. Most are surprised that 85 percent of the learning they are to do is from texts and that their professors want them to come already having “learned” the material because class is for clarifying, analyzing and applying.
Many “good” readers have difficulty reading academic texts, not realizing that reading-to-learn is an intensely active process: a quest to construct understanding, problem-solve, and evaluate the author’s information, intentions and biases.
Shockingly, in some states 40 percent of college freshmen must do remedial work before continuing.
Legislators and other educational stakeholders dislike paying for students to gain skills in college they should and could acquire in high school.
http://go.uen.org/1sf

3 myths power effort to give federal lands to Utah
Salt Lake Tribune op-ed by Dan McCool, professor of political science at the University of Utah

The American Lands Council and Rep. Ken Ivory’s bill to give federal lands to the state of Utah (HB 148) have generated a great deal of press in recent weeks. This effort is based on three myths.
The first myth is that the federal government made a promise to give public lands to states. In fact, there is no law or Supreme Court case that makes such a promise. Nor is there any law or court case that mandates that the amount of public land in each state be the same.
Rather, the U. S. Constitution clearly gives the federal government the right to decide how, if, and when to dispose of and manage public lands: “The Congress shall have the power to dispose of and make all needful rules and regulations respecting the territory or other property belonging to the United States” (Article 4, Sec. 3).
The government has exercised that right extensively.
http://go.uen.org/1rS

Is Utah really the best managed state? What would the poor say?
Deseret News op-ed by Larry Alan Brown, a writer and longtime government improvement advocate and business consultant in Alpine

Gov. Gary Herbert and state legislative leaders tout Utah as the “best managed state” in the nation, according to Forbes, a pro-business publication. They point to an unemployment rate that has dropped from 8.4 percent to 3.6 percent since 2009, adding nearly 90,000 jobs. The governor said the state’s strong economy is “the rising tide that lifts all boats.” But Utah’s poor must be on a different boat. Theirs is not being lifted by the tide. It is being swamped.
Among their many needs, impoverished people require a boost in two main areas: education and treatment for mental illness.
While unemployment has gone down, the number of Utahns living in poverty has steadily risen since 2000, according to the Department of Workforce Services. Apparently, the poor are not getting many of the new jobs or the education to compete for them. Meanwhile, companies who want to move to or expand in Utah are starting to hesitate to do so because of a growing shortage of qualified workers.
Education is the key to future success for the less fortunate, especially preschool. But Utah legislators are loath to fund preschool programs. One program is Head Start, a time-tested 50-year-old federal program that teaches learning and social skills to poor kids. Utah is one of only seven states that do not provide funding to supplement federal dollars for Head Start, resulting in a waiting list of some 800 vulnerable children at one Salt Lake County Head Start provider alone.
http://go.uen.org/1s4

Education importance
Deseret News letter from Thodore Mahas

I have been supporting Utah’s public education system since I went to the little red schoolhouse in Clearfield over 80 years ago. We have raised four children and 16 grandchildren in public schools with great success. I feel providing education for all children in the public system is America’s greatest legacy and our promise of a chance for success. Yes, my company has built more than 150 schools, but I advocated this attitude long before I began building schools.
http://go.uen.org/1s6

School lunch
Deseret News letter from Ashley Curtis

One thing that almost every student complains about with school is the food. Sour milk and crunchy fries sure won’t help students receive the energy they need to function through the day. Even the new policy where students have to take a fruit cup or vegetable with every lunch isn’t helping. From experience, I have taken multiple fruit cups that are moldy or old and veggies that are warm and dry. Students end up throwing away these options and it is wasting money while leaving the students with empty stomachs. This then causes sleepiness, inattentiveness and slower reactions with the students for the rest of the day.
If the food we ate actually had some nutritional value these problems would go away.
http://go.uen.org/1s3

Lacrosse as sport
Deseret News letter from Gary Leany

I currently play lacrosse for West Jordan High School. Lacrosse is not considered a school-sanctioned sport, so we had to create a club. This causes the players to have to pay a lot more money. Also, we cannot use the high school fields and resources for practice or games. I would like to see lacrosse start to be recognized as a sport in high schools.
http://go.uen.org/1s5

Stop the Sprucewood geyser
Salt Lake Tribune letter from Travis McClure

Would someone with the materials and ability go to Sprucewood Elementary School at 12110 South 1000 East in Sandy and fix a sprinkler? Every day for two years I’ve watched water shoot six feet in the air through a broken sprinkler, and I don’t think the school district will ever fix it.
http://go.uen.org/1rW

Is Florida nuts to pay Utah $5 million for test questions?
(Fort Lauderdale) Florida Sun Sentinel commentary by columnist Gary Stein

You want to know why Florida schools are messed up?
Here’s one good reason.
Schools have leaky roofs. Some don’t have enough basic supplies. Yet the state will be paying $5 million to lease questions for the new exam to replace the FCAT. They are paying it to Utah. And this was supposed to be a test specifically designed for Florida kids.
http://go.uen.org/1sB

Segregation and peers’ characteristics in the 2010–2011 kindergarten class
60 years after Brown v. Board
Economic Policy Institute analysis

Closing achievement gaps—disparities in academic achievement between minority and white students, and between low-income and higher-income students—has long been an unrealized goal of U.S. education policy. It has now been 60 years since the Supreme Court declared “separate but equal” schools unconstitutional in Brown v. Board of Education. We experienced two decades of school desegregation, coupled with a “war on poverty,” that substantially narrowed race-based gaps during the 1970s and 1980s. However, subsequent shifts in policies that led to increased segregation and inequality have resulted in ballooning income-based gaps and a virtual halt to progress on closing race-based gaps.
With income inequality at record levels, the interactions between poverty and race remain strong and troubling and continue to impede educational progress for many students. One result of such interactions is ongoing segregation—at both the neighborhood and school levels. Yet most education “reforms” focus on a narrow set of policy fixes that minimize the roles of poverty and of race and overlook the impact of segregation. As scholars document the connections between neighborhood- and school-level segregation, it is important that we better understand how both affect schools and students in order to more productively guide both future research and policymaking.
This paper uses data from a recent representative cohort of U.S. students entering kindergarten—the National Center for Education Statistics’ Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Kindergarten Class of 2010-11—to begin to do that.

The findings, though just descriptive, are often surprising and raise both serious concerns and many new questions:
• The vast majority of white students, even poor ones, are in classrooms with other students who are not poor. In contrast, most students of color, both black and Hispanic, go to school with many other students who are living in poverty.
• While the family characteristics of white children vary relatively little depending on the type of classroom they are in (unless that classroom is very heavily minority), family characteristics of black and Hispanic children vary substantially from heavily white to heavily minority schools.
• Academic performance varies greatly, depending on the school’s level of segregation across all races of students; the more heavily minority the school, the less prepared students are on average in the fall, and the smaller their relative gains by spring.
• Finally, the data appear to support more sophisticated analyses’ suggestions that income segregation underlies many apparent negative consequences of racial segregation.
http://go.uen.org/1rR

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NATIONAL NEWS
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Next NEA leader’s first task: Win back public
Politico

The new president of the largest teachers union in the country will become the voice of roughly 3 million teachers at perhaps the most critical moment in the National Education Association’s history.
First item on the agenda: Win back the public.
Union watchers say the newly elected Lily Eskelsen García — a former school cafeteria worker teacher, folk singer and Utah teacher of the year — has a “hell of a job” ahead of her. She faces court cases challenging teacher tenure and job protections, the defection of historically loyal Democrats, growing apprehension over the Common Core, diminishing ranks, public relations campaigns painting her union as greedy and a complicated chessboard of state and local members with a variety of interests.
Eskelsen García, elected Friday, has big plans: She wants to further shift the union away from its longstanding and reflexive support of Democrats — which it has already begun. She wants to banish what she says is a loaded word — tenure. And she wants to lead a campaign against high-stakes decision-making based on test scores at the same time she firms up her union’s support of the Common Core.
http://go.uen.org/1rP

http://go.uen.org/1rQ (Ed Week)

http://go.uen.org/1sx (SLT)

http://go.uen.org/1s8 (OSE)

NEA Wants Duncan’s Resignation
Associated Press

WASHINGTON — The nation’s largest teachers’ union wants Education Secretary Arne Duncan to quit.
Delegates of the National Education Association adopted a business item July 4 at its annual convention in Denver that called for his resignation. The vote underscores the long-standing tension between the Obama administration and teachers’ unions – historically a steadfast Democratic ally.
A tipping point for some members was Duncan’s statement last month in support of a California judge’s ruling that struck down tenure and other job protections for the state’s public school teachers. In harsh wording, the judge said such laws harm particularly low-income students by saddling them with bad teachers who are almost impossible to fire.
http://go.uen.org/1sn

http://go.uen.org/1sq (Ed Week)

Obama Highlights Push for Better Skilled Teachers
Associated Press

WASHINGTON — President Barack Obama brought forward a new administration effort Monday to place quality teachers in schools that need them the most.
Obama said the U.S. education system has “a problem” in that students who would benefit the most from having skilled or experienced teachers in their classrooms are least likely to get them, including black and Hispanic students.
Obama credits education and good teachers for helping him get to the White House. He said he wants to make sure that every child has the same access to good teachers that he had.
http://go.uen.org/1so

http://go.uen.org/1sy (WSJ)

Lawsuit Challenges New York’s Teacher Tenure Laws
New York Times

An education advocacy group on Thursday threw down the first challenge to New York’s teacher tenure laws in the wake of a landmark court decision in California last month finding such laws there unconstitutional.
A lawsuit filed in State Supreme Court on Staten Island argues that the tenure laws violate the State Constitution’s guarantee of a “sound basic education” by making it difficult to fire bad teachers and by protecting the most veteran teachers in the event of layoffs, regardless of their quality. The suit, filed against city and state education officials, names as plaintiffs 11 public school students whose parents belong to a group known as the New York City Parents Union.
The road ahead is less than certain in either state.
http://go.uen.org/1rM

http://go.uen.org/1sv (Marketplace)

For Vergara Ruling on Teachers, Big Questions Loom
Education Week

In the annals of education-equity cases, the decision in Vergara v. California was nothing less than a bombshell.
The ruling last month by a Los Angeles Superior Court judge said that aspects of California teachers’ tenure and due-process protections violated the constitutional rights of the state’s neediest children. Within minutes, advocates proclaimed it a win for students who have historically received lower-quality education; others, such as the California Teachers Association, saw it as an unbridled attack on teachers and unions.
To a degree, the cacophony of responses greeting the decision has obfuscated the fact that many of the implications of the lawsuit remain unclear, both in the Golden State and nationwide.
Among the lingering questions: Will the ruling, at a slim 16 pages, hold up on appeal? Will California’s notoriously polarized legislature, fearful of additional litigation and bad press, consider changing the statutes at issue on its own? And finally, will similar lawsuits elsewhere—one is already primed for introduction in New York—be as initially successful?
http://go.uen.org/1sr

Texas Starts to Have Company in Position on Common Core
Texas Tribune

When Texas refused to sign onto a nationwide effort five years ago to develop common academic standards in reading and math — putting $700 million in federal money at risk — the state found itself in lonely territory.
The Common Core, which would be adopted in 45 states, was aimed at raising reading and math learning benchmarks in public schools and easing collaboration on education policies. Spearheaded by the Obama administration, the initiative was overseen by the National Governors Association and embraced by both Republican and Democratic policymakers.
Texas’ decision to not participate failed to make much of an immediate impact beyond state borders, despite an unusual alliance of typically left-leaning teachers associations and conservative activists opposing what they said was a road to a potential federal takeover of education policy.
“Texas was in front of opposing the standards right before they even came off the press. But the other state boards of education weren’t paying attention to Texas’ reasons. What Texas was doing just wasn’t on the horizon for them,” said Sandra Stotsky, an education researcher and longtime opponent of the Common Core.
In the years since, similar concerns have driven four Republican controlled states — Indiana, Louisiana, South Carolina and Oklahoma — to announce that they were dropping them from their public schools. Several other states, including Arizona, North Carolina, Ohio and Missiouri have faced pressure to do the same.
http://go.uen.org/1rN

http://go.uen.org/1su (NewsHour)

Year-Round Schools Get Fresh Look in Congressional Report
Education Week

While a two-and-a-half-month summer vacation has just begun for most American students, students at year-round schools will be back in class in a few weeks. A little rusty on the model? A new report from the Congressional Research Service, the unit of the Library of Congress that provides policy and legal analysis to the U.S. House and Senate, shares the latest data on year-round education.
http://go.uen.org/1ss

A copy of the report
http://go.uen.org/1st (Congressional Research Service)

What We Don’t Know About Summer School
NPR

It’s a warning echoed in countless teen movies — “If you don’t pass this class, you’ll go to summer school!” Kids for generations have been threatened with the elusive summer school: fail this test, miss this day and kiss your vacation goodbye.
This summer is no exception, with districts around the country pulling students in for all sorts of programs. But surprisingly, it’s really hard to get a head count — either nationally or at the district level — of how many kids are going to summer school.
So as the July heat kicks in, we started wondering about the whole idea. What, exactly, is summer school? How much does it cost? And, the biggest question, does it work?
In a nutshell, we have no idea.
http://go.uen.org/1sm

Latinos say education is top priority
New poll finds under a third of Latino voters consider immigration ‘extremely important’
Columbus (OH) Dispatch

When Lourdes Barroso de Padilla and her husband enrolled her 6-year-old daughter, Eva, in Clintonville Academy, she wanted to create opportunities for her that she never had.
“I’ve faced challenges in terms of culturally understanding the college process and saving for college,” she said. “These things I had to learn along the way with my parents. We understand education is important for not just getting ahead, but we want to create a love of learning in our daughters.”
U.S. Latinos were most likely to rank education as an extremely important issue in a recent study by the Pew Research Center. The study asked Latino voters which issues they considered “ extremely important” to their lives. While 52 percent said the economy and 43 percent said health care, 57 percent ranked education as “extremely important.”
Just 32 percent said immigration.
“The study opens up the stereotype that Latinos are only concerned with the issue of immigration,” said Abril Trigo, director of the Center of Latin American Studies at Ohio State University. “For Latinos — people who are legal citizens — education is important because it looks to forward the future of our kids. But Latinos are not only migrants, they are people, too, and have concerns not just about migration.”
http://go.uen.org/1sw

GOP senator: FCC program hurting rural schools
The Hill

Two Kansas Republicans want to overhaul a government program to make sure more rural schools can connect to the Internet.
Sen. Jerry Moran (R-Kan.) and Ajit Pai, a Republican member of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) who grew up in Kansas, argue that the current program is too complex and unfairly weighted towards large, urban schools.
“The bad news is this federal program meant to close the digital divide is actually making it worse for rural schools,” they wrote in an op-ed in the Wichita Eagle. “A few commonsense reforms, including simplifying the application process and providing certainty to schools, could fix that.”
The FCC’s E-Rate program subsidizes broadband Internet programs in schools and libraries, with the goal of giving 99 percent of the country’s students high-speed access to the Web. FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler is looking to funnel $2 billion of program funding towards providing Wi-Fi access in schools and libraries, a plan that has received pushback from educators.
But Moran and Pai argued that schools in their home state were already getting the shaft.
http://go.uen.org/1sz

First Lady Bucks GOP on School Lunch Rules
Associated Press

WASHINGTON — First ladies typically avoid getting into public scraps, but Michelle Obama has jumped into perhaps her biggest battle yet.
She’s fighting a House Republican effort to soften a central part of her prized anti-childhood obesity campaign and says she’s ready “to fight until the bitter end.”
Mrs. Obama even mocked the GOP effort in an opinion column and argued her case on Twitter.
“Remember a few years ago when Congress declared that the sauce on a slice of pizza should count as a vegetable in school lunches?” she wrote in The New York Times. “You don’t have to be a nutritionist to know that this doesn’t make much sense. Yet we’re seeing the same thing happening again with these new efforts to lower nutrition standards in our schools.”
http://go.uen.org/1sp

Blue Bird Recalls School Buses for Steering Issue
Associated Press

Blue Bird is recalling more than 2,500 All American school buses and some transit buses to fix a problem that could make steering more difficult.
The company also is recalling a smaller number of school buses that may be prone to a propane fuel leak, according to paperwork filed with the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.
The school bus maker said it has received no injury or accident reports tied to any of these recalls.
Blue Bird Corp. said the steering problem can develop on some buses made between 2011 and last May if a steering shaft clamp comes into contact with a rubber close-out boot on the floor. It also is recalling more than 400 transit buses to fix the same problem.
http://go.uen.org/1rV

Shaping a School System, From the Ground Up
New York Times

In the fall of 2011, an eclectic group of people from the San Francisco Bay Area began making regular trips to Lima, Peru. Among them were architects, mechanical engineers, ethnographers, communication designers and education specialists.
They were all employees of the design company Ideo, which is perhaps best known for designing the first laptop computer and the first Apple computer mouse. But now Ideo had been hired by a Peruvian businessman, Carlos Rodriguez-Pastor, to work on a new type of project: designing a network of low-cost private schools from scratch, including the classrooms, the curriculum, the teacher-training strategies and the business model.
Mr. Rodriguez-Pastor was “trying to break the traditional school model,” he recalled in a recent interview. “We thought, why not get different perspectives rather than build on what we think we know?”
Increasingly, design companies like Ideo are being asked to build complex systems for businesses, governments and nonprofit organizations.
http://go.uen.org/1rO

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CALENDAR
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USOE Calendar
http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

UEN News
http://www.uen.org

July 10:
Utah State Charter School Board meeting
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://go.uen.org/1pn

July 15:
Executive Appropriations Committee meeting
1 p.m., 210 Senate Building
http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2014&Com=APPEXE

July 16:
Education Interim Committee meeting
2:30 p.m., 30 House Building
http://le.utah.gov/Interim/2014/html/00003664.htm

Political Subdivisions Interim Committee meeting
2:30 p.m., 25 House Building
http://le.utah.gov/Interim/2014/html/00003693.htm

July 17:
Utah State Board of Education meeting
4 p.m. 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

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