Education News Roundup: July 15, 2014

PropertyTaxUtahToday’s Top Picks:

Jordan Deputy Superintendent Burke Jolley is stepping down.
http://go.uen.org/1vV (SLT)
and http://go.uen.org/1vW (DN)
and http://go.uen.org/1wj (KUTV)
and http://go.uen.org/1wh (KTVX)

Is Utah collecting all the property taxes it should be collecting?
http://go.uen.org/1wx (DN)
and http://go.uen.org/1wy (SLT)
and http://go.uen.org/1wD (KUTV)
and http://go.uen.org/1wz (KSL)
and http://go.uen.org/1wA (KUER)
or a copy of the audit
http://go.uen.org/1wB (Utah State Auditor’s Office)

Alpine Board candidate won’t seek a recount.
http://go.uen.org/1vX (PDH)

Oklahoma Supreme Court will hear arguments about Common Core today.
http://go.uen.org/1vZ (Tulsa World)

Missouri will keep Common Core while it studies if it can better the standards.
http://go.uen.org/1w0 (Governing)
and http://go.uen.org/1w1 (Ed Week)
and http://go.uen.org/1w2 (Columbia [MO] Daily Tribune)

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TODAY’S HEADLINES
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UTAH

Cities, Jordan School District meet to stave off a split Board responds to list of member cities’ demands, including personnel issues, in attempt to keep the district together.

Audit: Utahns undertaxed $100M since 2006

Candidate will not seek recount after loss in Alpine School Board race

Report: Nevada Hispanics face many obstacles to scholastic, financial success Bleak picture of student success emboldens push for reform

What a young girl can learn from Utah women about STEM education and careers

Autistic teens use architecture software to build job skills Conference » Hiring people with disabilities is good for society and economy, speakers say.

Ogden kids get taste of Shakespeare in midsummer theater camp

Big donation from South Central to fund K-2 Chromebook computers

Hearing set for former Utah bus driver accused of molesting students

UHSAA hires former Davis coach Ryan Bishop as new assistant director

Why the Connecticut charter school program is reeling from scandal

OPINION & COMMENTARY

Student-centered education is best chance to rise from bottom of the list in education funding

State’s heavy hand in Uintah County

The Case Against Exit Exams

Beyond the Factory Model
Oakland teachers learn how to blend

Why Poor Schools Can’t Win at Standardized Testing The companies that create the most important state and national exams also publish textbooks that contain many of the answers. Unfortunately, low-income school districts can’t afford to buy them.

OMG! Texting doesn’t actually hurt kids’ grammar or spelling skills

NATION

State supreme court to hear arguments in Common Core suit

Missouri Governor Vetoes Bill to Arm Teachers, Signs Bill to Replace Common Core

Jeb Bush Draws Tea Party Ire Touting Education Record

Schools a Haven for Kids Who Crossed Boarder Alone

Quietly, a New Test Gains Advocates
Schools volunteer to test their students against global competitors

Before Buying Technology, Asking ‘Why?’

White House asked to stay away from school nutrition summit

School Officials Try Healthier Cafeteria Options

Staples, USPS end program to set up mini-post offices in stores

Edmonton school board drops abstinence-based sex ed after complaint

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UTAH NEWS
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Cities, Jordan School District meet to stave off a split
Board responds to list of member cities’ demands, including personnel issues, in attempt to keep the district together.

Four other cities are considering joining South Jordan in asking the Jordan School District to change its ways, in hopes of avoiding a possible district split.
And it appears the Jordan district has already made at least one change, announcing to employees that Deputy Superintendent Burke Jolley will leave the district.
Board vice president Susan Pulsipher said Monday she could not comment on whether Jolley’s exit has anything to do with threats from South Jordan City of splitting from the district. But South Jordan has asked for personnel changes among other things as it considers splitting, and South Jordan Mayor David Alvord said Monday several of the council members wanted Jolley out.
Jolley declined to comment Monday about his exit, though the district announcement said it was by mutual agreement. His contract is not up until June 2015.
http://go.uen.org/1vV (SLT)

http://go.uen.org/1vW (DN)

http://go.uen.org/1wj (KUTV)

http://go.uen.org/1wh (KTVX)

Audit: Utahns undertaxed $100M since 2006

SALT LAKE CITY — A recent audit of Utah’s property tax system revealed a miscalculation that caused property owners in the state to be undertaxed by more than $100 million since 2006.
As a result, Utah property owners could face slightly higher tax rates in the coming years.

“It’s good to have official publications that are re-emphasizing the importance of making sure we know exactly where those dollars are so that taxpayers can be confident the money is being spent appropriately,” said Royce Van Tassell, vice president of the Utah Taxpayers Association.
While taxpayers were favored in the error, the $100 million could have been used to support Utah schools and other service agencies, Van Tassell said.
http://go.uen.org/1wx (DN)

http://go.uen.org/1wy (SLT)

http://go.uen.org/1wD (KUTV)

http://go.uen.org/1wz (KSL)

http://go.uen.org/1wA (KUER)

A copy of the audit
http://go.uen.org/1wB (Utah State Auditor’s Office)

Candidate will not seek recount after loss in Alpine School Board race

OREM – Keri Guinn will not request a vote recount for the five-vote loss she suffered running for a spot on Alpine School District’s Board of Education.
“I have not requested a recount for personal reasons,” Guinn said. “I’m just not going to request a recount.”
She had been campaigning for a school board seat for Orem’s District 5 and received, by the final count, 549 votes to candidate Maynard Olsen’s 554, making up half of the total votes cast. Long-standing ASD board member Jodee Sundberg captured the remaining half of the votes.
Olsen will face Sundberg in the general election.
http://go.uen.org/1vX (PDH)

Report: Nevada Hispanics face many obstacles to scholastic, financial success
Bleak picture of student success emboldens push for reform

Hispanics in Nevada are trailing their counterparts in Western states when it comes to education and access to jobs and business opportunities, according to a new report from the Kenny Guinn Center for Policy Priorities.
“The idea of investing in this infrastructure of opportunity benefits everybody, but we chose to focus on Latinos because it’s a growing and increasingly significant portion of the population,” said Nancy Brune, Guinn Center executive director. “Things like education, access to capital, infrastructure of opportunity, we need to make sure we provide that or there can be a long term fiscal impact. There will be forgone revenues from taxes, increasing costs for health care, and there is a link between poverty, illiteracy and higher prison populations. If we don’t think of how to grow opportunities in Nevada, we could suffer long term fiscal impacts.”
The report, The State of Latinos in the Intermountain West, compares education, economic, housing and health care data regarding Hispanics in Nevada, Arizona, California, Colorado, New Mexico, Texas and Utah, and makes recommendations for improvement. It’s the first report from the Las Vegas-based Guinn Center, a non-profit think tank that launched last year.
The findings bolster the growing chorus of Hispanic community leaders demanding more resources for education and a reconfigured structure for governing higher education in the state.

Key education findings
• In 2011-2012, Nevada’s overall graduation rate ranked second lowest in the nation, and lowest in the region (Nevada, Utah, Arizona, New Mexico, Texas, California and Colorado). The graduation rates for minorities and ELL students are also at or near the bottom.
• Nevada and Utah are the only states in the region with no Hispanic Serving Institutions, a federal designation that provides grant opportunities for schools with a minimum of 25 percent Hispanic enrollment, although Nevada has five that are progressing toward the designation and Utah has none.
http://go.uen.org/1wE (Las Vegas Sun)

A copy of the report
http://go.uen.org/1wF (Guinn Center for Policy Priorities)

What a young girl can learn from Utah women about STEM education and careers

SALT LAKE CITY — When Lara Ionescu Silverman was a young girl, she would ready herself for bed and then her father would read her a bedtime story — from a children’s encyclopedia.
Her mother, the chief executive officer of a technology firm, and her father, an architect, moved the family from Romania to the United States and from those early days placed their priorities directly on education for her and her sister.
“I was very privileged to have that support early on,” Ionescu Silverman said, noting she developed a strong affinity for science and technology that was supported by her parents.
Today, the married mother of an infant daughter is running a lab on the “cutting edge of science,” one of the small percentage of women who studied in the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics, fields that are in search of qualified people.
Utah’s Prosperity 2020 STEM Education Initiative is working to tap into the curiosity of young girls and boys to ready them for STEM careers, a place were women are underrepresented.
http://go.uen.org/1wc (DN)

Autistic teens use architecture software to build job skills
Conference » Hiring people with disabilities is good for society and economy, speakers say.

Sixteen-year-old Mason Dimock can focus intently on one subject, thinks visually and spatially, and is interested in technology — skills that have helped him land a summer job designing for a construction company.
He and nine other Salt Lake City teens were selected for a pilot project by NeuroVersity, a company that aims to give students with autism or similar disorders the training they’ll need for careers. The students work with 3-D imaging software called SketchUp Make, developed by Google.
“I think it’s a great program,” Dimock said about the pilot Monday. “It not only helps you with SketchUp, but it helps with social skills, too … [The software] is good for architecture. You can make pretty good money; they use it for construction.”
The NeuroVersity effort was highlighted at a Monday conference, “The Bottom Line of Disabilities: The Social Financial and Economic Impact in Our Communities,” held at the Columbus Community Center in Salt Lake City. The gathering was sponsored by the nonprofit center, the Governor’s Office of Economic Development and others.
http://go.uen.org/1w7 (SLT)

http://go.uen.org/1wG (DN)

Ogden kids get taste of Shakespeare in midsummer theater camp

OGDEN — Rose Garrett didn’t want to waste her summer vacation sitting on the couch, watching television — so she became a fairy queen. Garrett, a 14-year-old from Ogden, is playing the role of Titania in William Shakespeare “A Midsummer Night’s Dream.”
“I love acting,” she said. “It’s always been something I enjoy.”
Joining Garrett on stage are 27 other teens and children, ranging in age from 3 to 17, who signed up for Ogden School District’s Summer Theatre Camp.
http://go.uen.org/1wf (OSE)

Big donation from South Central to fund K-2 Chromebook computers

South Central Communications, under the leadership of Chief Executive Officer Michael East, has donated $11,630 to the Kane Schools Foundation for Students (KSFS) to fund the purchase of Chromebook computers for Kindergarten through Second Grade (K-2) classrooms in the Kane School District. The proposal, called K-2 Technology Foundational Skills, was developed by Kane District Reading Specialist Nancy Roundy, along with all K-2 teachers in the district. Roundy presented the idea at a KSFS board meeting in May of 2014. Michael East, a new member of the KSFS Board since February, was impressed with the idea and decided that South Central should help provide funding to obtain the computers and put the new program in place before the new school year.
This is the largest single business donation made to the non-profit Kane Schools Foundation, which is celebrating its tenth anniversary this year.
http://go.uen.org/1vU (SUN)

Hearing set for former Utah bus driver accused of molesting students

West Jordan • A former Canyons School District bus driver — charged with sexually molesting two 5-year-old Sandy girls — is scheduled for a two-day preliminary hearing on both cases beginning July 30.
John Martin Carrell allegedly molested both while they rode his bus to and from Altara Elementary School.
Carrell, 61, was charged Monday in 3rd District Court with 10 counts of aggravated sexual abuse of a child and one count of attempted aggravated sexual abuse of a child, all first-degree felonies, for acts that allegedly occurred on his bus in March and April.
He was charged in May with 23 counts of aggravated sexual abuse of a child for alleged abuse of the other girl from late February to late April.
http://go.uen.org/1wa (SLT)

http://go.uen.org/1wd (DN)

http://go.uen.org/1wH (OSE)

http://go.uen.org/1wC (PDH)

http://go.uen.org/1wg (KUTV)

http://go.uen.org/1wi (KTVX)

http://go.uen.org/1wk (KSL)

http://go.uen.org/1wl (KSTU)

UHSAA hires former Davis coach Ryan Bishop as new assistant director

KAYSVILLE — Ryan Bishop never expected to be a lifer coach.
He came from a coaching family and married into a coaching family, but always knew he’d eventually end up in administration some day. When and where he had no idea, but to prepare himself for the unforeseen he completed his administrative degree five years ago.
Last month, Bishop’s “dream situation” presented itself.
When UHSAA assistant director Kevin Dustin was hired as the new Salt Lake Community College athletic director in mid-June, Bishop immediately put his name into the hat along with 23 others to be Dustin’s replacement.
Late last week, UHSAA executive director Rob Cuff offered Bishop the job, who effective immediately has resigned as the Davis High football coach to begin the next chapter in his life.
http://go.uen.org/1we (DN)

Why the Connecticut charter school program is reeling from scandal

A long-standing critique of the charter school movement nationally is that the schools lack oversight. A recent push to expand charters in Connecticut is now under fire after the leader of one major charter was found to have fudged his past.
http://go.uen.org/1wb (DN)

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OPINION & COMMENTARY
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Student-centered education is best chance to rise from bottom of the list in education funding
Deseret News op-ed by Lynn Stoddard, author of “Educating for Human Greatness”

A diverse group of educators and parents may have found a way to get Utah off the bottom of the list in funding for public education. They suggest this simple concept: Switch from subject-centered to a student-centered system of public education.
Our conventional, compulsory system focuses on subject matter — what all students should know and be able to do in a limited number of subjects in each grade.
In sharp contrast to this, student-centered education focuses on students, including their unique talents, gifts, abilities, interests, needs and questions.
http://go.uen.org/1vY

State’s heavy hand in Uintah County
Salt Lake Tribune letter from Rod Wadley

I read with much interest your story (“Phosphate mine could harm Vernal’s water source,” July 7) and editorial on the phosphate mine that threatens Vernal and Uintah County’s water supply. The news piece ends talking about the county’s water protection ordinance.
What you failed to mention is the ordinance passed by Uintah County is unenforceable because of language added to Utah State Code, Title 40 (chapter 8 sect. 5 sub part 2 c & d) . This part of Title 40 makes any such ordinance unenforceable.
It appears to me that with this modification from 2011, that the state of Utah and specifically SITLA are applying the same heavy hand of government on the citizens of Utah that the elected leaders of this state complain of with the federal government . Do as I say, not as I do?
http://go.uen.org/1w9

The Case Against Exit Exams
Washington Monthly op-ed by Anne Hyslop

Students today cannot afford to be high school dropouts any more than they can afford to enter college and the workforce unprepared. Luckily, the transition to college- and career-ready standards across the country offers states the opportunity to fully reimagine how they can best ensure students not only graduate from high school, but do so ready to succeed in higher education and on the job.
The new standards open possibilities for richer instruction, better curricula, and more deliberate alignment between secondary and postsecondary learning. And the new assessments states are launching next year to match the standards will play a critical role in their successful implementation. The tests need to tell public officials whether schools and educators are positively influencing learning and encouraging student growth. They need to tell teachers whether their individual students are making progress and whether their instructional practices are effective. They need to tell families whether their students are on track to college and career readiness. And they need to tell students, especially high school students, whether they are likely to need remediation before starting college-level classes. But the new assessments do not need to be exit exams—at least, that’s the argument I make in a new report released today, “The Case Against Exit Exams.”
http://go.uen.org/1w4

A copy of the report
http://go.uen.org/1w5 (New America Foundation)

Why Poor Schools Can’t Win at Standardized Testing
The companies that create the most important state and national exams also publish textbooks that contain many of the answers. Unfortunately, low-income school districts can’t afford to buy them.
Atlantic commentary by Meredith Broussard, assistant professor at Temple University

You hear a lot nowadays about the magic of big data. Getting hold of the right numbers can increase revenue, improve decision-making, or help you find a mate—or so the thinking goes. In 2009, U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan told a crowd of education researchers: “I am a deep believer in the power of data to drive our decisions. Data gives us the roadmap to reform. It tells us where we are, where we need to go, and who is most at risk.”
This is a story about what happened when I tried to use big data to help repair my local public schools. I failed. And the reasons why I failed have everything to do with why the American system of standardized testing will never succeed.
http://go.uen.org/1ww

Beyond the Factory Model
Oakland teachers learn how to blend
Education Next analysis by Joanne Jacobs

Like many high-poverty middle schools, Oakland’s Elmhurst Community Prep is trying to reach students who are academically all over the map. One-third of the students are working at grade level in reading and math, says Principal Kilian Betlach. Another third are one to two years behind. The remaining third are three or four years behind—or more. “You can’t teach them by aiming for the middle and providing these little supports,” says Betlach.
Differentiation—teaching students at very different levels of achievement in the same class—is “the greatest challenge facing America’s schools today,” writes Michael Petrilli.
“Teachers are told to sprinkle your differentiation fairy dust,” says Betlach. With 32 students in a class, and no aides, “it’s not possible.”
A foundation-funded experiment is testing whether “blended learning” can personalize instruction in eight Oakland schools. Blended learning combines brick-and-mortar schooling with online education “with some element of student control over time, place, path, and/or pace” of learning, according to the Clayton Christensen Institute definition of the term.
http://go.uen.org/1w6

OMG! Texting doesn’t actually hurt kids’ grammar or spelling skills
Vox commentary by columnist Joseph Stromberg

Niall Ferguson put it most bluntly: “Texting Makes U Stupid.”
Texting has become the dominant form of communication among teens, with the average American teen sending and receiving thousands of texts each month. This has led to widespread concerns that the informal spelling and grammar used in texts (termed “textisms” by researchers) would erode these kids’ ability to use proper language.
Except, as it turns out, the data indicates that spending hours each day writing words and creatively manipulating language — as texting kids tend to do — doesn’t actually reduce kids’ formal spelling or grammar skills.
“There is, by now, a clear body of evidence,” says Nenagh Kemp, a language psychologist at the University of Tasmania who’s spent the past few years studying the topic, and recently published a new study on it with Clare Wood, of Coventry University in the UK. “Parents and educators need not panic that exposure to abbreviated and unconventional spelling and writing styles in digital communication will lead to the ruin of young people’s conventional literacy skills.”.
http://go.uen.org/1wu

A copy of the study
http://go.uen.org/1wv (Developmental Psychology)

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NATIONAL NEWS
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State supreme court to hear arguments in Common Core suit
Tulsa (OK) World

The Oklahoma Supreme Court is set to hear oral arguments Tuesday in a lawsuit challenging the constitutionality of legislation that repealed Common Core standards.
The plaintiffs — five school teachers, three parents of public school students and four members of the state Board of Education — requested that the case be expedited to limit any uncertainty it could cause for educators.
“It is apparent the court has expedited the hearing of this and certainly the petitioners and I are appreciative of that,” said Robert McCampbell, the attorney for the plaintiffs. “We are asking that it be resolved as soon as possible because if House Bill 3399 is unconstitutional as we contend, there is no need to go back to the Priority Academic Student Skills, the standards used before 2010, for the upcoming school years. Either way, students, parents and educators need to know.”
http://go.uen.org/1vZ

Missouri Governor Vetoes Bill to Arm Teachers, Signs Bill to Replace Common Core
Governing

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon vetoed on Monday a bill that would have allowed teachers to carry guns in the classroom, saying that ““arming teachers will not make our schools safer.”
The bill, SB656, called for teachers to be allowed to become “school protection officers” after undergoing firearms training, if their local school board approved. But in his veto message, Nixon said that despite arguments that schools in rural areas, far away from first responders, might need help during a shooting situation, giving guns to teachers isn’t the right way to address the problem.

In another school-related action, Nixon signed a bill, HB 1490, that directs Missouri officials to come up with their own version of state school standards, to replace the Common Core standards that have prompted controversy nationwide. Common Core will remain in effect while educator groups develop Missouri’s standards.
http://go.uen.org/1w0

http://go.uen.org/1w1 (Ed Week)

http://go.uen.org/1w2 (Columbia [MO] Daily Tribune)

Jeb Bush Draws Tea Party Ire Touting Education Record
Bloomberg

One of Jeb Bush’s biggest accomplishments is his work to improve Florida’s public schools — and that record may come under fiercest attack from his own party if he enters the Republican 2016 presidential primary.
The former governor is touting gains under his “A-plus” plan, which imposed statewide testing standards, provided financial rewards to improving schools and offered students a way out of those that were failing them. The state’s high-school graduation rate has increased to 75.6 percent, compared with 52.5 percent when Bush, 61, took office in 1999.
Yet his support for a similar set of national education standards, the “Common Core” initiative created in 2009 by the bipartian National Governors Association and backed by the White House, places him at odds with forces within his party who say it’s government overreach.
“There’s a lot of anger and concern about him running, because of his stance on education,” said Karen Effrem, co-founder of the Florida Stop Common Core Coalition, which is made up of several local Tea Party groups. “All he’s doing in expanding federal control and destroying the autonomy of parents and local school districts.”
http://go.uen.org/1wt

Schools a Haven for Kids Who Crossed Boarder Alone
Associated Press

ARLINGTON, Va. — Teacher Michael Coughlin sometimes learns about his students’ harrowing trips across the border alone and what they left behind from the essays they write. Other times, they’ll mention a court date or ask for help finding an immigration attorney.
Most of these students at H-B Woodlawn Secondary Program are determined, he says, but “they are also very scared because they don’t have certainty for their future here.”
America’s schools are one of the few government institutions where the children and teens coming unaccompanied across the border are guaranteed services, from science instruction to eye exams.
While their cases are being processed by immigration authorities, most of these minors are released to family members or sponsors who are told the children must be enrolled in school.
Schools and districts in metropolitan areas such as Washington, Houston and Miami have seen an uptick in the number of these students and anticipate more could enroll this fall.
http://go.uen.org/1wn

Quietly, a New Test Gains Advocates
Schools volunteer to test their students against global competitors
Harvard Education Letter

As educators and policymakers continue to debate the value of the new Common Core assessments and other mandatory assessments, a small but growing number of schools and districts are signing up to participate in a new and different kind of test: the OECD Test for Schools, a voluntary assessment designed by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development to gauge the thinking skills and attitudes of 15-year-olds.
Piloted during the 2012–13 school year at 105 U.S. schools, including a mix of traditional, magnet, and charter schools (and one private school), the new test was administered at nearly 300 schools this school year. Results will be available to participating schools as early as this month.
Participation is entirely confidential, as are the results. Yet leaders in a handful of schools have publicized their participation and posted their 2012–13 scores. Most say they were looking for a more challenging test than their state tests as a way of preparing teachers and students for the type of problem-solving tasks in the Common Core tests now in development. They also said that with all the emphasis on global competition, they were curious how their own students stacked up against students from other countries. A few participated in order to demonstrate that low-income minority students could perform as well or better than anyone else nationally or internationally.
http://go.uen.org/1ws

Before Buying Technology, Asking ‘Why?’
Education Week

District leaders and other advocates of personalized learning frequently say that the approach isn’t about technology. But that’s easy for an administrator to say when every child in his or her district has a school-provided computer.
The record of spending certainly seems to suggest districts believe that one requires the other.
http://go.uen.org/1wp

White House asked to stay away from school nutrition summit
Politico

BOSTON — Michelle Obama’s food policy czar, celebrity chef Sam Kass, was once so in with the lunch lady crowd that he landed a guest judge spot on a tearful school lunch episode of Food Network’s “Chopped” and handed out awards at the School Nutrition Association’s convention in Denver.
Two years later, when he asked to speak at the group’s annual convention this week in Boston, the answer: “No.”
The rebuke shows how ugly the fight has become between the first lady and her supporters, who want kids to eat more fruits, vegetables and whole grains in their school lunches, and the organization that represents cafeteria workers and their allies who argue that the federal government is going too far in its push for healthier meals.
At stake is the health of millions of kids, an $11 billion school lunch program dominated by big food companies that want to build brand loyalty early and even the legacy of the first lady — who has made combating the childhood obesity epidemic her primary cause.
http://go.uen.org/1w3

School Officials Try Healthier Cafeteria Options
Associated Press

BOSTON — Bean burgers, peanut butter substitutes and pre-sliced vegetable packets were on the menu Monday as school lunchroom managers from around the country sampled offerings in a hunt for fare that will meet stricter health mandates – without turning off sometimes-finicky students.
“I have my work cut out for me,” said Sara Gasiorowski, who was among the roughly 6,500 people attending a conference for school nutrition professionals at the convention center.
A director of food services for the school district in Wayne Township, Indiana, she was looking for healthy, affordable breakfast options as her district expects higher dairy and produce costs.
This fall, new requirements from the U.S. Department of Agriculture will alter the makeup of school meals, calling for less sodium and more fruits and vegetables. Grain-based foods such as breads, tortillas, crackers and pastas will have to be rich in whole grains. Calorie, fat and sodium limits will be placed on snacks and drinks sold in school vending machines, snack bars and a la carte lines.
http://go.uen.org/1wo

Staples, USPS end program to set up mini-post offices in stores
Reuters

Staples Inc SPLS.O said it will end a pilot program with the U.S. Postal Service to set up mini-post offices in the company’s retail outlets, after several protests outside the stores.
Postal workers have protested the program for months, objecting to expanding post office services to Staples stores, staffed with non-union workers.
The news comes days after the American Postal Workers Union won the support of the American Federation of Teachers (AFT) after it approved a resolution to boycott Staples.
http://go.uen.org/1wm

Edmonton school board drops abstinence-based sex ed after complaint
CBC

The Edmonton Public School Board has said it will tell teachers not to use an anti-abortion centre to teach part of its sexual education curriculum, after a high school student filed a human rights complaint over what she was taught.
Eighteen-year-old Emily Dawson and her mother Kathy have filed a human rights complaint over a workshop that the Edmonton Pregnancy Care Centre put on at McNally High School last year, which she says misled students about contraception, sexually transmitted infections and other issues in an effort to push abstinence.
“That was highly disappointing,” Dawson told CBC News.
Phone calls, emails and social media comments in response to media reports about the Dawsons’ complaint prompted board officials to make the change.
http://go.uen.org/1wq

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CALENDAR
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USOE Calendar
http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

UEN News
http://www.uen.org

July 15:
Executive Appropriations Committee meeting
1 p.m., 210 Senate Building
http://le.utah.gov/Interim/2014/html/00003737.htm

State Board of Education Superintendent Search Committee meeting
5 p.m., 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.utah.gov/pmn/sitemap/notice/223341.html

July 16:
Education Interim Committee meeting
2:30 p.m., 30 House Building
http://le.utah.gov/Interim/2014/html/00003664.htm

Political Subdivisions Interim Committee meeting
2:30 p.m., 25 House Building
http://le.utah.gov/Interim/2014/html/00003693.htm

July 17:
Utah State Board of Education meeting
4 p.m. 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

July 22:
Education Task Force
9 a.m., 210 Senate Building
http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2014&com=TSKEDU

August 14:
Utah State Charter School Board meeting
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://go.uen.org/1pn

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