Education News Roundup: July 18, 2014

The Elementary and Secondary Education Act as Reauthorized by the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001

The Elementary and Secondary Education Act as Reauthorized by the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001

Today’s Top Picks:

State School Board postpones its decision on whether to file for an extension of its ESEA waiver.
http://go.uen.org/1xX (SLT)
and http://go.uen.org/1xY (DN)
and http://go.uen.org/1yq (KUER)
and http://go.uen.org/dg (Politico)

There’s plenty of follow up on the Governor’s call for more information on Utah’s standards.
http://go.uen.org/1xT (SLT)
and lots more below or an analysis by Bob Bernick: http://go.uen.org/1xW (UP)

Utah teachers travel to Finland to see what they can learn about schools there.
http://go.uen.org/1yA (SLT)

Wisconsin Gov. Walker asks the legislature there to repeal Common Core.
http://go.uen.org/1yy (Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel)

————————————————————
TODAY’S HEADLINES
————————————————————

UTAH

State ponders, Should it go back to No Child Left Behind?
Public education > Decision on hold as debate continues over federal intrusion.

Utah guv wants academic standards re-examined
Education > A new website will invite the public to raise concerns about the content of specific requirements.

What can Utah schools learn from education leader Finland?
Education > Finland eschews testing, long hours.

‘Nurse-in’ held to protest letter given to breast-feeding mom

Utah teacher charged with inappropriately touching students

Truman Brothers headline Bear River band fundraiser

Are Advanced Placement courses worth it? Some top universities are beginning to say no

The 9 different types of AP teachers

OPINION & COMMENTARY

Public Education and Black Helicopters

Gov. Herbert: An Education Action Figure?

Logan principal faces the ire of breast-feeding moms

U.S. Students from Educated Families Lag in International Tests
It’s not just about kids in poor neighborhoods

NATION

Half of teachers leave the job after five years. Here’s what to do about it

Florida lawmakers quietly change third-grade retention law

Gov. Scott Walker calls for Legislature to repeal Common Core standards

Oklahoma students in education limbo? Superintendent of Oklahoma breaks it down

Major Revisions Underway for School Leaders’ Standards
Guidelines to reflect jobs’ changing roles

Report: College Aspirations Fall Short of Reality for Many Low-Income Students

————————————————————
UTAH NEWS
————————————————————

State ponders, Should it go back to No Child Left Behind?
Public education > Decision on hold as debate continues over federal intrusion.

After more than two hours of heated debate, the state school board voted Thursday evening to postpone a decision about whether to return to the unpopular federal education law No Child Left Behind.
The board voted to decide at its Aug. 8 meeting whether to seek a renewal of the state’s waiver to No Child Left Behind (NCLB). Opponents of renewing the waiver worry that doing so would further tie the state to federal control, while those in favor of renewal say that returning to NCLB would harm Utah students.
Without that waiver most of the state’s schools would be labeled as failing this year because NCLB requires 100 percent of students to be proficient in reading and math by 2014. Utah would also likely have to shift $26 million in federal dollars from their current uses to old programs and strategies.
In exchange for the waiver, Utah had to promise to implement a plan addressing college and career readiness, school accountability and teacher evaluation, among other things.
A standing-room-only crowd filled the board room Thursday, with many wearing stickers that said “Don’t renew the waiver.”
http://go.uen.org/1xX (SLT)

http://go.uen.org/1xY (DN)

http://go.uen.org/1yq (KUER)

http://go.uen.org/dg (Politico)

Utah guv wants academic standards re-examined
Education > A new website will invite the public to raise concerns about the content of specific requirements.

With new academic standards continuing to divide educators, lawmakers and parents, the governor will ask the Utah attorney general’s office to reexamine the state’s adoption of them.
Gov. Gary Herbert will ask the attorney general to look into what, if any, federal entanglements have been involved in Utah’s adoption of Common Core State Standards in math and language arts. He’s also convening a group of Utah experts to review the standards from a higher education perspective.
And his office has created a webpage to solicit comments about specific standards from the public.
http://go.uen.org/1xT (SLT)

http://go.uen.org/1y8 (OSE)

http://go.uen.org/1y9 (PDH)

http://go.uen.org/1ya (CVD)

http://go.uen.org/1yd (KUTV)

http://go.uen.org/1yg (KTVX)

http://go.uen.org/1yj (KSL)

http://go.uen.org/1ym (KSTU)

http://go.uen.org/1yn (KCSG)

http://go.uen.org/1yo (KCSG)

http://go.uen.org/1yp (KUER)

http://go.uen.org/1yr (KNRS)

http://go.uen.org/1ys (MUR)

http://go.uen.org/1yw (Ed Week)

http://go.uen.org/1yt (Governor’s Office)

What can Utah schools learn from education leader Finland?
Education > Finland eschews testing, long hours.

It’s a country that shies away from high-stakes school testing.
It’s a place where teachers are required to have master’s degrees, students spend less time in school than in the U.S., and early childhood education programs are available to all kids.
To some Utahns, the school system in Finland might sound like a dream, and, to others, a backward approach. But there’s no arguing with the results: Finland’s students rank far higher than those in the U.S. on international PISA tests.
At a time when Utahns are searching for ways to improve education – debating everything from new academic standards to teacher training to technology – some are turning to Finland for the answers.
More than 30 Utah educators recently visited the small Nordic nation as part of a Brigham Young University trip to learn about the schools there.
They were struck by a number of differences between Utah and Finnish schools. They saw strategies in Finland that might work in Utah, and others that might not translate.
http://go.uen.org/1yA (SLT)

Essays from teachers in the program:
Tara Black: http://go.uen.org/1yD (SLT)
Denise Hamsa: http://go.uen.org/1yB (SLT)
Russ McKell: http://go.uen.org/1yC (SLT)

‘Nurse-in’ held to protest letter given to breast-feeding mom

The summer free lunch program is dedicated to providing nutrition to children in the valley – unless you’re a breast-feeding baby. Then you’re out of luck.
Over 10 breast-feeding mothers sat down with their kids on Thursday at Mount Logan Middle School to participate in the free lunch and to breast-feed their babies in public to protest a letter another mother received Wednesday asking her to cover up or not breast-feed in the lunchroom.
http://go.uen.org/1xQ (LHJ)

http://go.uen.org/1y5 (DN)

http://go.uen.org/1yf (KTVX)

http://go.uen.org/1yh (KSL)

http://go.uen.org/1yl (KSTU)

Utah teacher charged with inappropriately touching students

Four fifth-grade girls in Salt Lake City have accused their teacher of touching them inappropriately.
James Rolland Carter, 62, was charged Wednesday in 3rd District Court with two second-degree felony counts of sexual abuse of a child and two class A misdemeanor counts of lewdness involving a child.
Carter’s school is not identified in the charges, but the address of the allegations matches Lincoln Elementary School.
The Salt Lake City School District would not confirm any details of a case involving Carter, but spokesman Michael Williams said that an elementary teacher who was employed for 13 years “is under investigation for alleged improper conduct.” Williams would not identify the teacher by name.
http://go.uen.org/1y4 (SLT)

http://go.uen.org/1yc (KUTV)

http://go.uen.org/1ye (KTVX)

http://go.uen.org/1yi (KSL)

http://go.uen.org/1yk (KSTU)

Truman Brothers headline Bear River band fundraiser

GARLAND — Bear River High School’s marching band has a problem.
“It’s a good problem to have, but it definitely is a problem,” said the band teacher, Wade Walton of Tremonton.
When Walton starting directing the marching band eight years ago, there were about 35 kids in the group.
“Now we’re pushing 100,” he said, and the number is expected to grow.
http://go.uen.org/1y7 (OSE)

Are Advanced Placement courses worth it? Some top universities are beginning to say no

Austin Drake planned to go to Columbia University since the age of 12. He took every Advanced Placement course he could manage, paying particular attention to science and math.
Drake knew that attending a school like Columbia would be too expensive for his parents; he’d need to get scholarships, grants and if possible, shorten his time there by testing out of core requirements. He hoped AP classes would help him, as they have a generation of students.
That promise, however, is now under threat. Top-tier universities are beginning to turn their backs on AP credit, and some college admissions advisers say taking those classes may no longer offer a competitive advantage to getting into elite schools.
http://go.uen.org/1xU (DN)

The 9 different types of AP teachers

Advanced Placement classes aren’t all about the students.
According to the 2013 College Board AP report, 132,555 high school teachers taught an AP class in the United States.
http://go.uen.org/1y6 (DN)

————————————————————
OPINION & COMMENTARY
————————————————————

Public Education and Black Helicopters
Utah Policy analysis by Bob Bernick

No doubt seeing political trouble ahead, GOP Gov. Gary Herbert announced Thursday morning a new special commission to look into Utah public education standards, and requested an attorney general opinion to “make sure” that Utahns are in fact in control of education standards, and not the feared Big Brother federal government.
If it’s not a case of a politician asking for a study to get the wackos off his back, it’s close to it.
But who can blame Herbert?
The “black-helicopter” folks on the Utah Republican Party’s right wing have been blasting Common Core for several years.
The issue first hit Herbert on the side of the head just before the 2012 state GOP convention.
He eliminated all right-wing challengers then, but he found himself defending Common Core all the same to some upset delegates.
But Herbert has already said he plans to run for re-election in 2016, and House Speaker Becky Lockhart, R-Provo, businessman Jonathon Johnson, and other Republicans are looking to get in the race and challenge him.
So it’s best not to let the Common Core sore fester.
http://go.uen.org/1xW

Gov. Herbert: An Education Action Figure?
Utah PoliticoHub commentary by KAREN PETERSON, who writes the blog Utah Moms Care

Gov. Herbert Press ConferenceToday, Gov. Herbert held a press conference to address the concerns he has heard regarding public education and to present a plan of action. The plan outlined three principles:
1 Maintaining high academic standards in all subjects.
2 Monitoring and limiting the federal government’s role in education.
3 Preserving state and local control, including in curriculum, testing, and instructional practices.
His plan includes:
http://go.uen.org/1yb

Logan principal faces the ire of breast-feeding moms
Salt Lake Tribune commentary by columnist PAUL ROLLY

There was the Ordain Women march against female exclusion from the LDS Church’s all-male priesthood that led to the excommunication of the group’s leader, Kate Kelly.
There were the numerous protests, mostly by women, over the Supreme Court decision that said Hobby Lobby could deny insurance coverage for certain types of contraception.
But the most concentrated expression of female outrage this summer was the ire descending this week on Mount Logan Middle School by breast-feeding mothers.
The Cache County school became the focus of national outrage when Principal Mike Monson wrote a letter to a mother attending the federal free summer-lunch program who breast-fed her baby without covering up.
http://go.uen.org/1y3

U.S. Students from Educated Families Lag in International Tests
It’s not just about kids in poor neighborhoods
Education Next analysis by Eric A. Hanushek, Paul E. Peterson and Ludger Woessmann

“The big picture of U.S. performance on the 2012 Program for International Student Assessment (PISA) is straightforward and stark: It is a picture of educational stagnation…. Fifteen-year olds in the U.S. today are average in science and reading literacy, and below average in mathematics, compared to their counterparts in [other industrialized] countries.”
U.S. secretary of education Arne Duncan spoke these grim words on the bleak December day in late 2013 when the international tests in math, science, and literacy were released. No less disconcerting was the secretary’s warning that the nation’s educational problems are not limited to certain groups or specific places. The “educational challenge in America is not just about poor kids in poor neighborhoods,” he said. “It’s about many kids in many neighborhoods. The [test] results underscore that educational shortcomings in the United States are not just the problems of other people’s children.”
In making his comments, Secretary Duncan challenged those who cling to an old belief that the nation’s educational challenges are confined to its inner cities. Most affluent Americans remain optimistic about the schools in their local community. In 2011, Education Next asked a representative sample to evaluate both the nation’s schools and those in their own community. The affluent were especially dubious about the nation’s schools-only 15 percent conceded them an A or a B. Yet 54 percent gave their local schools one of the two top ratings.
http://go.uen.org/13K

————————————————————-
NATIONAL NEWS
————————————————————-

Florida lawmakers quietly change third-grade retention law
Tampa Bay (FL) Times

As the Florida Education Association noted in its latest lawsuit, SB 850 did more than expand the state’s school voucher system.
It also changed the rules for Florida’s controversial and oft-copied third-grade retention rules, first promulgated by Jeb Bush. The rule, which as Politico noted is losing steam in other states, requires third graders to pass the state reading exam or repeat the grade until they can demonstrate the ability to move ahead.
The law always included exemptions, such as a performance portfolio, an alternate test score and consideration of disabilities and English proficiency. Now, the Legislature has added another way out: Previous third grade retention.
http://go.uen.org/1xZ

Gov. Scott Walker calls for Legislature to repeal Common Core standards
Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

Madison – Republican Gov. Scott Walker said Thursday he wants Wisconsin to repeal the Common Core education standards it has adopted along with most other states, making his strongest statement on the issue yet.
“Today, I call on the members of the state Legislature to pass a bill in early January to repeal Common Core and replace it with standards set by people in Wisconsin,” Walker said in a written statement.
The declaration comes after months of virtually no public debate among Wisconsin lawmakers on the standards; earlier this year, a proposal in the Legislature to undo them went nowhere, with Walker saying little.
http://go.uen.org/1yy

Half of teachers leave the job after five years. Here’s what to do about it
Hechinger Report  by Alexandria Neason

Amid intense debate about new education standards, and teacher tenure and pay, the Alliance for Excellent Education has turned the focus to new teachers – and their tendency to quit.
A new report, published by the Alliance in collaboration with the New Teacher Center (NTC), a non-profit that helps schools and policymakers develop training for new educators, found that about 13 percent of the nation’s 3.4 million teachers move schools or leave the profession every year, costing states up to $2 billion. Researchers estimate that over 1 million teachers move in and out of schools annually, and between 40 and 50 percent quit within five years.
The high turnover rates are sometimes due to layoffs, “but the primary reason they leave is because they’re dissatisfied,” said Richard Ingersoll, an education professor at the University of Pennsylvania whose research on teacher retention was published in the report. Teachers say they leave because of inadequate administrative support and isolated working conditions, among other things. These losses disproportionately affect high-poverty, urban and rural schools, where teaching staffs often lack experience.
A Consortium on Chicago School Research (CCSR) report found that schools serving low-income, minority students turn over half of their staffs every three years, deepening the divide between poor and wealthy students to the most experienced teachers.
But the new report says poor retention isn’t a commitment problem. It’s a support problem.
http://go.uen.org/1yz

Oklahoma students in education limbo? Superintendent of Oklahoma breaks it down
(Oklahoma City, OK) KFOR

For at least the next two years, Oklahoma students will be side-lined with an uncertain academic future.
Lawmakers repealed common core standards, and the Oklahoma supreme court affirmed that decision.
That means students will follow old pass standards, which no one thinks were rigorous enough for today’s college and work environment.
A two year back to the drawing board effort will begin to develop new Oklahoma standards.
Today, Superintendent of Oklahoma Janet Barresi is here to break down exactly what we’re facing in the months and years ahead.
http://go.uen.org/1y2

Major Revisions Underway for School Leaders’ Standards
Guidelines to reflect jobs’ changing roles
Education Week

Model standards used nationwide to guide, prepare, and evaluate school leaders-including principals, their supervisors, and superintendents-are expected to be revised and re-released this fall. The aim is to reflect the ways in which those jobs have changed in the past decade and to clarify roles, responsibilities, and expectations within a markedly different environment.
The latest Interstate School Leaders Licensure Consortium, or ISLLC, standards-last updated in 2008-are expected to be released in October.
In the months that follow, the Council of Chief State School Officers and the National Policy Board for Educational Administration, the groups leading the revision efforts, will also release revised National Educational Leadership Preparation, or NELP, standards, and new model standards for principal supervisors, who coach, evaluate, and provide other support to principals.
The revision of the ISLLC and NELP standards and the issuance of the first-ever national model standards for principal supervisors come at a critical time. Principals have had to adjust to a multitude of changes-in expectations, in job descriptions, and in performance benchmarks-resulting from federal and state policy initiatives.
http://go.uen.org/1yx

Report: College Aspirations Fall Short of Reality for Many Low-Income Students
Education Week

Many low-income students have high aspirations when it comes to college. However, they often don’t have the means or preparation to enroll and succeed.
New research out July 17 from ACT Inc. and the National Council for Community and Education Partnerships finds that while 95 percent of ACT-tested students from low-income families said they wish to pursue some type of postsecondary education, only 59 percent enroll in college right after high school. Overall, 87 percent of all ACT-tested graduates indicate they want to go to college and 71 percent of them do.
There is also a gap in preparation by wealth, the report finds. Just 69 percent of students from low-income families who took the ACT had completed the recommended core curriculum in high school (four years of English and three years each of mathematics, social studies and science), compared with 84 percent of students from high-income families.
http://go.uen.org/1y0

A copy of the report
http://go.uen.org/1y1 (ACT)

————————————————————
CALENDAR
————————————————————

USOE Calendar
http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

UEN News
http://www.uen.org

July 22:
Education Task Force
9 a.m., 210 Senate Building
http://le.utah.gov/Interim/2014/html/00003816.htm

August 8:
Utah State Board of Education meeting
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

August 14:
Utah State Charter School Board meeting
250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City
http://go.uen.org/1pn

September 6:
Executive Appropriations Committee meeting
1 p.m., 210 Senate Building
http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2014&Com=APPEXE

Related posts:

Comments are closed.