Education News Roundup: Aug. 11, 2014

Utah State Board of Education August meeting

Utah State Board of Education August meeting

Education News Roundup: Aug. 11, 2014

Today’s Top Picks:

Utah State Board of Education votes to conditionally seek an extension of the state’s ESEA waiver.

http://go.uen.org/1Gf (SLT)

and http://go.uen.org/1Gj (DN)

and http://go.uen.org/1Gi (OSE)

and http://go.uen.org/1GA (PDH)

and http://go.uen.org/1GG (SGS)

and http://go.uen.org/1Hb (KUTV)

and http://go.uen.org/1H5 (KSL)

and http://go.uen.org/1GR (KSTU)

and http://go.uen.org/1GU (KUER)

and http://go.uen.org/1H6 (Ed Week)

or  http://go.uen.org/rh (USOE)

ENR is going to miss Brenda Hales.

http://go.uen.org/1Gm (SLT)

and http://go.uen.org/1Ge (SLT)

Granite Board OKs a small tax hike.

http://go.uen.org/1Gg (SLT)

Ogden Board considers a small tax hike.

http://go.uen.org/1Gx (OSE)

“When the Water Canyon School opens its doors to students on Monday morning with an enrollment of 164 students, it will be serving children whose parents once viewed public education as an impediment to spiritual growth.”

http://go.uen.org/1Gs (DN)

White students no longer comprise a majority of U.S. public school students.

http://go.uen.org/1Gl (AP)

and http://go.uen.org/1H0 (AP)

GOP committee condemns new AP history framework.

http://go.uen.org/1H3 (Ed Week)

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TODAY’S HEADLINES

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UTAH

 

Utah School Board votes to renew Utah’s federal waiver Education » Common Core opponents are not happy, stage a protest rally.

 

Utah deputy education superintendent explains resignation Education » Hales said she had planned retirement.

 

Granite school board approves small tax hike Education » Money will pay for teacher training days; outdoor program to stay closed.

 

Ogden School District plans tax hike

 

See how Washington County stacks up on number of school administrators

 

New school provides hope, second chances for FLDS community

 

Bereavement mixed with optimism as new Dixie Middle opens

 

Weber High hosts forum on suicide, loss

 

September hearing set for Utah teacher accused of sex with students

 

Nephi teacher found not guilty of molesting student

 

Former School Bus Driver Accused Of Abusing Two Young Girls To Appear In Court

 

S.L. County Council considering former Hartvigsen School pool for adaptive recreation programs

 

New gym and cafeteria coming to Providence Elementary

 

ICSD promotes teacher collaboration to benefit students

 

New Elementary Education Director Meets Challenges For Upcoming School Year

 

Weber teachers get a blast of the future

 

Washington County Schools Among First To Kick Off New School Year

 

Should sex ed begin earlier?

 

Why has U.S. academic success dropped? The answer may be on the playground

 

 

 

 

OPINION & COMMENTARY

 

Washington County district runs lean

 

Catholic schools provide a unique option in Utah’s vibrant educational landscape

 

Thumbs up, thumbs down

 

Former Utah legislator is in wrong place at wrong time — again

 

The Conundrum of the Common Core Waiver

 

What does the NCLB waiver vote mean?

 

New lawsuit holds the school board accountable

 

Let’s teach kids to think critically

 

Jordan District ‘buyout’ is appalling

 

Step up anti-bullying efforts

 

Local educator fondly recalled

 

Pitching the ‘Non-Common-Core Curriculum’

 

 

 

NATION

 

White Students No Longer to be Majority in School

 

Republican National Committee Condemns New AP History Framework

 

‘Building A Better Teacher’: Dissecting America’s Education Culture

 

Bad behavior on Social Media Can Cost Recruits

 

Retired generals back FLOTUS in food fight

 

District drops federal lunch program

 

Regardless of location, concussions serious: study

 

Loudoun Valley football parents fight for helmet sensors, but administrators decline

 

New Mexico faces teacher shortage two days before school begins

 

Cultivation of Curiosity in Children Linked to Later Aptitude in Science

 

Katy Perry: I Could Really Use a Better Education

 

 

 

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UTAH NEWS

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Utah School Board votes to renew Utah’s federal waiver Education » Common Core opponents are not happy, stage a protest rally.

 

Utah schools will not return to the much-despised federal education law, No Child Left Behind, when classes resume in coming weeks, the state school board decided Friday.

The board voted to seek a renewal of the state’s waiver to No Child Left Behind (NCLB), pleasing the Utah PTA, the Utah Education Association, business leaders and all 41 district superintendents who had urged renewal.

The decision disappointed those who consider the waiver federal overreach that binds Utah to Common Core academic standards. Many of the critics protested outside as the board convened Friday.

Without the waiver, almost all Utah schools would have failed to meet the law’s goals this year. That’s because under NCLB, 100 percent of students were expected to be proficient in math and language arts by this year — a goal many consider unrealistic.

Also, Utah schools likely would have had to shift about $26 million now being used to help struggling students back to old programs and strategies, possibly in other schools.

http://go.uen.org/1Gf (SLT)

 

http://go.uen.org/1Gj (DN)

 

http://go.uen.org/1Gi (OSE)

 

http://go.uen.org/1GA (PDH)

 

http://go.uen.org/1GG (SGS)

 

http://go.uen.org/1Hb (KUTV)

 

http://go.uen.org/1H5 (KSL)

 

http://go.uen.org/1GR (KSTU)

 

http://go.uen.org/1GU (KUER)

 

http://go.uen.org/1H6 (Ed Week)

 

http://go.uen.org/rh (USOE)

 

 

 

 

 

Utah deputy education superintendent explains resignation Education » Hales said she had planned retirement.

 

Some Utah education leaders seemed somewhat caught off guard by the resignation of the state deputy superintendent late last week.

But Brenda Hales said she’d been telling colleagues for months that she planned to retire this fall or winter. She said she gave her notice on Friday and will use vacation and other leave until her retirement becomes official at the end of December.

“It may have been faster than some people thought,” Hales said Monday of her resignation, “but it’s been something I’ve had in mind for a long time.”

http://go.uen.org/1Gm (SLT)

 

http://go.uen.org/1Ge (SLT)

 

 

 

 

Granite school board approves small tax hike Education » Money will pay for teacher training days; outdoor program to stay closed.

 

The Granite School Board unanimously approved a 2.54 percent property tax increase Thursday night.

A resident with a home valued at just over $222,000 — the district average — will pay $22.24 more per year.

Four residents spoke in favor of the increase during the meeting, and no one spoke against, district spokesman Ben Horsley said on Friday.

The tax hike won’t fund new initiatives, but will enable the district to continue supporting the district’s 68,100 students.

http://go.uen.org/1Gg (SLT)

 

 

 

 

Ogden School District plans tax hike

 

OGDEN — The Ogden School District has scheduled a “Truth in Taxation” meeting at 6 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 14. The meeting is a public hearing on the district’s intent to raise property taxes above the certified tax rate.

http://go.uen.org/1Gx (OSE)

 

 

 

 

See how Washington County stacks up on number of school administrators

 

ST. GEORGE – As approximately 27,000 students return to the classroom Monday in the Washington County School District, an often-heard criticism is almost certain to be voiced among parents and, perhaps, even teachers.

That criticism is that the district operates with a larger-than-necessary administration in an era when more funds are needed for instruction in area schools.

District officials have heard the accusations before, and they counter that the Washington County School District is as lean as it can be for its size and that the district is operating with fewer administrators compared to similar-sized districts.

District Superintendent Larry Bergeson said he has heard the opinions of others that the school district is “top heavy” when it comes to the number of administrators compared to teachers and support staff, but “people don’t have the facts.”

“Compared to other districts our size, we are well under,” Bergeson said. “You can look at all of the stats compared to other averages, and it is not that we are under, we are well below what other districts have.”

http://go.uen.org/1Hc (SGS)

 

 

 

New school provides hope, second chances for FLDS community

 

HILDALE — Water Canyon School may look like just another public school.

But for the community it’s designed to serve, it is a symbol of hope and possibility. It is also the embodiment of second chances.

“The whole thing is a miracle,” said Willie Jessop, a former leader and spokesman for the Fundamentalist LDS Church. “Our community needed some hope, and the school is that hope. That’s the brightest light the community has had in many years. It’s a chance to educate itself out of the problems it’s created.”

When the Water Canyon School opens its doors to students on Monday morning with an enrollment of 164 students, it will be serving children whose parents once viewed public education as an impediment to spiritual growth.

http://go.uen.org/1Gs (DN)

 

 

 

 

Bereavement mixed with optimism as new Dixie Middle opens

 

ST. GEORGE – Students and teachers stepped into their first day Monday at the new Dixie Middle School with a mixture of optimism and sadness, eager for the school year to start but still reeling from the recent death of a beloved science teacher.

Terri Lusk passed away July 25 after being hit by a truck while jogging with a friend on Red Hills Parkway, and while she wasn’t there to help the new school year get underway, her presence was felt by students and staff alike.

http://go.uen.org/1GF (SGS)

 

 

 

 

Weber High hosts forum on suicide, loss

 

PLEASANT VIEW — Greg Gray used to joke with his family by quoting from The Dark Knight, a Batman blockbuster released in 2008. Every now and again around the house, he would teasingly ask, “Why … so … serious?” in his best imitation of the Joker villain’s voice.

“So I say the same thing to you young people here, Why so serious? Lighten up,” Greg’s father, Steve Gray, Gray told an audience gathered Friday at Weber High School for a forum on suicide and loss. “Laugh at yourself (and) give yourself a chance.”

Many teenagers are still without the life experiences they need to put their problems in perspective on a day to day basis, Gray said.

http://go.uen.org/1Gv (OSE)

 

 

 

 

September hearing set for Utah teacher accused of sex with students

 

Farmington • A former Davis High School English teacher accused of having sexual relationships with two teenage boys will have a preliminary hearing in September.

Brianne Altice, charged in Farmington’s 2nd District Court with four counts of first-degree felony rape and two counts of first-degree felony forcible sodomy, made a brief appearance in court Friday where a Sept. 19 preliminary hearing date was set.

According to court documents, Altice is accused of having sexual intercourse with a then-16-year-old student on several occasions between January and September of 2013.

Altice, 35, was set to go to trial in September, but last month, prosecutors filed more charges against her after a 17-year-old boy told police that he had sexual intercourse and oral sex with the former teacher once between April and June of last year.

http://go.uen.org/1Gq (SLT)

 

http://go.uen.org/1Gw (OSE)

 

http://go.uen.org/1GM (KUTV)

 

http://go.uen.org/1GQ (KSTU)

 

 

 

 

Nephi teacher found not guilty of molesting student

 

NEPHI — A Nephi teacher has been found not guilty of sexually molesting a former student.

A jury deliberated about two hours before returning the verdict Thursday evening in favor of 39-year-old Hadley Christensen.

He was charged with a first-degree felony count of aggravated sexual abuse of a child following a sleepover with his daughter and her 11-year-old friend at his Nephi home in December 2012.

http://go.uen.org/1GB (PDH)

 

http://go.uen.org/1GP (KUTV)

 

http://go.uen.org/1GV (MUR)

 

 

 

 

Former School Bus Driver Accused Of Abusing Two Young Girls To Appear In Court

 

John Carrell, a former Canyons School District bus driver, is set to make an appearance for a decision on a preliminary hearing Monday afternoon.

The former bus driver has been charged with 23 counts of aggravated sexual abuse of a child. Police believe Carrell repeatedly abusing two special needs girls while they were on the bus to Altara Elementary School.

A judge will hear whether Carrell wants a preliminary hearing the in the case, if Carrell waives his preliminary hearing the case will go straight to trial.

http://go.uen.org/1GN (KUTV)

 

 

 

S.L. County Council considering former Hartvigsen School pool for adaptive recreation programs

 

SALT LAKE CITY — Community members, among them Paralympic gold medalist Muffy Davis, want the Salt Lake County Council to use the pool at the former Hartvigsen School for county-run adaptive recreation programs.

Earlier this week, Davis told the County Council there is growing demand for recreational opportunities for people with disabilities.

“It’s not just the kids, but adults and the aging population,” she said.

The pool, located at 350 E. Baird Circle (3605 South), was built about 40 years ago, but the Granite School District discontinued its use after opening a new Hartvigsen School in Taylorsville. The school serves students with disabilities.

http://go.uen.org/1Gt (DN)

 

 

 

 

New gym and cafeteria coming to Providence Elementary

 

PROVIDENCE – A new and safer gym is on its way to Providence Elementary. The previous gymnasium, and cafeteria located in its basement, was brought down last month because it was no longer seismically safe.

http://go.uen.org/1GE (CVD)

 

 

 

 

ICSD promotes teacher collaboration to benefit students

 

CEDAR CITY – The Iron County School District has been preparing to welcome students back to the classroom, and this year, secondary school students will have the chance to reap the same benefits that come from teacher collaboration that have been enjoyed in the elementary schools for many years.

During the last school board meeting of the past academic year, the board approved a program in which middle and high schools within the district will start later in the morning every Wednesday.

During the time teachers would normally be preparing for their students and teaching on Wednesday mornings, they will get together to share challenges that come up in the classroom, working together to find solutions.

http://go.uen.org/1GH (SGS)

 

 

 

 

New Elementary Education Director Meets Challenges For Upcoming School Year

 

CEDAR CITY, Utah – The newest addition to the administrative team at the Iron County School District has his work cut out for him early on, but says he is up to the task and excited for his new role in the community.

ICSD Elementary Education Director Steven Burton said that despite the fact that he is still learning the ropes of his new position, he already has some solid goals in mind for the upcoming year.

http://go.uen.org/1GS (KCSG)

 

 

 

Weber teachers get a blast of the future

 

PLEASANT VIEW — In the future, homes will be automated, and even your refrigerator will be connected to the Internet.

“If your husband stole your yogurt, your fridge will know you need the yogurt and will place the order,” said Jerry Ropelato “That’s not too far off.”

There will also be flying cars and autonomous vehicles, and high-speed trains running between 700 and 1,500 miles per hour. Holographs will be commonplace, he said, and 3-D printing will be used in a variety of ways. A Chinese construction company is already using 3-D printers to create up to 10 small houses per day, and combining 3-D printing with human cells could soon result in the creation of new organs.

“The University of Kentucky made the claim six months ago that they believe they will have a fully functioning heart — with all of the vessels and muscles completely working — within 10 years,” he said.

Ropelato, from the Ogden Valley, is CEO of a high-tech business called WhiteClouds. He was invited to share some of the latest and greatest high-tech breakthroughs and plans around the world, with teachers at Brain Blast 2014. In addition to including ideas for colonies on Mars and space mining, and cutting-edge robotics and bionics, he ended his look into the future with a video about education, featuring an imagined classroom filled with touch screen smart desks.

“It was very overwhelming,” said Cheyleen Simone, a teacher from Roosevelt Elementary School in Washington Terrace. “It was very cool.”

Simone was one of many Weber School District employees attending Brain Blast 2014, held Aug. 6-7 at Weber High School.

http://go.uen.org/1Gy (OSE)

 

 

 

 

Washington County Schools Among First To Kick Off New School Year

 

Schools in Washington County are among the first in the state to open their doors.

“Once those kids come back, you’re on stage, said Washington County Superintendent Larry Bergeson. “It’s a minute by minute, hour by hour responsibility.”

http://go.uen.org/1GO (KUTV)

 

 

 

Should sex ed begin earlier?

 

To significantly lower the number of teen pregnancies, unsafe abortions and sexually transmitted diseases in the U.S., focused sex education needs to start as early as fifth grade, according to research out of Georgetown University.

http://go.uen.org/1Gr (DN)

 

 

 

 

Why has U.S. academic success dropped? The answer may be on the playground

 

A fierce rash on the boy’s flushed face was Tim Walker’s first clue his student was stressed.

http://go.uen.org/1Gu (DN)

 

 

 

 

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OPINION & COMMENTARY

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Washington County district runs lean

(St. George) Spectrum editorial

 

There is, perhaps, no more worthy profession than that of education. There is, perhaps, no more thankless profession than that of education.

That last statement is particularly true when talking about the district-level administrators. Often viewed as the people in power in the “ivory tower,” these people help set the tone for districts with their leadership and handle the often-unpleasant task of dealing with budgets and politicians as legislation moves through the process.

One complaint often heard in Washington County — particularly since the district moved from its cramped offices to the spacious structure at 121 W. Tabernacle St. in St. George — is that the district is too heavy on administrators at a time when schools are scraping by on pennies to educate the area’s more than 27,000 students.

With school starting Monday in the district, The Spectrum decided to take a look at the district’s staffing to see if the district office really is bloated. We promised last year when we urged you to vote in favor of a $185 million school bond that we would pay attention to how that money was spent. While this short investigation is not tied to that bond initiative, we felt it was important to follow through so you know we are paying attention to your concerns.

What we found is that the district actually is quite lean in comparison to other districts with similarly large numbers of students.

http://go.uen.org/1GI

 

 

 

Catholic schools provide a unique option in Utah’s vibrant educational landscape Deseret News editorial

 

In just a short time, the school year will begin. And over the next decade, an unprecedented number of new students are projected to flood into Utah’s public education system. Meeting their needs will require innovative solutions and different approaches. As such, elected officials and school administrators might do well to take a cue from Utah’s Catholic schools, which are doing something right.

Nationwide, Catholic schools have seen a serious decline in enrollment over the past few decades. Fifty years ago, there were nearly 13,000 Catholic schools in the United States with more than 5.2 million students. Today, the number of Catholic schools has been cut in half, and the number of students has dropped to 1.8 million.

Utah, however, is bucking the national trend. Since 1999, five Catholic schools opened their doors, and none have closed despite increased competition from the surge in charter schools.

http://go.uen.org/1Gh

 

 

 

 

Thumbs up, thumbs down

(Ogden) Standard-Examiner editorial

 

Thumbs up: To happy kids who receive back-to-school shopping sprese. We appreciate the efforts of the Davis Education Foundation Child Spree and other groups that make getting ready for school affordable for those in need.

http://go.uen.org/1Gz

 

 

 

 

Former Utah legislator is in wrong place at wrong time — again Salt Lake Tribune commentary by columnist PAUL ROLLY

 

Former Rep. Craig Frank has shown time and time again that he would love to get back into the Legislature. But when it comes to meeting residency requirements, he might have the worst timing of any politician in recent memory.

Frank was about as gung-ho a right-wing tea party lawmaker as anyone in Utah’s Capitol Hill. He often boasted of his libertarianism and anti-big-government passion on Facebook.

He was a tireless champion of education reforms that favored public charter schools while his wife, Kim, was a lobbyist for the Utah Association of Public Charter Schools.

http://go.uen.org/1Gn

 

 

 

 

The Conundrum of the Common Core Waiver

Utah PoliticoHub commentary by Sen. Margaret Dayton

 

I had the opportunity to address the State School Board today (on Friday, August 8, 2014) about the legislative intent of a bill that I passed nearly a decade ago.

HB 135 was passed in 2005, but the drafting and crafting process took a full two years. During the 2004 interim, every single education committee meeting discussed the onerous ramifications of No Child Left Behind (NCLB) and what could be done. HB 135 was the result of some of those discussions.

http://go.uen.org/1GK

 

http://go.uen.org/1GW (Utah Senate Site)

 

 

 

 

What does the NCLB waiver vote mean?

Utah PoliticoHub commentary by columnist DANIEL BURTON

 

The Utah State Board of Education (USBE) votes whether to renew the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) waiver on Friday August 8. While the ostensible result of the vote will be to renew or not renew the waiver, there will be efforts by all interested parties to label what the vote means.

http://go.uen.org/1GL

 

 

 

New lawsuit holds the school board accountable

(Provo) Daily Herald op-ed by Connor Boyak, president of Libertas Institute

 

Earlier this month, Libertas Institute announced a new lawsuit against Common Core here in Utah. There are six plaintiffs: two teachers, two parents of school aged children, and two school board members. None of them were consulted prior to adopting the Common Core standards in our state.

That may sound a bit silly — who are they to think they should have been consulted? As it turns out, state law requires it; § 53A-1-402.6 of the Utah code requires the Utah State Board of Education to establish and implement standards “in consultation with local school boards, school superintendents, teachers, employers, and parents.” The point of this law is to ensure local control and buy-in of whatever standards the Board adopts.

That didn’t happen with Common Core — and it should have. Here’s what actually happened.

http://go.uen.org/1GC

 

 

 

 

Let’s teach kids to think critically

(St. George) Spectrum op-ed by Leigh Washburn, chairwoman of the Iron County Democratic Party

 

We’ve known for a long time that American students lag behind the rest of the industrialized world in math and science. Some industries find it hard to recruit employees who have the basic skills to perform jobs that are available. As a university professor, I encountered many college students with woefully inept writing and other communications skills.

We need a K-12 education system that teaches children how to understand and, later, to critically analyze what they read, how to present their own ideas and back them up, how to set up basic math problems and understand why they work.

Recognizing that different geographic areas and different student populations require different approaches, how to achieve these goals is best left to educators at the local level. But surely no one could disagree with the overall concept.

Oh wait. They could if it meant actually agreeing with something coming from the Obama administration. Except in this case, it didn’t, although some conservatives would have you believe otherwise.

Some elements of this “subversive” Common Core plan came from George W. Bush’s No Child Left Behind program, but it was largely the result of efforts by former Arizona governor and then chair of the National Governors Association Janet Napolitano in 2008.

http://go.uen.org/1GJ

 

 

 

Jordan District ‘buyout’ is appalling

Salt Lake Tribune letter from Peter and Sandy Hahn

 

We are residents of West Jordan and support the Jordan School District with our taxes, although we have no children in the district.

We are appalled by the story regarding the “buyout” of Burke Jolley’s contract. It appears that Mr. Jolley voluntarily “removed” himself from district employment. We believe this constitutes cancellation of his contract. To reward him with half a million dollars in salary and benefits, not to mention an unearned bonus for the coming year and purchase of more retirement credits, is unbelievable and disgusting. It appears that when you have a professional contract with the Jordan School District, you get paid very well, whether you work or not!

http://go.uen.org/1Gp

 

 

 

Step up anti-bullying efforts

Salt Lake Tribune letter from Kayla Contreras

 

Crime rates are rising and public schools are not as safe as they once were. Bullying has been in the news a lot lately, and as a mother of a young child, it’s frightening to think about what could happen to my child. This is a topic that needs constant attention.

I understand that schools cannot follow up every report of bullying and that some kids will grow out of it, but research shows that 40 percent of the boys identified as bullies in grades six through nine had three or more arrests by the age of 30. We have to find a better way to help bullies in their youth.

http://go.uen.org/1Go

 

 

 

 

Local educator fondly recalled

(Logan) Herald Journal letter from Margie Seager-Olsen

 

Rulon Clair Olsen, what an inspiration to young minds!

In 1964-65, I was blessed to have Mr. Olsen as my fifth-grade teacher, the first year he taught at Wilson Elementary School. Miss Hazel Adams was the principal, and Mrs. DeSpain the secretary. The younger photo published in the paper is how I remember him.

http://go.uen.org/1GD

 

 

 

 

Pitching the ‘Non-Common-Core Curriculum’

Education Week commentary by columnist Catherine Gewertz

 

Most publishers are scrambling to produce materials aligned to the common core, since those math and English/language arts guidelines are in effect in 43 states and the District of Columbia. But some, it seems, are keeping their eye on a niche market: parents who want to opt their kids out of those standards.

Discovery K12 is a case in point. The publisher of free, online homeschooling curricula is aiming its product at common-core opponents, noting in its marketing materials that the common standards are “one of the main reasons” that parents are choosing to teach their children at home. (Whether research would bear this out as a “main reason” for homeschooling remains to be seen.)

Check out their pitch, in a press release issued today.

http://go.uen.org/1H2

 

 

 

 

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NATIONAL NEWS

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White Students No Longer to be Majority in School Associated Press

 

KENNETT SQUARE, Pa. — The cheerful sign outside Jane Cornell’s summer school classroom in Pennsylvania’s wealthiest county says “Welcome” and “Bienvenidos” in polished handwriting.

Inside, giggling grade-schoolers who mostly come from homes where Spanish is the primary language worked on storytelling with a tale about a crocodile going to the dentist. The children and their classroom at the Mary D. Lang Kindergarten Center, near both mushroom farms and the borough’s bucolic red-brick downtown, are a subtle reminder of America’s changing school demographics.

For the first time ever, U.S. public schools are projected this fall to have more minority students than non-Hispanic whites enrolled, a shift largely fueled by growth in the number of Hispanic children.

Non-Hispanic white students are still expected to be the largest racial group in the public schools this year at 49.8 percent. But the National Center for Education Statistics says minority students, when added together, will now make up the majority.

http://go.uen.org/1Gl

 

http://go.uen.org/1H0 (AP)

 

 

 

 

Republican National Committee Condemns New AP History Framework Education Week

 

The Republican National Commitee is calling for a fight against the College Board’s new framework for Advanced Placement U.S. History, claiming that it  “deliberately distorts and/or edits out important historical events.”

The new framework “reflects a radically revisionist view of American history that emphasizes negative aspects of our nation’s history while omitting or minimizing positive aspects,” said a resolution adopted by the RNC on Friday at its summer meeting in Chicago.

The resolution demands that the College Board delay for at least one year its plan to debut the framework in high schools this fall. It urges that a committee be convened to draft a new AP U.S. history framework that is “consistent both with the APUSH course’s traditional mission, with state history standards, and with the desires of U.S. parents and other citizens for their students to learn the true history of their country.” And it calls on Congress to “investigate this matter” and withhold any funding to the College Board until a suitable framework is produced.

Asked for a response to the RNC resolution, College Board spokeswoman Carly Lindauer said in an email that the new AP U.S. history framework, developed and “overwhelmingly supported by” college faculty and expert AP teachers, is “built to be flexible.”

“It allows for a focus on state priorities, as well as teacher and parent choices that best fit the needs of their individual students,” she wrote. “The new course emphasizes the American founding documents and their essential role in our nation’s history, and recognizes American heroism, courage, and innovation. College Board leaders continue to meet with individuals who have concerns about the redesign to listen and receive feedback.”

http://go.uen.org/1H3

 

 

 

‘Building A Better Teacher’: Dissecting America’s Education Culture NPR All Things Considered

 

Teacher effectiveness is a hot topic in education circles right now. How do you measure it, and how can you improve it? What type of teachers should schools keep, and who should they let go?

Elizabeth Green says that it’s not, as some people assume, a question of personality or charisma. Great teachers are not born, they’re made, she says — and there’s much more to teaching than being “good” or “bad” at it. Her book, Building a Better Teacher, explores teaching as a craft and shows just how complicated that craft can be.

Green studied teaching methods in both American and Japanese classrooms over the span of six years. She tells NPR’s Arun Rath that teaching must itself be taught and that individual techniques are key.

http://go.uen.org/1GT

 

http://go.uen.org/1H7 (Hechinger Report)

 

http://go.uen.org/1H8 (Education Next)

 

 

 

 

Bad behavior on Social Media Can Cost Recruits Associated Press

 

At St. Paul’s Episcopal School in Mobile, Alabama, the high school that produced Crimson Tide quarterbacks AJ McCarron and Jake Coker, there’s a new preseason ritual for football players: the social media talk.

It’s about more than minding their manners. Coach Steve Mask warns players not to post about injuries, which can scare away recruiters. Committing on Twitter to a school is also discouraged – one recent former player tweeted commitments to four different schools without informing any coaches.

“He came across as being not reliable,” Mask said. “He gets a little joy out of the attention, but it’s not worth it.”

This season, Mask is taking his players’ online personas so seriously that he’s assigning an assistant to monitor their accounts. As college programs increasingly use Twitter, Instagram and other social media accounts to evaluate a player’s character, one wrong comment can cost a scholarship offer.

http://go.uen.org/1H1

 

 

 

Retired generals back FLOTUS in food fight Politico

 

First lady Michelle Obama has an unexpected force backing her up in the simmering fight over school lunch standards: retired admirals and generals.

Mission: Readiness, a group of nearly 500 former military leaders, is planning to “storm the Hill” when Congress comes back to town next month and urge lawmakers to keep new school nutrition standards intact.

“We’re not going to retreat our way out of the problem,” said Lt. Gen. Norman Seip, who served in the Air Force for 35 years and is now a vocal advocate for the group.

Formed in 2008, Mission: Readiness aims to ensure kids are healthy and educated enough to serve in the military — or just be productive civilians. For the top military brass, the obesity epidemic is increasingly seen as a threat to national security.

About 75 percent of young adults are not eligible to serve in the military because of obesity, lack of education and/or criminal records, according to Defense Department data cited by the retired military leaders.

http://go.uen.org/1Gk

 

 

 

 

District drops federal lunch program

Cincinnati Enquirer

 

Lunch at Fort Thomas Independent Schools may include more French fries, fewer vegetables and larger portions this year. One thing that won’t be on the menu: federal dollars.

The Campbell County district is opting out of the federal school lunch program, forfeiting hundreds of thousands of dollars in federal funding.

The reason: Kids didn’t like their healthful lunches.

http://go.uen.org/1Ha

 

 

 

Regardless of location, concussions serious: study Reuters

 

NEW YORK – Concussions in high school football players are equally serious no matter where on the head the hit occurred, according to a new study.

Regardless of where on the head the players were hit, their symptoms were similar, as were the length of time symptoms lasted and how long players stayed off the field, researchers found.

“We were actually a little bit surprised,” Dawn Comstock told Reuters Health. “Based on some of our prior research, we expected to see some differences.”

http://go.uen.org/1GZ

 

 

 

Loudoun Valley football parents fight for helmet sensors, but administrators decline Washington Post

 

Amid widespread debate about head trauma and the safety of playing football, parents of the athletes at Loudoun Valley High School in Purcellville, Va., were thrilled when a Bethesda, Md., company offered to place impact sensors on team helmets. A light would turn on when a helmet took a big hit, an indicator that trainers should check for a concussion.

Brain Sentry, partnering with Inova Neuroscience Research, wanted to put the sensors on all Loudoun football and lacrosse helmets to identify the risks athletes face and to study data from more than 2,000 students.

But Loudoun County school officials declined the offer, saying that the sensors lacked sufficient testing and that the one-ounce devices could void the helmets’ safety certification. They also said they worry that the sensors could report false positives, that the school system doesn’t have enough trainers to properly monitor players wearing the sensors and that opponents might target key players if they know that tripping a sensor could mean getting someone off the field.

While both sides say students’ safety is their priority, the school system’s decision set off a battle with the group of Loudoun Valley parents, who almost immediately defied school system orders forbidding the sensors.

http://go.uen.org/1GX

 

 

 

 

New Mexico faces teacher shortage two days before school begins Reuters

 

ALBUQUERQUE N.M. – Just two days before classes resume, New Mexico’s biggest school district faces a shortage of almost 200 teachers, officials say, with the majority of the unfilled positions in special education and elementary grades.

With some 87,000 students due to return to Albuquerque Public Schools (APS) on Wednesday, the district is still looking for 392 staff, including 198 teachers.

APS spokeswoman Johanna King said the shortages represented just a small fraction of the district’s total teacher roster of around 6,300. But she said they were a challenge.

http://go.uen.org/1GY

 

 

 

 

Cultivation of Curiosity in Children Linked to Later Aptitude in Science Education Week

 

Washington – The key to the United States winning the international race for the most STEM workers may be allowing—and even encouraging—kids to ask “why? why? why?”

All children have some level of innate curiosity that drives them to explore the way things work. But parents can cultivate that curiosity by exposing their children to new ideas and encouraging them to ask questions. And doing so could lead to effects that unfold for years, Adele E. Gottfried, a professor of educational psychology at California State University Northridge, said at the American Psychological Association Convention.

In a study of 118 children and their parents, Gottfried found that parents’ answers on a survey, taken when their children were 8, about their efforts to encourage creativity correlated strongly with their children’s interest and ability in science during the middle school years and, later, their enrollment in greater numbers of science courses in high school.

“Exploration is the central foundation of scientific endeavors,” Gottfried said. So children who’ve learned to search for answers without the promise of an extrinsic reward may be more skilled at it or drawn to it.

http://go.uen.org/1H4

 

 

 

 

Katy Perry: I Could Really Use a Better Education Yahoo!

 

As Katy Perry nears her 30th birthday in October, the hitmaker has plenty to celebrate, from her chart-topping albums to her sold-out shows around the world. But she has one big thing she regrets (and, no, it’s not Russell Brand).

“I’m kind of bummed at this stage that I didn’t have a great education because I could really use that these days,” she confessed to Yahoo in an exclusive interview.

Even before dropping out of high school during her freshman year, Perry’s learning was admittedly stunted. As her pastor parents were always starting new churches, her family was constantly moving. “I was being pulled out of school even in the middle of school and sometimes being home-schooled. Sometimes we were sent to these really half-Christian, half-education, I-don’t-know-what-they-were schools,” she explained.

Still, it was great teachers who helped push the pop star toward success.

http://go.uen.org/1H9

 

 

 

 

 

————————————————————

CALENDAR

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USOE Calendar

http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

 

 

UEN News

http://www.uen.org

 

 

August 14:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://go.uen.org/1pn

 

 

August 18:

Utah State Board of Education Superintendent Search Committee meeting

5 p.m., 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://www.utah.gov/pmn/sitemap/notice/226553.html

 

 

September 4-5:

Utah State Board of Education meeting

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

 

 

September 16:

Executive Appropriations Committee meeting

1 p.m., 210 Senate Building

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2014&Com=APPEXE

 

 

September 17:

Education Interim Committee meeting

2:30 p.m., 30 House Building

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2014&Com=INTEDU

 

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