Education News Roundup: Aug. 13, 2014

"Kids going to school" by Spyros Papaspyropoulos/CC/flickr

“Kids going to school” by Spyros Papaspyropoulos/CC/flickr

Education News Roundup

Today’s Top Picks:

Some Utah school districts are still looking for teachers.

http://go.uen.org/1If (KSL)

UDOT unveils a walking-to-school app.

http://go.uen.org/1HY (SLT)

and http://go.uen.org/1I0 (DN)

and http://go.uen.org/1Ic (KUTV)

and http://go.uen.org/1Id (KTVX)

and http://go.uen.org/1Ij (KSL)

and http://go.uen.org/1Ii (KSTU)

New West Valley charter school focuses on teen moms.

http://go.uen.org/1Ib (KUTV)

BYU poli-sci professor floats the idea of a ballot initiative on funding Utah schools.

http://go.uen.org/1HM (DN)

Study find schools staffing is up, but mostly for aides.

http://go.uen.org/1HU (Marketplace)

or a copy of the report

http://go.uen.org/1HV (Fordham)

GOP lawmakers want ESEA waivers probed.

http://go.uen.org/1Is (Ed Week)

and http://go.uen.org/1Iw (The Hill)

and http://go.uen.org/1Ix (The Blaze)

 

 

 

 

 

————————————————————

TODAY’S HEADLINES

————————————————————

 

 

UTAH

 

Districts still filling teaching positions for coming school year

 

Walking to school in Utah? There’s an app for that Walking School Bus helps parents make sure kids take safe routes and alerts them when students arrive at destination.

 

School cafeteria evaluation leads to low-cost solutions with big impacts

 

Charter School Exclusively For Teen Mothers Coming To West Valley City

 

Granite, Salt Lake school districts approve tax increases

 

Hildale public school reopens after more than a decade

 

Cache County School District discusses design of North Logan High School

 

Snow College Expands Concurrent Enrollment

 

Top scholars in Utah Valley get top scholarships

 

Ex-bus driver ordered to stand trial on 33 sex abuse charges

 

First Day of School in Washington County

 

10 tips for easy back-to-school transitions

 

Preventing back-to-school colds

 

Making Back To School Trends Happen

 

Best states for underprivileged children

 

 

 

OPINION & COMMENTARY

 

Defend Utah academic standards

 

Despite leaders, Utah needs a comprehensive education plan

 

Schools that nurture individual greatness

 

School choice: Parenting not politics

 

Bullying in our schools must be addressed now

 

With Fractions, Common-Core Training Goes Beyond ‘Invert and Multiply’

 

National Food Fight

 

Readin’, Writin’ and Social Justice Agitatin’

 

Yes, I am a teacher. No, I am not going to destroy society and your children The anti-union celebrities (and their secret backers) have taken the war on teachers public. But educators shouldn’t have to defend doing our jobs

 

Robo-readers aren’t as good as human readers — they’re better

 

 

 

NATION

 

School staffing up 500%, but not with teachers

 

Republican Lawmakers Ask GAO to Probe NCLB Waivers

 

Can You Fight Poverty by Paying Kids to Go to School?

 

Judge tells California to teach English learners

 

Now hiring: School consultant for unaccompanied immigrant students

 

Oklahoma seeking extension of its No Child Left Behind waiver Repeal of Common Core leaves the NCLB waiver in question.

 

Bobby Jindal shouldn’t be deposed in Common Core case, lawyer argues

 

Kansas State Board of Education member challenges Common Core

 

Chinese Seek Freedom, Edge at US High Schools

 

Michelle Rhee Prepares To Leave CEO Job At StudentsFirst, Group She Founded

 

Google’s Classroom tool open to teachers worldwide Now open to all Google Apps for Education users, Classroom helps teachers work with students in and out of the classroom.

 

States Get $28M in Grants to Defray AP Exam Costs

 

Douglas County football player has died

 

 

 

————————————————————

UTAH NEWS

————————————————————

 

Districts still filling teaching positions for coming school year

 

SALT LAKE CITY — As many parents are getting ready to send their kids back to school, some districts are in a rush to hire enough teachers to greet them, a district spokesperson says.

Salt Lake City School District is in the process of filling 28 positions that are vacant as a result of creating more teaching positions in an effort to reduce class sizes, an increase in the number of students, late resignations and the difficulty of filling some of the positions, according to Craig Ruesch, executive director of Human Resources.

About two-thirds of those positions are elementary school teaching positions, and the others are secondary level teaching positions. The district initially needed to fill 35 openings, and had 28 openings remaining as of Tuesday. At the beginning of most school years, the district typically has between 10 and 15 openings to fill.

http://go.uen.org/1If (KSL)

 

 

 

Walking to school in Utah? There’s an app for that Walking School Bus helps parents make sure kids take safe routes and alerts them when students arrive at destination.

 

In the past, kids had to walk to school, uphill both ways, in the snow — and they didn’t even have a smartphone app to help them.

The Utah Department of Transportation (UDOT) has fixed that (at least the app part).

UDOT unveiled on Tuesday a new, free app aimed at making it simple for Utah kids to safely walk to school. The Walking School Bus app helps parents locate and coordinate with other walkers in their neighborhoods, and it alerts parents when their children make it to class.

Cherissa Wood, with UDOT, said there’s been a 65 percent reduction in the number of kids walking and biking to school in the last 25 years nationwide, and she said the main reason is safety concerns.

http://go.uen.org/1HY (SLT)

 

http://go.uen.org/1I0 (DN)

 

http://go.uen.org/1Ic (KUTV)

 

http://go.uen.org/1Id (KTVX)

 

http://go.uen.org/1Ij (KSL)

 

http://go.uen.org/1Ii (KSTU)

 

 

 

 

School cafeteria evaluation leads to low-cost solutions with big impacts

 

WEST JORDAN — Roles were reversed Tuesday at Hayden Peak Elementary School, with school district officials getting a lesson on the science behind serving food.

In an effort to improve food consumption at Hayden Peak Elementary, the Utah State Office of Education flew Kathryn Hoy, manager for the Cornell Center for Behavioral Economics and Child Nutrition Programs to Utah to evaluate the school’s lunchroom environment.

The school scored above average, Hoy said, though she also made some minor suggestions. And the good news is that most of the changes can be made without additional cost.

“Just by putting whole fruit in a bowl in a high-traffic area, like next to the register, you can increase your fruit sales by 102 percent,” she said. “The studies we’ve done have some really impactful numbers behind it.”

http://go.uen.org/1HZ (DN)

 

http://go.uen.org/1IB (KSTU)

 

 

 

 

Charter School Exclusively For Teen Mothers Coming To West Valley City

 

Construction crews are rushing to finish work at the new, first-of-its-kind Utah Charter School for teen moms.

Kairos Academy in West Valley City will cater not only to the young mother, but to their babies as well.

“We are here to be that hand that pushes them along and when something happens and we help pick them back up and tell them they can keep going,” said Adrienne Lansing, one of the founders of the school.

http://go.uen.org/1Ib (KUTV)

 

 

 

Granite, Salt Lake school districts approve tax increases

 

SALT LAKE CITY — The school boards of Granite School District and Salt Lake City School District have approved tax increases during recent Truth in Taxation hearings.

Granite residents will see an increase of $22.24 per year for the average home — valued at $222,159 — which will generate roughly $3.7 million for the school district, spokesman Ben Horsley said.

http://go.uen.org/1I1 (DN)

 

 

 

 

Hildale public school reopens after more than a decade

 

HILDALE, Utah – Students in Hildale are going back to school, some for the first time in over a decade. The Washington County School District reopened the town’s public school this year. It’s called the Water Canyon School. Community members say they hope the school will repair some of the isolation they’ve felt from members of the FLDS church..

Formerly Phelps elementary, the public school shut down in 200 after a revelation from FLDS leader Warren Jeffs resulted in almost all the students being pulled out. Residents of the Southern Utah town approached the school district about reopening it.

http://go.uen.org/1Ih (KSTU)

 

 

 

Cache County School District discusses design of North Logan High School

 

The look of the new high school in North Logan is starting to take shape after Mike Liechty presented preliminary design plans to the Cache County School District Board of Education on Thursday.

http://go.uen.org/1I7 (LHJ)

 

 

 

 

Snow College Expands Concurrent Enrollment

 

Ephraim – Snow College is reaching out to small schools throughout the state to offer two way video concurrent enrollment classes. According to Craig Mathie, Vice President for Student Success at Snow College, the state legislature appropriated $1.3 million dollars for the expansion. This will allow high school students in out of the way areas to take college level courses while still in high school.

http://go.uen.org/1Ik (MUR)

 

 

 

Top scholars in Utah Valley get top scholarships

 

It seems we read a great deal about murder, mayhem and mischief in the papers today among young people. But there’s an outstanding exception with those involved in the Hugh O’Brian (HOBY) Youth Leadership of Utah.

It all began, as old-timers will remember a black and white TV hero of the ‘50s, with the name of the original Wyatt Earp on TV — aka Hugh O’Brian.

http://go.uen.org/1I5 (PDH)

 

 

 

Ex-bus driver ordered to stand trial on 33 sex abuse charges

 

WEST JORDAN — A judge ruled Monday that the question of whether a former Canyons School District bus driver routinely abused two girls on his bus will go before a jury.

Third District Judge Bruce Lubeck ordered John Martin Carrell, 61, to stand trial on 33 counts of aggravated sexual abuse of a child, a first-degree felony, that Carrell is facing in two separate cases. Both cases involve two young girls with special needs.

The judge, however, did dismiss a single count of attempted aggravated sexual abuse of a child, a first-degree felony, Monday.

http://go.uen.org/1I2 (DN)

 

http://go.uen.org/1Hp (KUTV)

 

 

 

 

 

First Day of School in Washington County

 

http://go.uen.org/1I8 (SGS)

 

 

 

 

10 tips for easy back-to-school transitions

 

SALT LAKE CITY — There is no question that when the lazy days of summer come to an end, the transition to a new school year can be tough. Going back to a strict schedule and routine can make the first few weeks of school grueling.

http://go.uen.org/1Ie (KSL)

 

 

 

 

Preventing back-to-school colds

 

By her own account, Jeanne Gallagher is no germaphobe. The mom of three has always encouraged her girls to play hard outdoors in the dirt all summer and says she doesn’t mind if they suffer from an occasional cold or virus. She knows that’s helping to build her daughters’ immune systems.

But back-to-school time brings the busy mother a serious case of dread. “School is like a petri dish because the students interact within a closed-in space and the bacteria and viruses are able to grow on lots of unsuspecting hosts,” says Gallahger, who works in television and film production. “Inevitably, they get sick.”

http://go.uen.org/1Ig (KSL)

 

 

 

Making Back To School Trends Happen

 

Time to gear up for back to school and Ron is looking at this year’s hottest trends your students will be wanting.

http://go.uen.org/1Ia (KUTV)

 

 

 

 

Best states for underprivileged children

 

Who classifies as “underprivileged” in America?

According to the personal finance website Wallet Hub, those deprived of basic necessities such food, love and care make up the forgotten of our society. “Such are fundamental rights, not privileges,” they wrote in anticipation of International Youth Day, pointing out that many of America’s children fail to receive the basic care they deserve.

http://go.uen.org/1HN (DN)

 

http://go.uen.org/1Il (MUR)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

————————————————————

OPINION & COMMENTARY

————————————————————

 

Defend Utah academic standards

(Ogden) Standard-Examiner editorial

 

Educators in Utah need to do all they can to defend the current educational standards in the state. It would help if legislators showed the same diligence.

We’re glad that Utah educators renewed the state’s No Child Left Behind waiver. NCLB is not perfect and Utah needs appropriate autonomy to maintain and improve educational standards. Utah’s not alone in applying for a waiver; 43 states have in all.

There was opposition to Utah’s waiver position. Activists, many of whom oppose Common Core educational standards, were demonstrating last week. These anti-Common Core activists have the ear of some Utah state legislators. A recent law in our state mandates that the state board of education post potential educational standards on its website, invite public comment and hold three public meetings in distinct areas of the state.

We support those efforts.

http://go.uen.org/1I3

 

 

 

Despite leaders, Utah needs a comprehensive education plan Deseret News op-ed by Richard Davis, professor of political science at Brigham Young University

A. Scott Anderson, the CEO of Zions Bank, recently wrote an op-ed on these pages advocating a comprehensive plan for Utah’s public education in the 21st century. I wholeheartedly agree with Mr. Anderson’s call. Just as the state adopted and implemented a comprehensive transportation plan, so Utah needs a similar education plan that will reform education and increase currently inadequate funding.

The need is acute. Utah spends just over half the national average per pupil on education. By contrast, New York state’s per pupil spending is three times that of Utah’s. But it isn’t just the traditional high spending states that Utah lags behind. Utah’s spending is significantly below that of states notorious for low education spending, such as Oklahoma, Mississippi and Idaho.

How does Utah climb out of this hole?

http://go.uen.org/1HM

 

 

 

 

Schools that nurture individual greatness

(Ogden) Standard-Examiner op-ed by LYNN STODDARD, a retired educator

 

In a few days another school year will be upon us. Will it be business as usual? Utah has a subject-centered system that tries to standardize and make students fit a predetermined curriculum. Would you rather have a system that aims to develop the unique, unlimited potential of each student?

Consider the words of Ralph Waldo Emerson: “The secret of education lies in respecting the pupil. It is not for you to choose what he shall know, what he shall do. It is chosen and foreordained and only he knows the key to his own secret.”

If Emerson’s words are true, then who should choose what each child should know and be able to do? In a compulsory, subject-centered system, “experts” decide what all students are supposed to know and be able to do at grade-level check points. The subject matter content is chosen before the student ever enters the classroom.

In contrast to this is a student-centered system wherein the subjects are chosen “after” the teacher learns who the students are and what they can do.

http://go.uen.org/1I4

 

 

 

 

School choice: Parenting not politics

(Provo) Daily Herald commentary by Ganel-Lyn Condie, a former magazine editor and award winning journalist

 

Before you become a parent you have a lot of NEVERS: Never will my kids do this … Never will I let my kids to that … It is so easy to pass judgement on misbehaving toddlers and rebellious teens. When you aren’t in the game, arm-chair quarterbacking is commonplace.

I once was a mom who said things like, “I will never home school.”

Decisions about careers and family are made by us all. Personally, I settled on the most beloved of professions, that of public school teacher. Obtaining an Elementary Education degree gave me insight into the workings of a classroom, teachers and other families.

One of the biggest lessons I learned was that within a single family siblings are really different from one another. There may be a book worm in the same family with a sports star who hates to read. Children are different. Choices in education, likewise, need to be varied.

Why do we fight for the right of choice and then fight each other in choosing?

http://go.uen.org/1IA

 

 

 

Bullying in our schools must be addressed now

(Provo) Daily Herald letter from Kayla Contreras

 

Crime rates are rising and public schools are not as safe as they once were. Bullying has been in the news a lot lately, and as a mother of a young child, it’s frightening to think about what could happen to my child because of the increase in bullying at our public schools. This is a topic that needs constant attention and maintenance.

I understand that schools cannot follow up every report of bullying and that some kids will grow out of it, but research shows that 40 percent of the boys identified as bullies in grades six through nine had three or more arrests by the age of 30. We have to find a better way to help bullies in their youth.

http://go.uen.org/1I6

 

 

 

 

With Fractions, Common-Core Training Goes Beyond ‘Invert and Multiply’

Education Week commentary by columnist Liana Heitin

 

Rockville, Md. – “Who would draw a picture to divide 2/3 by 3/4?” asked Marina Ratner, a professor emerita of mathematics at the University of California at Berkeley, in a recent Wall Street Journal opinion piece.

Ratner meant the question as rhetorical—she’s an adamant opponent of the Common Core State Standards in math and spends the article arguing that they’re making math education in the country worse. Her point was that drawing such a picture is a waste of time and makes the problem overly complex.

However, at a professional development session on the common core I attended last month, held by the Maryland department of education, a small group of middle school math teachers learned how to illustrate these types of equations. And as evidenced by the “oohs” and “ahhs” voiced during the hour-and-a-half-long session, most attendees found it quite illuminating.

http://go.uen.org/1It

 

 

 

National Food Fight

Wall Street Journal commentary by columnist GLENDA TOMA

 

You know something has gone awry when a school district would rather forgo hundreds of thousands of dollars in funding than remain in the national school lunch program. But for Campbell County in Kentucky, the reason was simple enough: Kids weren’t eating the healthy meals that met new federal standards. Instead, they were throwing the food away. Not only was that money in the garbage but, in the eyes of the district, money that could have been used for other necessities such as textbooks.

That Kentucky school district and others who have opted out of the program can afford to do so. But for schools in low-income areas with a large percentage of students who qualify for a free or reduced-price lunch, it would be impossible to execute the lunch program without help from the federal government. Still, the trend in these schools is the same one noticed by Campbell County—food being tossed in the trash.

http://go.uen.org/1HO

 

 

 

 

Readin’, Writin’ and Social Justice Agitatin’

Town Hall commentary by columnist Michelle Malkin

 

It’s back-to-school season across the country. But in an increasing number of districts, “back to school” doesn’t mean back to learning. Under the reign of social justice indoctrinators, academics are secondary to political agitation. Activism trumps achievement.

In Massachusetts, the John J. Duggan Middle School will open on August 25 with a new name and mission. It is now a “social justice magnet school.” As a hiring advertisement for teachers explained earlier this year, the emphasis will be on “helping students develop the necessary skills to analyze and synthesize information and to generate empathy by looking at multiple sides of important issues facing the world, be that hunger, water quality, racial barriers, child labor or imbalance of power.”

Concise writing, as you can see, is not on the social justice pedagogues’ agenda.

http://go.uen.org/1I9

 

 

 

 

Yes, I am a teacher. No, I am not going to destroy society and your children The anti-union celebrities (and their secret backers) have taken the war on teachers public. But educators shouldn’t have to defend doing our jobs Manchester (UK) Guardian commentary by Valerie Braman, a Philadelphia-based high school English and communications teacher and teacher coach

 

I learned recently that I don’t live in the real world: before that, I’d assumed that if my degrees, certifications and teaching career didn’t qualify me as a resident of the “real world”, then the taxes, rent, car payments and student loans that I am dutifully paying off certainly would. But each time my eyes wander into the comments section of an education-related article, I’m told that my fellow educators and I inhabit an alternate universe in which we are the villains, responsible for all of society’s ills.

In the “real world”, I’ve been informed, the singular solution to the problems with education in America is to get rid of the teachers’ unions and even to just fire and replace all teachers, which would magically transport us all to this vaunted real world in which no educator should be entitled to pensions, affordable health benefits or due process. (In it, I’m certain I’d be wealthy enough to start using phrases like “job creators” and attending Chamber of Commerce events, instead of just standing outside of them to protest corporate tax breaks and cuts in education funding.)

In the “real world”, I didn’t choose my profession because I want to help my students develop into productive and successful citizens or because our neighborhoods and societies will flourish when educational opportunities and systems are strong – and, certainly, the union for which I work cares about none of that either. In that world, people entrust their children exclusively to grasping, greedy monsters and criminals who became teachers because of the massive salaries, premium benefits, minimal work hours and the joys of lording power over impressionable young people. (Nothing makes one feel more powerful than a room full of adolescents calling you “Miss!”)

But that sort of finger-pointing isn’t limited to those hiding safely behind screen names.

http://go.uen.org/1Im

 

 

 

 

Robo-readers aren’t as good as human readers — they’re better Hechinger Report commentary by columnist Annie Murphy Paul

 

In April of 2012, Mark D. Shermis, then the dean of the College of Education at the University of Akron, made a striking claim: “Automated essay scoring engines” were capable of evaluating student writing just as well as human readers. Shermis’s research, presented at a meeting of the National Council on Measurement in Education, created a sensation in the world of education —among those who see such “robo-graders” as the future of assessment, and those who believe robo-graders are worse than useless.

The most outspoken member of the second camp is undoubtedly Les Perelman, a former director of writing and a current research affiliate at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. “Robo-graders do not score by understanding meaning but almost solely by use of gross measures, especially length and the presence of pretentious language,” Perelman charged in an op-ed published in the Boston Globe earlier this year. Test-takers who game the programs’ algorithms by filling pages with lots of text and using big words, Perelman contended, can inflate their scores without actually producing good writing.

Perelman makes a strong case against using robo-graders for assigning grades and test scores. But there’s another use for robo-graders — a role for them to play in which, evidence suggests, they may not only be as good as humans, but better. In this role, the computer functions not as a grader but as a proofreader and basic writing tutor, providing feedback on drafts, which students then use to revise their papers before handing them in to a human.

http://go.uen.org/1Iu

 

 

 

 

 

 

————————————————————-

NATIONAL NEWS

————————————————————-

 

School staffing up 500%, but not with teachers Marketplace

 

School staffing has shot up nearly 500 percent over the past several decades, according to a report released on Wednesday by the Thomas B. Fordham Institute. A huge chunk of that growth is the number of teacher aides — the Girl and Guy Fridays (sort of) of the classroom.

They’re the ones that help a teacher corral 25 kids on a playground, or run to the copier when there’s a room full of kids to supervise. It’s no wonder teachers love them.

“Parents are positive toward aides because they give their kids more attention,” says Robert Slavin, director of the Center for Research and Reform in Education at Johns Hopkins University, who has done research on teacher aides.

Aides are especially appreciated by parents of kids with special needs. Over the years, federal laws have empowered parents to make sure their kids are getting the education they need. Having an aide is often part of that plan, says Matthew Richmond, who wrote the Fordham report.

“So as those expectations have risen over time,” he says, “I think that what you’ve seen is just an increase in number of personnel in order to help provide those services.”

Plus, Richmond says, because they’re not certified, they’re cheaper than teachers, and they’re easy to find.

Slavin says, while aides might help teachers, they haven’t had an impact on student grades.

http://go.uen.org/1HU

 

A copy of the report

http://go.uen.org/1HV (Fordham)

 

 

 

 

Republican Lawmakers Ask GAO to Probe NCLB Waivers Education Week

 

The Obama administration has issued more than 40 waivers from the No Child Left Behind Act to states, and is in the process of extending many of them.

But the two top Republicans in Congress on K-12 policy—Rep. John Kline, R-Minn., the chairman of the House education committee, and Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., the top Republican on the Senate education panel, say they don’t have a clear grasp of how the department is implementing the program, or how states have changed their laws to comply with the waivers, not to mention what the process has been like for states seeking changes to their flexibility plans.

Now the two lawmakers want the Government Accountability Office, Congress’ investigative arm, to look into the waivers, which is sure to trigger a blockbuster of a GAO report at least in wonky K-12 policy land.

http://go.uen.org/1Is

 

http://go.uen.org/1Iw (The Hill)

 

http://go.uen.org/1Ix (The Blaze)

 

 

 

 

Can You Fight Poverty by Paying Kids to Go to School?

Politico Magazine

 

Three years ago, Gordon-Cole was one of 600 people (most of them single mothers) selected for the Memphis Family Rewards Program, a widely watched trial that provides cash incentives to poor parents and their high school-age children for completing tasks that seem, at first glance, absurdly second nature for middle-class families. A student who compiles an acceptable school attendance record gets $40 a month, showing up for an annual dental or medical check-up means a $100 check, grades are monetized ($30 for an A, $20 for B, $10 for a C) and taking a college entrance exam like the ACT gets you a $50 check. Parents are also rewarded: Adults get a $150 monthly bonus, up to $1,800 a year, simply for working full-time.

The rewards system, modeled on similar programs in Mexico, Brazil and Indonesia principally aimed at the rural poor, is one of the few genuinely novel anti-poverty experiments to sprout up in the innovation desert that is post-1996 welfare reform in America. Enthusiasm for the programs, known as “conditional cash transfers” (CCTs), remains high internationally, and has been enthusiastically embraced by the Davos set. In a 2009 report, the World Bank hailed the success of CCTs in Mexico as “powerful proof that well-designed public programs can have significant effects on critical social indicators.”

But paying poor people to perform quotidian tasks is a much harder sell in the up-from-the-bootstraps culture of the United States, and the cash transfers have been ridiculed or, at the very least, greeted with skepticism everywhere they’ve been tried in America.

http://go.uen.org/1HP

 

 

 

 

Judge tells California to teach English learners Associated Press via Modesto (CA) Bee

 

LOS ANGELES — A Los Angeles judge Tuesday ordered the state of California to educate all children who don’t speak English, saying it needs to take action after reports showed a quarter of school districts failed to meet that state and federal requirement.

Judge James Chalfant said the California Department of Education needed to figure out the best way to enforce the law and make sure English instruction is provided in a state where more than a fifth of students are deficient in English.

“You’ve got to go ferret this out because you can’t have even one child that isn’t getting their instructional services,” Chalfant said. “You have a report that 20,000 aren’t getting their instructional services. That’s not good enough.”

http://go.uen.org/1HR

 

http://go.uen.org/1HS (Ed Week)

 

A copy of the ruling

http://go.uen.org/1HT (ACLU of Southern California)

 

 

 

 

Now hiring: School consultant for unaccompanied immigrant students USA Today

 

A California school district is hiring an unaccompanied minors consultant to work with the unprecedented number of immigrant children arriving from Central America in the past year.

Oakland Unified School District posted a job opening this month for a “support services consultant” to help unaccompanied immigrant students find legal help, as well as counseling, health and educational services.

These students need extra assistance finding services because they don’t have refugee status that would give them access to a social worker, food stamps or Medi-Cal, the state’s Medicaid program, said Catalina Reyes, principal at Oakland International High School.

http://go.uen.org/1Io

 

 

 

Oklahoma seeking extension of its No Child Left Behind waiver Repeal of Common Core leaves the NCLB waiver in question.

Tulsa (OK) World

 

The Oklahoma State Department of Education on Tuesday requested a one-year extension of its flexibility waiver from the federal No Child Left Behind Act.

In 2012, Oklahoma was one of the first states to be granted such a waiver, but since the state Legislature repealed Common Core standards for public schools this spring, the status of that waiver has been in question.

“Good work and great results have emerged from (the flexibility waiver). Losing this flexibility would be akin to erasing incredible progress toward helping Oklahoma children build success — not just in the current school year, but for an entire generation and beyond,” State Superintendent Janet Barresi wrote in a letter addressed to U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan and Deborah Delisle, assistant education secretary.

“When I took office in 2011, Oklahoma had only just left the starting line in the race to more effective schools. Now in 2014, we are well around the track and rapidly advancing toward the finish line.”

http://go.uen.org/1HX

 

 

 

Bobby Jindal shouldn’t be deposed in Common Core case, lawyer argues New Orleans Times-Picayune

 

Much of a lawsuit over Common Core should be dismissed, and Gov. Bobby Jindal should not have to be deposed, lawyers for state officials argued to a Baton Rouge judge on Tuesday.

The court appearance before Judge Todd Hernandez at 19th Judicial District Court involved just one of the lawsuits that have been filed in Louisiana over the state’s use of Common Core testing materials. This lawsuit was filed by a group of teachers, parents and the New Orleans charter group Choice Foundation, and was later joined by the Board of Elementary and Secondary Education (BESE). They are asking the judge to lift a suspension on testing contracts that the governor’s administration imposed.

Tuesday’s hearing was focused on whether the parents and other plaintiffs have legal standing to sue on the issue, and who they can force to give depositions in the case –including Jindal, and Commissioner of Administration Kristy Nichols.

http://go.uen.org/1HW

 

 

 

 

Kansas State Board of Education member challenges Common Core Topeka (KS) Capital-Journal

 

A member of the Kansas State Board of Education on Tuesday challenged the state’s standards for teaching mathematics and reading, which also have faced attacks from conservative Kansas legislators.

Steve Roberts, R-Overland Park, said Kansas should back away from the standards “just a bit” and “put students first.”

Doing so, he said, would allow Kansas to have “a better educational product and service.”

“I truly believe that,” he said.

The state board approved the standards in 2010. They are commonly called the Common Core and are currently in place in most states.

http://go.uen.org/1Iv

 

 

 

Chinese Seek Freedom, Edge at US High Schools Associated Press

 

BEIJING — After getting a glimpse of the endless cramming for China’s grueling college entrance exams from the seniors in his high school, 16-year-old Zhang Kaisheng decided to take a different path.

Like a growing number of Chinese teenagers, Zhang plans to enroll this fall in a private U.S. high school where he and his parents hope he will get a more well-rounded – if far more expensive – education. Tuition, room and board can cost around $40,000 – three to four times more than an elite private school in China.

“I feel like the U.S. education fits me better and will allow me to do things I like to do,” said Zhang, who loves playing basketball.

With more than 333,000 of its students in U.S. colleges and graduate schools, China has long been the top feeder of international students in America. Now Chinese high school students are following suit in astonishing fashion: Last year U.S. schools welcomed 50 times more of them than they did just eight years earlier.

http://go.uen.org/1Ip

 

 

 

Michelle Rhee Prepares To Leave CEO Job At StudentsFirst, Group She Founded Huffington Post

 

Former Washington, D.C., schools chancellor Michelle Rhee has told people close to her that she is preparing to step down as CEO of StudentsFirst, the advocacy organization she created after leaving her chancellor post, according to three sources close to the organization.

Rhee is expected to remain active on StudentsFirst’s board after she steps down, likely by the end of this year. The sources requested anonymity because they were not authorized to discuss details of Rhee’s move.

Francisco Castillo, spokesman for StudentsFirst, said in a statement to The Huffington Post: “Michelle remains fully committed to education reform and leading StudentsFirst.” He declined to elaborate.

http://go.uen.org/1HQ

 

 

 

 

Google’s Classroom tool open to teachers worldwide Now open to all Google Apps for Education users, Classroom helps teachers work with students in and out of the classroom.

c/net

 

The Google Classroom project has completed its pilot phase and is now open for all Google Apps for Education users.

Unveiled in May, Google Classroom is an online tool which integrates Google Drive, Docs, and Gmail in order to encourage teachers to use the services for assigning and collecting work online, as well as boosting communication channels for teachers and students in and outside of the classroom. Classroom is offered as part of the Google Apps for Education suite.

Google School, part of the toolkit, allows educators to assign and collect work, view who has and has not tackled an assignment, make announcements, and create separate Drive folders for each student. In addition, in a similar way to Google+, students can post to a “stream” of content to connect with other classmates.

In order to maintain student privacy, Classroom is ad-free and data will not be used for marketing purposes.

http://go.uen.org/1Iy

 

http://go.uen.org/1Iz (Wired)

 

 

 

 

 

States Get $28M in Grants to Defray AP Exam Costs Associated Press

 

WASHINGTON — The Education Department said Tuesday that it was awarding $28.4 million in grants to 40 states, Washington, D.C., and the Virgin Islands to reduce the cost of advanced placement exams for low-income students.

The department said the reduced cost will encourage low-income and first-generation students to take the exams. Students who pass the test could earn college credit, reducing the time and cost for a post-secondary degree.

Some students could pay as little as $18 for an exam, or less when coupled with other subsidizes. Without the grants, some advanced placement tests cost nearly $100.

http://go.uen.org/1Iq

 

http://go.uen.org/1Ir (ED)

 

 

 

Douglas County football player has died

Atlanta Journal-Constitution

 

He was a leader with big dreams and a passion for playing football. Zyrees Oliver wanted to be the best, and he also wanted the best for his family and friends.

But early Monday, Zyrees died after being removed from a ventilator five days after collapsing at his home. As his classmates returned Monday morning to Douglas County High School, his family was making plans to return Zyrees to his home state of New Jersey. He was 17.

Late Sunday, Zyrees’ family faced the heartbreaking decision of removing the ventilator, an aunt told The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. There was no longer hope for the teen’s recovery, Nina Oliver said.

http://go.uen.org/1In

 

 

 

 

 

 

————————————————————

CALENDAR

————————————————————

 

USOE Calendar

http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

 

 

UEN News

http://www.uen.org

 

 

August 14:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting

9 a.m., 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://go.uen.org/1pn

 

 

August 18:

Utah State Board of Education Superintendent Search Committee meeting

5 p.m., 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://www.utah.gov/pmn/sitemap/notice/226553.html

 

 

August 26:

Education Task Force meeting

9 a.m., 210 Senate Building

http://le.utah.gov/Interim/2014/html/00003983.htm

 

 

September 4-5:

Utah State Board of Education meeting

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

 

 

September 16:

Executive Appropriations Committee meeting

1 p.m., 210 Senate Building

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2014&Com=APPEXE

 

 

September 17:

Education Interim Committee meeting

2:30 p.m., 30 House Building

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2014&Com=INTEDU

 

Related posts:

Comments are closed.