Education News Roundup: Aug. 26, 2014

"back to school" by Emma_Brown/CC/flickr

“back to school” by Emma_Brown/CC/flickr

Education News Roundup

Today’s Top Picks:

Sigmund Freud was puzzled by the question: “What to women want?” Utah Policy raises similar puzzlement over the question “What do Utahns want in public education?”

http://go.uen.org/1On (UP)

There’s lots of follow-up to UP’s poll yesterday on Common Core showing 41 percent opposed it, but 49 percent either support or are neutral to it.

http://go.uen.org/1Oo (DN)

and http://go.uen.org/1Op (SLT)

and http://go.uen.org/1OX (KSL)

and http://go.uen.org/1OJ (KUER)

Stateline expands the view on Ferguson problems to look at the effect growing suburban poverty is having on cities, including Salt Lake City.

http://go.uen.org/1OQ (Stateline)

Ed Week questions how stable the increased funding sources for public education are.

http://go.uen.org/1ON (Ed Week)

————————————————————

TODAY’S HEADLINES

————————————————————

 

 

UTAH

 

Poll: There’s No Way to Make Everyone Happy When it Comes to Education in Utah

 

New poll shows many Utahns oppose and misunderstand Common Core

 

Ferguson, Other U.S. Suburbs See Poverty Rise

 

Warner disagrees with Lockhart’s idea of giving every student a laptop computer

 

Warner opposes interim appointment of Joel Coleman as State Superintendent

 

Building a Better Teacher

 

Utah school takes security to the next level with parental involvement

 

Utah cafeteria worker who threw out kids’ lunches resigns

 

Bus driver charged with abusing girls released on bail

 

Copper Hills High student remembered on first day of class

 

Students Smash Out The Danger Of Eating Disorders At Park City Event

 

InTech Collegiate High School grads again show high ACT scores

 

Utah kids endure rainy first day at school

 

North Cache 8-9 Center to host Back to School night

 

For the first time in American history, non-Hispanic whites will be outnumbered in public schools

 

The costs of back to school are increasing for parents

 

 

 

OPINION & COMMENTARY

 

Four Professions You Might Not Be Cut Out For

 

School start times are designed for everything but the kids we’re trying to educate

 

Crazy frenzy ends with first day of school

 

How to Get Kids to Class

To Keep Poor Students in School, Provide Social Services

 

Do Evaluations Penalize Teachers of Needy Students?

 

The case for cop and teacher cams

 

I’d rather black, superhuman student-athletes just be human

 

 

 

NATION

 

Fiscal Recovery Buoys K-12 Budgets as School Year Opens Most states feel some lift, but aid stream unstable

 

L.A. Unified halts contract for iPads

 

Is Google’s Free Software A Good Deal For Educators?

 

Zuckerberg-backed Panorama Education releases free feedback survey for schools

 

Accountability Report Urges Fewer Tests, More Peer Review

 

Why Financial Education Might Not Work

One paper found that classes aren’t necessarily the way to solve the financial literacy gap.

 

Mississippi high school football player dies after falling ill in game

 

 

 

————————————————————

UTAH NEWS

————————————————————

 

Poll: There’s No Way to Make Everyone Happy When it Comes to Education in Utah

 

Utahns want public schools to prepare students for college, but they’re not sure how best to get there.

A new UtahPolicy.com poll conducted by Dan Jones and Associates finds a whopping 92% of Utahns think students should graduate from high school ready to go to college. Similar overwhelming percentages think students should learn problem-solving and critical thinking skills in school. Another 81% feel student achievement standards should be similar no matter what school they attend.

Even though more than 9 in 10 Utahns think students should leave high school ready for college, 71% think students should also be career-ready when they graduate.

http://go.uen.org/1On (UP)

 

 

 

New poll shows many Utahns oppose and misunderstand Common Core

 

SALT LAKE CITY — A plurality of likely Utah voters oppose the Common Core State Standards, but only 1 in 5 can accurately identify what they are, according to a poll released Monday by UtahPolicy.com.

The poll, conducted by Dan Jones & Associates, surveyed 408 likely voters and found that 41 percent of participants opposed the Common Core compared with 29 percent who support the standards.

The remaining 30 percent responded that they were either neutral or “didn’t know” when asked whether they support or oppose the Common Core, meaning the voters who either support or have no opinion of the state standards outnumber the voters who oppose them.

“I would say the best way to put it is that Utahns are split about this issue,” said Bryan Schott, managing editor of UtahPolicy.com. “They’re really not sure how they feel about it. They’re broken up into a number of camps, and when we asked them what Common Core was, they really couldn’t answer.”

http://go.uen.org/1Oo (DN)

 

http://go.uen.org/1Op (SLT)

 

http://go.uen.org/1OX (KSL)

 

http://go.uen.org/1OJ (KUER)

 

 

 

 

Ferguson, Other U.S. Suburbs See Poverty Rise

 

Ferguson’s fires run counter to the narrative about suburbia, the story Americans tell themselves about strip malls and rolling lawns, about McMansions and upward mobility. Instead, the unrest in the St. Louis suburb following the shooting of an unarmed black teenager by a white police officer evokes images of 1960s-era Watts, of burning inner-city neighborhoods in New York, Washington, Detroit and Chicago.

The tear gas and protests in Ferguson were sparked by the shooting of Michael Brown, but they point to deeper, more pervasive problems that are plaguing suburbs across the country: rapidly increasing poverty, scarce jobs and even scarcer resources.

“Poverty is rising in suburban communities and it’s smashing the stereotype of calm and prosperity,” said Lawrence Levy, executive dean of the National Center for Suburban Studies at Hofstra University. “All over the country outside major central cities, the rate of poverty in the suburbs is exceeding that of the (urban) places people used to leave to escape.”

In the span of a decade, Ferguson, which has a population of just over 21,000, saw a 99 percent increase in its poor population, according to Elizabeth Kneebone, a fellow at the Brookings Institution and the co-author of Confronting Suburban Poverty in America. (Overall, the St. Louis suburbs saw a 68 percent increase in its poor population.)

Ferguson is not alone in this drastic shift in suburban demographics. Across the country, from Atlanta to Honolulu to Salt Lake City to Seattle, there are now more poor people living in the suburbs than there are living in cities.

Perceptions have yet to catch up with how radically the geography of poverty has shifted, according to Kneebone. Without an up-to-date understanding of the complexity of poverty, she said, suburbs often don’t have the resources needed to help their impoverished populations.

http://go.uen.org/1OQ (Stateline)

 

 

 

Warner disagrees with Lockhart’s idea of giving every student a laptop computer

 

Utah House Speaker Becky Lockhart is vying for the state’s top education post. Lockhart, in a Friday evening statement, said she has officially applied to be superintendent of Utah Schools. Lockhart has already announced that she will not seek re-election this year.

New Utah State Board of Education member Terryl Warner said Lockhart made news when she proposed giving every public school student a laptop computer, which Warner said would cost about $300 million.

“I look at my district,” Warner said. “It’s a small district. We don’t have the infrastructure for it. We don’t have the IT people for it.

“So instead of saying, ‘You, Cache, Logan, Morgan, Box Elder and Rich counties must give a kid, between a first-grader and a 12-grader a laptop,’ why don’t we give them that money and let them determine how best to use it?”

http://go.uen.org/1OC  (CVD)

 

 

 

Warner opposes interim appointment of Joel Coleman as State Superintendent

 

Members of the Utah State Board of Education last week approved the appointment of Joel Coleman to serve as interim superintendent of state public instruction until the retiring Martell Menlove can be replaced.

The vote was nine to six and new State School Board member Terryl Warner, a resident of Hyrum, was one of those voting against the appointment.

http://go.uen.org/1OB (CVD)

 

 

 

 

Building a Better Teacher

 

Think about that one teacher who had the biggest impact on your education. What skills or qualities did that person have that other teachers didn’t? What would it mean for America’s future if we could impart the expertise of all those best teachers to every other classroom instructor? In a new book, the journalist Elizabeth Green sets out to define a concrete set of best practices any teacher can learn and apply in the classroom. Green joins us Tuesday to make her case for building a better teacher.

Elizabeth Green is the co-founder of Chalkbeat, an education news network. Her new book is called Building a Better Teacher: How Teaching Works (And How to Teach It to Everyone).

http://go.uen.org/1OK (KUER RadioWest)

 

 

 

 

Utah school takes security to the next level with parental involvement

An elementary school in Bountiful started class Monday with new new security measures in place.

A group of parents concerned about access to Bountiful Elementary School raised more than $10,000 for the security upgrades. They held a ceremonial ribbon-cutting for the redesign at the start of the school year.

Teacher Lindy Crismer has worked at Bountiful Elementary for 28 years. She’s advocated for upgrades during much of that time.

http://go.uen.org/1OY (KSL)

 

 

 

Utah cafeteria worker who threw out kids’ lunches resigns

 

The cafeteria worker who earlier this year threw away dozens of kids’ lunches after their parents failed to pay for the food on time has resigned from Uintah Elementary School.

Salt Lake City School District spokesman Jason Olsen confirmed on Monday that the worker, known as Miss Shirley, resigned last week. He said the district did not ask her to leave, and it was her decision. He did not respond to a question about whether it had to do with the lunch incident earlier this year.

Attempts to reach the cafeteria worker for comment on Monday were not immediately successful.

http://go.uen.org/1Ot (SLT)

 

 

 

 

Bus driver charged with abusing girls released on bail

 

SALT LAKE CITY — A former Canyons School District bus driver awaiting trial on charges of abusing two young disabled girls on his bus is now free on bail.

On Aug. 11, 3rd District Judge Bruce Lubeck ordered John Martin Carrell, 61, to stand trial on 33 counts of aggravated sexual abuse of a child, a first-degree felony, that Carrell is facing in two separate cases. Both cases involve two young girls with special needs.

After being bound over for trial, Carrell’s attorney, Ron Yengich, successfully argued for his client’s $5 million bail to be reduced. Lubeck reduced Carrell’s bail to $250,000 in each case. He also ordered Carrell to wear an ankle monitor if he made bail and told him he must remain at his home unless he has a doctor’s appointment or is meeting with his attorney.

http://go.uen.org/1OG (KSL)

 

 

 

Copper Hills High student remembered on first day of class

 

WEST JORDAN, Utah – The first day of school took a sad turn for one Utah high school.  14-year old Jacob Santos died over the weekend in a car crash just before starting at Copper Hills High in West Jordan.

Jacob would’ve started his first day in high school on Monday. Some of the students who knew him best are wearing dress clothes to honor him. But it was down the street at west hills middle school where Jacob left a lasting memory.

http://go.uen.org/1OF (KTVX)

 

 

 

Students Smash Out The Danger Of Eating Disorders At Park City Event

 

A group of high school students in Park City gathered Monday evening to smash out eating disorders.

They got out the sledgehammers to put a dent in hazardous thinking and unhealthy habits. The event is called Southern Smash.

http://go.uen.org/1OE (KUTV)

 

http://go.uen.org/1OH (KSTU)

 

 

 

InTech Collegiate High School grads again show high ACT scores

 

For the fifth year in a row, the most recent graduating class from InTech Collegiate High School scored an average ACT score higher than both the state and national averages.

http://go.uen.org/1Oz (LHJ)

 

 

 

Utah kids endure rainy first day at school

 

Children dodged rain outside Bonneville Elementary in Salt Lake City after the first day of school Monday.

Students in the Salt Lake City, Granite and Davis school districts returned to classes Monday. Jordan District high school students also returned to class. Canyons and Alpine district students had their first day last week.

http://go.uen.org/1Ou (SLT)

 

http://go.uen.org/1Ox (DN)

 

http://go.uen.org/1Oy (OSE)

 

 

 

 

North Cache 8-9 Center to host Back to School night

 

The North Cache 8-9 Center’s Back to School night will be from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 27, at the school. Parents are invited to attend.

http://go.uen.org/1OA (LHJ)

 

 

 

For the first time in American history, non-Hispanic whites will be outnumbered in public schools

 

For the first time in American history, schools are in for a massive demographic shift. This fall the overall number of Latino, African-American, Native and Asian students will outnumber non-Hispanic white students.

http://go.uen.org/1Ow (DN)

 

 

 

The costs of back to school are increasing for parents

 

“Back to school” are three words that can sound like music to parents’ ears, but that music can turn stressful with the added cost of back-to-school shopping.

http://go.uen.org/1Ov (DN)

 

 

 

 

 

 

————————————————————

OPINION & COMMENTARY

————————————————————

 

Four Professions You Might Not Be Cut Out For Salt Lake Tribune editorial cartoon by Pat Bagley

 

http://go.uen.org/1Os

 

 

 

 

School start times are designed for everything but the kids we’re trying to educate Deseret News commentary by columnist Lois M. Collins

 

The teenager’s behavior had become vexing. It seemed she was always on the verge of a small explosion, frequently argumentative and sometimes overly emotional. Her mom described her as frequently frustrated and said her grades were slipping, which they’d never done before.

“I’m going to take her to a counselor,” her mom confided. “I honestly think she might be experiencing a mental illness.”

Thorough tests indicated my friend’s daughter was, in fact, sleep deprived. Between a homework overload, late-night text messages that periodically interrupted her sleep and an early morning school start, she was struggling. Getting her sleep back in balance would prove to be somewhat challenging.

Just in time for the start of a new school year, the American Academy of Pediatrics has released new recommendations regarding school start times, which any parent of a teenager can tell you are designed to meet every need but a teen’s need for sleep.

http://go.uen.org/1Oq

 

 

 

 

Crazy frenzy ends with first day of school (St. George) Spectrum commentary by columnist Therresa Worthington

 

Oh the excitement! It’s been a crazy time getting the kids ready for school and then finally seeing them off to the first day.

All I could think about Monday is hurry, hurry and hurry some more, but the payoff is wonderful – silence.

http://go.uen.org/1OD

 

 

 

 

How to Get Kids to Class

To Keep Poor Students in School, Provide Social Services New York Times op-ed by DANIEL J. CARDINALI

 

ARLINGTON, Va. — FOR the 16 million American children living below the federal poverty line, the start of a new school year should be reason to celebrate. Summer is no vacation when your parents are working multiple jobs or looking for one. Many kids are left to fend for themselves in neighborhoods full of gangs, drugs and despair. Given the hardships at home, poor kids might be expected to have the best attendance records, if only for the promise of a hot meal and an orderly classroom.

But it doesn’t usually work out that way. According to the education researchers Robert Balfanz and Vaughan Byrnes at Johns Hopkins, children living in poverty are by far the most likely to be chronically absent from school (which is generally defined as missing at least 10 percent of class days each year).

Amazingly, the federal government does not track absenteeism, but the state numbers are alarming.

http://go.uen.org/1Or

 

 

 

 

Do Evaluations Penalize Teachers of Needy Students?

Education Week commentary by columnist Stephen Sawchuk

 

It’s a disturbing but increasingly consistent pattern: Fewer teachers of disadvantaged students or students of color get the top ratings on newly established teacher-evaluation systems.

The phenomenon is raising the pressing, delicate, and so far unanswered question: Is this a problem with bias in these new rating systems, or is it symptomatic of the fact that such students are less likely to have high-quality instruction?

http://go.uen.org/1OP

 

 

 

 

The case for cop and teacher cams

Chicago Tribune op-ed by Reihan Salam, a columnist for Slate

 

If you’ve ever had the distinct displeasure of calling a customer service hotline, you’ve probably heard a soothing voice tell you that “this call may be monitored for quality assurance purposes.”

It can be comforting to know that there is — in theory, at least — someone out there monitoring customer service representatives who make life more difficult rather than less. Customer service representatives dealing with abusive customers can take comfort in this kind of monitoring, too, as it can shield them from false accusations of bad behavior. By reviewing recordings of calls gone wrong and calls gone right, meanwhile, trainees can learn from the sometimes trying experiences of others. What’s not to like?

Thankfully, the stakes of customer service interactions tend to be pretty low. The same can’t be said about interactions between armed police officers and civilians, which can be a matter of life and death.

The turmoil in Ferguson, Mo., vividly reminds us that while most of these interactions go smoothly, far too many spiral out of control. We know little about the exact circumstances surrounding the shooting death of 18-year-old Michael Brown. But had the police officer who shot and killed Brown been obligated to wear a video recording device, there is reason to believe that Brown still would be alive.

But why stop at video recording the police? While I will happily concede that video recording is particularly important for the police, in light of their ability to use deadly force, there are many public servants who have considerable power over others and who are shielded from scrutiny in the absence of video recording.

Public school teachers and administrators are the most obvious example. In March, the Justice Department issued an alarming report on racial disparities in school discipline policies. For example, while black children represent only 18 percent of all children attending preschool, 42 percent of all preschool students suspended once are black, as are 48 percent of children suspended more than once.

Video recordings could determine whether teachers are systematically biased against black students, if they are disciplining students in an entirely race-neutral way, or if the truth is somewhere in between. Investigators could identify patterns that could help inform how teachers are trained to manage their classrooms.

http://go.uen.org/1OU

 

 

 

I’d rather black, superhuman student-athletes just be human Hechinger Report commentary by Andre Perry, founding dean of urban education at Davenport University in Grand Rapids, Mich.

 

What happens when prep athletes take off their uniforms?

The same black males who are beloved heroes on schools’ playing fields can be treated as violent trespassers off of them. Between being a celebrated superhero and a profligate thug, black students just need to be seen – as human.

Last week, Jackie Robinson West became the first all black Little League team to win the American title and to advance to Little League World Series. My heart raced like my sons played on Jackie Robinson West or faster than a Mo’ne Davis’ fastball. Davis, 13, also starred in the same tournament and had me wanting to #throwlikeagirl. As a former prep and collegiate athlete, I know the personal as well as community fantasies and joy athletics generate. Likewise, I cheered excessively for Jackie Robinson West and Mo’ne.

My plaudits may have been symptoms of my need to exhale from the previous two weeks of depressing Ferguson, Missouri coverage. My raucous applause may have expressed society’s unhealthy exalting of black athletes in sports. In a more optimistic light, I might have cheered for real amateur athletics and the incredible stories they almost always produce.

However, I’ve come to believe that my jubilation for those particular young baseball players expresses a deeper need for validation. I rooted because I want black lives to matter. I need some recognition of my and my peers’ humanity. But I know that I shouldn’t look for this type of validation from sports – especially prep or collegiate athletics. The reality is my sons can very easily be adored for his play on an athletic team and be preyed upon during his way home. Away from an athletic fields, kids apparently lose their cuteness.

I’d rather not have the fear of my sons being killed by police than have some glory with being sports stars. I’d rather they be valued citizens than superheroes.

http://go.uen.org/1OR

 

 

 

 

 

————————————————————-

NATIONAL NEWS

————————————————————-

 

Fiscal Recovery Buoys K-12 Budgets as School Year Opens Most states feel some lift, but aid stream unstable Education Week

 

The modest but steady recovery of state K-12 budgets over the past few years is expected to continue, national experts on education finance say, although to what extent schools and districts will feel a real impact from budget changes for the 2014-15 school year is an open question.

In the current budget year, most state lawmakers have decided to continue reinvesting in public schools through their traditional “foundation” programs, which generate much of the state aid for K-12. Roughly a dozen states, though, including Nevada and Pennsylvania, are at least in the early stages of considering new funding formulas.

Even as revenues continue their climb back from the huge declines brought about by the recession that officially lasted from December 2007 to June 2009, the revenue streams that school budgets rely on so heavily remain unstable in various ways.

http://go.uen.org/1ON

 

 

 

L.A. Unified halts contract for iPads

Los Angeles Times

 

L.A. schools Supt. John Deasy suspended future use of a contract with Apple on Monday that was to provide iPads to all students in the nation’s second-largest school system amid mounting scrutiny of the $1-billion-plus effort.

The suspension comes days after disclosures that the superintendent and his top deputy had especially close ties to executives of Apple, maker of the iPad, and Pearson, the company that is providing the curriculum on the devices. And an internal report that examined the technology effort showed major problems with the process and the implementation.

“Moving forward, we will no longer utilize our current contract with Apple Inc.,” Deasy wrote in a memo sent to the Board of Education on Monday.

“Not only will this decision enable us to take advantage of an ever-changing marketplace and technology advances, it will also give us time to take into account concerns raised surrounding the [project],” Deasy wrote.

http://go.uen.org/1OL

 

http://go.uen.org/1OO (Ed Week)

 

 

 

Is Google’s Free Software A Good Deal For Educators?

NPR

 

Kaitlin Morgan says, this year, her school district is going “full Google.”

Morgan teaches U.S. and world history and advises the yearbook at Woodlake Union High School in California’s Central Valley. At Woodlake, “full Google” means a plan to have one Google Chromebook for every two students by the spring, running Google Apps.

The Chromebook is a relatively cheap, stripped-down laptop. It’s become popular in the education world, with 85 percent of its U.S. sales last year going to the ed market.

And the Chromebook is just the beginning. Already, Google Apps for Education claims 30 million active users around the world. The free, Web-based software works on any device and allows teachers and students to use Gmail with their own .edu address.

It’s the beginning of what Google calls the “paperless classroom” — moving assignments, class discussions, feedback, tests and quizzes online.

Now comes Google’s latest education offering, launched last week: Google Classroom.

Classroom enables a teacher to create a “class” at the touch of a button. She or he can upload syllabus materials, whether text, audio or video, and send out assignments on the class news feed.

http://go.uen.org/1OI

 

 

 

 

Zuckerberg-backed Panorama Education releases free feedback survey for schools Boston Business Journal

 

Over the past year, Boston-based Panorama Education and Harvard School of Education researchers have been collaborating to develop a better survey to help educators gather feedback at schools across the country.

On Tuesday, Panorama, which is backed by Mark Zuckerberg and other notable entrepreneurs, released a free, open-source survey tool that schools can use to ask their students better questions on their experience and help administrators make better decisions about education in general.

http://go.uen.org/1OV

 

 

 

Accountability Report Urges Fewer Tests, More Peer Review Education Week

 

Accountability for the public schools should be far less test-driven and more the product of teachers holding one another to high professional standards, the National Center on Education and the Economy proposes in a report issued Thursday.

More folks seem to be pushing the less-is-more approach to testing: A group of advocates held a forum on that topic earlier this summer, and the American Federation of Teachers passed a resolution at its July convention urging a dramatic scaling-back in the number of exams students must take.

There’s one major sticking point to the idea, though: The renewal of the No Child Left Behind Act, the federal education law requiring annual testing of public school students, has been hopelessly stuck for years. The U.S. Department of Education has granted nearly every state waivers from certain of the law’s requirements, but it’s held fast to the annual-testing one so far. Still, the time to build a push for fewer tests is now, NCEE President Marc Tucker said.

“We aren’t going to get a successor to No Child Left Behind unless there is consenus on a larger reform in American education, and there is no consensus,” he said in an interview. “I don’t think it’s a moment too soon to start building one.”

http://go.uen.org/1OS

 

A copy of the report

http://go.uen.org/1OT (NCEE)

 

 

 

 

Why Financial Education Might Not Work

One paper found that classes aren’t necessarily the way to solve the financial literacy gap.

U.S. News & World Report

 

As the major international survey known as the Programme for International Student Assessment, or PISA, recently made clear, American teens have a lot to learn about basic personal finance principles. The survey of over 29,000 15-year-olds in 18 countries, conducted by the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development, found that about 18 percent of American students failed to demonstrate even a basic grasp of financial capability. The results suggest they would likely struggle with relatively simple tasks such as understanding an invoice or making spending decisions.

The findings have flamed an ongoing debate in the financial education community: What is the best way to teach students about money? Should schools be required to incorporate money classes into their curriculum? Should parents step up the money talk at home?

A 2012 paper from the National Bureau of Economic Research, “Financial Literacy, Financial Education and Economic Outcomes,” wades through multiple studies on the impact of financial literacy and concludes that there might be more efficient ways to help people make smarter money decisions.

While research has repeatedly confirmed that many Americans, and not just teens, are unable to answer basic financial questions about compound interest, real rates of return and risk diversification, the findings on how best to fix this dearth of knowledge have been mixed. Showing that financial education actually causes better financial choices is difficult to do.

“The evidence is more limited and not as encouraging as one might expect,” the paper’s authors, Justine Hastings, Brigitte Madrian and William Skimmyhorn, point out. Indeed, some studies have found no relationship between high school financial education courses and students’ financial literacy.

http://go.uen.org/1OW

 

 

 

Mississippi high school football player dies after falling ill in game Reuters

 

A Mississippi high school football player died on Monday, three days after falling ill during a game, school officials said.

Walker Wilbanks was playing in a Friday night game for Jackson Preparatory School, a private school in a suburb of Jackson, when he came off the field and complained that he was not feeling well, a school spokeswoman said.

Wilbanks was taken to a hospital where he suffered a seizure and swelling in his brain before he died, school spokeswoman Crisler Boone said.

http://go.uen.org/1OM

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

————————————————————

CALENDAR

————————————————————

 

USOE Calendar

http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

 

 

UEN News

http://www.uen.org

 

 

August 26:

Education Task Force meeting

9 a.m., 210 Senate Building

http://le.utah.gov/Interim/2014/html/00003983.htm

 

 

September 4-5:

Utah State Board of Education meeting

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

 

 

September 16:

Executive Appropriations Committee meeting

1 p.m., 210 Senate Building

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2014&Com=APPEXE

 

 

September 17:

Education Interim Committee meeting

2:30 p.m., 30 House Building

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2014&Com=INTEDU

 

 

September 11:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://go.uen.org/1pn

 

Related posts:

Comments are closed.