Education News Roundup: Sept. 25, 2014

Untitled by Nick Oliver/CC/Flickr

Untitled by Nick Oliver/CC/Flickr

Education News Roundup

Today’s Top Picks:

 

Correction: In yesterday’s roundup there was a story about the debate between House District 30 candidates Fred Cox and Mike Lee. A corrected version of that story was posted after the roundup was sent out. You can read the corrected version here: http://go.uen.org/1UA (SLT)

Trib and Channel 2 follow up on school lunch issue at Uintah Elementary.

http://go.uen.org/1VH (SLT)

and http://go.uen.org/1VT (KUTV)

KSL looks at blended learning at Juan Diego.

http://go.uen.org/1VU (KSL)

Orem council member opposes a tax incentive for a mall based, in part, on the effect the break has on Alpine District.

http://go.uen.org/1Wb (KTVX)

and http://go.uen.org/1Wc (PDH)

NewsHour holds a debate. Topic: Is there too much testing in schools?

http://go.uen.org/1W2 (NewsHour)

Did ENR just hear Bart Simpson say “Ay, carumba”?: “For up to five days a year, the ‘Flexible Instructional Days’ pilot program will allow schools in all 501 school districts, including Philadelphia, to use nontraditional instruction methods, such as cyber school, when bad weather or other emergencies shut down school buildings.

http://go.uen.org/1W0 (Philly Inquirer)

Delaware creates “Foundations of College Math” for high school seniors focusing on skills students will need in college, including geometry, algebra and statistics.

http://go.uen.org/1W3 (Wilmington News-Journal)

Side effect of the digital classroom? “These days, being a school parent is more like a part-time job.”

http://go.uen.org/1W9 (Marketplace)

 

 

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TODAY’S HEADLINES

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UTAH

 

Utah cafeteria manager who tossed school lunches doesn’t want job back She calls board’s report misleading, and “it was easy to take it out on a 62-year-old lunch lady.”

 

Blended learning at JDCHS mixes traditional and digital

 

$63 million tax break given to Orem’s University Mall developer

 

Stewart urges Tonaquint students to work hard to pursue goals

 

Ogden school soccer fields to benefit from $65,000 grant

 

Roy school crossing guard hit by car

 

Parents, students upset at dress-code enforcement

 

The fight over ‘Under God’ in pledge of allegiance is about to pick up

 

 

 

 

OPINION & COMMENTARY

 

Hurry, but don’t rush to digital education Too soon for universal devices.

 

The great peril of standardized education

 

Bingham High dress-code debate: sexuality versus expression

 

Ask your teachers if they’re carrying guns

 

Guns in school

 

Students before teachers

 

Students lack school-life balance

 

The Common Core Is Working in My Classroom

 

Americans hate all public schools, except the ones their own kids attend

 

 

 

 

NATION

 

Is there too much testing in the public schools?

 

Center for Union Facts says Randi Weingarten is ruining nation’s schools

 

Due Process Laws Vary for Teachers by State Complicated systems exist for educator job protections

 

Bill Clinton: Charter Schools Must Be Held To ‘The Original Bargain’

 

In Pa., ‘snow day’ an endangered species

 

Most Delaware grads not ready for college math

 

What urban districts need to know to get their English language learners up to Common Core standards

 

When the digital classroom meets the parents

 

FBI Releases Report Examining Mass Shootings

 

Michelle Obama urges leaders to show courage in fight for education

 

To Stop Picky Eaters From Tossing The Broccoli, Give Them Choices

 

 

 

 

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UTAH NEWS

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Utah cafeteria manager who tossed school lunches doesn’t want job back She calls board’s report misleading, and “it was easy to take it out on a 62-year-old lunch lady.”

 

A school nutrition manager said she was upset and angry after reading a report blaming her for the fallout when 17 students’ school lunches were thrown away at Uintah Elementary School in January.

“I read the report,” Shirley Canham told The Salt Lake Tribune on Wednesday. “I was not happy with it, obviously.”

Salt Lake City School District released the report, conducted by outside investigators, two weeks ago after the school lunch incident gained national attention and prompted changes to school lunch policies around the state.

Investigators laid most of the blame for the incident on Canham, saying she failed to properly notify parents of low account balances and lied to her supervisor about the school’s normal procedures for serving students with accounts in arrears.

But Canham said the report is misleading in what details it does and does not include and largely excuses the district for allowing an antiquated and ill-conceived policy to remain in practice.

http://go.uen.org/1VH (SLT)

 

http://go.uen.org/1VT (KUTV)

 

 

 

 

Blended learning at JDCHS mixes traditional and digital

 

DRAPER — This year, when students pack up for classes at Juan Diego Catholic High School, they throw in a laptop or iPad with the pens, pencils, and paper. In August, after months of debate and a year of trial and error, the school started using a blended learning approach to teaching.

In this environment, students often take tests, quizzes, and class notes on their devices while teachers lecture. A debate might begin in the classroom and continue online. Administrators like Marianne Rozsahegyi think that fosters inclusion. “All of a sudden, everybody is engaged, not just the five who like to talk but everybody is engaged and it’s really wonderful to have that rich dialogue,” says Rozsahegyi.

http://go.uen.org/1VU (KSL)

 

 

 

 

$63 million tax break given to Orem’s University Mall developer

 

OREM, Utah  – A developer will spend $500 million to expand University Mall in Orem. The expansion will be called “University Place” and will have retail, commercial, and residential space much like Salt Lake’s “City Creek Mall.”

While almost everyone agrees this mall needs an upgrade, the big question is funding. Just last night, Orem City Council voted 5-1 to approve a $63 million tax incentive to give to the developer.

The developer will put $500 million into the mall. The city and county would provide $63 million in tax breaks.

“That money that Woodbury was going to receive as an incentive doesn’t exist yet. It would only exist as property taxes go up. So the city of Orem and the businesses of Orem will see no increase in their property tax,” said Downs.

But one council member doesn’t think any tax dollars should fund it.

“The mall is the wealthiest landlord in the city. Why should we give the wealthiest landlord a 75% discount on their property taxes for 20 years?” said City Council Member Hans Anderson.

City Council Member Hans Anderson voted against the tax break. He feels that way largely because the Alpine School District will provide the majority of the tax break at $44 out of $63 million.

“What they’re going to give the mall here, Alpine School District, would build four of those schools,” said Anderson.

http://go.uen.org/1Wb (KTVX)

 

http://go.uen.org/1Wc (PDH)

 

 

 

Stewart urges Tonaquint students to work hard to pursue goals

 

ST. GEORGE – FreshmanU.S. Rep. Chris Stewart, R-Utah, urged students attending an assembly Wednesday at Tonaquint Intermediate School to work hard to pursue their dreams.

Stewart, of Farmington, cited as an example hard work on his part in which he prevailed over others, whom he believed to be smarter, to graduate from a pilot training program in the U.S. Air Force.

http://go.uen.org/1VR (SGS)

 

http://go.uen.org/1VS (SGN)

 

 

 

Ogden school soccer fields to benefit from $65,000 grant

 

The Ogden School Foundation has received a $65,000 grant to install new irrigation systems and synthetic turf on Ogden School District soccer fields.

The grant, announced this week by the U.S. Soccer Foundation, was one of nine grants totalling more than $511,000. It’s part of the foundation’s Safe Places to Play program.

http://go.uen.org/1VI (SLT)

 

 

 

 

Roy school crossing guard hit by car

 

ROY — A crossing guard was hit by a car in front of Roy Elementary School this morning.

Police are investigating the accident. There’s no immediate word on the condition of the crossing guard.

http://go.uen.org/1VM (OSE)

 

http://go.uen.org/1Wd (SLT)

 

http://go.uen.org/1We (KUTV)

 

 

 

 

Parents, students upset at dress-code enforcement

 

SALT LAKE CITY — Parents and students at a Utah high school say they’re angry at the way school administrators enforced a dress code at a homecoming dance.

Parent Chad Pehrson said his 17-year-old daughter was one of dozens of students at Bingham High School in South Jordan who were pulled aside before entering the dance last Saturday.

Pehrson said his daughter was told her dress was too short despite it complying with the school policy. She and other students were turned away, Pehrson said, while other students wearing similar dresses or outfits that violated the policy were allowed inside.

http://go.uen.org/1VO (OSE)

 

http://go.uen.org/1VQ (LHJ)

 

http://go.uen.org/1VY (AP)

 

 

 

The fight over ‘Under God’ in pledge of allegiance is about to pick up

 

The continuing back-and-forth over the wording of the Pledge of Allegiance is getting a new group of participants: three New Jersey public school students and their parents, all of whom want a court to reject efforts to strike the words “under God” added 60 years ago.

http://go.uen.org/1VK (DN)

 

 

 

 

 

 

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OPINION & COMMENTARY

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Hurry, but don’t rush to digital education Too soon for universal devices.

Salt Lake Tribune editorial

 

The Office of Legislative Fiscal Analyst has provided estimates of what it would cost Utah to put a computer tablet in the hands of every public school student from kindergarten to 12th grade over the next four years, and the numbers argue for a more cautious timetable.

The estimates can only be described as ball park figures, and it’s a big park, ranging from a low of about $184 million over those four years to a high of $451 million. There are vast differences in costs depending on what devices are purchased and what level of support and instruction are needed to get the most out of the devices:

http://go.uen.org/1VD

 

 

 

 

The great peril of standardized education

(Ogden) Standard-Examiner op-ed by LYNN STODDARD, a retired educator

 

“I believe in standardizing automobiles. I do not believe in standardizing human beings. Standardization is a great peril which threatens American culture.” Albert Einstein

Einstein said these words 54 years before the U.S. Department of Education declared our nation to be at risk because of an inferior education system. The “Nation at Risk” report (1983) resulted in a huge government effort to “reform” American education. U.S. presidents called education summits and invited governors to bring business executives, but not educators, to the meetings.

What did they do? What would you expect from business executives who know assembly lines and standardization?

http://go.uen.org/1VP

 

 

 

Bingham High dress-code debate: sexuality versus expression

(Ogden) Standard-Examiner commentary by columnist LIAM DE BURCA

 

The Bingham High dress-code has ignited a national debate not on ’who is wearing the dresses’ but ’how we actually perceive’ these teenagers in their homecoming dresses.

While stories of men enforcing dress code’s are popular in the media today, even the co-hosts of The View weighed in on the Bingham story today.

But one student in particular, Cierra Gregersen, has something to say about it. She is one of the five students who decided not to “cover up” and to go home from Saturday’s homecoming.

http://go.uen.org/1VN

 

 

 

Ask your teachers if they’re carrying guns Salt Lake Tribune letter from Nancy Halden

 

I was discouraged by Benjamin Wood’s article (“Poll says Utahns OK with armed teachers,” Sept. 23). Once again the take-home message is that where our schools are concerned, our Legislature is unlikely to listen to the wishes of their constituents. Even though a majority of Utah parents would like to know if their child’s teacher has a gun in the classroom, the Utah Legislature didn’t even bother to give this issue a committee hearing when it came up in 2013. What’s a parent to do?

Here’s an idea. SEP (parent/teacher) conferences are fast approaching. Although your school’s principal is not allowed to ask which teachers are carrying guns in the classroom, there’s nothing to stop you, as a parent, from asking and following up with the school’s administration if you are concerned about your child’s safety.

You can contact your legislator, too.

http://go.uen.org/1VJ

 

 

 

 

Guns in school

Deseret News letter from Carissa Monroy

 

I am disappointed at recent stories suggesting approval of teachers carrying guns in schools. That includes a poll showing that the majority of Utahns support teachers carrying guns in the classroom and the Granite District directing its teachers not to advertise their concealed weapons.

It is true that there have been tragic school shootings in recent years, but we need to think about the consequences of more teachers carrying concealed weapons.

http://go.uen.org/1VL

 

 

 

 

Students before teachers

USA Today op-ed by Laurence H. Tribe, professor of constitutional law at Harvard Law School and a pro-bono legal adviser to Students Matter

 

When I decided to join Students Matter, the group that spearheaded a lawsuit that invalidated California’s teacher tenure, dismissal and “last in, first out” layoff laws, I expected negative reactions from fellow progressives.

Sure enough, the day of the announcement, lots of incredulous and even hostile e-mails appeared in my inbox, accusing me of betraying the Democratic Party, our allies in organized labor and even my own K-12 public school teachers.

These negative reactions are rooted in a misunderstanding of what is at stake as lawsuits similar to Vergara v. California spread to the other states with similar laws.

My support for curtailing teacher tenure and last-in, first-out layoff rules when they put the needs of adults before children is not a departure from my progressive roots. Rather, it is a natural and common-sense outgrowth.

http://go.uen.org/1VX

 

 

 

Students lack school-life balance

USA Today op-ed by Vicki Abeles, producer of Race to Nowhere, to air on national public television this Thursday through Saturday

 

Since school started this month, my 15-year-old son Zak has been having trouble sleeping. He’s been waking up in the middle of the night, worrying if he’s finished everything on his to-do list.

Compared to many students in our San Francisco neighborhood, Zak has a “light” schedule. He goes to school, participates in jazz band and does his homework. By design, he’s not the classically overscheduled child.

And yet, Zak’s daily routine of school-band-homework still manages to eat up most of his day. When Saturday finally rolls around, he’s not the carefree teen I wish he could be. Instead, he’s anxious, calculating whether he has enough time to get together with friends in between weekend assignments. Like many adults, he can’t find the “off” switch.

http://go.uen.org/1VW

 

 

 

 

The Common Core Is Working in My Classroom Education Week op-ed by Jeff Baxter, 2014 Kansas Teacher of the Year

 

“Call me Ishmael,” Professor Nellick read aloud to my college English class. It was an odd sentence from the start. Who was Ishmael? The name didn’t sound American. And why would Herman       Melville open a novel with this sentence? For the next two classes, our professor pressed, challenging me and my classmates to puzzle it out for ourselves.

I was soon pondering the meaning of other carefully chosen words, places, and names in Melville’s classic, Moby Dick. Why “damp, drizzly November in my soul”? Why “Queequeg” and “Pequod”? Before long, these questions brought the novel alive in my mind, and I was hooked. I changed majors from biology to English, and eventually became an English teacher myself.

Inspired by Professor Nellick’s demanding and engaging instructional approach, I have now taught Moby Dick to my high school English students for 21 years. But four years ago, I began to consider how I could make the novel even more relevant and captivating for students as my department began translating the Common Core State Standards into our school’s curriculum.

The common core challenges teachers to provide high school students with an appreciation of the foundational works of American literature.

http://go.uen.org/1W1

 

 

 

 

Americans hate all public schools, except the ones their own kids attend Washington Post commentary by columnist Catherine Rampell

 

In my column last Friday, I mentioned a peculiar paradox: that Americans think public schools nationwide are terrible — except for the ones their own kids attend. (This is not so different from Fenno’s Paradox, which refers to American attitudes toward Congress vs. toward their own congressperson.)

For several decades, Phi Delta Kappa International/Gallup has been surveying Americans about their attitudes towards public education. Three separate survey questions ask respondents to give grades – A, B, C, D or “fail” —  to denote the quality of schools. One asks about public schools “in the nation as a whole,” another about public schools “in your community,” and the last about “the school your oldest child attends.”

http://go.uen.org/1Wa

 

 

 

 

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NATIONAL NEWS

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Is there too much testing in the public schools?

NewsHour

 

This is the first year that schools will publish student test scores tied to the Common Core initiative. Critics argue that implementing these new standards cause overtesting that rob teachers and students of valuable teaching time. Judy Woodruff gets debate from Kathleen Porter-Magee of the Partnership for Inner-City Education and Miami-Dade County Public Schools superintendent Alberto Carvalho.

http://go.uen.org/1W2

 

 

 

Center for Union Facts says Randi Weingarten is ruining nation’s schools Washington Post

 

The 11-page mailing, on expensive paper stock, was sent first class to 125,000 households across the country this week.

“I’m writing to you about Randi,” the letter began. “You probably don’t know who Randi is. Most people don’t. The terrible impact Randi has on America’s educational system is something that I hope you will give me a few minutes to explain.”

The writer, Richard Berman, is a D.C.-based corporate communications consultant who is waging a national campaign against Randi Weingarten, the president of the American Federation of Teachers.

Berman has run a highly personal attack on Weingarten for the past year, paying for two billboards in Times Square that featured an unflattering two-story image of her, a full-page ad in the New York Times, radio spots and, now, lengthy mailings. He also paid workers to hand out anti-Weingarten flyers during Labor Day weekend in East Hampton, N.Y., where she has a home.

In the mailing, Berman refers to Weingarten as “a vicious individual” who is “on a crusade to stymie school reform and protect the jobs of incompetent teachers — the bad apples that drain so much of our tax resources and sabotage the efforts of parents and caring teachers.”

The campaign is being waged under the auspices of the Center for Union Facts, a nonprofit Berman created that is devoted to “research and education regarding labor unions and their activities.”

Reached Wednesday, Berman declined to identify who is funding the campaign. “That’s always a question that people ask me, and I always tell them we don’t disclose our donors,” he said.

http://go.uen.org/1VE

 

 

 

 

Due Process Laws Vary for Teachers by State Complicated systems exist for educator job protections Education Week

 

The concept underpinning teacher due process is simple: Teachers should have the right to hear and contest charges against them before they lose their jobs.

The reality of the laws governing those processes, though, is frequently far more complicated, a review of state due process laws shows. Among other things, they differ in the forum prescribed for such hearings, the timeline for completing them, and the kinds of evidence that can be introduced.

Obscure and often ill-understood, such details are nevertheless the ones with which advocates, teachers’ unions, and others will need to grapple in the wake of a surge of interest in revamping teachers’ job protections, one of the fallouts of the Vergara v. California decision.

http://go.uen.org/1VZ

 

 

 

Bill Clinton: Charter Schools Must Be Held To ‘The Original Bargain’

Huffington Post

 

NEW YORK — Charter schools have great potential, but they aren’t living up to their promise, former President Bill Clinton said late Tuesday night at a gathering of about 100 international philanthropists and businesspeople.

“If you’re going to get into education, I think it’s really important that you invest in what works,” Clinton said. “For example, New Orleans has better schools than it had before Hurricane Katrina, and it’s the only public school [district] in America where 100 percent of the schools are charter schools.”

But the reforms shouldn’t stop there, he added. “They still haven’t done what no state has really done adequately, which is to set up a review system to keep the original bargain of charter schools, which was if they weren’t outperforming the public model, they weren’t supposed to get their charter renewed,” he said.

http://go.uen.org/1VF

 

 

 

 

In Pa., ‘snow day’ an endangered species Philadelphia Inquirer

 

Pennsylvania has redefined the concept of the snow day, announcing that schools can offer “cyber days” when kids can’t make it into the classrooms.

In other words, some students can kiss snow days goodbye.

For up to five days a year, the “Flexible Instructional Days” pilot program will allow schools in all 501 school districts, including Philadelphia, to use nontraditional instruction methods, such as cyber school, when bad weather or other emergencies shut down school buildings.

http://go.uen.org/1W0

 

 

 

 

Most Delaware grads not ready for college math (Wilmington, DE) News Journal

 

More than half of Delaware public school students who enroll in the state’s colleges must start with remedial courses that don’t count toward their degrees, which can delay graduation or lead to them drop out.

To fix the problem, state education leaders have worked out a deal with Delaware’s colleges and universities so students who pass a new math class in their senior year are guaranteed to start college in a math class that will count for credit.

“Foundations of College Math” replaces the usual fourth-year math course and focuses on skills students will need in college, including geometry, algebra and statistics.

The class, developed with math faculty at Delaware universities, is being piloted at Concord High School, Laurel High School and Woodbridge High School.

http://go.uen.org/1W3

 

 

 

 

What urban districts need to know to get their English language learners up to Common Core standards Hechinger Report

 

California’s large urban school districts are failing to consistently provide quality instruction to students with limited English language proficiency, according to Patricia Gardara, co-director of the Civil Rights Project at UCLA.

“The large urban districts tend to have highly disproportionate poverty, transiency, and urban problems, which must be dealt with in addition to the regular instructional challenges,” Gardara told The Hechinger Report’s Pat Wingert.

That’s a problem The Council of the Great City Schools wants to fix. The group, which represents 67 of the country’s largest school districts, recently released a guide to help administrators and teachers change how they teach English language learners (ELLs) in their districts to complement Common Core. The guide is part instructional framework, part checklist for what to look for in instructional materials.

While the guide is agnostic on how ELL students are provided with English proficiency instruction – whether they receive services through stand-alone English as a Second Language classes or as part of English language arts classes shared with English proficient students – the guide is explicit about what the new standards must mean for teachers throughout the school building.

It calls for teachers in all subjects, not just English class, to learn how to teach their ELL students English language literacy. The idea is that math, English, social studies and science teachers will be providing students with not only subject area content but also with discipline-specific and academic English literacy lessons.

http://go.uen.org/1W4

 

A copy of the guide

http://go.uen.org/1W5 (Council of the Great City Schools)

 

 

 

 

When the digital classroom meets the parents Marketplace

 

The modern classroom is packed with digital technology that can record students’ academic performance in real time, as well as keep track of their attendance, assignments and more. All that data isn’t just changing the classroom and the job of teachers. It’s changing the role of parents, who are being asked to do more to keep up and keep tabs on their kids.

On a recent night at High Tech Los Angeles, a charter high school in Van Nuys, California, a group of parents got a lesson in just what that means. One of them was Nooneh Kradjain, who has two sons at the high school, and was busy scribbling notes. She said she was struck by how much things have changed since she was in school. “My parents just looked at the report card when it came home and said ‘good job, let’s go out to dinner.”

These days, being a school parent is more like a part-time job.

With so much access to information about their kids’ academic performance, parents are expected to be up on what’s happening. It’s on them now to know if their kids may be headed off track after flubbing a test or missing a homework assignment.

http://go.uen.org/1W9

 

 

 

FBI Releases Report Examining Mass Shootings Associated Press

 

WASHINGTON — The number of shootings in which a gunman wounds or kills multiple people has increased dramatically in recent years, with the majority of attacks in the last decade occurring at a business or a school, according to an FBI report released Wednesday.

The study focused on 160 “active shooter incidents” between 2000 and 2013. Those are typically defined as cases in which a gunman in an attack shoots or attempts to shoot people in a populated area.

The goal of the report, which excluded shootings that are gang and drug related, was to compile accurate data about the attacks and to help local police prepare for or respond to similar killings in the future, federal law enforcement officials said.

http://go.uen.org/1W6

 

http://go.uen.org/1W7 (CNN)

 

A copy of the report

http://go.uen.org/1W8 (FBI)

 

 

 

 

Michelle Obama urges leaders to show courage in fight for education Reuters

 

NEW YORK – U.S. first lady Michelle Obama urged international leaders to show the courage and commitment of girls who make sacrifices to go to school – like the abducted Nigerian schoolgirls – to provide children around the world the quality education they deserve.

Obama gave the keynote speech at an event dedicated to fighting a global learning crisis and held on the sidelines of the United Nations’ General Assembly.

Universal education for every child in the world is one of several millennium development goals the United Nations has committed to achieving by next year – but which is expected to slip away.

http://go.uen.org/1VG

 

 

 

 

To Stop Picky Eaters From Tossing The Broccoli, Give Them Choices NPR

 

In many communities, the local school district is the largest food provider, filling thousands of hungry bellies every day. But trying to feed healthful food to some of the pickiest eaters can result in mountains of wasted food.

Now, many schools are finding that giving kids a say in what they eat can cut down on what ends up in the trash.

It’s a lesson you can see in action in the lunchroom of Harris Bilingual Elementary School in Fort Collins, Colo. Kindergartners in light-up tennis shoes and pigtails march single-file into the cafeteria, sliding small trays along a salad bar.

“Alison, que quieres? Oh, broccoli, tambien,” says Kate Kosakowski, a teacher’s assistant at the school. She gives the pigtailed kindergartner a pat on the back and places several florets on the tray. Kids speak in both English and Spanish throughout the school week at Harris. Poudre School District, which includes Harris elementary, serves almost 15,000 meals a day.

The salad and fruit bar is a staple of this lunchroom.

http://go.uen.org/1VV

 

 

 

 

 

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CALENDAR

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USOE Calendar

http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

 

 

UEN News

http://www.uen.org

 

 

October 9:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://go.uen.org/1pn

 

 

October 9-10:

Utah State Board of Education meeting

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

 

 

October 14:

Executive Appropriations Committee meeting

1 p.m., 210 Senate Building

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2014&Com=APPEXE

 

 

October 15:

Education Interim Committee meeting

2:30 p.m., 30 House Building

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2014&Com=INTEDU

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