Education News Roundup: Oct. 2, 2014

Day #2 in Second Grade at Lincoln: Learning Protocols and Procedures. Photo from the National Blue Ribbon Schools Program.

Day #2 in Second Grade at Lincoln: Learning Protocols and Procedures. Photo from the National Blue Ribbon Schools Program.

Education News Roundup

Today’s Top Picks:

Home schoolers and at least one city councilman question North Ogden’s new curfew plan.

http://go.uen.org/1Zw (OSE)

Provo School District suffers data breach.

http://go.uen.org/1ZC (PDH)

and http://go.uen.org/1ZJ (KTVX)

and http://go.uen.org/1ZM (KSTU)

Former Education Secretary Bennett praises Project Lead the Way.

http://go.uen.org/1Zt (DN)

Should be an interesting board meeting tonight in suburban Denver.

http://go.uen.org/1Ve (AP)

and sidebar: What are students protesting?

http://go.uen.org/1ZQ (AP)

 

 

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TODAY’S HEADLINES

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UTAH

 

Home schoolers question North Ogden curfew plan

 

Two Utah schools get blue ribbon award

 

Provo City School District suffers data breach

 

Food Fight

Investigation into worker who tossed school lunches sparks policy changes

 

Land exchange benefits SILTA

 

‘Don’t Be a Monster’ anti-bullying campaign in Syracuse

 

Ogden schools beef up security for elementary kids

 

Ex-Tabiona coach sent to prison

 

Bus driver charged in death of 10-year-old gets surprise jail sentence

 

Utah gets No. 5 school safety rating

 

Bountiful and Woods Cross named to US top schools list

 

Water leak closes junior high school in Herriman

 

Incident Causes Brief Lockdown At Gunnison Schools

 

Assemblies educate students about pornography addiction

 

Herberger’s donates percentage of opening week sales to local schools

 

Granite School District announces testing for gifted and talented program

 

Sky View High School seeking parents for community council

 

Sky View High School to hold parent-teacher conferences

 

 

 

 

OPINION & COMMENTARY

 

Teaching American History

 

STEM education must start early — and Ogden’s Green Acres shows the pathway

 

Utah’s federal land takeover shouldn’t and won’t happen

 

Some classes provide targets for bullies

 

Maughan good choice for state school board

 

Great teacher merits an award

 

When Teachers Need Help in Math

As the Common Core standards change what students need to know, some schools are hiring in-house specialists.

 

Finding Overlap in the Common Math, Language Arts, and Science Standards

 

 

 

 

NATION

 

Protesters to Pack Meeting on Education Changes

 

Review of Missouri education standards divisive

 

Are teachers really ready for the Common Core?

The controversial standards are about to be tested for the first time, yet questions remain if educators have been adequately trained.

 

New Poll Data Buoys Public Ed Advocates

 

Without State Support, Paul’s iPad Pilot Project Scatters

 

No. 2 U.S. education official heads for exit

 

Military Surplus Program Provides Weapons to School Police

 

New York teen football player dies after collision

 

Texas school fund now worth nation-high $37.7B

 

 

 

 

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UTAH NEWS

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Home schoolers question North Ogden curfew plan

 

NORTH OGDEN – North Ogden officials are looking to pass a daytime curfew, but some home school parents are raising questions — giving council members reason to pause.

The city council discussed the proposed curfew, which would slap a student with a five-step process that includes students and their parents paying $50 fines, if students continue to sluff. If students continue to violate the curfew they would end up in a youth court, judged by their peers.

Some home school parents are opposing the curfew and some council members are questioning the necessity of a daytime curfew because there is already a state statute regarding attendance.

http://go.uen.org/1Zw (OSE)

 

 

 

Two Utah schools get blue ribbon award

 

Two Utah schools have been named National Blue Ribbon Schools for 2014, the U.S. Department of Education announced Tuesday.

Orem’s Lakeridge Jr. High School and Hyrum’s Lincoln Elementary School were among the 337 schools across the nation chosen for the award, which recognizes academic excellence and successful efforts to close student achievement gaps.

“These great schools are fulfilling the promise of American education — that all students, no matter their name or ZIP code, can flourish when schools provide safe, creative, and challenging learning environments,” U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan said in a prepared statement. “National Blue Ribbon Schools are models of consistent excellence and a resource for other schools and districts. We celebrate them for their tireless effort and boundless creativity in reaching and teaching every student.”

http://go.uen.org/1Zo (SLT)

 

http://go.uen.org/1ZG (LHJ)

 

 

 

 

Provo City School District suffers data breach

 

Employees of the Provo City School District may have an extra concern facing them as the district has discovered a data breach.

There was a phishing attack and someone gained access to an employee’s email account. That account contained files with sensitive, personal identification information for about half of the district’s employees. The district employs slightly more than 1,000 people.

No student records were affected, said Caleb Price, district spokesman.

http://go.uen.org/1ZC (PDH)

 

http://go.uen.org/1ZJ (KTVX)

 

http://go.uen.org/1ZM (KSTU)

 

 

 

 

Food Fight

Investigation into worker who tossed school lunches sparks policy changes

 

When 17 students at Uintah Elementary School had their school lunches tossed into the trash in January, it brought national television outlets to the school’s front door and also prompted a criminal investigation to look into sweeping accounting discrepancies by the lunchroom manager.

The criminal probe—known to Salt Lake City School District officials, but not made public until this week—shows that Shirley Canham, the 61-year-old lunchroom manager who threw away the lunches, had also spread nearly $9,000 in lunch money into the wrong children’s accounts.

Police reports show that 334 individual checks were applied to the wrong accounts between 2009 and 2014. According to the reports, there was no evidence that Canham was stealing money or enriching herself.

The Salt Lake County District Attorney’s Office declined to prosecute the case. But neither Canham nor the district were informed until September of that decision. During the lag time, some say, a cloud of unwarranted suspicion surrounded Canham, who resigned prior to the current school year. And after Canham came under fire for throwing out the lunches that January day, the district changed its policy in regard to dealing with the lunches of students whose accounts had run dry—and the change is right in line, Canham says, with her own unofficial policy that no child’s lunch would be thrown away.

http://go.uen.org/200 (SLCW)

 

 

 

Land exchange benefits SILTA

 

SALT LAKE CITY– A historic land exchange protecting Corona Arch and other scenic lands, along with $139 million in revenue, highlighted a near-record fiscal year for the Utah School and Institutional Trust Lands Administration (SITLA).

“Our stewardship efforts rarely make headlines, but SITLA has helped protect lands equal in number to the acreage of Arches, Canyonlands, and Zion national parks combined,” said SITLA Director Kevin S. Carter. “While our fiduciary responsibility of generating revenue is our primary focus, transferring out of lands ill-suited for development benefits everyone, trust land beneficiaries and taxpayers.”

Carter finalized the 60,000-acre Utah Recreational Land Exchange Act this past May with Governor Gary R. Herbert and Bureau of Land Management Director Juan Palma. The recent exchange helped the agency surpass 560,000 acres it has helped to protect or preserve since 1994.

The entirely self-funded agency also generated $138.9 million in revenue, just under its 2006 record of $140.7 million. SITLA’s Oil and Gas Group generated $93.5 million while the Mining, Surface and Real Estate Development groups generated a combined $45.4 million.

http://go.uen.org/1ZX (PDH)

 

 

 

‘Don’t Be a Monster’ anti-bullying campaign in Syracuse

 

SYRACUSE — Haunted houses are opening their doors across town, but one such place is making sure the monsters are kept inside their walls, by venturing out to local schools and teaching kids how to avoid being a monster.

Nightmare on 13th, a haunted house in Salt Lake City, is participating in the “Don’t Be a Monster” anti-bullying campaign this month at several schools, including Wednesday’s visit to Syracuse Junior High. “Don’t Be a Monster” is a national effort sponsored by haunted houses across the country during the month of October, national anti-bullying month.

http://go.uen.org/1Zu (OSE)

 

 

 

 

Ogden schools beef up security for elementary kids

 

OGDEN – Ogden schools are beefing up on safety and it’s now starting at the youngest ages.

The Ogden School District already partners with Ogden police to provide school resource officers for the junior and high schools — both help pay for the officers. And recently the Ogden police approached the district and offered to pay for an additional resource officer for the elementary schools.

http://go.uen.org/1Zv (OSE)

 

 

 

Ex-Tabiona coach sent to prison

 

DUCHESNE— Shay Alfred Price was sentenced to several years in prison for sexual activity with a female student while he was a teacher and coach at Tabiona High School.

In the Duchesne County courtroom Sept. 15, Judge Samuel Chiara ordered the 35-year-old Price to serve up to five years in prison for unlawful sexual conduct with a 16- or 17-year-old and up to five years in prison for distributing pornography to a person under 18. Both crimes were classified as third degree felonies, according to charging documents.

http://go.uen.org/1Zl (UBS)

 

 

 

 

Bus driver charged in death of 10-year-old gets surprise jail sentence

 

WEST JORDAN — A former school bus driver pleaded guilty Wednesday to charges connected with the death of a 10-year-old South Jordan girl who was hit by a second school bus after he dropped her off.

But while all sides knew going into court that a resolution had been reached and 44-year-old Troy Daniels, of Kearns, was about to accept a plea deal, many in the courtroom were caught off guard when 3rd District Judge Charlene Barlow went against the prosecution’s recommendation and sentenced Daniels to one year in jail.

“Frankly we weren’t expecting jail time period, let alone 365 days. … I’m very pleased and admittedly surprised at the sentence, as I know David and Seleny will be as well,” said Spencer Banks, the attorney for the parents of 10-year-old Seleny Joanne Crosby.

http://go.uen.org/1Zq (DN)

 

http://go.uen.org/1ZK (KTVX)

 

http://go.uen.org/1ZL (KSL)

 

 

 

 

Utah gets No. 5 school safety rating

 

OGDEN — Utah is No. 5 in the nation when it comes to “safest schools” and its teachers score at ninth best, an analysis conducted by WalletHub.com says.

The rankings, coming out just prior to Oct. 5, International World Teachers Day, took in 18 different key metrics, with Utah ranking better than average in eight and average in one other, according to the report by the Washington, D.C.-based group.

http://go.uen.org/1Zx (OSE)

 

 

 

 

Bountiful and Woods Cross named to US top schools list

 

FARMINGTON — Two schools in Davis School District were recently recognized in the Daily Beast’s America’s Best High Schools for 2014 list.

Bountiful High School came in at number 560 and Woods Cross High School was 588, and are the only two schools named in the list from Top of Utah. Bountiful High School has now been on the list for three years in a row.

http://go.uen.org/1Zy (OSE)

 

 

 

Water leak closes junior high school in Herriman

 

HERRIMAN — A major water leak forced the closure of Providence Hall Junior High, 4558 W. Patriot Ridge Drive, in Herriman Wednesday.

http://go.uen.org/1Zr (DN)

 

 

 

 

Incident Causes Brief Lockdown At Gunnison Schools

 

The Gunnison Elementary and High School were briefly put on lockdown this morning after a misinformed parent entered the elementary school. The school resource officer was called and escorted the parent from the school. No children were involved in the incident and all schools have returned to a normal status.

http://go.uen.org/1ZN (MUR)

 

 

 

 

Assemblies educate students about pornography addiction

 

WASHINGTON COUNTY — About 3,000 secondary students in Washington County from eighth through 12th grades attended assemblies Tuesday regarding the negative effects of viewing pornography.

The subject, not previously divulged to the students, was presented at Hurricane High School, Hurricane Middle School, Lava Ridge Intermediate School and Pine View High School by members of Fight the New Drug, a nonprofit organization that works to educate and prevent the viewing of pornography.

http://go.uen.org/1ZY (SGN)

 

 

 

Herberger’s donates percentage of opening week sales to local schools

 

As part of Herberger’s grand opening celebration at Cache Valley Mall, the store donated a portion of its sales to Logan City School District and Cache County School District.

http://go.uen.org/1ZD (LHJ)

 

http://go.uen.org/1ZI (CVD)

 

 

 

Granite School District announces testing for gifted and talented program

 

SOUTH SALT LAKE — Parents and teachers may refer students for consideration of assessment for the gifted and talented program for Granite School District.

http://go.uen.org/1Zs (DN)

 

 

 

 

Sky View High School seeking parents for community council

Parents of Sky View High School students who are interested in serving on the Sky View Community Council are invited to call Sky View High School’s main office at 563-6273 for more information.

http://go.uen.org/1ZF (LHJ)

 

 

Sky View High School to hold parent-teacher conferences

 

Sky View High School will be holding parent-teacher conferences from 4-8 p.m. Monday in the Spectator Gym. Parents and guardians are invited to attend with their student and a copy of their student’s schedule http://go.uen.org/1ZE (LHJ)

 

 

 

 

 

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OPINION & COMMENTARY

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Teaching American History

Salt Lake Tribune editorial cartoon by Pat Bagley

 

http://go.uen.org/1Zp

 

 

 

STEM education must start early — and Ogden’s Green Acres shows the pathway Deseret News op-ed by William J. Bennett, former U.S. secretary of education

 

Throughout my career in education, I have had both the fortune and distress of visiting hundreds of schools throughout the country. By my count, I have just completed my 603rd school visit, at the Green Acres Elementary School in Ogden, Utah. Green Acres belongs in the “fortune” category.

My experience in visiting various schools across the nation mirrors what most people know about our schools: some are truly bad, some are great, and most fall in the middle — they do OK. It has been my practice that when I find a school doing a great job (teachers are enthused to be there, students are excited to learn, the principal is proud and supportive of the environment, and the parents are engaged), I try to promote it — the best education reform, after all, is replicating what is done right. If one school can do it, others should be able to as well.

The occasion of my visit was to see the new science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) program Green Acres had instituted, using Project Lead The Way’s (PLTW) program. Project Lead The Way is a national leader in STEM education and is one of the education organizations I am proud to affiliate with and to serve as a senior adviser.

http://go.uen.org/1Zt

 

 

 

 

Utah’s federal land takeover shouldn’t and won’t happen

(Logan) Herald Journal op-ed by Thad Box of Logan

 

Rains last week brought water for farms, industry, recreation and life itself. The lifeblood of our existence falls mostly on land owned by me and some 314,000,000 other Americans. Only about a fourth (24.8 percent) of our state is privately owned, but we depend on water that falls on the three fourths (75.2 percent) of Utah that we the people own. Through complex water laws, we share that water with millions of people downstream.

Next summer that land will support wildlife, livestock, campers and hikers. Much of that land will soon be covered with snow, providing winter sport recreation to millions of people. Those people can’t use their land every day like I can. They spend months planning a short vacation in some of the most beautiful country in the world — a place we Utahns take for granted. Many Americans, who proudly own an equal share in our land, may never see it.

http://go.uen.org/1ZH

 

 

 

Some classes provide targets for bullies

(Ogden) Standard-Examiner letter from Orlee Johnson

 

I am writing in regards to my concern over bullying, and the fact that Utah is one of the highest states in teen suicides. Could it be connected to our our special ed classes, where students with special problems can be branded as “retards” or any other name these bullies can pin on them?

These students need help and understanding with the problems they may have, not abuse.

http://go.uen.org/1Zz

 

 

 

 

Maughan good choice for state school board

(Ogden) Standard-Examiner letter from Frank Maughan

 

It hasn’t escaped my attention that during the upcoming election a State School Board seat is available. I know each candidate from the Top of Utah personally. In fact I have known one all his life.

Dr. Willard Maughan, having quietly served in numerous civic positions over the past 35 years, is certainly qualified to guide and participate in discussions about where Utah’s public education is heading, and when.

http://go.uen.org/1ZA

 

 

 

 

Great teacher merits an award

(Ogden) Standard-Examiner letter from Patrick Matthews

 

My name is Patrick Matthews and I am a Boy Scout and a seventh-grade student at Centennial Junior High School.

I am writing to let readers know that I think Ms Sharlene Bremer of Kaysville Elementary School should be awarded for her greatness. I have really appreciated her work.

http://go.uen.org/1ZB

 

 

 

 

When Teachers Need Help in Math

As the Common Core standards change what students need to know, some schools are hiring in-house specialists.

Atlantic commentary by PAT WINGERT, an education reporter based in Washington, D.C.

 

A few years ago, third-grade teacher Laura Metrano considered herself strictly a language-arts person. “I am a writer and a reader,” she said during a break in her school day at Springhurst Elementary in Dobbs Ferry, New York. As a child, she said, “I was always a very reluctant math student.” As a teacher, “I felt intimidated by third-grade math.”

Her insecurity grew when Josh Rosen, the school’s math coach and coordinator, switched Springhurst to a new mathematics textbook that emphasized critical thinking over basic memorization. When Rosen offered to coach her on effective ways to teach to this new standard, she took him up on the offer. He started observing her class and making suggestions. Sometimes, they’d switch roles and she’d watch him teach her class. She joined a small group of Springhurst teachers for Rosen’s “Math is not Elementary” course that met after school one day a week for 10 weeks.

“Taking Josh’s course unlocked something in me,” Metrano said. “I’m so much more confident, and I have multiple ways to teach math.  Now it’s my favorite thing to teach. That’s a huge turnaround.”

While other schools are struggling to prepare for the new Common Core assessments in the spring, Springhurst principal Julia Drake said she’s confident that her 681-student school in affluent Westchester County will fare well. Having a well-trained math specialist made all the difference, she said. “A couple of days of professional development is not the same as someone in-house who really understands it,” she said. “Once you’ve had a math specialist, you can’t imagine getting by without one.”

http://go.uen.org/1ZV

 

 

 

Finding Overlap in the Common Math, Language Arts, and Science Standards Education Week commentary by columnist Liana Heitin

 

A few years ago, Tina Cheuk, a project manager for the Understanding Language initiative at Stanford University, woke up one morning, printed out several new sets of standards, and started cutting.

“I was frustrated,” she said in a phone interview yesterday. Looking at the Common Core State Standards in English/language arts and math, along with the framework that would become the Next Generation Science Standards, she said, “I felt overwhelmed. And that was my full-time job looking at standards.”

Cheuk, a former teacher, saw patterns in the standards and began organizing them accordingly. She focused on what she calls the “practice standards,” which outline the skills demonstrated by proficient students. (She took them from the common core’s Standards for Mathematical Practice; the descriptions of literate students’ “capacities” in the language arts common standards; the guidelines for developing English-language-proficiency standards that correspond to the common core, developed by the Council of Chief State School Officers; and the NGSS’ science and engineering practices.)

She came up with this Venn diagram, which shows how the practice standards overlap:

http://go.uen.org/1ZS

 

 

 

 

 

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NATIONAL NEWS

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Protesters to Pack Meeting on Education Changes Associated Press

 

DENVER — Students and teachers fighting a plan to promote patriotism and downplay civil disobedience in some suburban Denver U.S. history courses are expected to pack a school board meeting Thursday where the controversial changes could face a vote.

Turnout is expected to be so high that the teachers union plans to stream video from the meeting room – which holds a couple hundred people – on a big screen in the parking lot outside. Students said they’ll protest with teachers before the school board meeting. A walkout planned at a school Thursday morning didn’t take place after the principal sent a letter to parents asking them to discourage their children from participating.

The principal at Golden High School, Brian Conroy, “proud” that students have made their opinions known but said a walkout now would be “counter-productive” and unnecessary because students have already gotten the attention of the school board.

Students across a majority of the 17 high schools in Colorado’s second-largest school district have left classes in droves over the past few weeks, waving signs and flags in protests organized by word of mouth and social media.

http://go.uen.org/1Ve

 

Sidebar: What are students protesting?

http://go.uen.org/1ZQ (AP)

 

 

 

Review of Missouri education standards divisive Associated Press via Education Week

 

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. — Parents and teachers creating education guidelines for Missouri schoolchildren are hoping for the best but bracing for what could be a yearlong fight over the role that Common Core standards should have in classrooms.

A new Missouri law created several task forces charged with creating goals for students that prepare them for college and careers, but members responsible for evaluating those standards were divided within hours of their first meetings last week.

Problems started when not all of the appointees had been named in time for last week’s meetings. Those who made it argued about whether to actually meet, then about whether state education officials should be present, who should take notes, and whether the public should be allowed to watch their work. At one meeting, a task force decided to shut off a video camera that had been recording the proceedings.

Some groups are preparing for more gridlock when the groups meet again Thursday and Friday.

http://go.uen.org/1Zn

 

 

 

 

Are teachers really ready for the Common Core?

The controversial standards are about to be tested for the first time, yet questions remain if educators have been adequately trained.

Boston Globe Magazine

 

The Common Core marks a stark change in what American public schools will expect students — and teachers — to do in the classroom. The standards are meant to reduce the time students spend memorizing formulas and filling in multiple-choice quizzes. They’ll need to use critical thinking to solve problems and rationalize their answers. And no longer will educators teach students that there’s one right answer or one right path to that answer. This means that teachers will be held to new expectations in the way they instruct students.

But for the most part, on-the-job teacher training, which has long been criticized for its ineffectiveness, hasn’t changed much in response to the demands of the Common Core. In Massachusetts, some individual schools and districts are trying innovative methods, but teachers say much of the training offered by the state has been the traditional lecture format, which most experts agree doesn’t work. At sessions like the Solution Tree event in Boston, “we sit down and we do everything that we’re not supposed to do as teachers,” Brown tells me. Kanold had recommended that successful Common Core math classrooms be 65 percent student-led and just 35 percent teacher-led, but Brown estimates that Kanold’s own workshop was 95 percent presenter-led.

Much is at stake.

http://go.uen.org/1ZW

 

 

 

New Poll Data Buoys Public Ed Advocates

Politico

 

With a month to go before midterms, the activists at Democrats for Public Education are urging candidates to speak up — loudly — about their support for neighborhood schools. DPE gave Morning Education a sneak peek at new poll data that shows voters strongly back liberal priorities such as increasing funding for public schools, lowering class sizes and expanding programs to help low-income children overcome the disadvantages of poverty. Voters also express strong support and admiration for public school teachers — who have been popping up in candidates’ campaign ads for months, precisely because they’re seen as such trusted emissaries.

The national poll of 1,200 active voters, conducted by Democratic polling firm Harstad Strategic Research, found that 79 percent of Democrats, 57 percent of independents and 45 percent of Republicans support increasing funding for public schools. By contrast, voters express serious doubts about reforms such as online learning, private-school vouchers, parent trigger laws and handoffs that let private companies take over management of public schools.

Candidates across the country have already been playing up education as a theme; the adequacy of school funding is a key issue in the gubernatorial races in Florida, Pennsylvania and Michigan and in the U.S. Senate race in North Carolina. DPE President Steve Rosenthal said he hopes more candidates take the poll data to heart and start beating the drums for public education. “This information could, and should, be used as a road map for those who want to speak out loud and clear in support of neighborhood schools and public education,” he said.

http://go.uen.org/1Zm

 

 

 

 

Without State Support, Paul’s iPad Pilot Project Scatters Twin Falls (ID) Times-News

 

PAUL | Idaho’s top politicians pinned dreams and promises to an iPad pilot program at Paul Elementary School.

The excitement was clear during a December 2012 ceremony announcing the school as Idaho’s first iSchool Campus project.

“The students at Paul will help make Idaho one of the most competitive places in the world,” Lt. Gov. Governor Brad Little said during the event. Also in attendance that day were Idaho House Speaker Scott Bedke, R-Oakley, state Sen. Dean Cameron, R-Rupert, and Idaho Department of Commerce Director Jeff Sayer.

Paul Elementary received $244,000 in grant money to cover the first year of expenses. Each of its nearly 500 students had an iPad to use.

But that excitement and state’s help didn’t last long.

Last year, Paul Elementary applied for a state technology pilot grant to continue the program, asking for more than $375,000 to cover the costs for the second and third years.

The state doled out a total of $3 million to other schools, but rejected Paul’s request.

Now, the Minidoka County School District is using supplemental levy money to make the last payment on the iPads.

http://go.uen.org/1ZZ

 

 

 

No. 2 U.S. education official heads for exit Washington Post

 

Jim Shelton, the deputy secretary and second in command at the U.S. Department of Education, will resign his government job by the end of the year, department officials said Wednesday.

Shelton, 47, has held several posts at the department since joining the agency in 2009 and has had a significant influence over the agency’s policies. Shelton ran the department’s innovations program and was a force behind its Promise Neighborhoods, a grant program that gives “cradle to career” help to students in selected poor communities.

http://go.uen.org/1ZO

 

 

 

 

Military Surplus Program Provides Weapons to School Police Education Week

 

A U.S. Department of Defense program that has been criticized for “militarizing” local police departments by providing them with free surplus equipment has also provided school police around the country with armored vehicles, semiautomatic rifles, and grenade launchers.

The revelations about the military equipment provided through the agency’s 1033 surplus equipment program have stoked concerns by civil rights groups that law enforcement is overreaching into school matters and contributing to a punitive atmosphere.

Since the 2012 shooting deaths of 20 children and six adults at a Newtown, Conn., elementary school, districts around the country have stepped up security measures, adding new equipment, police officers, and armed guards.

But civil rights and student organizations have said the role of school police too often extends beyond securing buildings and into routine student discipline matters that should not involve law enforcement, especially for minority students and students with disabilities, who bear a disproportionate share of such punishments.

http://go.uen.org/1ZR

 

 

 

New York teen football player dies after collision Reuters

 

NEW YORK – A 16-year-old New York high school football player died at a Long Island hospital after colliding with an opponent during a varsity game, school officials said on Thursday.

The death of Tom Cutinella, a junior at Shoreham-Wading River High School in Shoreham, New York, comes at a time when awareness is already growing about the long-term health effects of head injuries in professional and youth sports, particularly football.

Cutinella died from a head wound he suffered during a game against Elwood John H. Glenn High School on Wednesday night, according to local media reports and Steven Cohen, superintendent of Shoreham-Wading River Schools.

http://go.uen.org/1ZP

 

http://go.uen.org/1ZT (CSM)

 

 

 

 

Texas school fund now worth nation-high $37.7B Associated Press via Fort Worth (TX) Star-Telegram

 

AUSTIN, Texas — A fund Texas uses to buy instructional materials and cover some local school districts’ costs is now worth nearly $38 billion, officials announced Tuesday, making it the nation’s largest educational endowment.

Land Commissioner Jerry Patterson credited a booming natural gas industry for growing the Permanent School Fund, which was worth about $37.7 billion as of June 30.

It was started in 1854 with an initial investment of just $2 million.

The fund is overseen by Patterson’s office and the State Board of Education, among other state entities. It gets proceeds from the sale of state land and rental of mineral rights for oil and natural gas exploration.

http://go.uen.org/1ZU

 

 

 

 

 

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CALENDAR

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USOE Calendar

http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

 

 

UEN News

http://www.uen.org

 

 

October 9:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://go.uen.org/1pn

 

Utah State Board of Education meeting

3:30 p.m. 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

 

 

October 10:

Utah State Board of Education meeting

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

 

 

October 14:

Executive Appropriations Committee meeting

1 p.m., 210 Senate Building

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2014&Com=APPEXE

 

 

October 15:

Education Interim Committee meeting

2:30 p.m., 30 House Building

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2014&Com=INTEDU

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