Education News Roundup: Oct. 10, 2014

Utah State Board of Education August meeting

Utah State Board of Education August meeting


Education News Roundup

Today’s Top Picks:

 

Note: The roundup will not be delivered Monday in recognition of Columbus Day.

 

Utah State Board of Education interviewed the four finalists for State Superintendent last night. A hiring decision could happen today.

http://go.uen.org/23J (SLT)

and http://go.uen.org/23K (DN)

 

There’s some follow up to Utah’s ESEA waiver extension.

http://go.uen.org/23L (SLT)

and http://go.uen.org/23M (DN)

and http://go.uen.org/23R (OSE)

and http://go.uen.org/23T (PDH)

and http://go.uen.org/23Y (KSL)

and http://go.uen.org/240 (KSTU)

and http://go.uen.org/246 (Ed Week)

 

Logan Herald Journal previews the District 1 State Board race between Terryl Warner and David Clark.

http://go.uen.org/23N (LHJ)

 

Governor’s Office follows up on its Common Core news conference earlier this week.

http://go.uen.org/241 (Governor’s Office)

 

Zions Bank CEO Scott Anderson urges you to vote in school board races, among others.

http://go.uen.org/24m (DN)

 

Children’s education advocate Malala Yousafzai shares in Nobel Peace Prize.

http://go.uen.org/243 (USAT)

and http://go.uen.org/24e (WSJ)

and http://go.uen.org/244 (Reuters)

 

California may be having trouble attracting new teachers.

http://go.uen.org/248 (EdSource)

or a copy of the report

http://go.uen.org/249 (California Commission on Teacher Credentialing)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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TODAY’S HEADLINES

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UTAH

 

Final four make their case for state superintendency Interviews » Final four candidates discuss funding, student performance.

 

Utah gets waiver from No Child Left Behind Education » Five other states also get reprieve from the law.

 

Terryl Warner, David Clark face off in Utah State Board of Education race

 

Utah Valley University announces new board of trustees member

 

Latinos bolstering enrollment numbers at Utah public colleges

 

State Board of Education responds to Utah Attorney General’s analysis of Common Core standards

 

Rule change means no Haka at some Bingham football games

 

Utah teacher who shot toilet charged with misdemeanor School incident » Sixth-grade teacher faces misdemeanor charge after gun accidentally discharged.

 

Teacher accused of sexually abusing 2 students pleads not guilty

 

Inside Our Schools

 

 

 

 

OPINION & COMMENTARY

 

Utah could be national education leader

 

Utah in control of education standards

 

With predictions for voter turnout low, Utahns need to step it up

 

A Musical Fix for American Schools

Research shows that music training boosts IQ, focus and persistence

 

Is It Ever Okay to Make Teachers Read Scripted Lessons?

American entrepreneurs have created a popular alternative to Kenya’s dismal public schools. The key: handing out e-readers and making sure teachers recite every page.

 

 

 

 

NATION

 

Three states take lead on Common Core, but are they moving too fast?

New Jersey, Maryland, and Washington State are among the first states to tie graduation to new Common Core tests. But critics say kinks still need to be worked out.

 

Counties look at cost of educating unaccompanied minors who crossed border

 

Nobel winner Malala: Kids ‘should stand up for their rights’

 

Teacher preparation enrollments plummet

 

Researchers and Schools Diverge in Definitions of Bullying

 

Superintendent candidates debate role of federal government in Wyoming education

 

School board: Bible classes stay, curriculum to undergo evaluation

 

SAT vs. ACT: What’s the Difference?

 

Map: A Wave of State Student-Data-Privacy Legislation

 

Education

 

 

 

 

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UTAH NEWS

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Final four make their case for state superintendency Interviews » Final four candidates discuss funding, student performance.

 

The four men vying for the position of state superintendent sat for a final job interview on Thursday in front of their 15 would-be employers and roughly 25 spectators.

Members of the State School Board quizzed the candidates on their outlook for the future of the state, Utah’s adoption of new standards in math and English and the new computer adaptive testing system, SAGE, which is expected to show a decline in student proficiency when scores are released this month.

Each candidate was given one hour to present themselves to the board. A final selection could be made as early as Friday.

http://go.uen.org/23J (SLT)

 

http://go.uen.org/23K (DN)

 

 

 

 

Utah gets waiver from No Child Left Behind Education » Five other states also get reprieve from the law.

 

Utah schools can ignore the requirements of No Child Left Behind for another year after the Obama administration approved the state’s application for a waiver extension Thursday.

The Department of Education announced that six states, including Utah, had been approved for waivers, which free schools from the Adequate Yearly Progress requirements of the embattled education law.

Without a waiver, schools would be required to show 100 percent student proficiency on statewide tests or be subject to sanctions, including diverted funding for at-risk students, faculty and administrative changes and potentially the closing and reopening of low-performing schools as charters.

http://go.uen.org/23L (SLT)

 

http://go.uen.org/23M (DN)

 

http://go.uen.org/23R (OSE)

 

http://go.uen.org/23T (PDH)

 

http://go.uen.org/23Y (KSL)

 

http://go.uen.org/240 (KSTU)

 

http://go.uen.org/246 (Ed Week)

 

 

 

 

Terryl Warner, David Clark face off in Utah State Board of Education race

 

Over the course of the last year, the Utah State Board of Education has seen its share of controversy, from the implementation of the oft-criticized Common Core to the appointment of an interim superintendent. Through most of these controversies, board member Terryl Warner has been speaking out for more transparency. Now, Warner is up for re-election for District 1 and is defending her seat against challenger David Clark.

http://go.uen.org/23N (LHJ)

 

 

 

 

Utah Valley University announces new board of trustees member

 

OREM — The Utah Valley University board of trustees has welcomed Taran K. Chun as a new trustee member. Chun replaces Fidel Montero, who stepped down to serve as UVU President Matthew S. Holland’s new chief of staff.

Chun is currently the principal of Mountain View High School in Orem. His career includes experience as a high school teacher and coach, high school and middle school administrator, and adjunct professor, with the majority of his work in teaching and administration at Title I schools. Chun helped turn a failing Title I school into a successful school, based on No Child Left Behind standards, in only one year, according to a UVU news release.

http://go.uen.org/24j (DN)

 

http://go.uen.org/24k (UVU Review)

 

 

 

Latinos bolstering enrollment numbers at Utah public colleges

 

While overall enrollment at public colleges in Utah might be plateauing, there is one demographic group that has seen a dramatic upward shift on campuses: Latinos.

The number of students on Utah college campuses hasn’t changed much since last fall, but more of them are now Hispanic, with the demographic climbing 6.5 percent in the last 12 months compared to just a tenth of a percent overall.

http://go.uen.org/24i  (Fox News Latino)

 

 

 

 

State Board of Education responds to Utah Attorney General’s analysis of Common Core standards

 

SALT LAKE CITY — The Utah State Board of Education appreciates and affirms the report issued Tuesday by the Utah Attorney General’s Office. In finding that the State Board legally and publicly adopted the Common Core State Standards in 2010, the report confirms the Board’s belief that it acted ethically and in compliance with the state constitution and state law.

http://go.uen.org/24n (KCSG)

 

 

 

Rule change means no Haka at some Bingham football games

SALT LAKE CITY — Football players at Bingham High School will not be able to participate in a long-standing tradition as much as they used to. Region Three schools made a rule change that prohibits the Haka in some places.

The rule change states no team can perform a pre-game ritual on the field during an away game. That includes dances, posting flags, and doing the Haka — a fierce, traditional New Zealand war chant.

The decision isn’t sitting well with students like sophomore Tapu Tafuna.

http://go.uen.org/24l (KSL)

 

 

 

Utah teacher who shot toilet charged with misdemeanor School incident » Sixth-grade teacher faces misdemeanor charge after gun accidentally discharged.

 

The Utah teacher who accidentally shot a toilet has been charged with a misdemeanor. And on Thursday, she resigned from the school district.

Michelle Ferguson-Montgomery, 39, was charged Oct. 1 in Taylorsville Justice Court with one count of discharge of a firearm in a prohibited area within city limits.

Charging documents also claim Ferguson-Montgomery initially misled police about what happened at Westbrook Elementary School during the September gun incident.

http://go.uen.org/23O (SLT)

 

http://go.uen.org/23P (DN)

 

http://go.uen.org/23Q (OSE)

 

http://go.uen.org/23S (PDH)

 

http://go.uen.org/23V (KUTV)

 

http://go.uen.org/23W (KTVX)

 

http://go.uen.org/23X (KSL)

 

http://go.uen.org/24o (TPM)

 

 

 

 

Teacher accused of sexually abusing 2 students pleads not guilty

 

DAVIS COUNTY, Utah — A former Davis County high school teacher pleaded not guilty Thursday to charges resulting from accusations that she sexually abused a student, and this is the second set of charges that have been brought against her relating to sexual abuse of a student.

Brianne Altice will stand trial on four counts of rape and two counts of forcible sodomy. She had pleaded not guilty to some of the charges earlier, and Thursday she pleaded not guilty to the other charges, which stem from accusations from a second student that arose after charges were filed regarding the first student.

http://go.uen.org/23Z (KSTU)

 

 

 

Inside Our Schools

 

Arrowhead Elementary

Utah Online School K-12

Riverside Elementary

Valley Academy Charter

http://go.uen.org/23U (SGS)

 

 

 

 

 

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OPINION & COMMENTARY

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Utah in control of education standards

Commentary from the Utah Governor’s Office

 

The results of the attorney general’s review of Utah’s adoption of Common Core standards were presented to Gov. Gary R. Herbert, today. The review was requested as part of an effort to resolve divisive issues in education and address questions regarding any current federal entanglements associated with the Common Core standards.

“What we now have are objective and legally reviewed facts,” said Gov. Hebert. “For those whose view has been that Utah has always held control of its own education standards, they can rest assured they are correct. For those who have been concerned the federal government has taken some degree of control of Utah’s education system, they can breathe a sigh of relief.”

http://go.uen.org/241

 

 

 

 

With predictions for voter turnout low, Utahns need to step it up Deseret News op-ed by A. Scott Anderson, CEO and president of Zions Bank

 

The pundits tell us that in the 2012 general election, 140 million Americans voted. However, the prediction for the Nov. 4, 2014, general election coming up in just a few weeks is that only 80 million Americans will vote — 60 million fewer than two years ago.

The election experts note that this is not a presidential election year. They also forecast that citizens 25 years and younger will not be voting this year as they did in 2012. Women will not vote in the numbers they did in 2012. And not as many Hispanic voters will be coming to the polls in November as did in 2012.

This election is vitally important when you consider the critical issues our Legislature will be discussing: the state budget, air quality, Medicaid expansion, ethics reform and funding for education, transportation and water infrastructure. Those we elect will make decisions important to every citizen.

Who else will we elect?

— Half of our state school board and many local school board members. The school board sets the overall policy and direction of our schools, including such matters as Common Core, teacher salaries, graduation requirements, class sizes and technology in schools. This is an important election for our schools.

http://go.uen.org/24m

 

 

 

A Musical Fix for American Schools

Research shows that music training boosts IQ, focus and persistence Wall Street Journal op-ed by JOANNE LIPMAN, co-author, with Melanie Kupchynsky, of “Strings Attached”

 

American education is in perpetual crisis. Our students are falling ever farther behind their peers in the rest of the world. Learning disabilities have reached epidemic proportions, affecting as many as one in five of our children. Illiteracy costs American businesses $80 billion a year.

Many solutions have been tried, but few have succeeded. So I propose a different approach: music training. A growing body of evidence suggests that music could trump many of the much more expensive “fixes” that we have thrown at the education system.

http://go.uen.org/24h

 

 

 

 

Is It Ever Okay to Make Teachers Read Scripted Lessons?

American entrepreneurs have created a popular alternative to Kenya’s dismal public schools. The key: handing out e-readers and making sure teachers recite every page.

Atlantic commentary by columnist TERRANCE F. ROSS

 

Sunlight streamed through an oversized classroom window in Kisauni—a slum in Mombasa, Kenya—as a group of 6-year-olds fixed their eyes on their teacher. As he rhapsodized about the intricacies of grammar, he snuck a glance at his Nook e-reader every couple minutes; it was imperative that he follow the guidelines written there. Without much prodding, his students enthusiastically recited the spelling lesson in unison. The cheerful ambience stood in stark contrast to that of most public schools in the poverty-stricken district.

The teacher—or academy manager, to be more precise—worked for Bridge International Academies, a for-profit company that has grown, in only six years, into a behemoth in Kenyan education. The company has done this by focusing on one core tenet: accurately evaluating teacher performance. Its first academy opened in the Mukuru Slum in January 2009, and as of October 2014, Bridge has over 350 locations and 100,000 pupils in Kenya, with plans for expansion into other Anglophonic developing countries—Uganda, Nigeria, and India—slated for 2015. In each new location, the goal is the same: to solve the problems that plague primary schooling in the developing world, and make a profit in the process.

http://go.uen.org/24d

 

 

 

 

 

 

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NATIONAL NEWS

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Three states take lead on Common Core, but are they moving too fast?

New Jersey, Maryland, and Washington State are among the first states to tie graduation to new Common Core tests. But critics say kinks still need to be worked out.

Christian Science Monitor

 

States trying to give teeth to the Common Core by tying new tests to graduation requirements are bumping up against resistance.

Forty-three states are currently signed on to the Common Core State Standards, a voluntary system designed to ensure that high school graduates are prepared for college. New Jersey, Maryland, and Washington are among a smaller number starting to link graduation requirements to the new and more challenging Common Core testing systems.

For supporters, the moves are a natural part of the transition from the adoption phase of Common Core to actually implementing the standards in a meaningful way. But an array of critics say the process is moving way too fast.

http://go.uen.org/247

 

 

 

Counties look at cost of educating unaccompanied minors who crossed border

 

Officials in three Northern Virginia counties are scrutinizing the costs of educating the nearly 2,000 unaccompanied minors living there, with an eye toward recouping expenses from the federal government for keeping the children — who crossed the U.S. border without parents — in local public schools.

The children, most of whom entered the country in a wave of unaccompanied minors from Central America, have been released to sponsors in various jurisdictions. The federal Office of Refugee Resettlement says that there are 1,775 such children living in Fairfax (1,131), Prince William (417) and Loudoun (227) counties.

The issue is filled with political tension, as the Obama administration has sought refuge for the immigrant children amid a long-standing debate about how best to secure the U.S. borders and how to treat those who cross illegally. There has been special attention to children who enter the country unsupervised as there was an increase earlier this year that has just started to ebb.

http://go.uen.org/242 (WaPo)

 

 

 

 

Nobel winner Malala: Kids ‘should stand up for their rights’

USA Today

 

Malala Yousafzai said Friday she is “honored” to be sharing the 95th Nobel Peace Prize with Kailash Satyarthi.

“We should all consider each other as human beings and we should respect each other,” said Malala, who was in chemistry class when she found out about the award. “It is my message to children all around the world that they should stand up for their rights.”

The Norwegian Nobel Committee cited the two “for their struggle against the suppression of children and young people and for the right of all children to education.”

Yousafzai, 17, the youngest Nobel winner, is from Pakistan, and Satyarthi, 60, is from India — adding significance to the award, given the tumultuous history between those two nations.

The committee “regards it as an important point for a Hindu and a Muslim, an Indian and a Pakistani, to join in a common struggle for education and against extremism,” it said.

http://go.uen.org/243

 

http://go.uen.org/24e (WSJ)

 

http://go.uen.org/244 (Reuters)

 

 

 

 

Teacher preparation enrollments plummet

(Oakland, CA) EdSource

 

Enrollments in teacher preparation programs in California are continuing to decline at a precipitous rate, according to new figures from the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing.

In the 2012-13 school year, the last year for which figures are available, enrollments in teacher preparation programs dropped to 19,933 – down 53 percent from 2008-09. Over an 11-year period, enrollments have declined by 74 percent, from a high of 77,700 in 2001-02.

The commission will review the figures along with its “Annual Report Card on California Teacher Preparation” at its meeting in Sacramento on Friday.

The declining enrollments are coming at an especially challenging time for California schools. The state’s nearly 1,000 school districts are embarking on a slew of new reforms – including the Common Core standards, the New Generation Science Standards, Smarter Balanced assessments and focusing on several new “priority areas” specified in the state’s new school financing law – that will require a highly trained and enthusiastic workforce to ensure their success.

http://go.uen.org/248

 

A copy of the report

http://go.uen.org/249 (California Commission on Teacher Credentialing)

 

 

 

Researchers and Schools Diverge in Definitions of Bullying Education Week

 

One of the biggest challenges for those who seek to end bullying among students has been defining exactly what “bullying” is.

Even as efforts to address the behavior have moved to the front burner of child well-being initiatives in recent years, researchers and educators say that major studies have relied on inconsistent definitions and methods of measuring its prevalence.

Some focus on the essential interpersonal dynamics of bullying—including an imbalance of power between the perpetrator and the victim—while others seek to be more objective by focusing on a list of common bullying behaviors.

And if researchers can’t agree on exactly what the problem is, they can’t help identify effective solutions for K-12 educators, who are increasingly facing new accountability measures that incorporate issues related to school climate and student behavior.

Further complicating the situation, many school leaders take an “I know it when I see it” approach to defining the problem, or they use broader definitions for bullying than researchers do, said David Finkelhor, a sociologist and the director of the Crimes Against Children Research Center at the University of New Hampshire, in Durham.

http://go.uen.org/245

 

 

 

 

Superintendent candidates debate role of federal government in Wyoming education Casper (WY) Star-Tribune

 

Candidates for Wyoming Superintendent of Public Instruction squared off over federal involvement in education policy-making at Casper College Thursday.

Entering the debate, Republican candidate Jillian Balow called Democratic candidate Mike Ceballos a Washington D.C.-influenced liberal with union connections.

Ceballos denied the connection to D.C. saying the only people he knows in the nation’s capital are members of the Wyoming congressional delegation.

The candidates’ discussion of the federal government’s role in education policy continued during the debate.

http://go.uen.org/24f

 

 

 

 

School board: Bible classes stay, curriculum to undergo evaluation Salisbury (NC) Post

 

The Rowan-Salisbury Board of Education ruled to keep Bible classes in the district’s elementary schools in tact.

After roughly an hour and 15 minutes of public comment and an hour-long closed session to consult with its attorneys, the board unanimously approved Chairman Dr. Richard Miller’s motion to simply “evaluate and adjust our curriculum to meet constitutional requirements.”

The discussion was in response to a letter sent to Superintendent Dr. Lynn Moody from the Freedom From Religion Foundation calling the district’s elementary Bible classes “flagrantly unconstitutional.”

On Tuesday, Patrick Elliot, an attorney with the Freedom from Religion Foundation, said they would decide whether or not to “proceed with litigation” based on the board’s action.

The organization got involved when a “local complainant” reported that the Bible classes at Cleveland, Woodleaf and Mount Ulla elementary schools taught “troubling teachings” such as seven-day creation and the Bible being “literal fact.”

“We have not changed anything,” Miller said after the meeting.

http://go.uen.org/24g

 

 

 

 

SAT vs. ACT: What’s the Difference?

NBC

 

The ACT and the SAT are both standardized tests that help colleges evaluate students and are accepted by all schools. So what sets the exams apart?

http://go.uen.org/24b

 

 

 

 

Map: A Wave of State Student-Data-Privacy Legislation Education Week

 

Twenty-one states enacted more than two dozen student-data-privacy related laws during recent legislative sessions. Some states, such as Florida, focused on restricting the collection of sensitive student information, including biometric data. Idaho was one of six states to enact a law focusing on improved data governance by public agencies. And California enacted a pair of new laws that proponents describe as the most aggressive attempt to date to balance the promise of digital learning technologies with the need to secure and protect student data.

http://go.uen.org/24c

 

 

 

Education

Stanford University State of the Union 2014 program

 

Randi Weingarten, Linda Darling-Hammond, and Chester Finn discuss education and education reform.

http://go.uen.org/24a (YouTube)

 

 

 

 

 

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CALENDAR

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USOE Calendar

http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

 

 

UEN News

http://www.uen.org

 

 

October 10:

Utah State Board of Education meeting

7 a.m. 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

 

 

October 14:

Executive Appropriations Committee meeting

1 p.m., 210 Senate Building

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2014&Com=APPEXE

 

 

October 15:

Economic Development and Workforce Services Interim Committee meeting

9 a.m., 20 House Building

http://le.utah.gov/Interim/2014/html/00004578.htm

Education Interim Committee meeting

2:30 p.m., 30 House Building

http://le.utah.gov/Interim/2014/html/00004563.htm

 

 

October 16:

Native American Legislative Liaison Committee meeting

8 a.m., 30 House Building

http://le.utah.gov/Interim/2014/html/00004528.htm

 

 

November 13:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://go.uen.org/1pn

 

 

October 29:

Education Task Force meeting

1 p.m., 210 Senate Building

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2014&com=TSKEDU

 

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