Education News Roundup: Oct. 21, 2014

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Education News Roundup

Today’s Top Picks:

 

New report issued in Uintah Elementary lunch issue.

http://go.uen.org/28R (SLT)

 

Trib takes a closer look at SAGE scores due out Monday.

http://go.uen.org/29c (SLT)

 

Hello? Anyone out there want to be a teacher? Anyone? Anyone at all?

http://go.uen.org/294 (Ed Week)

 

MOOCs are migrating to AP classes.

http://go.uen.org/293 (WaPo)

 

Aha. That dream ENR had about getting in an argument with Bert over Snuffleupagus’ taxonomy wasn’t a dream. It was a premonition. Sesame Street toy characters are going interactive.

http://go.uen.org/28M (NYT)

 

 

 

 

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TODAY’S HEADLINES

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UTAH

 

Report: Tossed Salt Lake City school lunches a protocol breach Schools » Second probe of lunch fiasco reiterates blame on cafeteria worker.

 

Trib Talk: SAGE test scores explained

 

Air Force pitches 700,000-acre Utah training range expansion Military promises to accommodate ranchers’ needs; residents voice concerns about grazing permits and likely road closures.

 

Unopposed races the norm in Box Elder County

 

Pornography Education Pilot Project Launches in Taylorsville

 

AT&T surprises 162 Salt Lake teachers by funding their DonorsChoose.org projects

 

Potential for child porn charges among problems stemming from prevalence of teen sexting

 

Morningstar Names Best 529 College-Savings Plans for 2014, Assigns Negative Analyst Rating to Three Plans Analysts identify 29 plans likely to outperform their peers on a risk-adjusted basis

 

BioUtah Partners with Utah STEM Action Center to Provide STEM Student Scholarships, Special Tickets to Utah Life Science Summit

 

Jazz Take Nearly 200 Students on Field Trip to Discovery Gateway Children’s Museum

 

It’s 2014: Are all our schools proficient yet?

 

This type of high school can increase your child’s chances of getting into college

 

 

 

OPINION & COMMENTARY

 

Technology in today’s schools — Getting an early start is crucial, and costly

 

Dear teachers – you’ve got mail!

 

No free health care, lunch?

 

Repair or Replace

 

A Letter to Parents: There Is Such a Thing as Too Many Tests

 

Louisiana, do your homework: Student absenteeism, not Ebola, is the real epidemic

 

America’s Schools: Still Separate and Very Much Unequal

 

 

 

NATION

 

Steep Drops Seen in Teacher-Prep Enrollment Numbers California and other big states particularly hard hit, raising supply concerns

 

Why Chicago is mandating coding education

 

The Short Shelf Life Of Urban School Superintendents

 

Sesame Workshop Tackles Literacy With Technology

 

Test mania? Local superintendents call increased testing of students under Common Core an “abomination.”

 

Polls Show Early Education Popular in Battleground States

 

Charter Schools Borrow at Record Pace Led by Texas: Muni Credit

 

Free online AP courses debut on edX Web site

 

Bullying of Students with Disabilities Addressed in Guidance to America’s Schools

 

State board president, superintendent groups at odds over plans for choosing next education commissioner

 

Searching for Adult Supervision in Sayreville

 

 

 

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UTAH NEWS

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Report: Tossed Salt Lake City school lunches a protocol breach Schools » Second probe of lunch fiasco reiterates blame on cafeteria worker.

 

The Salt Lake City School District is reiterating that a school cafeteria worker broke district protocol in January when she “arbitrarily and capriciously” plucked lunches from 17 students, giving them milk and fruit instead.

School district officials on Thursday evening sent parents a second outside report detailing that the Uintah Elementary lunch worker sidestepped district guidelines in directing payments for thousands of student meals into the wrong accounts last year.

The district in recent weeks said several cafeteria employees had inaccurately processed $8,000 in cash and check payments prior to the Jan. 28 debacle.

The new report from law firm Thompson, Ostler & Olsen comes in response to parents’ questions submitted to the Salt Lake City school board earlier this month. But it largely refers to the findings of an earlier investigation by the same firm. And some parents say many of their questions were not answered.

http://go.uen.org/28R (SLT)

 

 

 

 

Trib Talk: SAGE test scores explained

 

Utah schools and school districts will find out how well their students did on new computer-adaptive tests next week, but parents will have to wait a bit longer to see their child’s individual scores.

On Tuesday at 12:15 p.m., Associate State Superintendent Judy Park and Tribune education editor Rebecca Walsh join Jennifer Napier-Pearce to discuss the SAGE test report cards and why parents will likely need a tutorial to understand the scores.

http://go.uen.org/29c (SLT)

 

 

 

Air Force pitches 700,000-acre Utah training range expansion Military promises to accommodate ranchers’ needs; residents voice concerns about grazing permits and likely road closures.

 

Partoun • The U.S. Air Force on Monday told residents of west Juab County it needs to expand its training range to accommodate the new F-35 and asked for community cooperation.

Chris Robinson, the director of operations for the Utah Test and Training Range, said adding 700,000 acres around the perimeter of the Utah Test and Training Range will create more ground and air space for F-35 pilots to test the aircrafts’ missiles.

No missiles or bombs will be dropped on the expanded areas, Robinson told about 50 people here at a public meeting at West Desert High School.

Much of the acreage in the expansion belongs to the Utah School and Institutional Trust Lands Administration (SITLA).

Kim Christy from SITLA said the proposal calls for the federal government to trade Utah land currently owned by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management. Christy said some of the property being discussed has mining and quarry potential in Juab, Millard and Beaver counties. SITLA’s mission is to sell and manage its lands to generate money for public schools.

http://go.uen.org/28T (SLT)

 

http://go.uen.org/291 (KUER)

 

 

 

 

Unopposed races the norm in Box Elder County

 

BRIGHAM CITY — The election cycle in Box Elder County this year is going to be a very quiet one.

A sample ballot for Box Elder’s Nov. 4 election shows that aside from state legislative races — which feature areas and candidates not only from Box Elder but also from Tooele and Weber counties — there is only one real “race” for public office.

The Box Elder District 3 school board race, which pits Wade Hyde against JuDean Parkinson, is the only Box Elder County race that features two candidates.

http://go.uen.org/29f (OSE)

 

 

 

Pornography Education Pilot Project Launches in Taylorsville

 

Students at Eisenhower Junior High School in Taylorsville got an unusual lesson Monday. The children heard a presentation about pornography. The assembly is part of a pilot project organized by Salt Lake County to educate kids and parents about the dangers of what some are calling the “new drug.”

Junior high students in Utah are not used to hearing about pornography in school. When Eisenhower’s principal announced the topic, the students began talking nervously amongst themselves. But when Clay Olsen, founder of the non-profit Fight the New Drug, came on stage, he had their attention.

Through stories, videos, and graphics, Olsen explained that pornography can be addictive, and that it harms relationships and society in general. Olsen told KUER that because of the taboo nature of the topic, children don’t get enough information about it. And the world has changed since their parents were children.

http://go.uen.org/290 (KUER)

 

 

 

AT&T surprises 162 Salt Lake teachers by funding their DonorsChoose.org projects

 

SALT LAKE CITY – Dozens of teachers in the Salt Lake area got a big surprise Monday morning when they woke up to find that AT&T was funding all of their projects posted on the crowd funding site DonorsChoose.org. In total, AT&T is funding 162 teachers, 170 project for a total of $220,760. With this funding 17,595 students will benefit. Projects ranged from supplies for geology and science projects, to theatre projects and technology needs.

David Oyler is one of the teachers who learned his DonorsChoose.org project was funded by AT&T. Mr. Oyler has been a science teacher at the Utah Schools for the Deaf and Blind for three years. In that time he’s had 11 projects funded on DonorsChoose.org.

http://go.uen.org/28X (KTVX)

 

http://go.uen.org/29b (PRNewswire)

 

 

 

 

Potential for child porn charges among problems stemming from prevalence of teen sexting

 

SALT LAKE CITY — A recent University of Utah study found nearly one in five students surveyed sent a sexually explicit image, or a sext, while in high school, and even more reported they had received such photos.

Doctor Donald Strassberg is a professor of psychology at the University of Utah, and he spoke about the prevalence of sexting among teens.

“Almost half of the boys said that while in high school, they received a naked picture of a girl,” he said.

http://go.uen.org/28Y (KSTU)

 

 

 

 

Morningstar Names Best 529 College-Savings Plans for 2014, Assigns Negative Analyst Rating to Three Plans Analysts identify 29 plans likely to outperform their peers on a risk-adjusted basis

 

CHICAGO — Morningstar, Inc., a leading provider of independent investment research, today announced new Analyst Ratings, research, and reports for 64 of the nation’s largest 529 college-savings plans. The plans together represent approximately 95% of the more than $214 billion in U.S. 529 plan assets as of Sept. 30, 2014, an 18% increase compared with assets under management of $181 billion as of Sept. 30, 2013. Morningstar has identified 29 plans that are likely to outperform their peers on a risk-adjusted basis over the long term.

Morningstar’s qualitative Analyst Rating scale includes Medalist ratings of Gold, Silver, and Bronze, as well as Neutral and Negative ratings. This year, Morningstar analysts awarded four Gold ratings, four Silver ratings, 21 Bronze ratings, 32 Neutral ratings, and three Negative ratings. Morningstar upgraded five plans and downgraded 10.

Gold medalists, in alphabetical order by state:

Alaska’s T. Rowe Price College Savings Plan, managed by T. Rowe Price Associates;

Maryland College Investment Plan, managed by T. Rowe Price Associates;

Nevada’s Vanguard 529 College Savings Plan, managed by Ascensus; and

Utah Educational Savings Plan, managed by the agency of the same name.

http://go.uen.org/29h (PRNewswire)

 

 

 

BioUtah Partners with Utah STEM Action Center to Provide STEM Student Scholarships, Special Tickets to Utah Life Science Summit

 

SALT LAKE CITY–BioUtah and the Utah STEM Action Center today announced that the two organizations will partner to support the growth and development of promising STEM-focused high school students through the Utah Life Science STEM Awards scholarships.

“Life sciences play a crucial role at the heart of STEM education”

The 2014 Utah Life Science STEM Awards will provide two scholarships, $750 each, to high school juniors or seniors engaged in STEM (science, technology, engineering & math) activities, who aspire to make a positive impact in one or more life science disciplines.

http://go.uen.org/29e (Businesswire)

 

 

 

 

Jazz Take Nearly 200 Students on Field Trip to Discovery Gateway Children’s Museum

 

SALT LAKE CITY – Utah Jazz players will treat nearly 200 first and second graders from Jackson Elementary School to a fun and educational field trip to the Discovery Gateway children’s museum on Thursday, Oct. 23 from 1:30 – 2:30 p.m.  The visit is part of NBA Cares Week, an annual league-wide community outreach initiative that continues through Oct. 26.

http://go.uen.org/29g (Utah Jazz)

 

 

 

It’s 2014: Are all our schools proficient yet?

 

It’s been 12 years since President George W. Bush signed No Child Left Behind with a beaming Ted Kennedy by his side. According to the terms of the law itself, every public school was now supposed to be adequate.

http://go.uen.org/28U (DN)

 

 

 

 

This type of high school can increase your child’s chances of getting into college

 

New York City’s small high schools apparently boost graduation rates and college admission rates, and do so at a lower per pupil cost than traditional high schools, according to a study just released by MDRC, a major nonprofit education policy research firm.

http://go.uen.org/28V (DN)

 

 

 

 

 

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OPINION & COMMENTARY

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Technology in today’s schools — Getting an early start is crucial, and costly Deseret News editorial

 

In Europe, 5-, 6- and 7-year-olds are learning computer coding. The idea among British, German and Estonian governments and school boards is that if students are familiar with the intricacies of computers at an early age, they will be better prepared for technology jobs later.

The programs teach preschool-age students how to code and do basic computer programming via simple algorithms. Students enjoy the fun, challenging programs as do the instructors, who feel the curriculum is flexible enough to let them teach students what is presently applicable.

http://go.uen.org/28K

 

 

 

 

Dear teachers – you’ve got mail!

(Ogden) Standard-Examiner commentary by BROOKE HANSEN, a junior at Weber High School

 

Teachers — the wise mentors who get paid to help us become knowledgeable.

They seem to know everything about everything! But, as the students can tell you, there are just some things we really wish our teachers knew …

http://go.uen.org/28W

 

 

 

No free health care, lunch?

Salt Lake Tribune letter from Gary (Red) Hatch

 

Mia — Yes, everyone should be required to have health insurance, or they should be denied services at all emergency rooms!

Now, what is your unique idea about the 17 elementary school students who had their lunches thrown into the trash at Uintah Elementary School a couple of months ago?

http://go.uen.org/28S

 

 

 

 

Repair or Replace

Inside Higher Ed op-ed by Arthur Levine, president of the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation

 

The newspaper and book businesses have been transformed in recent years. But not education. After a 30-year school reform movement, no major urban school district in the country has been successfully turned around. Meanwhile, despite loud and persistent criticism from government, media and families, the cost of college continues to rise faster than inflation and student loan debt is ballooning. So why hasn’t education changed?

This nation is making a transition from a national, analog, industrial economy to a global, digital, information economy. All of our social institutions — not just education but also government, media, health care and finance — were created for the former. The result is that they work less well than they once did. They seem to be broken and need to be redesigned for a new era.

The redesign is happening in two ways: through repair, attempting to fix the existing institutions; and through replacement, creating new institutions to take the places of the old ones.

http://go.uen.org/298

 

 

 

A Letter to Parents: There Is Such a Thing as Too Many Tests (Tallahassee, FL) Sunshine State News op-ed by PATRICIA LEVESQUE, CEO of the Foundation for Excellence in Education

 

There has been much said recently about an overabundance of testing in schools, and I understand that it can be difficult to decide how this impacts your child’s education.

So let’s take a deeper look at testing.

Obviously, tests are nothing new. Who doesn’t remember cramming for a final exam? The intent of those tests was to measure what we learned during the year, which is why they counted heavily on the final grade.

That approach hasn’t changed. What has changed is now we have standardized tests developed by the state and school districts serving as final exams.

Why? Because they ensure that all kids are taught to the same high standards. And they give parents a much more honest, objective report of how their children are doing.

http://go.uen.org/28N

 

 

 

 

Louisiana, do your homework: Student absenteeism, not Ebola, is the real epidemic Hechinger Report commentary by Andre Perry, founding dean of urban education at Davenport University

 

As a preventative measure to protect against the spread of Ebola, the Louisiana State Board of Elementary and Secondary Education made new emergency changes to the state’s governing handbook.

However, there is no emergency — just an Ebola scare, which the board simply contributed to by making changes to sound policy. There is currently no epidemic of the Ebola virus in the U.S., where three cases have been reported, with one fatality.

The best preventative measure schools can take to avert an outbreak of a communicable disease is to effectively teach about viruses.

Nevertheless, the board adopted changes to the Bulletin as emergency rules, which do not require public comment and go into effect immediately. Specifically, it affirmed that a local superintendent or chief charter school officer can “dismiss any or all schools due to emergency situations, including any actual or imminent threat to public health or safety which may result in loss of life, disease, or injury; an actual or imminent threat of natural disaster, force majeure, or catastrophe which may result in loss of life, injury or damage to property; and, when an emergency situation has been declared by the governor, the state health officer, or the governing authority of the school.”

I’ve never seen a school leader buck an edict from a governor, state health official or disaster manager.

http://go.uen.org/296

 

 

 

 

America’s Schools: Still Separate and Very Much Unequal Moyers & Company commentary by Renee Moore, Moore teaches English at Mississippi Delta Community College, and Elaine Weiss, national coordinator for the Broader Bolder Approach to Education

 

I have taught in two different Mississippi Delta high schools, and now work in a community college.

From the 30,000 foot level, at the federal Department of Education, and even in the Mississippi statehouse, we are told that the problem with our schools is low standards and lack of accountability for teachers. From the ground, it looks quite different. Schools that serve the highest-poverty students like the one where I teach are consistently and intentionally under-resourced, exacerbating the dire circumstances in which many of them live.

I once visited the three-room trailer home of one of my high-school students near the town of Alligator, Mississippi, which was housing 10 people — six of them young children. There were only two light fixtures: one in the kitchen, one in the bathroom. No tables, so they ate meals and did their homework on the kitchen floor.

Schools do not operate in a vacuum. Family circumstances that accompany students when they walk through the classroom door every day have a big impact on those students’ success. Many Delta children are technically homeless. They “float around” from house to house, relying on strangers or relatives in very unstable living situations. And because there are not enough health providers, just getting to see a doctor can be an all-day event.

http://go.uen.org/299

 

 

 

 

 

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NATIONAL NEWS

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Steep Drops Seen in Teacher-Prep Enrollment Numbers California and other big states particularly hard hit, raising supply concerns Education Week

 

Fresh from the United States Air Force, Zachary Branson, 33, wanted a career with a structured day and hours that would allow him to be home in time to watch his kids in the evening. But just a month into his online teacher-preparation program at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, he had something of a crisis of faith.

It was brought on, he said, by the sense of being in the middle of an ideological war that surfaced in everything from state-level education policy on down to his course textbook, which had a distinct anti-standardized-testing bent.

“I feel like teachers are becoming a wedge politically, and I don’t want anything to do with that,” Mr. Branson said.

He’s not alone in having qualms about entering the teaching profession.

Massive changes to the profession, coupled with budget woes, appear to be shaking the image of teaching as a stable, engaging career. Nationwide, enrollments in university teacher-preparation programs have fallen by about 10 percent from 2004 to 2012, according to federal estimates from the U.S. Department of Education’s postsecondary data collection.

http://go.uen.org/294

 

 

 

Why Chicago is mandating coding education CNNMoney

 

NEW YORK — Parlez-vous “code”?

Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel believes the language of the future is code writing — and he wants every kid in Chicago to be prepared.

“In three years time, you can’t graduate from high school in the city of Chicago if you didn’t take code writing and computer science,” said Mayor Emanuel in conversation with Cisco CEO John Chambers. “We’re making it mandatory.”

Emanuel first announced the city’s five-year plan for computer science education last December. In three years, Chicago public high schools will require a foundational computer science course in order to graduate. In five years, at least 50% of its high schools will offer AP computer science courses.

http://go.uen.org/28O

 

 

 

 

The Short Shelf Life Of Urban School Superintendents NPR Morning Edition

 

If you’re a 12th-grader right now in the Los Angeles schools, that means you probably started kindergarten back in 2001. It also means that, as of this week, you’ve seen four superintendents come and go.

As we discussed today on Morning Edition, the ouster of John Deasy last week as the head of the nation’s second-largest district has renewed a long-running debate about leadership of big-city schools, and particularly the challenges of raising achievement in such a politically charged environment.

Deasy told Morning Edition host Steve Inskeep last week that there’s a clock ticking on “reform”-minded superintendents, such as himself, who want to shake things up quickly. “I think there is,” he said, calling it a “worrisome trend in America.”

But he said that, regardless of that external pressure, he felt personally that there was no time to waste in his efforts to make a difference for students.

“I think there’s always the delicate balance of how slow you’re willing to go,” Deasy told Morning Edition. “And then you have to square that with looking youth in the eye and say, ‘Well, it’s not your turn this year,’ and that’s difficult to do.”

So, is there a time limit?

Actually, superintendents tend to get hired, and fired, pretty quickly regardless of whether they consider themselves reformers.

Deasy’s tenure, at 3 1/2 years, is about average for an urban superintendent.

http://go.uen.org/28Z

 

http://go.uen.org/29a (LAT)

 

 

 

Sesame Workshop Tackles Literacy With Technology New York Times

 

Elmo and his “Sesame Street” buddies could soon be having two-way conversations of sorts with children.

Sesame Workshop, the nonprofit producer of “Sesame Street,” and the children’s speech recognition company ToyTalk plan to announce Monday that they have signed a two-year research partnership agreement to explore how to use conversational technology to teach preschool literacy.

The agreement formalizes work the two have been undertaking for more than a year. Sesame Workshop has been testing prototype mobile apps that use ToyTalk’s proprietary PullString technology, a combination of speech recognition meant to understand children’s speech patterns, artificial intelligence and prewritten scripts responding to what a child has said.

The first products resulting from the partnership could be available early next year, said Miles Ludwig, managing director of Sesame Workshop’s Content Innovation Lab. Products that more formally teach children to read will take longer, however.

http://go.uen.org/28M

 

 

 

 

Test mania? Local superintendents call increased testing of students under Common Core an “abomination.”

Cleveland Plain Dealer

 

CLEVELAND, Ohio – Some superintendents in Northeast Ohio say the increased hours that students will spend taking state tests this year – an increase as Ohio shifts to new Common Core-based exams – are too many and should be cut back.

One goes as far as calling the testing increase an “abomination” – a comment that drew support from colleagues.

As we reported here on Saturday, testing time on the new state exams will double this year for many grades to around 10 hours per child.

http://go.uen.org/28P

 

 

 

 

Charter Schools Borrow at Record Pace Led by Texas: Muni Credit Bloomberg

 

U.S. charter schools are issuing a record amount of municipal debt, with Texas leading the charge as borrowers rated close to junk tap a program that gives their bonds top credit grades.

The institutions, privately run with public funding, have sold $1.6 billion of securities in 2014, data compiled by Bloomberg show. That’s more than all of last year and the most in Bloomberg data beginning in 2007. About $464 million has come from Texas, which for the first time in April backed a charter-school deal with its Permanent School Fund. The state-run pool guarantees bonds, lending the debt the AAA grade that Standard & Poor’s accords Texas.

Charter schools, which enroll 4.2 percent of U.S. public school students, are building a presence in the bond market as more parents seek academic options without paying private-school tuition. In Texas, the number of institutions tripled from 2000 to 2012 and enrollment jumped to 190,000 from 26,000, according to the National Center for Education Statistics.

“The backing of the Permanent School Fund is critical to the growth of charter schools” given the savings it generates, said David Dunn, executive director of the Austin-based Texas Charter Schools Association. “There’s still a lot of room to go. We’re still not meeting the demand.”

http://go.uen.org/29d

 

 

 

Free online AP courses debut on edX Web site Washington Post

 

Rice University launched a free Advanced Placement biology course Monday on a Web site overseen by two other elite schools, a potentially significant milestone for a movement that aims to bring college-level courses to high school students.

The site, edX, was created by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University in 2012 as a nonprofit platform for those universities and selected others to offer massive open online courses, or MOOCs , to the world.

AP Biology from Rice is the first MOOC on the site advertised as an AP course for high school students. It is divided into four content segments — the Cell; Genetics; Evolution and Diversity; and Ecology — followed by an exam in April.

How many students will take AP Biology or any other AP class in this way is anyone’s guess.

http://go.uen.org/293

 

 

 

 

Polls Show Early Education Popular in Battleground States Education Week

 

A majority of voters in five battleground states—Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Ohio, and North Carolina—support expanding early-learning programs such as preschool and home-visiting programs, according to polls results released Oct. 20 that were conducted with the backing of early-education advocacy groups.

The polls in Colorado, Florida, Ohio, and North Carolina were conducted between May and September for the First Five Years Fund, an advocacy organization with offices in Washington and Chicago. The Georgia survey was conducted in August on behalf of the Georgia Early Education Alliance for Ready Students, based in Atlanta.

Overall, voters supported the idea of increased investment in early education, though Republicans generally showed less support in the various states than Democrats.

http://go.uen.org/295

 

 

 

Bullying of Students with Disabilities Addressed in Guidance to America’s Schools U.S. Department of Education

 

As part of National Bullying Prevention Awareness Month, the U.S. Education Department’s Office for Civil Rights (OCR) today issued guidance to schools reminding them that bullying is wrong and must not be tolerated—including against America’s 6.5 million students with disabilities.

The Department issued guidance in the form of a letter to educators detailing public schools’ responsibilities under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act and Title II of Americans with Disabilities Act regarding the bullying of students with disabilities. If a student with a disability is being bullied, federal law requires schools to take immediate and appropriate action to investigate the issue and, as necessary, take steps to stop the bullying and prevent it from recurring.

http://go.uen.org/292

 

 

 

 

State board president, superintendent groups at odds over plans for choosing next education commissioner Kansas City (MO) Star

 

When it comes to picking Missouri’s next education commissioner, state school board President Peter Herschend doesn’t want any time wasted.

The board’s working plan to decide by the end of the month on a successor to retiring Commissioner Chris Nicastro has alarmed many superintendents across the state.

There is no need for a national search, Herschend said. No need to convene state working groups to brainstorm on the state’s vision or list the qualities needed in the next chief educator.

“We have clear-stated objectives,” Herschend told The Star. “We know qualified men and women available today. We cannot afford to let education in Missouri go on cruise control for the four months of time it takes for a full-blown search.”

If the board’s work goes as planned, he said, he expects it will emerge from a lengthy closed session at its regular meeting Monday ready to present its choice, take a vote in open session and announce it.

http://go.uen.org/297

 

 

 

Searching for Adult Supervision in Sayreville New York Times

 

About now in Sayreville, N.J., in any other year, in most any other football season, people would have been talking about the local high school’s chances to win a state championship.

They would be dissecting the Sayreville War Memorial Bombers’ last game, or chatting about which player had been the latest to draw the interest of college recruiters.

But this year, the topic around the water coolers is not win-loss records, but arrest records, and how Sayreville managed to end up in the agonizing place it now finds itself.

How did a system that’s supposed to protect its players and teach them to be responsible break down on almost every level? Those charged with watching over the Sayreville players — coaches, administrators, even parents — have failed.

Sayreville’s season has been canceled, and seven players — ages 15 to 17 — have been arrested on charges that include the sexual assault and hazing of four freshmen in the locker room.

http://go.uen.org/28L

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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CALENDAR

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USOE Calendar

http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

 

 

UEN News

http://www.uen.org

 

 

October 29:

Education Task Force

1 p.m., 210 Senate Building

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2014&com=TSKEDU

 

 

November 7:

Utah State Board of Education meeting

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

 

 

November 13:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://go.uen.org/1pn

 

 

November 18:

Executive Appropriations Committee meeting

1 p.m., 210 Senate Building

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2014&com=APPEXE

 

 

November 19:

Education Interim Committee meeting

2:30 p.m., 30 House Building

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2014&com=INTEDU

 

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