Education News Roundup: Nov. 5, 2014

voter booths

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Education News Roundup

Today’s Top Picks:

Congratulations/condolences to last night’s winners in State School Board races.

http://go.uen.org/2gH (SLT) or

http://electionresults.utah.gov/elections/schoolboard/0

And best of luck to the two whose race continues.

http://go.uen.org/2gG (LHJ)

and http://go.uen.org/2gN (SLT)

Congrats and condolences are also in order for local board races.

http://go.uen.org/2gY (PDH)

and http://go.uen.org/2gO (SLT)

and http://go.uen.org/2gZ (LHJ)

and http://go.uen.org/2h0 (SGS)

and http://go.uen.org/2gV (OSE)

Standard profiles Ogden interim superintendent Sandy Coroles.

http://go.uen.org/2gX (OSE)

Nationally, it was a rough night for teacher unions …

http://go.uen.org/2gJ (USN&WR)

and http://go.uen.org/2ha (Ed Week)

… although they did pick up a win in California.

http://go.uen.org/2gK (LAT)

 

 

 

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TODAY’S HEADLINES

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UTAH

 

Voters boot three Utah state school board incumbents

 

David Clark ahead of Terryl Warner by 55 votes; Utah State Board of Education District 1 race too close to call

 

Incumbents defeat challengers in school board races

 

Incumbents fall in Canyons School District race

 

Two incumbents likely voted off Cache County School District Board

 

Newcomers, incumbents take school board seats

 

Taylor upsets Galbraith to take school board president spot

 

Voters approve bond to rebuild Provo schools

 

Voters divided over tax increases, bonds in Salt Lake and Utah counties

 

Schooled in Engagement

 

Ogden’s Coroles has her work cut out for her

 

High school students learn life skills with fall plays

 

Utah teacher who shot elementary school toilet pleads no contest

 

Provo students to design ornaments for White House Christmas tree

 

5 Ogden schools suffer power outage

 

Juan Diego students participate in mock earthquake drill

 

Kurt Bestor offers scholarships to high-school choirs

 

Health care firm employees distribute books to children

 

Cool School: Big Budah at Morgan High

 

October Students of the Month honored by St. George Exchange Club

 

Educator of the Week: Courtney Droz

 

Student of the Week: Rebecca Morrison

 

What the GOP wave might mean for education issues

 

Obama calls for preschool spending boost to support working women

 

 


 

 

OPINION & COMMENTARY

 

Keep school board non-partisan

 

Common Core good for military families

 

Last night’s implications for education reform

 

Education: A Natural Issue for Republicans Tuesday’s big win is an opportunity for addressing conservative ideas about education.

 

What Happens to Test Scores When Teachers Are Paid $125,000 a Year?

A charter school in a low-income Manhattan neighborhood tries an experiment—with mixed results.

 

 

 


 

 

NATION

 

Teachers Unions Take a Beating in Midterm Races Most of the GOP governors the unions wanted to defeat were successful.

 

Marshall Tuck concedes to Tom Torlakson in state schools chief race

 

State Digital Education Programs Grow, But Disparities Persist

 

Fredette donates 900 sweatshirts to NY school

 

 

 

 

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UTAH NEWS

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Voters boot three Utah state school board incumbents

 

Three state school board incumbents fell to challengers in Tuesday’s election, according to unofficial results.

Linda Hansen defeated incumbent Michael Jensen 59 percent to 41 percent in District 3, with all precincts reporting.

The incumbent in District 6, Dan Griffiths, lost to challenger Brittney Cummins, 42 percent to 31 percent. Griffiths also was challenged by Pat Rusk, who got 27 percent of the votes. The latter was added to the ballot in September after U.S. District Court Judge Clark Waddoups ruled the state’s process for selecting school board candidates is unconstitutional.

Challenger Joel Wright defeated District 9 incumbent Heather Groom, 46 percent to 38 percent. Joylin Lincoln was the third candidate in the race, garnering 16 percent of the vote.

Like Rusk, Wright was put on the ballot after Waddoups’ decision.

District 1 incumbent Terryl Warner narrowly lost to challenger David Clark. Only 57 votes separated the two, according to unofficial results with all precincts reporting.

In the board’s open seats, Mark Huntsman beat Mike Miles with 64 percent of the vote in District 14.

Spencer Stokes defeated Willard Maughan, 54 percent to 46 percent, for the District 2 seat currently held by board member Keith Buswell.

State Charter School Board member Laura Belnap defeated Mark Bouchard, former chairman of Prosperity 2020, for the District 5 seat. Long-time board member Kim Burningham retired, leaving the seat open. Belnap had 56 percent of the vote to Bouchard’s 44 percent.

http://go.uen.org/2gH (SLT)

 

http://electionresults.utah.gov/elections/schoolboard/0

 

 


 

 

David Clark ahead of Terryl Warner by 55 votes; Utah State Board of Education District 1 race too close to call

 

In a race that is too close to call, David Clark seems to have eked out a win for the District 1 seat on the Utah State Board of Education, beating incumbent Terryl Warner by a mere 55 votes. However, this outcome could change, as nearly a thousand absentee ballots still need to be counted before the race can be called officially.

Warner, a longtime victim’s advocate in Cache County, was appointed by the lieutenant governor to replace Tami Pyfer, who took a job as the governor’s education adviser halfway through her term. Warner said she knew the race was going to be close.

“He’ll be great if he wins. He’s a really nice guy,” Warner said of Clark.

Likewise, Clark said he also believed it would be a close race.

“Terryl Warner is a very competent person, and people have a lot of confidence in her, as well they should,” Clark said. “I’m not surprised it’s close, but I’m a little surprised it’s this close.”

The remaining ballots will be counted in the next few days, and an official decision will be announced by the state.

http://go.uen.org/2gG (LHJ)

 

http://go.uen.org/2gN (SLT)

 

 

 


 

 

Incumbents defeat challengers in school board races

 

Incumbents dominated the Alpine, Nebo and Provo school board races.

The campaigning for seats on the Alpine board was especially vicious prior to Election Day, with the Alpine Education Association endorsing certain candidates, although not Wendy Hart in District 2.

The incumbent won re-election anyway without the endorsement.

http://go.uen.org/2gY (PDH)

 

 


 

 

Incumbents fall in Canyons School District race

 

Voters in the Canyons School District ousted two of the three remaining inaugural Board of Education members in Tuesday’s election, according to unofficial results.

Challenger Clareen Arnold beat incumbent Tracy Cowdell with 55 percent of the vote, while Amber Shill defeated incumbent Kim Horiuchi with 52 percent of the vote.

Board President Sherril Taylor survived a challenge from Andrew Boyce with 54 percent of the vote, and Steve Wrigley, who was first elected after the district was created, beat Cole Hansen with 61 percent of the vote.

In Salt Lake City School District, candidates spoke of a need to restore public trust after the lunches of 17 Uintah Elementary students were seized and thrown away in January.

http://go.uen.org/2gO (SLT)

 

 

 


 

 

Two incumbents likely voted off Cache County School District Board

 

The Cache County School District Board of Education will have two new members if the election results hold steady.

Two incumbents, Jon Jenkins and Bart Baird, have likely lost their reelection bids against newcomers Randall Bagley and Roger Pulsipher, respectively. Allen Grunig was able to hold onto his seat on the board in a landslide victory over challenger Danny Brownell.

http://go.uen.org/2gZ (LHJ)

 

 

 


 

 

Newcomers, incumbents take school board seats

 

  1. GEORGE – The Washington County School board welcomed two new members and reelected two incumbents, according to unofficial election results Tuesday night.

http://go.uen.org/2h0 (SGS)

 

 

 


 

 

Taylor upsets Galbraith to take school board president spot

 

MORGAN — Current Morgan County School Board president Bruce A. Galbraith has lost his District 2 seat on the board to challenger Ted W. Taylor.

Taylor, a first-time candidate, upset the incumbent, 57 percent to 43 percent, in Tuesday’s election.

http://go.uen.org/2gV (OSE)

 

 


 

 

Voters approve bond to rebuild Provo schools

 

PROVO — Voters in Provo approved a $108 million bond Tuesday to rebuild five of the community’s schools.

The final results had 70.65 percent in favor of the issue. There were 8,332 votes in favor and 3,461 opposed.

http://go.uen.org/2gI (PDH)

 

 

 


 

 

Voters divided over tax increases, bonds in Salt Lake and Utah counties

 

SALT LAKE CITY — Voters in Salt Lake and Utah counties were divided over a number of ballot issues Tuesday, including whether to fund parks, schools and a public safety center.

Murray schools levy

A tax increase in the Murray City School District narrowly failed Tuesday. With all precincts reporting, 52 percent of voters had cast ballots against the proposed levy, while 48 percent voted in support of it. The hike would have increased annual taxes on an average residential property from $935.70 to $945.09, and commercial properties from $1,701.28 to $1,718.35.

The levy was not a bond, the school board explained on its website, but was meant to be used for maintenance and operations. Based on concerns from parents and educators, revenue generated by the levy would help address growing class-size concerns.

http://go.uen.org/2hh (DN)

 

 


 

 

Schooled in Engagement

 

This week, the Utah State Board of Education will have a full meeting covering everything from charter schools to corporal punishment in the classroom. A forum at the U will feature researchers discussing how partisanship can get in the way of communicating with folks of different political stripes. Later in the week, Corey Kanosh, a Paiute singer and traditional dancer killed by police while unarmed in 2012, will be remembered at a vigil and rally at the Utah Capitol.

Utah State Board of Education

Friday, Nov. 7

The State Board of Education has a full agenda, so you’d better be prepared to take notes. The board will discuss action items related to charter school oversight and approvals, and may also make changes to the controversial system for grading schools. A draft proposal to prohibit corporal punishment in Utah’s public schools and many other issues will also be discussed.

http://go.uen.org/2hm (SLCW)

 

 

 


 

Ogden’s Coroles has her work cut out for her

 

OGDEN — Whether Sandy Coroles serves as superintendent of Ogden School District for just a few months, or several years, she has big goals: To build a community of trust, to move the kids forward, and to ensure that students leave high school college- and career-ready.

“It’s a huge challenge, but I think we can do it,” she said in an interview in the Standard-Examiner video studio.

Coroles was recently named interim district superintendent, to replace Brad Smith, who is moving on to the position of state schools superintendent. She’s heard that Ogden’s school board may conduct a search for a permanent replacement in January.

http://go.uen.org/2gX (OSE)

 

 

 


 

 

High school students learn life skills with fall plays

 

High school students across the Top of Utah are dressing up for something other than Halloween and trick-or-treating — and are giving the community a treat with a lineup of fall plays and musicals.

“Students gain confidence on stage that translate to every other area of their life,” said Jana Coates, drama teacher at Northridge High School and director of the school’s production of “Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat.”

Mark Daniels, drama teacher at Weber High School and director of the school’s fall show, “Oklahoma!” said there’s magic in a standing ovation at the end of a successful show because of the confidence the students involved gain.

http://go.uen.org/2hi (OSE)

 

 

 


 

 

Utah teacher who shot elementary school toilet pleads no contest

 

Taylorsville • A Utah teacher who accidentally shot a toilet while at school pleaded no contest Wednesday to discharging a weapon as part of a plea in abeyance.

Michelle Ferguson-Montgomery 39, was charged in Taylorsville Justice Court with one misdemeanor count of discharge of a firearm in a prohibited area within city limits. The class B misdemeanor charge carried the possible punishment of up to six months in jail.

But as part of the plea in abeyance, Ferguson-Montgomery will serve no jail time and the case will be dismissed in 12 months if she completes a firearm safety course, pays a $705 court fee and commits no new crimes.

She has already paid to replace the toilet, which school officials have said cost roughly $200.

http://go.uen.org/2gM (SLT)

 

http://go.uen.org/2gR (DN)

 

http://go.uen.org/2h1 (KUTV)

 

http://go.uen.org/2h3 (KSL)

 

http://go.uen.org/2h6 (KSTU)

 

http://go.uen.org/2h9 (AP)

 

 

 


 

 

Provo students to design ornaments for White House Christmas tree

 

PROVO — Several art students from Provo High School were selected to design ornaments for the National Christmas Tree Lighting.

The National Christmas Tree Lighting is an annual televised tradition, and ornaments representing each state are created to adorn the Christmas tree on the south side of the White House in an area known as the Ellipse, according to the national website. The Utah Art Council selected the Provo High National Art Honors Society to design the Utah ornaments and Provo High School art teacher and advisor James Rees said it is quite an honor.

http://go.uen.org/2h4 (KSL)

 

 


 

5 Ogden schools suffer power outage

 

OGDEN — When teachers arrived at school in Ogden this morning, all was fine. At 7:01 a.m., the lights went out.

“We didn’t have power at at least five schools on the east bench of Ogden,” said Zac Williams, spokesman for Ogden School District. “At that time students were already en route to school, so the decision was made not to cancel for safety reasons.”

Polk Elementary, Wasatch Elementary, T.O. Smith Elementary, Ogden High School and Mount Ogden Junior High were all listed as without power in a 7:25 a.m. posting on the district’s Facebook page.

The power came back on at 7:38 a.m., and then went out again.

http://go.uen.org/2gW (OSE)

 

 

 


 

 

 

Juan Diego students participate in mock earthquake drill

 

DRAPER, Utah – Students and staff at Juan Diego Catholic school in Draper put the schools emergency plan to the test Wednesday morning. They held an earthquake drill, and they did it in partnership with Lone Peak Hospital and members of the Utah National Guard.

http://go.uen.org/2h2 (KTVX)

 

 

 


 

 

Kurt Bestor offers scholarships to high-school choirs

 

For the second year in a row, composer/musician Kurt Bestor is giving Wasatch Front high school choirs a chance to perform with him at Abravanel Hall — and win scholarship money for their schools.

Choirs from Weber, Davis, Salt Lake, Utah, Summit and Wasatch counties are invited to submit videos of their musical selections to Bestor’s Facebook page from Nov. 13 to 17. The public will be able to vote on those videos from Nov. 17 to 26.

Five winners will be announced on Dec. 4, and will receive scholarship money for their school’s choral department. First place gets $1,000, second and third place get $500, and fourth and fifth get $250.

http://go.uen.org/2hl (SLT)

 

 

 


 

Health care firm employees distribute books to children

 

To encourage reading and literacy at a young age, Molina Healthcare employees volunteered to distribute books, donated by The Molina Foundation, and hosted educational activities for more than 250 kids from Utah County at Mountainland Head Start in Pleasant Grove.

http://go.uen.org/2gT (DN)

 

 

 

 

Cool School: Big Budah at Morgan High

 

http://go.uen.org/2h7 (KSTU)

 

 

 


 

 

October Students of the Month honored by St. George Exchange Club

 

  1. GEORGE, Utah — The October Students of the Month recipients were recently honored by the St. George Exchange Club. The St. George Exchange Club sponsors the Student of the Month Program, which honors one student from the area high schools each month. This program recognizes the students’ accomplishments in academics, service and leadership in their respective schools.

http://go.uen.org/2h8 (KCSG)

 

 

 


 

 

 

Educator of the Week: Courtney Droz

 

Mrs. Courtney Droz has been a counselor at Springville Junior High for four years and has a total of 11 years of counseling experience. During her years at Springville Junior High Mrs. Droz has been a valued asset to the school, impacting the school in a very positive way.

http://go.uen.org/2hj (PDH)

 

 

 


 

 

Student of the Week: Rebecca Morrison

 

Rebecca Morrison, 17, is a senior at Springville High School and serves as the National Honor Society President, holds a 4.0 GPA, is outstanding in the areas of leadership and service and overall is a great young lady.

http://go.uen.org/2hk (PDH)

 

 

 


 

What the GOP wave might mean for education issues

 

The GOP takeover of the Senate could shake up higher education policy, analysts say, while results in state elections offer more of a mixed bag, with teacher unions prevailing in California, while the GOP retained two hotly contested governorships in Wisconsin and Florida, where education issues played a role.

http://go.uen.org/2gQ (DN)

 

 

 


 

 

Obama calls for preschool spending boost to support working women

 

Speaking on making women equal partners in the economy, President Barack Obama made a statement last week that has some advocates for stay-at-home mothers up in arms.

http://go.uen.org/2gS (DN)

 

 

 

 

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OPINION & COMMENTARY

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Keep school board non-partisan

Salt Lake Tribune letter from Tab L. Uno

 

As a former local school board member, I’m shocked by your recent editorial. Your defense of the “new old way” to elect state school board members (Oct. 31) fails to provide any support for your position for partisan state school board elections, except to imply that it’s easy and acceptable to the Utah Legislature.

Instead of standing up for the democratic ideal of nonpartisan school board elections by which local school board members are already elected (the new, old-old way), The Tribune seems to just lose its fortitude and avoid taking a strong position based on efficiency and ease of effort, not principle.

http://go.uen.org/2gP

 

 

 


 

 

Common Core good for military families

Deseret News letter from Paula Rowley

 

In the debates about Common Core, there is one important point that needs to be included. Inconsistent educational standards and goals across state lines can affect military families negatively.

Many military families relocate to new assignments every few years. Relocation brings the stress of setting up a new home, making new friends, and adjusting to new schools.

When educational standards differ from state to state, military families with children in local schools have to catch up or fill in gaps due to variations in the school curriculum.

http://go.uen.org/2gU

 

 

 


 

 

Last night’s implications for education reform Fordham Institute commentary by President Michael J. Petrilli

 

With a few exceptions, most of the races decided yesterday didn’t hinge on education reform. But the outcome will have big implications for education policy nonetheless.

That was certainly true in 2010, when a voter backlash against Obamacare triggered a wave of Republican victories, especially at the state level, which in turn set the stage for major progress on education reform priorities in 2011 (rightfully dubbed “the year of school choice” by the Wall Street Journal). In fact, as Ty Eberhardt and I have argued, 2010’s Republic surge deserves more credit for the education reforms of the past several years than does Arne Duncan’s Race to the Top.

So here we are again, with Republicans winning stunning victories in races for governor’s mansions and statehouses nationwide. And once again this will be good for education reform, especially reforms of the school-choice variety. Voucher and tax-credit programs in Wisconsin, Florida, and Arizona will continue apace; charter caps may be lifted and bad laws amended in Massachusetts, Maryland, and Illinois; comprehensive reform efforts in New Mexico, Nevada, and Michigan have a new lease on life.

There’s good news for reformers on the Democratic side of the aisle too, what with the teachers unions’ terrible, horrible, no good, very bad day signaling their waning influence. Of particular note is Rhode Island—Rhode Island!—which just elected a pro-education reform, pro-pension reform Democrat as governor and a bona fide charter school hero as lieutenant governor. All while voters in Providence rejected a union-backed convicted felon in favor of a charter supporter. Remarkable!

And what about Common Core? For sure, some of these outcomes will complicate matters in the short term.

http://go.uen.org/2hd

 

 

 


 

 

Education: A Natural Issue for Republicans Tuesday’s big win is an opportunity for addressing conservative ideas about education.

National Review op-ed by Frederick M. Hess, director of education-policy studies at the American Enterprise Institute, & Michael Q. McShane, a research fellow at AEI

 

The Republicans enjoyed a huge night on Tuesday. And it goes without saying that the results had little (or nothing) to do with education. Gallup’s final poll of what issues voters deemed most important found that education was top-of-mind for just 5 percent of voters.

Yet, while education wasn’t an important part of what happened Tuesday night, an ascendant Republican party would do well to think about what Tuesday night means for education. Yesterday’s wave was primarily an anti-Obama vote, but Republicans now need to show what they’re actually for. And there’s little that has more practical resonance or is more consistent with an opportunity agenda than efforts to help families access and afford great schools and colleges.

After all, as Henry Olsen has noted time and again on NRO, Republicans can run strong on the issues but get killed on the perception that they don’t care about kitchen-table concerns.

http://go.uen.org/2hg

 

 


 

 

What Happens to Test Scores When Teachers Are Paid $125,000 a Year?

A charter school in a low-income Manhattan neighborhood tries an experiment—with mixed results.

Atlantic commentary by SONALI KOHLI, who writes and produces for Quartz

 

The Equity Project Charter School opened in the Washington Heights neighborhood of Manhattan five years ago, with a fairly simple concept: get rid of extra administrative positions and pay teachers a lot of money—a base salary of $125,000 plus benefits and potential bonuses after two years of teaching. (A New York City public school teacher with five years of experience, by comparison, makes between $64,009 and $75,796.) Even the principal would earn less than the teachers to ensure that the school would be able to rely only on public funding, other than the cost of the school facility and its technology system.

The research group Mathematica Policy Research tracked the experiment at the middle school (fifth through eighth grade), and recently released an analysis, funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, of the school’s effectiveness during its first four years. The result: students gradually achieved significantly higher levels of learning, with a major leap during their fourth year, equivalent to more than one and a half grade levels for math and nearly half a year for English.

http://go.uen.org/2he

 

A copy of the report

http://go.uen.org/2hf (Mathematica)

 

 

 

 


 

 

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NATIONAL NEWS

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Teachers Unions Take a Beating in Midterm Races Most of the GOP governors the unions wanted to defeat were successful.

U.S. News & World Report

 

Going into Tuesday’s midterm elections, education reformers thought it was time to clean house. And with nearly every teachers union-backed candidate failing to secure a win, it seems reformers got their wish.

Even in states where Republican governors had implemented policies unpopular among teachers unions, and after those union members threw their money and voter-mobilizing muscle behind Democratic challengers, the union-backed candidates lost governor’s races in Kansas, Wisconsin, Michigan, Illinois and Florida.

Teachers unions really can claim only two big wins – Democrat Tom Wolf ousting incumbent Republican Gov. Tom Corbett in Pennsylvania and the re-election of Tom Torlakson as California’s superintendent of public instruction – despite the fact that the nation’s two largest teachers unions spent more in this election cycle than ever before: more than $60 million in total.

“A bunch of these guys did stuff you’re not supposed to be able to do. They tackled pensions in purple states. They modified collective bargaining. They fought expansively for school choice,” says Rick Hess, a resident scholar and director of education policy studies at the American Enterprise Institute. “What that says to me is the unions need to rethink some of their assumptions about what the world’s going to look like going forward.”

http://go.uen.org/2gJ

 

http://go.uen.org/2ha (Ed Week)

 

 

 


 

 

Marshall Tuck concedes to Tom Torlakson in state schools chief race Los Angeles Times

 

Challenger Marshall Tuck conceded Wednesday morning to incumbent Tom Torlakson in the contest for California superintendent of public instruction, a race  that became the most expensive on the state ballot.

With 100% of precincts reporting at least partial returns, Torlakson had 52% compared with Tuck’s 48%. Torlakson had 2,266,425 votes, which gave him a lead of 181,489 over his challenger, a fellow Democrat.

“Sixteen months ago we set out on this journey to do one thing: put children first and ensure that every child has equal access to a quality education,” Tuck said in a statement. “And despite yesterday’s loss, I couldn’t be prouder of the unique coalition of parents, community leaders, teachers, Democrats, Republicans and independents we built along the way. Together we proved that in California there is a growing call for change.”

Besides this coalition, Tuck also benefited from a deep well of financial support from wealthy donors and advocacy groups funded by such contributors. They effectively leveled a financial playing field dominated in the past by Torlakson’s primary supporters — the state’s teacher unions.

Supporters of both candidates had more than $10 million to spend, bringing unprecedented attention to a down-ballot contest and to an office with little direct authority over education policy or the state’s school districts.

http://go.uen.org/2gK

 

http://go.uen.org/2gL (Sacramento Bee)

 

 

 


 

 

State Digital Education Programs Grow, But Disparities Persist Education Week

 

Enrollment in state-run online schools is on the rise, though broad gaps remain in the availability of digital resources and tools across the country’s large, mid-sized, and small school systems, a new report concludes.

The report, “Keeping Pace With K-12 Digital Learning,”  is the eleventh edition of a nationwide review of online policies released by the Evergreen Education Group, a Durango, Colo.-based consulting company. The report describes a variety of public and private entities, including Connections Education, a commercial provider of online education; the Michigan Virtual School; the National Association of Independent Schools, and the Texas Education Agency.

One of the takeaways from the report is that, despite the seeming universality of digital education in the nation’s schools, access to those resources varies enormously, said John Watson, an author of the report and the CEO of the Evergreen group.

http://go.uen.org/2hb

 

A copy of the report

http://go.uen.org/2hc (Evergreen Education Group)

 

 


 

 

Fredette donates 900 sweatshirts to NY school Associated Press via Deseret News

 

GLENS FALLS, N.Y.— Jimmer Fredette of the New Orleans Pelicans has donated hundreds of sweatshirts to elementary school students in his New York hometown.

Officials with the Glens Falls City School District say Fredette and the Fredette Family Foundation have donated nearly 900 hoodies and zip-up sweatshirts. The clothing in the district’s colors of red and black arrived last week and are being distributed to every student in kindergarten through the fourth grade.

http://go.uen.org/2h5

 

 

 

 

 

 

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CALENDAR

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USOE Calendar

http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

 

 

UEN News

http://www.uen.org

 

 

November 6:

Utah State Board of Education meeting

4 p.m.250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

 

 

November 7:

Utah State Board of Education meeting

7:30 a.m.250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

 

 

November 13:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://go.uen.org/1pn

 

 

November 18:

Executive Appropriations Committee meeting

1 p.m., 210 Senate Building

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2014&com=APPEXE

 

 

November 19:

Education Interim Committee meeting

2:30 p.m., 30 House Building

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2014&com=INTEDU

 

 

November 20:

Native American Legislative Liaison Committee meeting

9 a.m., 20 House Building

http://le.utah.gov/Interim/2014/html/00004968.htm

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