Education News Roundup: Nov. 19, 2014

State Board of Education member Terryl Warner being sworn in by David Crandall, Board Chairman, during the March 2014 meeting.

State Board of Education member Terryl Warner being sworn in by David Crandall, Board Chairman, during the March 2014 meeting.

Education News Roundup

Today’s Top Picks:

 

Noooooooooooooo. ENR came back.

 

Growth is slowing in Utah schools.

http://go.uen.org/2iJ (SLT)

or a copy of the LFA report

http://go.uen.org/2iK (Legislature)

 

Congratulations to Utah State Board of Education Member Terryl Warner who, upon canvasing completed Tuesday, was re-elected to the Board earlier this month.

http://go.uen.org/2iT (LHJ)

and http://go.uen.org/2iU (CVD)

 

U College of Science encourages more students to become science majors.

http://go.uen.org/2iX (Chrony)

 

ACT hopes they succeed, at least according to their latest report on the Condition of STEM.

http://go.uen.org/2js (USN&WR)

and http://go.uen.org/2jv (USOE)

or a copy of the national report

http://go.uen.org/2jt (ACT)

or a copy of the Utah report

http://go.uen.org/2ju (ACT)

 

President Obama pushes for more internet connectivity and technology for schools.

http://go.uen.org/2j6 (AP)

and http://go.uen.org/2jc (Hechinger Report)

 

 

 

 

 

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TODAY’S HEADLINES

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UTAH

 

Slower education growth relieves some budget pressure Catch-up time? » Lawmakers will get chance to catch up, Senate budget chairman says.

 

Terryl Warner retains Utah State Board of Education seat in tight race

 

High School Students Get Psyched About Science

 

USHE promotes high school senior college application

 

Davis brain injury teacher wins statewide acclaim

 

Talk to children about suicide prevention, school district urges

 

Organization aims to get men involved in education Men4Ed held its kick-off event Saturday

 

Clear Horizons Academy director talks autism, education in Utah Valley

 

Nebo School District proposes boundary changes

 

Adult education program specializes in second chances Students can get either a diploma or a GED

 

Parents, fans want state championship game held in St. George

 

Native Americans Visit Manti Elementary

 

Common Core opponent to speak at library

 

Spring Lane student recognized in bookmark design contest

 

Coates for Kids group to donate 1,500 coats

 

High school students collect 1,000 bags of donations to help end global poverty

 

 


 

 

 

OPINION & COMMENTARY

 

Support high school theater

 

Build on Common Core

 

Gaiman’s comments were inspiring

 

Jeb Bush, Common Core and 2016

 

In New Republican Congress, Charters a Focus – But Not Much Else

 

The Case Against Universal Preschool

Is prekindergarten for all actually the solution for closing the achievement gap? Some experts say no.

 

 

 


 

 

NATION

 

Obama: US Needs to Bring Schools into 21st Century

 

Rep. John Kline Slated to Remain in Education Committee’s Top Spot

 

Push to Eliminate Election of Indiana Superintendent Possible in 2015

 

ClassDojo Adopts Deletion Policy for Student Data

 

Powerful Texas school board hears testimony on contentious textbooks

 

Poll: Voters know little about Common Core

 

Introduce Word Problems to Students Sooner, Studies Say

 

Grant High School students’ filming of sexual activity reflects nationwide issue

 

Few schools adhered to USDA nutrition standards before 2013

 

Family, School Spar in Court in ‘Under God’ Suit

 

Police: Math Teacher Pulled Knife on Student

 

 

 

 

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UTAH NEWS

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Slower education growth relieves some budget pressure Catch-up time? » Lawmakers will get chance to catch up, Senate budget chairman says.

 

Utah schools, bursting at the seams due to rapid growth in recent years, may see a slowing in the flood of new students pouring through the doors next year.

An estimated 7,951 new students are expected in Utah schools next year, according to state forecasts. That is nearly 25 percent lower than last year’s growth and the lowest level of growth since 2003. It is the first time since 2004 that the school population has grown by fewer than 10,000 students.

A total of 630,104 students are projected to be in Utah schools next year.

“Although we are still growing, that growth is slowing and we can expect it to continue to slow for a couple of years,” said legislative fiscal analyst Ben Leishman.

The slowing enrollment growth — combined with an economy that continues to expand at a brisk clip — is one factor that will likely give lawmakers a little budgetary breathing room during the next legislative session.

http://go.uen.org/2iJ (SLT)

 

A copy of the LFA report

http://go.uen.org/2iK (Legislature)

 

 

 


 

 

Terryl Warner retains Utah State Board of Education seat in tight race

 

Two weeks after Election Day, canvassing has been completed and close education races have been called. Terryl Warner has retained her seat as the District 1 representative on the Utah State Board of Education, while Jon Jenkins was defeated in his seat in the Cache County School District Board of Education.

Both races were too close to call the day of the election, but, through a finalizing of ballot counts, the results have been made official.

Warner defeated her opponent, David Clark, by 988 votes, a surprising turn of events since the preliminary count had Clark winning by 57 votes.

Warner had 10,161 votes in Cache County, 307 in Rich County, 3,706 in Box Elder County, 1,483 in Morgan County and 571 in Weber County for a total of 16,228 votes.

Clark had 8,148 votes in Cache, 298 in Rich, 4,791 in Box Elder, 958 in Morgan and 1,045 in Weber for a total of 15,240 votes.

http://go.uen.org/2iT (LHJ)

 

http://go.uen.org/2iU (CVD)

 

 


 

 

 

High School Students Get Psyched About Science

 

The normal quiet of the U on a Saturday morning was disturbed by hundreds of excited high school students in lecture halls and the Union as they attended the U’s annual Science Day.

Teachers, parents, and 520 students traveled from as far away as Cheyenne and as close as East High School to attend demonstrations and lectures given by faculty and staff from the College of Science. The five-hour event closed with a speech from the dean of the College of Mines and Earth Sciences Frank Brown and a drawing for $6,000 in scholarships, which are redeemable when and if the students decide to attend the U.

The 27 offered lectures covered STEM field topics from “What Can Flames, Fires, and Explosions Teach Us About Energy” to “The Science of Death & Mayhem” and everything in between. Amai Quader, a tenth grader from Highland High School said she attended “Earthquakes in Utah and Yellowstone” because she recently learned about fault lines in Ut. and wanted to get a better understanding of how they could affect her.

http://go.uen.org/2iX (Chrony)

 

 


 

 

 

USHE promotes high school senior college application

 

CEDAR CITY – The Iron County School Board joined with the Cedar City Council at the beginning of the board’s work meeting Tuesday to proclaim this week Utah College Application Week.

The proclamation was read by Cedar City Mayor Maile Wilson.

Jennifer Wood, secondary education director for the Iron County School District, said the Utah System of Higher Education wants every high school senior to apply for college.

To work toward this, the USHE has partnered with Cedar and Canyon View High Schools to promote Utah College Application Week.

http://go.uen.org/2jn (SGS)

 

 


 

 

Davis brain injury teacher wins statewide acclaim

 

FARMINGTON — As a child, Kristie Karren lost the use of her legs and left arm from polio, and though she regained full use of her legs, her left arm never completely recovered, making it impossible for her to ever get a 4.0 because she always failed typing and physical education.

Once Karren began working for the Davis School District 15 years ago in special education, she knew there had to be a better way to accommodate children with disabilities, so four years ago Karren joined the district’s Brain Injury Team, which helps transition students with brain trauma ease back into school. As a result of her efforts, Karren was awarded the Educator of the Year for 2014 by the Brain Alliance of Utah.

http://go.uen.org/2iP (OSE)

 

 

 


 

 

Talk to children about suicide prevention, school district urges

 

HIGHLAND — The Alpine School District has an urgent message for parents: Talk to your children about suicide.

Alpine certainly is not the only school district facing challenges with this issue. In 2013 suicide was the No. 1 cause of death for Utah youth ages 10-17.

http://go.uen.org/2jr (KSL)

 

 


 

 

Organization aims to get men involved in education Men4Ed held its kick-off event Saturday

 

After moving his young family to Park City from the Bay Area nearly two years ago, it wasn’t long before Court Durling realized there was a relatively untapped demographic in town when it comes to education.

Now, he is hoping to change that. Durling is among the founders of a new organization called Men4Ed, which is dedicated to giving fathers of students in the Park City School District a fun way to get involved in education.

http://go.uen.org/2jp (PR)

 

 


 

 

Clear Horizons Academy director talks autism, education in Utah Valley

 

In a sit-down with the director of Clear Horizons Academy, Lanny Adamson, he shared the following for the Daily Herald.

http://go.uen.org/2jo (PDH)

 

 


 

 

Nebo School District proposes boundary changes

 

SPANISH FORK — In order to accommodate rapid growth in the northern end of Nebo School District, a boundary realignment is being considered in anticipation of the opening of two new elementary schools.

http://go.uen.org/2iN (DN)

 

 


 

 

 

Adult education program specializes in second chances Students can get either a diploma or a GED

 

On a brisk late-fall evening, Danely Aguirre sits alone in front of a computer in a room near the back of the Park City Learning Center. Nineteen, with dreams of one day going to college and becoming a psychologist, she is making up for lost time.

In high school, Aguirre admits, her priorities were not in order. Schoolwork rarely came first. But she is here now because she sees the mistakes she has made, and she understands they don’t have to cloud her future. She’s one of dozens who enter the Park City School District adult education program each year in search of the diploma missed out on in high school or a General Education Development certificate (GED).

“It’s an awesome opportunity,” Aguirre said. “I didn’t take advantage of the high school years, so it’s nice to come back and actually finish. I got my priorities straight and want to get it over with to go into a higher education. It was like a gift to get this opportunity because a lot of people don’t have it.”

http://go.uen.org/2jq (PR)

 

 


 

 

Parents, fans want state championship game held in St. George

 

ST GEORGE – Southern Utah is gearing up for the state championship game on Friday at 11am. The Dixie Flyers and Hurricane Tigers will face off at the Rice-Eccles Stadium at the University of Utah. Even though it’s a great opportunity for the team, parents and fans wish the game was held in Southern Utah.

http://go.uen.org/2iY (KTVX)

 

 


 

 

 

Native Americans Visit Manti Elementary

 

MANTI, Utah – Tuesday, Manti Elementary School welcomed Native American dancers from Southern Utah University as part of Native American Heritage Month festivities for November.

Members of the Native American Student Association at SUU traveled to Manti Elementary to give insights to students on Native American culture, practices and traditions.

Representatives of the Navajo and Hopi tribes were among the presenters, each of whom were from the Four Corners Area.

http://go.uen.org/2iZ (MUR)

 

 


 

 

Common Core opponent to speak at library

 

OGDEN — Alisa Ellis will make a presentation about Common Core on Wednesday in the Main Branch of the Weber County Library.

Ellis, of Heber City, is against Common Core. She has spoken out against it on radio shows and at a meeting of the state Board of Education. In Ogden, her speech will cover her ideas about the purpose of Common Core, and the impact it could have on education and the country.

The free presentation starts at 7 p.m., and continues until 8:30 p.m., in the library at 2464 Jefferson Ave.

http://go.uen.org/2iR (OSE)

 

 


 

 

Spring Lane student recognized in bookmark design contest

 

HOLLADAY — Spring Lane Elementary student Kara Bagley’s colorful design of flowers clinging to an open book made her one of eight statewide winners in the Utah Educational Savings Plan’s “Make Your Mark” bookmark contest. Her artistic ability stood out among 2,300 entries.

http://go.uen.org/2iM (DN)

 

 


 

 

 

Coates for Kids group to donate 1,500 coats

 

OGDEN — Hundreds of kids in Ogden, Weber and Davis school districts will get off to a warm start this season, thanks to one local family.

Sara McLaughlin, president of Coates for Kids Inc., will give a total of 1,500 coats to students by the time Thanksgiving rolls around. On Monday morning, McLaughlin, along with about a dozen volunteers unloaded two truckloads of coats for students at North Park Elementary School in Roy.

http://go.uen.org/2iQ (OSE)

 

 


 

 

 

High school students collect 1,000 bags of donations to help end global poverty

 

  1. GEORGE — Students from high schools all over Washington County rallied in October to collect nearly 1,000 bags of clothing, books, and household items to help end extreme poverty as a part of the “Let’s End Poverty” program of Choice Humanitarian, a nongovernmental agency based in Salt Lake City.

Over the summer, students from high schools like Pine View, Snow Canyon, Tuacahn, and Desert Hills signed up to be advocate leaders for Choice Humanitarian.

http://go.uen.org/2iW (SGN)

 

 

 

 

 

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OPINION & COMMENTARY

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Support high school theater

(St. George) Spectrum editorial

 

It’s clear that Southern Utahns love and support the dramatic arts: Tuacahn regularly packs the house for shows from “Aladdin” to “Thriller”; Cedar City is the home of the Tony Award winning Utah Shakespeare Festival and the Neil Simon Festival; St. George Musical Theater is making their long-awaited comeback; Brigham’s Playhouse in Washington City is putting on a new play nearly every month, and those are just a few of the options available for theater lovers in Washington and Iron counties.

And we’re willing to support the arts with our tax dollars as well. Earlier this month Washington County voters passed the Recreation, Arts and Parks Tax while Cedar City and Brian Head have had RAP taxes for years.

And yet, when it comes to supporting our local up-and-coming theatrical performers, we can do better.

http://go.uen.org/2iV

 

 


 

 

Build on Common Core

Deseret News letter from Deborah Veater

 

I just received my son’s SAGE test results; after discussing them with him, I came up with some conclusions regarding Common Core and the SAGE test.

On the areas where my son didn’t do as well as expected, he said he couldn’t figure out how to put the answers in on the computer. He literally had to guess and hope it was correct. Overall, he performed above average when compared to other high school students in the state.

My first observation is that his teachers must be teaching him well. My second observation is that our high school scored better than others in the state and district. My last observations have to do with the curriculum and the testing. Does the testing represent the Common Core Standards being taught in the classroom? This type of testing changes the questions being asked based on the student’s weaknesses.

http://go.uen.org/2iO

 

 

 


 

 

Gaiman’s comments were inspiring

(Ogden) Standard-Examiner letter from Dixie and Fred Van Dyke

 

Recently, we had the privilege of attending an awards assembly to honor the 10 winners of the annual student essay contest. This year’s renowned author, Neil Gaiman’s comments to the students and teachers were inspirational and entertaining.

The Ogden School Foundation, and its director, Janis Vause, should be recognized for their efforts to bring this event to our schools and community every year. Teachers who encouraged their students to participate should also be commended. Without their combined efforts this would not be the success it has come to be. So kudos to all of you.

http://go.uen.org/2iS

 

 


 

 

 

Jeb Bush, Common Core and 2016

Wall Street Journal commentary by columnist BETH REINHARD

 

When Florida Gov. Jeb Bush hosts his educational think tank’s annual conference this week, his support for Common Core national academic standards will be center stage as he weighs a presidential campaign.

Conservative activists who view Common Core as a federal incursion into local schools could disrupt Mr. Bush’s path to the GOP nomination, but it’s unclear how big a factor education policy will be in the 2016 contest.

Races in which Common Core was raised as a campaign issue in the midterm election produced a mixed verdict. School superintendents who raised concerns about the national standards won in Arizona, Georgia and South Carolina. Arizona also elected an anti-Common Core governor, Republican Doug Ducey. On the other hand, Democratic governors criticized by their opponents for supporting Common Core, including Andrew Cuomo in New York and John Hickenlooper in Colorado, won re-election.

http://go.uen.org/2je

 

 


 

 

 

In New Republican Congress, Charters a Focus – But Not Much Else National Title I Association commentary by Brustein & Manasevit PLLC

 

This Election Day, Republicans swept the board, capturing seven new Senate seats, fourteen new seats in the House of Representatives, and a number of governorships and State legislatures. Despite promises from both Republican leadership and President Obama that the two sides will work together to advance bipartisan legislation, Republican lawmakers are already hard at work crafting an agenda that will do little to put them on the President’s good side.

At the top of the Republicans’ wish list is the repeal of some major pieces of the Affordable Care Act, the President’s signature health care law. They have also suggested “simplifying” the tax code by repealing or lowering some specific levies including the estate tax. And approving the Keystone Pipeline and opening up federal land for mining and drilling is high on the list.

In education, Republicans’ big focus will likely be on charter schools. For years – even while in the minority – Republicans touted the concept of “school choice,” a broad term which includes everything from charter schools to funding flexibility to vouchers for students to attend private schools.

A likely target will be passage of a new version of the Success and Opportunity through Quality Charter Schools Act. This bill, which passed the House this spring with broad bipartisan support, would combine existing federal charter school grant programs, prioritize funding for States whose laws are more charter-friendly, and offers new aid for charters hoping to purchase or build their own facilities. If a Republican Senate makes this bill a priority, it could easily sail through in the first few months of the year, offering both sides a victory – and the ability to tout bipartisan cooperation.

Overall, though, a Republican Congress does not bode well for the President’s education agenda.

http://go.uen.org/2jh

 

 


 

 

 

The Case Against Universal Preschool

Is prekindergarten for all actually the solution for closing the achievement gap? Some experts say no.

Atlantic commentary by columnist ALIA WONG

 

Universal prekindergarten sounds like a good thing. Early education for all! Why not? Anything for the kids.

Universal pre-k already exists—or is close to existing—in a number of states, including Oklahoma, Florida, and, most recently, New York. And given the appeal of the idea, it’s no wonder “preschool for all” emerged as a key talking point this election season, a year or so after President Barack Obama proposed a $75 billion federal universal pre-k program that involves partnerships with states. The promise of universal pre-k figured prominently in the 2014 campaigns of gubernatorial candidates in Pennsylvania and Maryland, among others. In Hawaii, an ultimately unsuccessful ballot initiative that would’ve amended the state’s constitution to allow the government to contract with private preschool providers—and eventually implement a universal pre-k system—was described, repeatedly, as a “yes brainer.”

But is universal pre-k truly the panacea that politicians and advocates, including Obama, make it out to be? Not quite, researchers say—although it does, as they point out, make for an effective political tool.

http://go.uen.org/2ji

 

 

 

 

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NATIONAL NEWS

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Obama: US Needs to Bring Schools into 21st Century Associated Press

 

WASHINGTON — President Barack Obama says the United States needs to bring its schools into the 21st century when it comes to technology.

Obama says less than 40 percent of public schools have high-speed Internet in their classrooms. He says that’s not good for the country where the Internet was invented.

Obama commented Wednesday as he opened a White House conference with school superintendents and other educators from across the country who are helping their schools and school districts transition to digital learning.

He launched resources for educators to learn about best practices around the country. And he announced a series of 12 regional meetings nationwide to improve technology in classrooms.

http://go.uen.org/2j6

 

http://go.uen.org/2jc (Hechinger Report)

 

 


 

 

 

Rep. John Kline Slated to Remain in Education Committee’s Top Spot Education Week

 

Rep. John Kline, the Minnesota Republican who’s skippered the Education and the Workforce Committee since 2011, is expected to be officially named its chairman once again for the 114th Congress, when the House Republican Conference votes later this morning.

The Republican Steering Committee released its recommendation for chairmen Tuesday night. The group, which controls committee assignments, said they’d like to see Kline continue at the education panel’s helm. The vote to ratify the recommendations is just a technicality.

http://go.uen.org/2ja

 

http://go.uen.org/2jj ([Minneapolis] Minnesota Post)

 

 


 

 

 

Push to Eliminate Election of Indiana Superintendent Possible in 2015 Education Week

 

The political and policy clashes between Indiana Superintendent of Public Instruction Glenda Ritz and Republican state officials, including Gov. Mike Pence, have made headlines for nearly two years since Ritz’s election as a Democrat in 2012. Now, one prominent Indiana group plans a lobbying effort to eliminate that election for state K-12 chief in the future.

Indiana Chamber of Commerce President Kevin Brinegar told the Associated Press Nov. 17 that the group wants a change in state law that would allow the governor, or failing that the state board of education (whose members are appointed by the governor), to select the next state superintendent, not the voters, in 2016, the next scheduled election for the office.

Justifying the chamber’s proposal, Bringer cited how “incredibly dysfunctional” the state board meetings are.

http://go.uen.org/2jb

 

http://go.uen.org/2jk (Indianapolis Star)

 

 


 

 

 

ACT: Student Interest in STEM Remains Steady for 2014 Graduates About half of 2014 test-takers showed an interest in STEM fields.

US News & World Report

 

Overall student interest in science, technology, engineering and mathematics fields remains steady, even as the pool of college-bound students increases, says a new report from the college testing organization ACT.

Of the ACT-tested graduates in 2014, about half, nearly 900,000, had an interest in STEM, according to the ACT’s annual report on educational progress in the context of STEM. Although the percentage of students interested in STEM overall has remained steady for the past five years, it doesn’t necessarily mean STEM isn’t gaining traction among high school students.

According to the U.S. News/Raytheon STEM Index, the numbers of students taking the ACT has risen steadily over the last 13 years. A deeper dive into the data shows that while math and science scores have remained mostly flat for all racial groups and for males, math scores for female students have gone up slightly.

http://go.uen.org/2js

 

http://go.uen.org/2jv (USOE)

 

A copy of the report

http://go.uen.org/2jt

 

A copy of the Utah report

http://go.uen.org/2ju

 

 


 

 

ClassDojo Adopts Deletion Policy for Student Data New York Times

 

The maker of ClassDojo, a popular behavioral tracking app used in schools across the United States, announced revisions on Tuesday in the way it retains student information.

Starting in January, the company intends to keep students’ behavioral records for only one school year.

“We are not a data company. So we have no need to keep any data beyond allowing it to be communicated between teachers, parents and students,” Sam Chaudhary, the co-founder of ClassDojo, wrote in an email to a reporter. “We think one year will give busy parents an opportunity to find time to review this information.”

An article in The New York Times on Monday reported on the concerns of some educators that schools were using software that collects sensitive details about students without sufficiently considering the ramifications for data privacy and fairness.

http://go.uen.org/2iL

 

 


 

 

 

Powerful Texas school board hears testimony on contentious textbooks Reuters

 

AUSTIN Texas – The Texas Board of Education, a group whose decisions can set the tone for school districts nationwide, heard testimony on Tuesday on a new set of school history and social studies textbooks that critics say advance Christian ideology.

The Republican-controlled 15-member body will be voting this week on whether to approve more than 100 books for use by students from elementary to high schools in the second-most populous U.S. state. Once textbooks are approved by Texas, they often are marketed nationally.

“Texas is in a leadership position and at the moment, they are abusing that position,” said Emile Lester, an associate professor of political science at the University of Mary Washington in Virginia, who wrote a critical review of some of the U.S. history textbooks that may be approved.

Lester and others said the textbooks overemphasized the role the biblical figure Moses and Judeo-Christian traditions played in the formation of the nations’ founding documents such as the Constitution, while paying little attention to constitutional provisions on the separation of church and state.

http://go.uen.org/2j0

 

http://go.uen.org/2j4 (AP)

 

 

 


 

 

Poll: Voters know little about Common Core EdSource

 

More than half of California voters said they knew nothing or very little about the state’s new Common Core standards for English language arts and math, according to a newly released report by the Policy Analysis for California Education/USC Rossier School of Education.

The results are not particularly unexpected, according to Morgan Polikoff, one of the report’s authors, because voters are typically ill informed on policy issues.

Still, it is unfortunate that so many Californians are uninformed about the new education standards, said Polikoff, an assistant professor of education at the USC Rossier School of Education. “Four years into adoption of such an important policy, there seems to be little awareness.”

http://go.uen.org/2jf

 

A copy of the survey

http://go.uen.org/2jg (PACE)

 

 


 

 

Introduce Word Problems to Students Sooner, Studies Say

Education Week

 

Fort Worth, Texas – If Ms. Smith’s 8th grade algebra class works through 10 word problems in an hour, and Ms. Jones’ class works through 10 equation problems during the same time, which class is likely to learn more math concepts by the end of class?

Please show your work.

Word problems are often considered one of the most challenging tasks in a beginning algebra class, with students likely to stumble over the move from the clean, basic formula to applying it in a real context.

Now, however, evidence from an ongoing series of experiments with students from middle school through college suggests that word problems might be easier and more beneficial for students when presented at the beginning, not the end, of a mathematics lesson.

http://go.uen.org/2j9

 

 


 

 

Grant High School students’ filming of sexual activity reflects nationwide issue

(Portland) Oregonian

 

In 2008, West Albany High School students learned what students at Portland’s Grant High School are learning today: videotaping sexual activity can have humiliating or even life-changing consequences.

In the Albany case, two male teens went to prison after being convicted of invading personal privacy and felony luring a minor, according to court documents. Several other charges, including using a child in display of sexually explicit conduct and first degree encouraging child abuse, were dropped. They were both 18 at the time they secretly made the recordings of two female teenagers, then ages 16 and 17.

Years later, Portland Public Schools officials are dealing with a similar incident involving Grant High School students. The Portland police Sex Crimes Unit is investigating the Grant case, but as of Nov. 17 no arrests have been made and little has been disclosed, including the names and ages of those under investigation. Initial reports say students recorded students having sex both on and off campus, and that that some of the filming occurred in a restroom on campus and was shared between students.

School districts across the country have recently grappled with situations involving students photographing or dispersing sexually explicit content online.

http://go.uen.org/2j1

 

http://go.uen.org/2j2 (Reuters)

 

 


 

 

Few schools adhered to USDA nutrition standards before 2013

Reuters

 

NEW YORK – Before the U.S. Department of Agriculture set strict standards for nutrition for federally reimbursable lunch programs, less than two percent of middle or high schools would have measured up.

The absence of certain standards was associated with youth obesity, according to a new study. Full implementation of the program, which should be happening now, may have a notable impact on adolescent health, though this study did not address implementation of the program, the authors write.

“By the time USDA standards get fully implemented, it will be really dramatic, there will be a very, very different nutritional environment in these schools,” said lead author Yvonne M. Terry-McElrath, a research associate at the Institute for Social Research at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor.

Beginning in the fall of 2012, the USDA required that schools participating in the federally reimbursable National School Lunch Program adhere to certain nutritional standards designed to limit levels of fat, sodium, sugar, and calories.

http://go.uen.org/2jm

 


 

 

Family, School Spar in Court in ‘Under God’ Suit

Associated Press

 

FREEHOLD, N.J. — Attorneys offered contrasting interpretations of the Pledge of Allegiance during oral arguments Wednesday in a New Jersey family’s lawsuit claiming a school district is discriminating against their child’s atheist beliefs.

The lawsuit focuses on the words “under God” that were added to the Pledge in 1954 and that have survived legal challenges before. Earlier this year, Massachusetts’ high court ruled in a similar lawsuit that the pledge is not discriminatory.

David Niose, an attorney for the American Humanist Association who is representing the unnamed family in the New Jersey case, said the Massachusetts’ court’s focus on the fact that the pledge was voluntary was “simply wrong.”

http://go.uen.org/2j3

 

 

 


 

 

Police: Math Teacher Pulled Knife on Student

Associated Press

 

BERNALILLO, N.M. — A New Mexico middle school teacher is facing charges that allege he threatened a student with a knife for talking during a pop quiz, police said Monday.

Bernalillo Police Chief Tom Romero said Benjamin Nagurski was arrested Friday after school officials took him out of the classroom following the bizarre exchange.

According to a criminal complaint, the 63-year-old math teacher threatened a student with the knife and told him to stop talking to another student.

http://go.uen.org/2j8

 

 

 

 

 

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CALENDAR

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USOE Calendar

http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

 

 

UEN News

http://www.uen.org

 

 

November 19:

Education Interim Committee meeting

2:30 p.m., 30 House Building

http://le.utah.gov/Interim/2014/html/00004989.htm

 

Public Utilities and Technology Interim Committee meeting

2:30 p.m., 450 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/Interim/2014/html/00005061.htm

 

 

November 20:

Native American Legislative Liaison Committee meeting

9 a.m., 20 House Building

http://le.utah.gov/Interim/2014/html/00004968.htm

 

 

November 25:

Education Task Force meeting

2 p.m., 445 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2014&com=TSKEDU

 

 

December 5:

Utah State Board of Education meeting

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

 

 

December 9:

Executive Appropriations Committee meeting

1 p.m., 210 Senate Building

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2014&com=APPEXE

 

 

December 11:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://go.uen.org/1pn

 

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