Education News Roundup: Nov. 24, 2014

"Trombone" by Prayitno/CC/flickr

“Trombone” by Prayitno/CC/flickr

Education News Roundup

Today’s Top Picks:

 

Study finds President Obama’s immigration plan would help undocumented immigrants in Utah the most.

http://go.uen.org/2l3 (SLT)

and http://go.uen.org/2lm (KTVX)

or a copy of the report

http://go.uen.org/2l4 (MPI)

Lehi teacher dispenses with desks in the classroom.

http://go.uen.org/2lp (KSL)

Look for the American Fork High band in the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade.

http://go.uen.org/2l8 (DN)

and http://go.uen.org/2lf (PDH)

and http://go.uen.org/2lk (KUTV)

and http://go.uen.org/2lF (KTVX)

and http://go.uen.org/2ln (KSL)

Utah State Board of Education Member Jefferson Moss advocates partisan school board elections.

http://go.uen.org/2lj (Utah PoliticoHub)

States get some breathing room on teacher equity plans.

http://go.uen.org/2lt (Ed Week)

 

 

 

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TODAY’S HEADLINES

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UTAH

 

Obama orders may help Utahns the most

Study » 55% of undocumented immigrants statewide could benefit, higher than in any other state.

 

Lehi teacher ditches desks to help students

 

Text hotline aims to help students speak up

 

Cyber-bully targets Heber students on Instagram; posts tell students to kill themselves

 

Stories, resources from KSL’s suicide prevention special

 

Grief counselors available at Utah school after student killed in shooting accident

 

New assessment brings changes to school grading system

 

Utah woman heads up the National Education Association

 

Ogden students build biographies of history’s heroes

 

Computer coding camp captures competitive creativity

 

AF High Band performs with borrowed instruments at title game — theirs are headed to New York

 

Visiting artist constructs installation at Wilson Elementary

 

Goofy pageant spins serious help for teacher’s daughter

 

Canyon View’s Talons raise funds for competition

 

Granite district revises calendar for Jewish holiday

 

Davis School Board seeks comment on proposed calendar

 

 

 


 

 

 

OPINION & COMMENTARY

 

Flood of Secret Bills Not Slowing Down as Legislative Session Approaches

 

Elections for the Utah State Board of Education Should be Partisan

 

Utah has too many sports classifications

 

From an exchange student: The experience of coming to study in Utah

 

Good habits

 

What It Takes to Fix American Education

We’re spending way too much time focusing on who is ‘winning’ and ‘losing’ debates over education, and not enough on implementing proven solutions.

 

Should the U.S. Make Standardized Tests Harder?

A counter-intuitive argument for why the country should spend more money on the assessments

 

How to support students on the brink of deportation

 

New Interest, Old Rhetoric, Limited Results, and the Need for a New Direction for Computer-Mediated Learning

 

 

 


 

 

 

NATION

 

States Get Federal Running Room on Teacher-Equity Plans

 

Latinos prize education, recent immigrants enthusiastic about American schools

 

Texas Approves New Social Studies Texts — With Changes

 

Huge settlement in sex abuse case has L.A. Unified rethinking reforms

 

Iowa Supreme Court Rejects Juvenile Charge in School Bus Bullying

 

 

 

 

 

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UTAH NEWS

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Obama orders may help Utahns the most

Study » 55% of undocumented immigrants statewide could benefit, higher than in any other state.

 

A higher percentage of undocumented immigrants in Utah could benefit from President Barack Obama’s new immigration executive orders than in any other state, a new study says.

The Migration Policy Institute estimates that 55 percent of the undocumented population in Utah could be shielded from deportation through his action, or about 48,000 people.

The next highest are Oregon, 52 percent; Texas, 51 percent; and California and Illinois, both 50 percent.

Pam Perlich, senior research economist at the University of Utah, says the reason for Utah’s top ranking may be that its economy suffered less in the recession than most states, so more undocumented immigrants remained here instead of returning home — and built families.

http://go.uen.org/2l3 (SLT)

 

http://go.uen.org/2lm (KTVX)

 

A copy of the report

http://go.uen.org/2l4 (MPI)

 


 

 

 

Lehi teacher ditches desks to help students

 

LEHI — Annette Krueger had an inspiration at a teacher’s conference over the summer. It didn’t come from the material, but the discomfort she felt from sitting for three hours.

“We didn’t have a break and I started thinking about my kids,” she said.

All summer she became obsessed with how to improve the learning process for her students. She researched, and made a case to her principal. Then, she moved out the constrictive desks and brought in beanbags, banana chairs and benches.

“It was risky for me,” said Krueger. “I was concerned that when (parents) came to back-to-school night, they might say, ‘My kids are out of there.'”

Two parents did pull their children. But since then, she hasn’t heard a single complaint. In fact, her students say the setup helps them do their best work.

http://go.uen.org/2lp (KSL)

 

 


 

 

Text hotline aims to help students speak up

 

PLAIN CITY — Police and school administrators throughout Weber County hope a new hotline established specifically for teenagers will help students look out for their friends.

The appropriately named FRIENDS Hotline is designed to receive text messages from any junior high or high school students in the Ogden and Weber school districts who wish to anonymously communicate with police about any number of concerns, including bullying, sexual harassment, depression, suicide risk, vandalism, drug abuse and more.

Texts sent to the hotline will be sent to Ogden’s Real Time Crime Center, where police communicate with the anonymous tipster. The tip is relayed to school officials, who can then reach out to the at-risk or delinquent student and address their problem.

http://go.uen.org/2ld (OSE)

 

 


 

 

 

Cyber-bully targets Heber students on Instagram; posts tell students to kill themselves

 

HEBER CITY — Instagram posts berating students and telling them to end their own lives resulted in a police investigation to find a cyber-bully at Rocky Mountain Middle School Thursday.

Heber City Police Officer Xela Thomas said investigators had identified the student responsible, but she declined to offer any identifying details about the student.

Investigators determined the bullying did not rise to the level of a criminal offense, according to Thomas.

http://go.uen.org/2lq (KSL)

 

 


 

 

Stories, resources from KSL’s suicide prevention special

 

SALT LAKE CITY — KSL has made a strong commitment to help break the silence on suicide. We want to spread hope and expand the community conversation with your help.

We all play a role in suicide prevention. Even if you do not know anyone directly who has died by suicide, you most likely do know someone impacted by it.

Below are stories filled with hope and resources to help break the silence on suicide.

Schools, students work to prevent suicide

Adults aren’t the only ones to deal with depression. Teens may also face the mental illness and see suicide as an escape. A Sandy school, however, is educating teens and parents on how to recognize and manage depression in a healthy way and prevent suicide.

http://go.uen.org/2lo (KSL)

 

 

 


 

 

Grief counselors available at Utah school after student killed in shooting accident

 

KAYSVILLE, Utah – A 12-year-old girl is dead after police said she was accidentally shot in a Kaysville home Sunday.

The Davis School District confirmed the girl was Adelaide Clinger.

Officials said she was a student at Centennial Junior High School, which will have grief counselors available for students Monday.

http://go.uen.org/2lr (KSTU)

 

 


 

 

 

New assessment brings changes to school grading system

 

SALT LAKE CITY — Utah’s school grading system will see some changes in light of SAGE, the new annual student assessment that found most students below a new standard of proficiency.

State education officials are making adjustments to how the grades are calculated to account for the change in assessment, aiming for a similar distribution as last year’s grades, according to Judy Park, associate superintendent of the Utah State Office of Education.

http://go.uen.org/2lD (KSL)

 

 

 

Utah woman heads up the National Education Association

 

Lily Eskelsen García, a Utah leader who is President of the National Education Association, spoke with 2News. She is a leading educator, but when she started out working with children, it wasn’t in the classroom but the lunchroom. See the whole story of her remarkable career.

http://go.uen.org/2ll (KUTV)

 

 


 

 

Ogden students build biographies of history’s heroes

 

OGDEN – Sixth-grader Luke Deru proudly put on his top hat and jacket so he could talk about one of his newfound heroes – Abraham Lincoln.

Deru and about 50 other sixth-graders at Wasatch Elementary have spent the last month learning all about historical figures that they chose. They wrote reports, found pictures and wrote a 28-line, seven-stanza riddle about their chosen person.

http://go.uen.org/2lc (OSE)

 

 


 

 

 

Computer coding camp captures competitive creativity

 

  1. GEORGE – There was no rest for the working, as 280 programmers of all levels of expertise competed in Southern Utah’s largest coding competition. Tables, chairs, computers and plenty of caffeine filled the Gardner Center Ballroom at Dixie State University wall to wall, from 8 a.m. Friday to 8 a.m. Saturday for the 24-hour Southern Utah Code Camp.

For the 5th annual Code Camp, organizers had to limit registration due to the event’s rapid growth and popularity.

http://go.uen.org/2li (SGN)

 

http://go.uen.org/2ls (KSTU)

 

 


 

 

 

AF High Band performs with borrowed instruments at title game — theirs are headed to New York

 

SALT LAKE CITY — For the first time in 52 years, American Fork High School was in the state championship football game but lost to top-ranked Bingham 20-3 on Friday.

Despite the loss, the highly touted American Fork marching band played on. But the performance was unlike any of its others.

As the team played, the school’s band was right there as usual cheering them on, but this time with instruments students were not used to playing.

The band is scheduled to participate in the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade next week and had put all of its instruments on a semitrailer Wednesday. The truck was somewhere between Utah and New York City at gametime.

http://go.uen.org/2l8 (DN)

 

http://go.uen.org/2lf (PDH)

 

http://go.uen.org/2lk (KUTV)

 

http://go.uen.org/2lF (KTVX)

 

http://go.uen.org/2ln (KSL)

 

 

 


 

 

Visiting artist constructs installation at Wilson Elementary

 

When visitors walk into Wilson Elementary, they will be greeted by a new art installation that was created this week with visiting artist Jeff Mather.

http://go.uen.org/2lg (LHJ)

 

 


 

 

Goofy pageant spins serious help for teacher’s daughter

 

OGDEN — Ogden High School students had a lot of fun Thursday night for a good cause. The school held its annual pageant where a host of senior boys competed for the coveted title of “Mr. Ogden” by sharing talents, funny dances and answering questions — a bit of silly mixed with seriousness.

The pageant is an event many look forward to, but this year it was a little different — the proceeds from the event went to help one of their own. Jaci Durtschi, a teacher at the school, has a 2-year-old daughter with cystic fibrosis. In the past the HOSA club organized the event, but was unable to do it this year. When the student government officers heard that it may not happen, they stepped up and wanted to make sure it kept going, said one of the student government advisers, Liz Wallace.

As the students started planning, Wallace had the idea to help Durtschi and when she suggested it, the students didn’t hesitate to jump on board, she said. Durtschi is the other student government adviser.

http://go.uen.org/2le (OSE)

 

 


 

 

 

Canyon View’s Talons raise funds for competition

 

CEDAR CITY – The Canyon View High School drill team, the Talons, hosted its annual craft fair at the school all day Saturday to raise money to pay for uniform and competition expenses.

The fair not only featured hand-made items for sale, but sold food and baked goods while providing entertainment by local performing groups and martial arts studios.

http://go.uen.org/2lh (SGS)

 

 


 

 

Granite district revises calendar for Jewish holiday

 

SOUTH SALT LAKE — The Granite School District has made adjustments to its 2015-16 calendar to accommodate the Jewish holiday Yom Kippur.

Fall parent/teacher conferences were originally scheduled on Sept. 21-24, with the compensatory day on Sept. 25.

The conferences now will be scheduled one week later, Sept. 28-Oct. 1, with the compensatory day on Oct. 2.

http://go.uen.org/2l9 (DN)

 

 

 


 

 

Davis School Board seeks comment on proposed calendar

 

FARMINGTON — The Davis Board of Education is seeking comment as it considers adoption of its proposed school calendar for 2015-16.

http://go.uen.org/2la (DN)

 

 

 

 

 

 

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OPINION & COMMENTARY

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Flood of Secret Bills Not Slowing Down as Legislative Session Approaches Utah Policy commentary by columnist Bob Bernick

 

Do you know what your Utah State House and Senate members are up to as the 2015 Legislature approaches?

Well, good luck with that.

Because if your representative or senator is operating like most of the 75-member House and 29-member Senate are, half of what they are up to is secret.

Yep. Secret.

Last week, in an open House GOP caucus (the Republican senators keep their caucus meetings closed), members were told that as of last Wednesday 692 new bill files for the 2015 Legislature had been opened by the 104 part-time lawmakers.

Of that number, 371 were “protected.”

That’s the official term for secret. Only the legislator asking the legislative attorneys assigned to draft that bill know the bill even exists, what’s its subject matter is, and what its wording will be.

So, 53.6 percent of all the bills now being drafted for the 2015 Legislature are secret.

http://go.uen.org/2l5

 


 

 

 

Elections for the Utah State Board of Education Should be Partisan Utah PoliticoHub commentary by Utah State Board of Education Member Jefferson Moss

 

Considerable discussion about how the Utah State Board of Education should be elected has already begun.

It’s almost universally agreed that the current method for selecting the Utah State Board of Education is flawed. The Legislature has yet to determine what should replace the current system, ruled by Judge Waddoups to be unconstitutional, and I expect that the Legislature will very likely change the process in the upcoming session.

When it does, I believe the Legislature should adopt partisan elections and for several good reasons:

http://go.uen.org/2lj

 

 


 

 

 

Utah has too many sports classifications (St. George) Spectrum commentary by columnist Todd Seifert

 

Maybe it’s all the state titles that have been determined in the past few weeks, but I have to voice some issues I have with the Utah High School Activities Association and the way it separates teams into classifications.

To be blunt: We have too many classifications for a state with just 130 high schools competing in athletics. Though I’ve mentioned it before, it really hit me when the UHSAA released its first draft for realignment for the 2015-17 seasons. The first draft shows five classes for all sports except football, for which it actually has six classifications.

As a result, the 3AA football state champion will be decided among a whole 12 teams. The 1A and 2A state titles will be decided among 10 teams each.

More than a bit watered down, I would say. And I think it provides way too many trophies.

http://go.uen.org/2lE

 

 


 

 

From an exchange student: The experience of coming to study in Utah

(Provo) Daily Herald op-ed by Agathe Picard

 

My name is Agathe. I am 16 years old and come all the way from Lyon, the second biggest city in France. It has been three months since I have been in the USA as an exchange student.

Approximately two years ago, I decided to study abroad because I love America. I was always curious to see how Americans live and to learn about their culture.

In January 2014, I signed up to go to the United States for 10 months to attend an American high school. One week later, I knew I was leaving! I waited for a very long time to have my host family and my state assigned, because I didn’t get to choose them; they got to choose me.

http://go.uen.org/2lC

 

 


 

 

Good habits

Deseret News letter from Robert Cutler

 

My training and employment as an educator covered both elementary and vocational education. By the time children enter elementary school, their work, study and respect habits are already well established by their home environment. Children need individual attention; if they don’t get it by way of compliments and praise, they resort to bad behavior.

In regard to vocational education, potential employers have said that schools should not be trying to train students for a particular vocation but should instead concentrate on having students learn to be honest, reliable, punctual and willing to learn skills needed when they enter the workforce.

http://go.uen.org/2lb

 

 


 

 

 

What It Takes to Fix American Education

We’re spending way too much time focusing on who is ‘winning’ and ‘losing’ debates over education, and not enough on implementing proven solutions.

Daily Beast commentary by Jonah Edelman, co-founder and CEO of Stand for Children

 

As a parent, a mentor, the son of a civil rights leader turned child advocate and a former aide to Robert F. Kennedy, and an advocate for children for nearly twenty years, I can tell you this with confidence: when it comes to helping underserved students succeed, there’s no silver bullet or quick fix.

But there are real solutions:

High quality, free preschool for three and four year-olds growing up in low or moderate income households.

High academic standards that are common across states, so students who move around have continuity and teachers can learn from each other and benefit from the best educational resources.

School principals who are effective instructional leaders, not just building managers, and who have the support they need to last in their difficult role.

Teachers who arrive with the skills and training needed to succeed and who are given the compensation, support, respect, and time to collaborate they need to stay in their profession, lead their schools, and improve their craft.

http://go.uen.org/2lz

 

 


 

 

Should the U.S. Make Standardized Tests Harder?

A counter-intuitive argument for why the country should spend more money on the assessments Atlantic commentary by MIKHAIL ZINSHTEYN, program manager at the Education Writers Association

 

With opposition to the new Common Core State Standards and the assessments linked to them reaching a fever pitch, advocating for better tests seems like an unpopular proposition. But what if U.S. students took fewer tests that measured their ability to understand academic concepts far more deeply than current tests permit?

A growing chorus of scholars is calling for just that: fewer but harder tests that go beyond the standard multiple choice model, ones that ask students to answer open-ended questions, solve tougher problems, and interpret harder texts.

“We could get the benefits of higher-quality assessments and spend less than we’re spending today,” said Linda Darling-Hammond, a leading professor of education at Stanford University, during a recent presentation. “We’re just not spending it in ways that are very optimal for promoting deeper learning.”

If the quality of tests are a reflection of how much students are expected to know, the standardized assessments of the No Child Left Behind era have missed the mark on measuring students’ ability to process complex knowledge, some research suggests.

http://go.uen.org/2ly

 

 


 

 

How to support students on the brink of deportation NewHour commentary by LAUREN MARKHAM, community school manager at Oakland International High School in Oakland, California

 

 

“I didn’t want to come here, but I had no other choice,” Ricardo told me earlier this fall.

Ricardo, a tenth grade student at Oakland International High School, left his home country of Guatemala last spring, making his way up through Mexico and crossing into the Arizona desert. His father left when he was a baby in Guatemala and a few years later, his mother passed away. He had lived with his grandparents for several years, but in 2013, they died too.

Gang violence had increased in his hometown and because he was an orphan, he was an easy target for gang recruitment. So he left. There was nothing to go back to, he thought as he walked through the desert in Arizona. But after he got separated from his group, he spotted a border patrol car and turned himself in.

After four months and three different detention shelters in Arizona and Texas, Ricardo arrived in Oakland to temporarily live with a sponsor — a friend of a friend of the family — while he waited for his day in court. Meanwhile, he enrolled at Oakland International High School, a public school for recently-arrived immigrants, where I coordinate non-academic services and partnerships for our students and families.

http://go.uen.org/2lx

 

 


 

 

New Interest, Old Rhetoric, Limited Results, and the Need for a New Direction for Computer-Mediated Learning National Education Policy Center analysis by Noel Enyedy, University of California at Los Angeles

 

The pace of technological advancement, combined with improvements technology has brought to other sectors, is leading policymakers and educators alike to take another look at computers in the classroom, and even at computers instead of classrooms. In particular, advances in computational power, memory storage, and artificial intelligence are breathing new life into the promise that instruction can be tailored to the needs of each individual student, much like a one-on-one tutor. The term most often used by advocates for this approach is “Personalized Instruction.” Despite the advances in both hardware and software, recent studies show little evidence for the effectiveness of this model of integrating technology into the learning process.

http://go.uen.org/2l6

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

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States Get Federal Running Room on Teacher-Equity Plans Education Week

 

The Obama administration’s plan to help boost the equitable distribution of teachers—a key goal of the 12-year-old No Child Left Behind Act that has gone largely unenforced—appears to give states a lot of running room to figure out just what these equity plans should look like, without clear, strong federal levers for ensuring that states follow through.

The teacher-equity guidance, released by the U.S. Department of Education Nov. 10, is aimed at ensuring that disadvantaged students have access to as many highly qualified teachers as other students. It directs states to focus their plans mainly on “inputs,” such as how many years of experience a teacher has, rather than “outputs,” or how effective teachers actually are at moving the needle on student achievement.

In addition, if a state with a waiver from provisions of the NCLB law isn’t able to come up with a strong plan and follow through on it, the Obama administration can put its waiver on high-risk status, or place a condition on it, department officials said. The department can also use the authority of its office for civil rights to investigate district practices. But it’s an open question whether the agency will actually use any of these sticks.

The equity plans are due by June 1; they were originally due in April 2015, to align with states’ NCLB waiver-renewal applications. The extra time is supposed to help states consult with “stakeholders,” including teachers’ unions, according to a letter to state chiefs sent Nov. 10 by Deborah S. Delisle, the assistant secretary for elementary and secondary education.

http://go.uen.org/2lt

 

 


 

 

 

Latinos prize education, recent immigrants enthusiastic about American schools (Ontario, CA) Inland Valley Daily Bulletin

 

Education is a top priority among Latinos living in the United States, according to a recent survey.

And for newly arrived immigrants, it’s a major perk.

“I think the Latino community does value education very much, often because we see it as a stepping stone to middle-class status,” said Jennifer R. Nájera, an associate professor in the Department of Ethnic Studies at UC Riverside.

Education and schools were more important to the respondents in The State of the Latino Family 2014 Survey than health care, terrorism and race relations, although they trailed the economy, immigration issues and crime.

http://go.uen.org/2lA

 

A copy of the study

http://go.uen.org/2lB (Kellogg Foundaton)

 

 


 

 

Texas Approves New Social Studies Texts — With Changes Texas Tribune

 

After adopting hundreds of pages in last minute updates and corrections, the Texas State Board of Education approved new social studies textbooks Friday.

All but the five Democrats on the 15-member board voted to accept products from all publishers except Worldview Software, which they rejected because of concerns over factual accuracy.

“When I think of the other publishers, they were on it. They were on the errors. I did not see that here,” Tincy Miller, a Dallas Republican, said of Worldview.

In total, they approved 89 products for eight different social studies courses that will be used in Texas public schools for the next decade. School districts do not have to buy products from the list vetted by the state education board, but many do because it offers a ready guarantee that materials cover state curriculum standards.

Friday’s vote marks the conclusion of a months-long review process where members of the public from across the political spectrum have pointed to thousands of perceived errors and flaws in how the books cover topics like climate change, Islam and the influence of Moses on American Founding Fathers.

http://go.uen.org/2l1

 

http://go.uen.org/2l2 (Reuters)

 

http://go.uen.org/2lw (Ed Week)

 

 


 

 

 

Huge settlement in sex abuse case has L.A. Unified rethinking reforms Los Angeles Times

 

Six years ago, the Los Angeles Unified School District found itself at the center of a high-profile teacher sex abuse scandal.

The year was 2008, and then-L.A. schools Deputy Supt. Ramon C. Cortines reacted firmly amid revelations that a school administrator, Steve Rooney, had sex with an underage student at one campus before being transferred to another, where he molested two girls.

Cortines oversaw new practices to improve communication with law enforcement agencies, conduct internal investigations of any employee under suspicion of wrongdoing and keep accused instructors out of classrooms until they are cleared.

But in the last couple of years, L.A. Unified found itself dealing with an even larger scandal. On Friday, the district approved paying the staggering sum of more than $139 million to alleged victims of former Miramonte Elementary teacher Mark Berndt.

The settlement has Cortines — the current superintendent — and others concerned that other earlier reforms didn’t work and considering what needs to be done for the district to better protect students from sexual misconduct by adults.

http://go.uen.org/2l7

 

 

 


 

 

Iowa Supreme Court Rejects Juvenile Charge in School Bus Bullying Education Week

 

Iowa’s highest court has reversed the finding of delinquency for a high school student accused of harassing and intimidating a classmate when the two exited a school bus.

The Iowa Supreme Court unanimously held that there was not enough evidence that a student identified as D.S. “intentionally” created an encounter with the other student or that “she possessed the requisite specific intent to threaten, intimidate, or alarm” her classmate.

The case concerns the contours of when school bullying can lead to juvenile charges. D.S. was 15 when she had the encounter with another 15-year-old student, identified as T.B.

D.S. allegedly said a number of nasty things about T.B. But critically, D.S. testified that she had yelled the name “T-bitch” to another student, not T.B. When T.B. responded “What?,” D.S. allegedly unleashed several venomous and vulgar comments towards her.

It is unclear whether the alleged conduct led to any school discipline, but T.B.’s mother approached the police chief of New Albin, Iowa, whose investigation into the incident led to the delinquency charges against D.S.

http://go.uen.org/2lu

 

A copy of the ruling

http://go.uen.org/2lv (Iowa Supreme Court)

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

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CALENDAR

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USOE Calendar

http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

 

 

UEN News

http://www.uen.org

 

 

November 25:

Education Task Force meeting

2 p.m., 445 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/Interim/2014/html/00005312.htm

 

 

December 5:

Utah State Board of Education meeting

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

 

 

December 9:

Executive Appropriations Committee meeting

1 p.m., 210 Senate Building

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2014&com=APPEXE

 

 

December 11:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://go.uen.org/1pn

 

 

January 26:

Opening day of the Utah Legislature

Capitol Building

http://le.utah.gov/

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