Education News Roundup: Dec. 18, 2014

 

Mini Murals of History by 5th grade students at HMK Elementary.

Mini Murals of History by 5th grade students at HMK Elementary.

Education News Roundup

Today’s Top Picks:

 

Housekeeping note: ENR is going to try out the whole bear-hibernation thing on Friday, but the roundup will return on Monday.

 

Audit finds federal money is a larger chunk of revenue for the state than income tax or sales tax revenue.

http://go.uen.org/2wq (UP)

and http://go.uen.org/2wr (DN)

and http://go.uen.org/2wB (OSE)

and http://go.uen.org/2wD (PDH)

and http://go.uen.org/2wF (CVD)

and http://go.uen.org/2wI (KSL)

or a copy of the audit

http://go.uen.org/2ws (Utah.gov)

 

Tips offered on how to keep students studying over the Christmas break. No tips on how not to look like the Grinch doing that.

http://go.uen.org/2wK (KSTU)

and http://go.uen.org/2wL (MUR)

 

Student poverty — that is, childhood poverty — continues to be a problem nationally.

http://go.uen.org/2wv (WaPo)

or a copy of the report

http://go.uen.org/2ww (Census Bureau)

 

What will the projected growth in health spending mean for education spending?

http://go.uen.org/2wO (Ed Week)

or a copy of the report

http://go.uen.org/2wP (GAO)

 

This just in from the North Pole (well, from within the Arctic Circle anyway): Santa wants a good education for children this year.

http://go.uen.org/2wN (Reuters)

 

 

 

 

 

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TODAY’S HEADLINES

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UTAH

 

Audit: Utah Becoming More Dependent on Federal Dollars

 

School district graduation rates steadily rising, intervention programs key

 

Schools’ grades rise after changes implemented

 

Sevier School District receives recognition

 

Utah students lack skills, training

 

Local students take part in a worldwide push to encourage youths to get excited about computer sciences, programming

 

Educators offer tips to prevent academic slides during winter break

 

WSU Faraday lectures share the fun of science

 

Minor injuries after school bus accident in Provo

 

Middle school students raise money to honor veterans

 

2nd-grader helps raise nearly $2K for teacher’s sick husband

 

Nibley Woman Spearheads Project To Feed School Children Over Weekends

 

Springville High presented: “The Mikado”

 

Preschool may come too late for some kids

 

 


 

 

OPINION & COMMENTARY

 

Graduation rate a win for diversity

A smorgasbord of mortarboards.

 

#StepUpSTG 2014

 

Grandfatherly Advice

 

Quit gambling on public lands

 

Adding Eyes:

The Rise, Rewards, and Risks of Multi-Rater Teacher Observation Systems

 

Was Moynihan Right?

What happens to the children of unmarried mothers

 

Uncovered:

Social Security, Retirement Uncertainty, and 1 Million Teachers

 

 


 

 

NATION

 

Poverty among school-age kids is above pre-recession levels in 30 percent of counties

 

GAO Projects Worrisome Long-Term Fiscal Outlook for State, Local Budgets

 

Influenza walloping schools in South, Midwest

 

Parent Trigger ‘Pilot Project’ In Columbus Has No Takers

 

Who is the biggest victim of America’s prison boom?

New research explores the damaging impact of parental incarceration on children

 

School grants transgender student access to boys restroom

 

Santa’s Christmas wish: the best education for children around the world

 

 

 

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UTAH NEWS

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Audit: Utah Becoming More Dependent on Federal Dollars

 

Who do GOP state lawmakers love to bash?

Democratic President Barack Obama and the federal government.

Where do we get the lion’s share of our state revenue?

Democratic President Barack Obama and the federal government.

A new state auditor report shows that for fiscal year 2014 – which ended last June 30 – Utah State Government got $4.368 billion from the feds.

And while the cash we’re getting from the feds is dropping this fiscal year (different reasons for that), the trend line for Utah taking more and more federal aid is clearly growing, says GOP Auditor John Dougall, who used to be one of those Republican legislators who hated to take federal money.

Each general session – the 2015 Legislature starts Jan. 26 – legislators put together the state budget. The current year’s budget is just over $13 billion, and GOP Gov. Gary Herbert suggests a budget for fiscal year 2015-2016 of $14.3 billion.

But this is a budget of state revenues – which mainly come from the personal and corporate income tax and the state sales tax.

Dougall points out in his new report that for fiscal 2014 when you include the federal monies that come to the state and are spent on a variety of programs, Utah spent $17.433 billion last fiscal year.

And the fed money made up 25 percent – a quarter – of all the money that was spent by the state.

And that is more than the $2.919 billion that came in individual income taxes or the $2.149 billion that came in the state sales tax – the state’s main two tax revenue sources.

http://go.uen.org/2wq (UP)

 

http://go.uen.org/2wr (DN)

 

http://go.uen.org/2wB (OSE)

 

http://go.uen.org/2wD (PDH)

 

http://go.uen.org/2wF (CVD)

 

http://go.uen.org/2wI (KSL)

 

A copy of the audit

http://go.uen.org/2ws (Utah.gov)

 

 

 


 

 

School district graduation rates steadily rising, intervention programs key

 

WASHINGTON COUNTY – The Washington County School District has issued a press release regarding high school graduation rates for the class of 2014. Collected data shows a steady increase in graduating seniors over the past four years.

“The overall graduation rate for seniors in the Washington County School District continues on the rise,” the press release stated, “marking the fourth consecutive year of graduation growth.”

The class of 2014 saw 1,679 out of 1,917 seniors graduating for an overall rate of 88 percent.

http://go.uen.org/2wZ (SGN)

 

 


 

 

Schools’ grades rise after changes implemented

 

FARMINGTON — There were no Fs this year.

And for Davis School District high schools, only As and Bs.

The grades listed this week by the Utah State Office of Education were much less troubling than last year’s report card, though many still doubt the value of the exercise.

Viewmont High went from an F last year to an A this year, but neither grade tells the public much about the school, said Dan Linford, principal.

“I’m skeptical of any single letter grade because I do feel like the message to the public is that this represents what the school is doing, when in reality, it’s just a small slice of a big pie,” he said.

http://go.uen.org/2wU (DCC)

 

 


 

 

Sevier School District receives recognition

 

The Sevier School District has been named to the 5th Annual Advanced Placement Honor Roll. The district is only 1 of 547 throughout the United States and Canada and 1 of only 4 in Utah. The distinction is given for districts that expand opportunity and improve performance for Advanced Placement Students. Superintendent Cade Douglas said it is a very distinguished award that the district needs to celebrate receiving. The other three Utah districts awarded include Washington, Duchesne and Davis.

http://go.uen.org/2wM (MUR)

 

 

 


 

 

Utah students lack skills, training

 

SALT LAKE CITY— Many students in Utah lack the skills and training they need to transfer seamlessly into the workforce, according to a recent poll by Dan Jones & Associates.

It makes hiring difficult for businesses. Out of the last 50 technology positions recently hired, by a local company, half of them were filled by people from out of state, according to Vice-president Jeff Weber.

Community leaders are raising concerns that the gap between education output and needs of the workforce is widening and that the long-term sustainability of Utah’s economy hangs in the balance.

http://go.uen.org/2wW (PDH)

 

 

 


 

 

Local students take part in a worldwide push to encourage youths to get excited about computer sciences, programming

 

MONROE — Students at South Sevier Middle School in Monroe joined part of a global movement last week, participating in a worldwide initiative called Hour of Code.

“I did this with my seventh graders last year and it was so successful I decided we needed to do it school wide this year,” said computer science teacher Kim Parsons. She said more than 300 students at the school participated in the event, which worldwide had nearly 76,000,000 people who had tried an hour of code as of Monday.

http://go.uen.org/2wX (Richfield Reaper)

 

 


 

 

Educators offer tips to prevent academic slides during winter break

 

SALT LAKE CITY — Children love the break from school, but is the time away from the books during the holidays a good thing?

Michelle Ortega, a mother of four, knows that during the holidays the last thing on her children’s mind is school.

“It’s probably the hardest thing to make sure that they’re going to remember what they last learned in school over the winter break,” Ortega said.

Educators said if kids keep their books shut during the two-week break, it can lead to academic slides.

http://go.uen.org/2wK (KSTU)

 

http://go.uen.org/2wL (MUR)

 

 


 

 

WSU Faraday lectures share the fun of science

 

OGDEN — Children love watching soap bubbles float through the air, and then delicately pop when they fall to the ground. They love soap bubbles even more when the bubbles are filled with hydrogen and oxygen, and gently float upward until they explode with a loud bang when touched by the flame of a torch.

Children and adults laughed and screamed as Weber State University faculty members demonstrated chemical reactions during the school’s annual Faraday Lectures this week in the Lind Lecture Hall.

WSU President Charles Wight played the role of Michael Faraday, an English scientist who began offering Christmas Lectures in 1825, at The Royal Institution in London.

“When Michael Faraday did this in the 1800s, it was for the general public and there were a lot of adults in the audience, but really he wanted to inspire the children and impart some of the excitement of science.”

Children were inspired as Wight, dressed in an old-fashioned looking suit with tails, recreated Faraday’s lecture on the chemical history of candles.

http://go.uen.org/2wC (OSE)

 

 

 


 

 

Minor injuries after school bus accident in Provo

 

PROVO — Some students received minor injuries Wednesday morning after a Provo City School District bus was involved in an accident near Center Street and Interstate 15. Most of the students were unharmed.

There were reports of two or three minor injuries, with no students being taken to the hospital, according to the Utah Highway Patrol. Another bus was dispatched to take the students for the rest of their journey. The students were on their way to Utah Valley University for a field trip.

http://go.uen.org/2wE (PDH)

 

 

 


 

 

Middle school students raise money to honor veterans

 

RIVERTON — Every year, the students at Oquirrh Hills Middle School pick a project for their big fundraiser — Oquirrhfest. This year, they focused on a part of history with which many of the students feel a distant connection.

“One of my great-grandfathers was in the Navy. The other one was a navigator,” said Kathryn “KT” Hendricks, a ninth-grader whose great-grandfathers served in World War II.

The middle school students are raising money to send World War II veterans to Washington, D.C., to see the memorial dedicated in their honor as part of Utah Honor Flight.

http://go.uen.org/2wJ (KSL)

 

 


 

 

2nd-grader helps raise nearly $2K for teacher’s sick husband

 

LEHI — When Teylor Mauss and her family started making Christmas caramels for their neighbors, they didn’t foresee making 3,000 chewy treats.

Mauss knew her son’s teacher’s husband was sick, but when she saw a GoFundMe account* created in hopes to raise money for his medical bills, she realized how serious it was.

Second-grade teacher Cassy Lewis’s husband, Tom Lewis, has been sick for five years with chronic lyme disease and is in need of financial assistance for their extensive medical bills. They reached their $12,000 goal Wednesday.

http://go.uen.org/2wH (KSL)

 

 


 

 

 

Nibley Woman Spearheads Project To Feed School Children Over Weekends

 

In a small warehouse just off Logan City’s main street a group of volunteers move crates of food. Workers are cold and they struggle to move canned goods with gloved hands.

“It is really cold this morning, but we are here every week during the school year come rain or shine,” said Nibley resident Peggy Reese.

Reese began the “Still Cool After School” supplemental food program five years ago when she was working at Ellis Elementary. The program brings community volunteers together each week of the school year to gather donated food items.

http://go.uen.org/2wT (UPR)

 

 

 


 

 

Springville High presented: “The Mikado”

 

This November, Springville High School’s drama and music department presented Gilbert and Sullivan’s classic “THE MIKADO” a musical comedy of love, law, and public execution. Music by Arthur Sullivan and Libretto by W.S. Gilbert. First performed in London, 1885.

http://go.uen.org/2×0 (PDH)

 

 


 

 

Preschool may come too late for some kids

 

While President Obama launched a $1 billion dollar public/private push to expand early childhood education last week, some are arguing that better preschool, however helpful, may be too little too late for many kids.

http://go.uen.org/2wA (DN)

 

 

 

 

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OPINION & COMMENTARY

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Graduation rate a win for diversity

A smorgasbord of mortarboards.

Salt Lake Tribune editorial

 

The Utah State Office of Education released its 2014 graduation rates last week, and a 2 percent increase has never looked so good.

This year 83 percent of Utah high school seniors graduated, continuing a trend that has seen the rate rise 7 percent since the federal government changed the way graduation rates are calculated in 2011.

But the truly good news in the data is that all ethnic minority groups have seen their graduation rates rise in the past five years. The rate for Latino students, the largest minority group, rose 4 percent in the last year. At 72 percent, the Latino rate still lags the overall rate, but it is a dramatic improvement from 55 percent in 2010. Pacific Islanders are another group making significant gains, going from a 69 percent graduation rate in 2010 to 82 percent this year. The rate for African-American and American Indian students also have improved over five years, but they’re still around 65 percent.

Any closing of the success gap between white and minority students is a promising development, especially given that it’s not because the white students’ graduation rate has declined. The tide is lifting all boats. In fact, the state has set a goal of having a 90 percent graduation rate by 2020, and the data show we’re on track to make that if the current trend continues.

http://go.uen.org/2wz

 

 

 


 

 

#StepUpSTG 2014

(St. George) Spectrum editorial

 

This month, the Spectrum & Daily News hosted #StepUpSTG 2014. We asked you to step up and help the less fortunate this holiday season and a great many of you did indeed find a way to pitch in. Our lobby is filled with donated sleeping bags, food, blankets, clothes, coats and much more all destined to help Washington County’s homeless with the help of the Washington County School District Foundation and SwitchPoint Community Resource Center.

But today is the last day. Tomorrow, we’ll be packing up all of the items that you have brought to our offices at 275 E. St. George Boulevard and we’ll be taking them over to SwitchPoint.

http://go.uen.org/2wG

 

 

 


 

 

Grandfatherly Advice

Salt Lake City Weekly commentary by columnist Katharine Biele

 

There’s no telling what will sway Gov. Gary Herbert, who sometimes seems just the least bit scared of the Legislature. Healthy Utah? Well, he’s worked hard on it, but it’s anyone’s guess whether lawmakers will run with it. Meanwhile, a group of senior citizens—the Utah Citizens’ Counsel—issued a list of recommendations for the governor and policy wonks to consider. These included incentives to clean the air, requests for more public education funding, Medicaid expansion and more. The recommendations are admittedly a bit progressive, but they come from a bipartisan group united mainly by age and former influence. Herbert would be wise to heed their advice. They have perspective and, unlike legislators, no hidden agenda.

http://go.uen.org/2wY

 

 


 

 

Quit gambling on public lands

Salt Lake Tribune letter from Stephen Trimble

 

I thought gambling was illegal in Utah, but the Legislature’s stubborn demand for state ownership of federal lands proves me wrong. Led by Ken Ivory into a high-stakes backroom rigged to profit only elite insiders, our rash representatives risk Utah’s future. Why abandon conservative common sense?

The governor and Legislature see land as a commodity, a playground for commerce. Their scenario for managing millions of acres of public lands depends on fossil fuels — a wager not faring well in Russia. Dirty energy is not the industry of the future.

Utah — already the second-driest state — sits in the crosshairs of global warming. As fires increase in strength and frequency, epic firefighting bills for Utah-owned rangelands will bleed a budget already short on education funding.

http://go.uen.org/2wV

 

 


 

Adding Eyes:

The Rise, Rewards, and Risks of Multi-Rater Teacher Observation Systems Carnegie Foundation analysis

 

NEW TEACHER EVALUATION SYSTEMS have emerged as the cornerstone of the recent movement to improve public school teaching. Fueled by incentives from the federal government, state and local policymakers have sought to replace the often-cursory evaluation models of the past with more comprehensive ones. In contrast to past evaluations, which often relied on a single classroom visit by an untrained administrator, new models evaluate teachers on the basis of their students’ achievement, on surveys that capture students’ perceptions of their teachers’ practice, and on improved classroom observations.

http://go.uen.org/2wu

 

 


 

 

 

Was Moynihan Right?

What happens to the children of unmarried mothers Education Next analysis by Sara McLanahan, professor of sociology and public affairs at Princeton University, and Christopher Jencks, professor of social policy at the Harvard Kennedy School

 

In his 1965 report on the black family, Daniel Patrick Moynihan highlighted the rising fraction of black children growing up in households headed by unmarried mothers. He attributed the increase largely to the precarious economic position of black men, many of whom were no longer able to play their traditional role as their family’s primary breadwinner. Moynihan argued that growing up in homes without a male breadwinner reduced black children’s chances of climbing out of poverty, and that the spread of such families would make it hard for blacks to take advantage of the legal and institutional changes flowing from the civil rights revolution.

Moynihan’s claim that growing up in a fatherless family reduced a child’s chances of educational and economic success was furiously denounced when the report appeared in 1965, with many critics calling Moynihan a racist. For the next two decades few scholars chose to investigate the effects of father absence, lest they too be demonized if their findings supported Moynihan’s argument. Fortunately, America’s best-known black sociologist, William Julius Wilson, broke this taboo in 1987, providing a candid assessment of the black family and its problems in The Truly Disadvantaged. Since then, social scientists have accumulated a lot more evidence on the effects of family structure. This article will offer some educated guesses about what that evidence means.

http://go.uen.org/2wx

 

 


 

 

Uncovered:

Social Security, Retirement Uncertainty, and 1 Million Teachers Bellwether Education Partners analysis

 

A teacher in Chicago probably doesn’t spend much time thinking about what isn’t on her paystub. But for all her years teaching in Illinois, she won’t have access to the retirement or disability protections offered by Social Security. And even if she leaves and begins employment that is covered by Social Security, she’ll never get benefits for those years she taught in Illinois.

Today, nine out of 10 Americans age 65 and older depend on Social Security benefits to lead a comfortable and secure retirement. Among middle-class Americans, Social Security makes up more than 40 percent of an individual retiree’s income. And yet not all workers can participate in Social Security, a fact few people realize.

While the system includes all private sector workers, many local and state government employees lack the retirement and social safety net offered by Social Security. Teachers constitute one of the largest groups of uncovered workers. Nationwide, approximately 1.2 million teachers (about 40 percent of all public K–12 teachers) are not covered. Those teachers are concentrated in 15 states— Alaska, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Georgia, Illinois, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Massachusetts, Missouri, Nevada, Ohio, Rhode Island, and Texas—and the District of Columbia, where many or all public school teachers neither pay into nor receive benefits from the system. They do not have the same essential income protection in their old age as nearly every other American worker does.

http://go.uen.org/2wt

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

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NATIONAL NEWS

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Poverty among school-age kids is above pre-recession levels in 30 percent of counties Washington Post

 

The poverty rate of school-age children remains above pre-recession levels in nearly 30 percent of the nation’s 3,140 counties.

The rate rose in 928 counties from 2007 to 2013, as depicted in the map above, and fell in just 15 counties, according to newly released Census Bureau data. In the remaining counties, the poverty rate for school-age children showed no statistically significant change.

“County school-age child poverty rates are still above their pre-recession levels in metropolitan areas of California, Nevada, Arizona, Florida, Georgia, the Carolinas, as well as the coastal areas of the Northeast and Great Lakes states,” Wesley Basel of the Census Bureau’s Small Area Estimates Branch, said in a Wednesday release. The poverty rate nationally for school-age children is 20.8 percent, or roughly 1 in 5.

http://go.uen.org/2wv

 

A copy of the report

http://go.uen.org/2ww (Census)

 

 

 


 

 

GAO Projects Worrisome Long-Term Fiscal Outlook for State, Local Budgets Education Week

 

In my story on state policy activity we could see in 2015, I reported that a vast majority of states approved spending increases in public schools for fiscal 2015, and that it’s fair to expect a similar trend in spending as states work on their fiscal 2016 budgets. But a new report from the federal Government Accountability Office (GAO) signals that not everything looks rosy for state and local government budgets.

In a fiscal outlook for state and local governments published on Dec. 17, the GAO states that using 45-year projections based on current fiscal conditions, the deficit for state and local operating budgets as a percentage of gross domestic product is slated to grow from about 2 percent of GDP to close to 4 percent of GDP by 2060. Capital-related expenditures are excluded from this calculation, as are funds used for transportation projects. (The report, unfortunately, doesn’t break out state and local budget projections separately.)

While tax receipts have grown by 9 percent in real dollars from 2009 to 2014, over the same period, property tax receipts have shrunk. More recently, the report states that “from the second quarter of 2013 to the second quarter of 2014, total tax receipts declined 1 percent and income tax receipts declined 8 percent in real dollars.”

“Since most state and local governments are required to balance their operating budgets,” the GAO report states, “the declining fiscal conditions indicated by our simulations continue to suggest that the sector would need to make substantial policy changes to avoid fiscal imbalances that would likely grow in the future.”

Education isn’t mentioned specifically in this GAO report. But a major factor in the long-term picture is the growth in health care expenditures, including health benefits for state and local employees and retirees.

http://go.uen.org/2wO

 

A copy of the report

http://go.uen.org/2wP (GAO)

 

 

 


 

 

Influenza walloping schools in South, Midwest USA Today

 

CHICAGO–With Christmas break tantalizingly close, flu-bitten students and teachers across the USA are limping into the holiday season.

Several public and private schools in Georgia, North Carolina and Tennessee announced this week they will be starting Christmas break early, because as many as 30% of their students and teachers are out sick as the country faces one of the worst influenza seasons of recent memory.

Meanwhile, schools in Illinois and Ohio that have had a large number of suspected flu cases have shuttered and reopened in recent days, so cleaners can scrub down buildings in an effort to keep the illness from spreading.

http://go.uen.org/2wS

 

 


 

 

Parent Trigger ‘Pilot Project’ In Columbus Has No Takers StateImpact Ohio

 

Improving low performing public schools is a problem that has troubled educators and parents for decades.

This year, Ohio is trying a new tactic – allowing for parents to take over a troubled school.

Under a ‘pilot project’ set by Ohio lawmakers, nearly two dozen Columbus City schools are eligible for the so-called ‘parent trigger’ option.

With an end of year deadline approaching the state’s largest district has not received a parent petition.

http://go.uen.org/2wy

 

 

 


 

 

Who is the biggest victim of America’s prison boom?

New research explores the damaging impact of parental incarceration on children Hechinger Report

 

NEW ORLEANS – Steven Alexander was in sixth grade when his mother, Carmen Demourelle, was sentenced to twelve years in prison for pickpocketing in New Orleans’s French Quarter. Though she was held in a women’s prison just an hour away, her four children could not telephone her and visited only about once a year.

At the time of her arrest, Demourelle was working sporadically as a beautician, though she was mainly making “fast money” by selling drugs and picking pockets while her children were in school, she said. But after school, she was an engaged and caring mother—until she was sent to prison. “I missed everything about her,” Alexander recalled. “I wanted her home.”

All four of Demourelle’s children moved in with their grandmother, who worked nights at a hospital. She supported them financially, Alexander said, but their schoolwork suffered almost immediately without their mother, who had been strict, especially about school. She hadn’t allowed them to play outside or turn on the television until their homework was done. She enforced early bedtimes. And the children were not allowed to spend time with neighbors deemed troublemakers.

Soon after their mother’s sentencing, however, homework went undone, forbidden friendships blossomed, and evenings at nightclubs became common—even on school nights.

None of the children finished high school. Almost all struggled with addiction.

http://go.uen.org/2wR

 

 


 

 

School grants transgender student access to boys restroom Asbury Park (NJ) Press

 

A Lacey transgender teen who gave up his female identity last year has won a battle against his school to use the boys restroom.

Rubin Smyers, a junior at Ocean County Vocational Technical School’s Performing Arts Academy, said he was granted access to the boys bathroom this month after school officials previously forced him to use a unisex facility.

Smyers protested the school’s decision by creating a petition that spread through social media and gained the support of nearly 2,000 people.

“I’m definitely happy about it,” said Smyers, 16. “But in a way, I almost wasn’t as thrilled or excited as I expected to be. They were giving me permission for something I already had the right to do.”

Smyers, born a girl, said he came out as a boy in 2013 and began using the boys bathroom at school that same year.

It wasn’t until this past May that school officials raised an issue with the bathroom Smyers used. He said the staff was torn over whether he should use the girls or boys dressing room during the school’s Spring Vocal Showcase at Ocean County Community College.

http://go.uen.org/2wQ

 

 


 

 

Santa’s Christmas wish: the best education for children around the world Reuters

 

From his home in the Arctic Circle, Santa Claus calls for better education for children and peace after a difficult year around the world. Roselle Chen reports.

http://go.uen.org/2wN

 

 

 

 

 

 

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CALENDAR

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USOE Calendar

http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

 

 

UEN News

http://www.uen.org

 

 

January 8:

Utah State Board of Education meeting

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

 

 

January:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://go.uen.org/1pn

 

 

January 26:

Opening day of the Utah Legislature

Capitol Building

http://le.utah.gov/

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