Education News Roundup: Jan. 9, 2015

LtoR: Utah State Board of Education Chairman Dave Crandall and outgoing board member Debra Roberts.

Utah State Board of Education Chairman Dave Crandall

Education News Roundup

Today’s Top Picks:

State School Board begins looking at science standards.

http://go.uen.org/2Bg (SLT)

and http://go.uen.org/2BF (KUER)

or http://go.uen.org/2BU (USOE)


State Board also wants NCLB fixed.

http://go.uen.org/2Bk (DN)

or http://go.uen.org/2BV (USOE)


David L. Crandall re-elected as USBE Chairman.

http://go.uen.org/2Bj (SLT)

and http://go.uen.org/2Bq (DN)

or http://go.uen.org/2BW (USOE)


President Obama proposes making community college tuition-free for many students.

http://go.uen.org/2BI (NYT)

and http://go.uen.org/2BJ (WaPo)

and http://go.uen.org/2BK (WSJ)

and http://go.uen.org/2BL (USAT)

and http://go.uen.org/qF (AP)

 

 

 

————————————————————

TODAY’S HEADLINES

————————————————————

 

 

UTAH

 

State school board starts work on Utah science standards Education » Board member says students better served by locally-defined guidelines.

 

State education leaders seek permenant resolution to No Child Left Behind conflicts

 

New state school board elects leaders

 

Increased Civics Education for Utah High School Students Enjoys Wide Support

 

‘Sunshine Caucus’ talks health care, public lands and education

 

Former Utah teacher faces more charges after teen says they had sex — again Courts » Brianne Altice is facing multiple felony charges for alleged relationships with three teenage boys.

 

Sex offender back behind bars after parent spots him near school

 

School bus involved in minor crash in Richmond

 

Roy Elementary to get crosswalk after accidents, parent concerns

 

Measles Outbreak Highlights Growing Problem

 

New principal named at American Fork High School

 

Inside Our Schools

 

 

 


 

 

OPINION & COMMENTARY

 

The Case for Annual Testing

 

America is secretly number one internationally in education

 

Summer Learning: Engaging All Students

 

Letting Education and Religion Overlap

Why expanding vouchers to include parochial schools is a good idea.

 

 


 

 

NATION

 

Obama Plan Would Help Many Go to Community College Free

 

NCLB Rewrite Could Target Mandate on Annual Tests

 

A ‘Sizable Decrease’ In Those Passing The GED

 

Could push to improve teacher training start by taking a cue from flight schools?

 

New Bill Calls For Appointed Superintendent, Beginning 2021

 

Chinese spend thousands persuading US schools to promote their language, culture

 

 

 

————————————————————

UTAH NEWS

————————————————————

 

State school board starts work on Utah science standards Education » Board member says students better served by locally-defined guidelines.

 

Utah school leaders are just starting the thorny process of updating the state’s science education standards.

But already they’ve been warned not to repeat the “mistakes” of the Common Core.

One member of a committee appointed to review the standards cautioned State School Board members Thursday against adopting education guidelines written outside the state. In 2010, Utah adopted national standards for English and mathematics.

“They’re really just a cut-and-paste,” Vincent Newmeyer said.

School board members started an initial review of the proposed science standards at a meeting this week.

http://go.uen.org/2Bg (SLT)

 

http://go.uen.org/2BF (KUER)

 

http://go.uen.org/2BU (USOE)

 

 

 


 

 

State education leaders seek permenant resolution to No Child Left Behind conflicts

 

SALT LAKE CITY — The State Board of Education on Thursday approved a joint resolution that asks Utah’s congressional delegation to resolve conflicts with the Elementary and Secondary Education Act.

The board also plans to apply for a three-year flexibility waiver that exempts the state from having to adhere to policies within the No Child Left Behind Act, which would impose “draconian penalties” on noncompliant schools, according to Brad Smith, state superintendent of public instruction.

One such policy would require every student in the state to score proficiently on statewide tests, where fewer than half of students actually did last year.

http://go.uen.org/2Bk (DN)

 

http://go.uen.org/2BV (USOE)

 

 


 

 

New state school board elects leaders

 

State school board members on Thursday re-elected David Crandall and David Thomas as board chairman and vice-chairman, respectively.

The board also added a second vice-chair position, which will be held by board member Jennifer Johnson.

“It just seems like we need more boots on the ground right now,” said board member Dixie Allen.

The board leadership elections came after the swearing in of six new board members who were elected during November’s election. Three of those incoming board members defeated incumbents, with the remaining two securing the open seats of retiring board members Debra Roberts and Kim Burningham.

http://go.uen.org/2Bj (SLT)

 

http://go.uen.org/2Bq (DN)

 

http://go.uen.org/2BW (USOE)

 

 


 

 

Increased Civics Education for Utah High School Students Enjoys Wide Support

 

Utahns overwhelmingly support the idea of the Legislature requiring public high school graduates to pass a civics test similar to the one new American citizens must pass.

Support goes across political, economic and religious lines, finds a new UtahPolicy poll.

Among all Utahns, pollster Dan Jones & Associates finds 84 percent support such a new law, only 14 percent oppose it.

Before someone can become a new citizen, he or she must meet several conditions, including passing a test on basic U.S. history, how our democratic republic operates, the various branches of government and so on.

Jonathan Johnson, chairman and CEO of Overstock.com, is pushing the new law that would require future high school graduates to meet the same test.

http://go.uen.org/2Bh (UP)

 

http://go.uen.org/2Bi (SLT)

 

http://go.uen.org/2Bp (DN)

 

http://go.uen.org/2By (KTVX)

 

http://go.uen.org/2BG (MUR)

 

 


 

 

 

‘Sunshine Caucus’ talks health care, public lands and education

 

  1. GEORGE – Key issues like proposed alternatives to Medicaid expansion, the future control of public lands in Utah and how to allocate an anticipated $600 million-plus budget surplus are still unsettled heading into the state Legislature’s annual general session.

Southern Utah’s “Sunshine Caucus” of state lawmakers talked those issues and more Thursday during a public forum hosted by the Washington County Republican Women, outlining some of their own questions and concerns but making it clear that most of the major issues would still need to be hashed out over the course of the 45-day session, which starts Jan. 26.

http://go.uen.org/2Bw (SGS)

 

 


 

 

Former Utah teacher faces more charges after teen says they had sex — again Courts » Brianne Altice is facing multiple felony charges for alleged relationships with three teenage boys.

 

A former Davis High School teacher is facing more felony charges after prosecutors accuse the 35-year-old woman of having sex with a teenage boy after she was arrested and charged for allegedly having sex with several students.

Brianne Altice was charged Tuesday with three counts of unlawful sexual activity with a minor and one count of dealing in harmful material to a minor, all third-degree felonies.

According to an arrest warrant, Altice allegedly had sexual intercourse and oral sex with a 17-year-old boy between November 2013 and August 2014. She is also accused of sending the boy a text message with a photograph of her breasts on June 7, 2014.

Her attorney, Edward Brass, said Thursday that prosecutors allege that the victim in the new case is one of the three teenage boys who have accused her of a sexual relationship while she was their teacher. She is facing 10 felony charges in another case for those alleged sexual relationships.

Because the alleged crimes happened when Altice was out on bail on the other charges — which include five counts of first-degree felony rape, two counts of first-degree felony forcible sodomy and three counts of second-degree felony forcible sexual abuse — prosecutors have asked that a no-bail hold be placed on the former teacher.

However, according to court records, Altice was booked into the Davis County jail on Wednesday and bailed out the same day.

http://go.uen.org/2Bo (SLT)

 

http://go.uen.org/2Br (DN)

 

http://go.uen.org/2Bs (OSE)

 

http://go.uen.org/2Bu (PDH)

 

http://go.uen.org/2Bx (KUTV)

 

http://go.uen.org/2Bz (KTVX)

 

http://go.uen.org/2BA (KSL)

 

http://go.uen.org/2BC (KSTU)

 

http://go.uen.org/2BM (Reuters)

 

http://go.uen.org/2BT (London Daily Mail)

 

 

 


 

 

Sex offender back behind bars after parent spots him near school

 

OGDEN, Utah — A registered sex offender is back behind bars after police found him near an Ogden Elementary School.

According to police, it was a parent picking their child up from North Ogden Elementary who recognized Ryan Schaffer.

Wednesday, Kirk Chugg was picking his little girl up from school when he noticed a car that didn’t look familiar. When he looked inside, he was surprised to recognize the man in the driver’s seat as Ryan Schaffer, someone he’d attended Weber High School with.

http://go.uen.org/2BD (KSTU)

 

 


 

 

School bus involved in minor crash in Richmond

 

The driver of a small car pulled out in front of a school bus full of students on U.S. Highway 91 in Richmond early Thursday.

According to the Utah Highway Patrol, the bus taking 84 students to White Pine Middle School was approaching North Cache Center when the driver of the car made a left turn onto the highway at 600 South, striking the bus on the right front corner.

http://go.uen.org/2Bv (LHJ)

 

 

 


 

 

Roy Elementary to get crosswalk after accidents, parent concerns

 

ROY — A crosswalk in front of Roy Elementary School will soon get a significant upgrade. Parents like Katie Simpson pushed for the change after a 70-year-old crossing guard was struck by a car last September.

“No kid should have to see that,” Simpson said, adding that her two children saw their crossing guard, injured in the street. “We don’t want to have any more accidents. We don’t want to have any more pedestrians hit, children hit, you know. We don’t want to see that happen here.”

The morning after the accident, several parents and their children picketed in front of the school, urging drivers to slow down, and asking UDOT to improve the crossing. Simpson says the group that organized through a Facebook page later took their grievances to the Roy City Council, which contacted UDOT.

http://go.uen.org/2BB (KSL)

 

 

 


 

 

Measles Outbreak Highlights Growing Problem

 

The issue of measles in California suddenly generated national headlines Wednesday thanks to a Disney connection. A person infected with measles is suspected of visiting Disneyland or Disney California Adventure Park in December after authorities discovered a dozen confirmed and suspected cases, all involving people who attended either of the parks just before Christmas.

Seven confirmed measles patients reside in California, while two live in Utah, the California Department of Public Health said. Three suspected measles cases involve California residents. All went to the Anaheim resort between Dec. 15 and Dec. 20.

Measles has become a growing concern among California health officials. Before the December cases, 2014 was already the worst year of measles cases in California in nearly two decades. Another disease, whooping cough, also known as pertussis, was recorded as having the highest rate in 2014 in this state since 1958.

The rise of these diseases come as a smaller percentage of California’s kindergartners are getting a full set of immunizations by the time they enter school.

http://go.uen.org/2BS (Sci-Tech Today)

 

 

 


 

 

New principal named at American Fork High School

 

AMERICAN FORK — Alpine School District officials on Thursday appointed Dan Weishar as the new principal of American Fork High School.

He replaces Doug Finch, who resigned Monday, citing personal reasons.

http://go.uen.org/2Bt (PDH)

 

 


 

 

 

Inside Our Schools

 

Arrowhead Elementary

Riverside Elementary

George Washington Academy

Hurricane Valley Academy Charter

Snow Canyon High

Dixie Middle School

http://go.uen.org/2BR (SGS)

 

 

 

 

————————————————————

OPINION & COMMENTARY

————————————————————

 

The Case for Annual Testing

Brown Center on Education Policy commentary by Grover J. “Russ” Whitehurst, Martin R. West, Matthew M. Chingos and Mark Dynarski

 

The new U.S. Congress is moving post haste to reauthorize the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA). With Republicans in the majority in both houses and the relevant committees chaired by individuals with considerable legislative skills (Lamar Alexander in the Senate and John Kline in the House) the smart money is on Obama seeing a bill in this session.

The most recent incarnation of ESEA, signed into law in January of 2002 by President George W. Bush, is the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB).  NCLB is the seventh reauthorization of ESEA since 1965, which means that Congress historically reworked this legislation roughly every five years.  We’re now 13 years into NCLB, so reauthorization is long overdue. It is not just the long delay that argues for congressional action, but the extent to which the Obama administration has replaced the provisions of the bill with its own set of priorities implemented through Race to the Top and state waivers.  Whatever one thinks of the appropriate federal role in education, there are surely strong reasons in our constitutional democracy to prefer that we get to where we are going through law rather than executive edict.

That said, this is a perilous moment for reauthorization because of the backlash against standards, testing, and accountability.

http://go.uen.org/2Bl

 

 


 

 

 

America is secretly number one internationally in education (Washington, DC) The Hill commentary by columnist Rachel Burger

 

Are U.S. schools really underperforming? A new study may change the perception of American public education’s shortcoming as one of cash, not curriculum.

For years, a narrative of the U.S. lagging behind other industrialized countries has dominated the media. For example, the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) ranks the United States as 27th in math and 17th in reading internationally — far below the international average — while the U.S. maintains the highest federal education budget in the world.

The United States certainly has underwhelming scores, but that isn’t the whole picture.

A new Columbia University study by Michael Rebell and Jessica Wolff has found that the United States outperforms every single country in the world when controlling for schools with a child poverty rate of less than 20 percent.

http://go.uen.org/2BP

 

 


 

 

Summer Learning: Engaging All Students

National Association of State Boards of Education commentary

 

Schools and teachers work hard all year to ensure that every child gets a chance to achieve. Yet the evidence now shows us that if students do not have meaningful summer learning opportunities, they are likely to lose a significant amount of the content they have mastered. That’s why this issue of the Standard focuses on the critical importance of extending learning time throughout the summer months. And because state boards of education can play a key role in enabling high quality summer learning, we hope this issue of the Standard will start a conversation in your state about how you can foster strong summer learning programs for all students.

http://go.uen.org/2Bm

 

 


 

 

 

Letting Education and Religion Overlap

Why expanding vouchers to include parochial schools is a good idea.

Wall Street Journal op-ed by ROBERT MARANTO, editor of the Journal of School Choice, AND  DIRK C. VAN RAEMDONCK, chief of staff and graduate coordinator, Department of Education Reform at the University of Arkansas

 

Ironically, free-market, highly religious America is dominated by government-education monopolies, while social-democratic, highly secular Belgium has embraced school choice, including state-funded religious schools. Belgian parents can choose public or private schools, including publicly funded Catholic, Protestant, Muslim and Jewish schools, as guaranteed by the national constitution.

While comparing Belgium’s relatively small yet diverse population (11 million), with the U.S. is difficult, especially when it comes to social outcomes, there’s no denying that Belgian students have far outscored their American counterparts on international assessment tests.

What explains the differences in approaches to school choice? American and Belgian 21st-century education policies reflect 19th-century education politics, particularly the nations’ different responses to religious strife.

http://go.uen.org/2BO

 

 

 

 

 

 

————————————————————-

NATIONAL NEWS

————————————————————-

 

Obama Plan Would Help Many Go to Community College Free New York Times

 

WASHINGTON — President Obama said Thursday that he would propose a government program to make community college tuition­free for millions of students, an ambitious plan that would expand educational opportunities across the United States.

The initiative, which the president plans to officially announce Friday at a Tennessee community college, aims to transform publicly financed higher education in an effort to address growing income inequality.

The plan would be funded by the federal government and participating states, but White House officials declined to discuss how much it would cost or how it would be financed. It is bound to be expensive and likely a tough sell to a Republican Congress not eager to spend money, especially on a proposal from the White House.

http://go.uen.org/2BI

 

http://go.uen.org/2BJ (WaPo)

 

http://go.uen.org/2BK (WSJ)

 

http://go.uen.org/2BL (USAT)

 

http://go.uen.org/qF (AP)

 

 

 


 

 

NCLB Rewrite Could Target Mandate on Annual Tests Education Week

 

For more than a decade, even amid big revisions to the original No Child Left Behind Act, one thing has remained constant: States have required students to take annual tests in reading and math in grades 3 through 8 and once in high school.

Now, as a long-stalled reauthorization of the law gets underway in a newly Republican-controlled Congress, that could be changing.

There’s been a reshuffling of the political landscape that’s aligned GOP interests in scaling back the federal role in K-12 education with support from some education organizations in reducing the number of tests.

At the same time, the civil rights, disabilities, and business groups that came together to help pass the NCLB law 13 years ago, and which remain deeply invested in testing as a crucial element in accountability for vulnerable groups of students, are in search of new congressional champions. And the Obama administration, which put annual assessments at the heart of its signature initiatives, is moving deeper into lame-duck status.

The chairmen of the House and Senate education panels—Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., and Rep. John Kline, R-Tenn.—have both expressed openness to cutting back the number of tests required under the law.

http://go.uen.org/2BN

 

 


 

 

A ‘Sizable Decrease’ In Those Passing The GED NPR Morning Edition

 

One year after the launch of a major overhaul of the GED exam — the first since 2002 — the high school equivalency program has seen a sharp drop in the number of people who took and passed the test, according to local and state educators and the organization that runs it. In addition, at least 16 states have begun offering or plan to offer new, alternative tests.

Combined, these changes represent a dramatic shift in the equivalency landscape dominated by the GED since its inception during World War II.

Last January, the GED test moved to the computer. It also got more expensive, by most accounts more difficult — and, for the first time, the program is being run on a for-profit basis. The new GED Testing Service is a joint venture between the American Council on Education, the nonprofit that has run the program since it began, and the education company Pearson.

What effect did all of these changes have on test takers?

http://go.uen.org/2BE

 

 

 


 

 

Could push to improve teacher training start by taking a cue from flight schools?

NewsHour

 

The burn-out rate for teachers in this country is high. Nearly half leave the profession within five years. That doesn’t come without consequences, American schools are falling behind. Some teacher educators are looking for what it would take to better prepare teachers, beginning in an unlikely place.

Before pilots can fly a plane, they have to follow systematic training.

“All the procedures and trainings are very well defined,” says Scott Pace, who is learning to be a flight instructor at Hanscom Air Force Base in Bedford, Massachusetts.

Pace’s students will have to pass a series of exams demonstrating specific skills before they can take flight. It’s all carefully supervised and closely regulated, because the stakes are high.

“My number one job as a flight instructor will be to keep the student safe. The plane safe, the flight safe, the people safe – on board, on the ground, everywhere,” Pace explains. “That’s the number one reason I’m there, because the student is not yet capable.”

And just like pilots aren’t allowed to fly solo until they are capable, Deborah Ball, dean of the University of Michigan’s School of Education, thinks teaching programs should follow the same principle.

http://go.uen.org/2BH

 

 


 

 

New Bill Calls For Appointed Superintendent, Beginning 2021 StateImpact Indiana

 

We’ve been hearing the same story for months: State Superintendent Glenda Ritz and members of the Indiana State Board of Education don’t really get along. People say the drama keeps the group from getting anything accomplished.

We may see a remedy for the problem during the 2015 legislative session.

Could appointing the superintendent, rather than electing someone to the position as is customary in Indiana, force the state’s education leaders to work together?

http://go.uen.org/2Bn

 

 

 


 

 

Chinese spend thousands persuading US schools to promote their language, culture Watchdog.org via Fox

 

In 2005, Chinese officials were trying to open a Confucius Institute at the University of Oklahoma and invited Paul Bell Jr., the then-College of Arts and Sciences dean, to fly to a conference in Beijing as “one of our special guests.”

The effort was part of a long-running campaign to persuade U.S. schools to promote Chinese culture. In the past decade, the Chinese have opened hundreds of the institutes and classrooms in universities, high schools and even elementary schools in the United States and around the world in an attempt to teach Chinese language, culture and to increase cultural understanding.

But, as Watchdog.org reported in October, a growing number of academics caution the institutes are propaganda arms of the Chinese government.

The Chinese paid more than $2,000 to fly Bell to China and an unknown amount more for lodging, records obtained by Watchdog.org under state open records laws show.

http://go.uen.org/2BQ

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

————————————————————

CALENDAR

————————————————————

 

USOE Calendar

http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

 

 

UEN News

http://www.uen.org

 

 

January:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://go.uen.org/1pn

 

 

January 12:

Administrative Rules Review Committee meeting

2 p.m., 445 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/Interim/2015/html/00000023.htm

 

 

January 26:

Opening day of the Utah Legislature

Capitol Building

http://le.utah.gov/

 

 

January 29:

Utah State Board of Education meeting

5 p.m., 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

Related posts:

Comments are closed.