Education News Roundup: Jan. 23, 2015

Sandy Coroles, Ogden School  District Superintendent . Photo by Ogden School District.

Sandy Coroles, Ogden School District Superintendent. Photo by Ogden School District.

Education News Roundup

Today’s Top Picks:

Advocate says education a part of the gender wage gap in Utah.

http://go.uen.org/2HX (SLT)

and http://go.uen.org/2HZ (DN)

and http://go.uen.org/2Ii (KSL)

or a copy of the study

http://go.uen.org/2HY (Voices for Utah Children)

Congratulations to Sandy Coroles who is no longer the interim, but the actual superintendent in Ogden School District.

http://go.uen.org/2I6 (OSE)

and http://go.uen.org/2If (KTVX)

“If we have the most students, percentagewise, in the nation, and we’re spending the least amount per student in the nation, a falling tax burden is not a sign of good health. It probably means we’re failing our young people.” – A. Scott Anderson, CEO and president of Zions Bank http://go.uen.org/2HW (DN)

House education committee chairman, Rep. Kline, still backs annual testing.

http://go.uen.org/2H5 (AP)

Condoleezza Rice will take over Jeb Bush’s Foundation for Excellence in Education.

http://go.uen.org/2I0 (AP)

and http://go.uen.org/2Iw (Ed Week)

New report finds some encouraging news about the state of Latino education in the U.S.

http://go.uen.org/2IC (NBC)

or a copy of the report

http://go.uen.org/2ID (Excelencia in Education)

 

 

 

 

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TODAY’S HEADLINES

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UTAH

 

Utah’s gender gap might not close till 2087 Wages » Lack of equality could add to a cycle of poverty as it also affects thousands of kids.

 

Hillyard warns of unintended consequences from Healthy Utah

 

Coroles named Ogden schools superintendent

 

Utah teacher selected for national fellowship

 

PVHS administrators promote 5-by-5 schedule

 

Civics Education Initiative

 

Scholarship started to remember former Utah House speaker

 

Governor’s Office Offers Full-Tuition Scholarship to Women in Tech

 

Report: Moab schools lag behind others in Utah

 

Former Utah teacher pleads not guilty to having sex with students

 

Two Weber High teens sent to hospital after car accident

 

Logan High Speech and Debate team fundraiser celebrates Legacy of Excellence

 

UHSAA board rejects requests to alter realignment plan Prep sports » Petitions by East, Highland, Roy and Ogden fail by 12-10-2 vote of the board.

 

Documentary featuring local Polynesian athletes premieres at Sundance Friday

 

 


 

 

OPINION & COMMENTARY

 

Taking Utah into Top 10 states for education will take leadership, funding

 

Turning the Tide for Financial Support for Education

 

State Charter Board fails to recommend four schools

 

Bring back pop, candy at school

 

Make K-12 Skills Relevant to Students

 

A New Way to Evaluate Teachers: Let Them Set Their Own Standards

 

Should Teachers be Allowed to Touch Students?

Sheltering children from physical contact deprives educators of an important instructional tool and students of an essential learning experience.

 

 


 

 

NATION

 

House Education Panel Head Endorses Annual Student Testing

 

Advocacy Groups Oppose Removal of Special Education Testing Caps

 

Is ‘The Test’ failing American schools?

 

Condoleezza Rice Taking Over Jeb Bush’s Education Foundation

 

Co-sponsor changes stance on bill to repeal Common Core

 

Latino Education Gains Are Encouraging: New Report

 

State of Indian Nations Speech Underlies US-Tribe Relations

 

Arts Integration (With Celebrity Visitors) May Help School Turnaround, Study Finds

 

Pediatrician group urges measles vaccinations amid Disneyland outbreak

 

Lawmaker: Schools should post vaccination rates online

 

Fired Florida School Chief Still a Finalist for National Superintendent of the Year

 

Schools open halls to electronic billboards

 

Paris Announces Plan to Promote Secular Values

 

 

 

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UTAH NEWS

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Utah’s gender gap might not close till 2087 Wages » Lack of equality could add to a cycle of poverty as it also affects thousands of kids.

 

It’s going to take a long time before a woman in Utah earns as much, on average, as a man.

Say, another 72 years.

That finding, along with several others in a study released Thursday by the nonprofit group Voices for Utah Children and the University of Utah department of economics, suggest inequality in the Beehive State will be hard to overcome — to the detriment of women, their children and the state’s economy as a whole.

“We need to develop Utah solutions that accomplish two key goals,” said Matthew Weinstein, an official with Voices for Utah Children. “We need to help women succeed in the workforce. And we need to help women balance work and family commitments.”

Education is a key to bridging the gap, Weinstein said, noting that Utah women are at a disadvantage since so many marry young, start having families and put off getting college degrees.

As a result, he noted that women nationally who have bachelor’s degrees tend to earn as much as men. But in Utah, a woman has to have a master’s degree before she can hope to take home a comparable paycheck.

http://go.uen.org/2HX (SLT)

 

http://go.uen.org/2HZ (DN)

 

http://go.uen.org/2Ii (KSL)

 

A copy of the study

http://go.uen.org/2HY (Voices for Utah Children)

 

 

 


 

 

Hillyard warns of unintended consequences from Healthy Utah

 

The 2015 session of the Utah Legislature could be a big one for Governor Gary Herbert. He has made some major proposals this year: a massive increase in education and his Healthy Utah plan.

State Senator Lyle Hillyard, R-Logan, says right now it is looking good for education because more money is available and there seems to be broad support.

http://go.uen.org/2IK (CVD)

 

 


 

 

Coroles named Ogden schools superintendent

 

OGDEN — The Ogden school board voted unanimously Thursday night to remove the word “interim” from Sandy Coroles’ title, and offer her the job as superintendent of Ogden City schools.

Jeff Heiner, president of the school board, said Coroles’ work as interim superintendent was given a “360 degree” review. In the review process, he said, several people were asked to rate her knowledge of the assignment and ability to drive the mission, her communication and customer service abilities, as well as her ability to collaborate, and to respond to various situations and questions.

http://go.uen.org/2I6 (OSE)

 

http://go.uen.org/2If (KTVX)

 

 


 

 

Utah teacher selected for national fellowship

 

A Salt Lake City elementary school administrator was selected for a fellowship with the National Institute for Latino School Leaders, institute officials announced Thursday.

Mountain View Elementary Assistant Principal Jennifer Amador Mayer-Glenn was among 15 educators picked by the institute, which trains school administrators to advocate for reform strategies, accountability systems and education programs that benefit Latino and English language learner students.

The National Institute for Latino School Leaders was launched in 2011 by the National Council of La Raza in partnership with the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. Over the course of one year, fellows are trained by national experts and participate in congressional briefings in Washington, D.C.

http://go.uen.org/2I3 (SLT)

 

 

 


 

 

PVHS administrators promote 5-by-5 schedule

 

WASHINGTON CITY – The principal at Pine View High School and other staffers made their case Thursday night for converting the campus to as 5-by-5 schedule next school year, contending it will serve both students who take Advanced Placement classes and others who are struggling.

“We picked what we think was the best schedule for our kids,” Principal Mike Mees told a gathering of more than 90 parents and students in a lecture hall.

The 5-by-5 schedule will provide extra time for learning and flexible time for both students and teachers, according to a fact sheet from the administration. The Board of Education voted unanimously this past Sept. 9 to carry out the 10-period block 5-by-5 schedule for 2015-2016. The school currently has a 4-by-4 block.

http://go.uen.org/2Id (SGS)

 

 

 


 

 

Civics Education Initiative

 

Salt Lake County Mayor Ben McAdams, Salt Lake City Mayor Ralph Becker and the mayors of 15 other communities in Salt Lake County each signed a resolution in support of the Utah Civics Education Initiative.

This bill requires an individual to pass the basic civics test as a condition for receiving a high school diploma or adult education secondary diploma.

http://go.uen.org/2IJ (KSTU)

 

 


 

 

Scholarship started to remember former Utah House speaker

 

SALT LAKE CITY Utah Valley University has established a new scholarship fund to honor the Utah’s first female speaker of the state House of Representatives.

Former Speaker Rebecca Lockhart, a Republican, died from a rare brain disease at her home in Provo on Saturday. She was 46.

UVU president Matthew Holland says the school is proud to create the Rebecca Lockhart Endowed Scholarship Fund to remember her.

http://go.uen.org/2I9 (KUTV)

 

http://go.uen.org/2Ia (PDH)

 

 

 


 

 

Governor’s Office Offers Full-Tuition Scholarship to Women in Tech

 

A local web development training company is working with the Governor’s Office of Economic Development to bring more women into tech industries.

Ty Diamse is the co-founder of Devpoint Labs.  He says that throughout his career he’s noticed a shortage of women in the tech industry and that’s something he wants to change.

“They have a different point of view and a different way of looking at things than just guys,” Says Diamse. “And I think that actually translates in companies as well when you’re actually solving problems you have just more diversity attacking a problem and you’re going to come out with a better solution overall.”

DevPoint Labs is working with the Governor’s Office of Economic Development to offer a full tuition scholarship to their tech boot camp to a one qualified female applicant. The company also offers other, smaller scholarships to women and asks that recipients go to schools in the area and encourage young girls to learn coding and web design. Anne Nichols is a student that just received one of these scholarships and she says she’s excited to talk to young women about getting involved in this industry.

http://go.uen.org/2Il (KUER)

 

 


 

 

 

Report: Moab schools lag behind others in Utah

 

The Utah State Office of Education released the assessment results last month of Utah schools’ proficiency in math, science and English; Grand County High School received a grim ‘F.’

The state office of education predicted that most Utah schools’ test scores would drop as a result of a new testing format created to measure more challenging standards set by the state two years ago. Test scores typically improve in the years thereafter, according to the state education office.

http://go.uen.org/2IH (Moab Sun News)

 

 


 

 

Former Utah teacher pleads not guilty to having sex with students

 

A former Davis High School English teacher accused of having sex with three male students pleaded not guilty during a Thursday to hearing.

Brianne Altice, 35, was crying when she entered the Farmington courtroom, according to the Standard-Examiner.

Altice is charged in 2nd District Court with a total of 14 felonies: five counts of first-degree felony rape, two counts of first-degree felony forcible sodomy, three counts of second-degree felony forcible sexual abuse, along with three counts of unlawful sexual activity with a minor and one count of dealing harmful material to a minor, all third-degree felonies.

http://go.uen.org/2I2 (SLT)

 

http://go.uen.org/2Ih (OSE)

 

http://go.uen.org/2I8 (KUTV)

 

http://go.uen.org/2Ig (KSL)

 

http://go.uen.org/2Ij (KSTU)

 

 

 


 

 

Two Weber High teens sent to hospital after car accident

 

PLEASANT VIEW — Two Weber High School teens were transported to the hospital after an accident Thursday afternoon.

A truck failed to yield at a stop sign at about 2:15 p.m. at the intersection of 500 West and Weber High Drive (3500 North), Pleasant View Chief Ryon Hadley said.

http://go.uen.org/2I7 (OSE)

 

 

 


 

 

Logan High Speech and Debate team fundraiser celebrates Legacy of Excellence

 

An event Saturday night will pay special tribute to Weston Henrie, Logan High debate coach for 25 years, by recognizing one of his top debaters, Allison Dunn, who later became Logan High Principal.

“Legacy of Excellence” is a celebration, dinner and silent auction fundraiser designed to establish the Allison Dunn Memorial Scholarship to provide the resources for more Logan High students to participate in top level tournaments, national competitions and debate camps.

http://go.uen.org/2Ic (CVD)

 

 

 


 

 

UHSAA board rejects requests to alter realignment plan Prep sports » Petitions by East, Highland, Roy and Ogden fail by 12-10-2 vote of the board.

 

Midvale • The Utah High School Activities Association Board of Directors narrowly rejected petitions by East, Highland, Roy and Ogden to make changes in alignment of sports leagues for the 2015-2017 seasons on Thursday.

The board voted 12-10-2 against making any changes to the alignment it adopted at its December meeting.

http://go.uen.org/2I4 (SLT)

 

http://go.uen.org/2I5 (DN)

 

 

 


 

 

Documentary featuring local Polynesian athletes premieres at Sundance Friday

 

SALT LAKE CITY — The Polynesian community is big on football, and there’s no doubt they turn out impressive talent to the NFL. For many players, the journey to the NFL is their way out of poverty and drugs, and that’s the focus of a documentary with local ties being featured at this year’s Sundance Film Festival.

The documentary “In Football We Trust” follows four young Polynesian high school football players in Utah, who are all focused on one goal: Making it in the NFL. The players are Harvey Langi, Leva and Vita Bloomfield and Fihi Kaufusi.

http://go.uen.org/2Ik (KSTU)

 

 

 

 

 

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OPINION & COMMENTARY

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Taking Utah into Top 10 states for education will take leadership, funding Deseret News op-ed by A. Scott Anderson, CEO and president of Zions Bank

 

Next Monday, the Utah Legislature begins its 2015 session. I want to express appreciation for our legislators’ service. It is a real sacrifice to take 45 days away from jobs and families to serve the state.

I am optimistic that our state lawmakers will provide real leadership this session and take the difficult actions that are necessary to support excellent education, along with transportation and water infrastructure, to keep our economy strong and our future bright. Serving in the Legislature is really all about leadership.

http://go.uen.org/2HW

 

 

 


 

 

Turning the Tide for Financial Support for Education Utah PoliticoHub commentary by Kim Burningham, a former member of the Utah State Board of Education

 

For years Utah has spent less per pupil than any other state in the country and our class sizes are larger. The picture is more dismal when one sees how public education expenditures have fallen as a percent of our personal income in the last two decades. In the new year signs of hope for turning the tide are appearing.

Several highly visible individuals and groups are announcing their support for increased educational funding. A Salt Lake Tribune editorial, published December 27, 2014 verbalizes the hope: “Let 2015 be the year of investing in Utah schools.”

In this blog, I will review several hopeful proposals. Although each proposal varies in amount and method, all advocate significant funding increases for education. If you are favorably impressed by any of these—as I am—I urge you to become strong advocates for the ideas.

http://go.uen.org/2Ie

 

 


 

 

 

State Charter Board fails to recommend four schools Commentary by Charter Solutions President Lincoln Fillmore

 

In recent years, the State Charter School Board has approved almost every application that came before it. After industry readers reviewed and USOE staff had provided feedback to charter applications, those that cleared the hurdle were put through perfunctory questions and largely approved. Even those that had major concerns (Roots, Scholar, Greenwood) were brought back in a future meeting and approved then.

So, to have four of the nine applicants who made it before the board after a new and longer weeding-out process is a real change in course. On balance, I’d say it’s an improvement.

http://go.uen.org/2Im

 

 


 

Bring back pop, candy at school

(Logan) Herald Journal letter from Casey O’Leary

 

The food that schools serve is definitely not what it used to be. We used to have a soda machine that we could buy from at lunch time. The vending machines didn’t have items to sell that said “100 percent natural ingredients, oven-baked, fat-free.” The school lunches have gone through huge changes to make things healthier for the students. If someone was afraid the school lunches were unhealthy, they could bring their own lunches. They could choose not to buy from the vending machines or soda machines. Now, kids who want to buy soda or a candy bar can’t.

This choice for the schools was thought to help the students become healthier. But some kids started to bring their own unhealthy food, and others just stopped eating lunch altogether. The soda machine has been replaced with a water bottle machine. The vending machine has granola bars and all-natural chips. This has upset a lot of the student body. Schools should be able to sell whatever they want, whenever they want.

http://go.uen.org/2Ib

 

 

 


 

 

Make K-12 Skills Relevant to Students

Education Week op-ed by Jonathan Hasak, a data-inquiry facilitator in the Boston public schools’ office of data and accountability

 

For all of the hand-wringing around the troubles facing our public schools, the issue of relevancy might turn out to be the most important.

The unintended cost from district, state, and federal accountability provisions has adversely affected schools: Constant testing sacrifices instructional time and forces educators to teach to the test. As for some students, good luck convincing one that performance in algebra is relevant to his career. Or that earning a high school diploma or college degree, for that matter, is in her long-term interest.

If students find school irrelevant, they can make short-term decisions without understanding the full scope of long-term opportunities they forgo. Too many young people are dropping out of high school or choosing work over college, as data released by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics in April 2014 shows. Alarmingly, this has happened despite the decline in the nation’s youth-employment rates to their lowest levels since the 1930s.

To increase student engagement, academic skills should be viewed as the foundation for gainful employment, while students learn to take advantage of those skills in the classroom. Collaboration between education and business leaders can help accomplish this and transform abstract schooling experiences into something more personal—something that can ignite student curiosity, creativity, motivation, and imagination.

http://go.uen.org/2It

 

 


 

 

 

A New Way to Evaluate Teachers: Let Them Set Their Own Standards Slate commentary by Sarah Carr, editor of the Teacher Project at Columbia’s Graduate School of Journalism

 

Last spring, as the school year was coming to a close, most of Michelle Breitenfeldt’s kindergarteners were not reading at grade level. But that did not stop the Wisconsin teacher from setting an ambitious goal for herself this school year: 80 percent of her students would be on target by May, she vowed. “I don’t like to give up,” she told me.

Breitenfeldt and her fellow kindergarten teachers set this goal as part of Wisconsin’s new teacher evaluation system, which debuted statewide this past fall. In Wisconsin, teachers now set one of the main criteria on which they will be judged—not administrators or state policymakers.

At a time when the debate over how to assess America’s schoolteachers is often framed as too easy vs. too harsh, Wisconsin is striving for something in between. The state is trying to create a teacher evaluation system that’s more rigorous than the observations of yesteryear—which in some communities might have encompassed a cursory classroom visit by an administrator—but less punitive than popular tactics used more recently, like publicly rating teachers on the websites of national newspapers like the New York Times or Los Angeles Times—or threatening them with dismissal for subpar student test scores. So Wisconsin is handing over some of the reins to teachers, asking them to decide how much students should be expected to learn, and how that growth should be measured.

http://go.uen.org/2Iz

 

 

 


 

 

Should Teachers be Allowed to Touch Students?

Sheltering children from physical contact deprives educators of an important instructional tool and students of an essential learning experience.

Atlantic commentary by JESSICA LAHEY, a contributing writer for The Atlantic and an English teacher

 

Touch has been an important part of my teaching for the past decade. When I was working as a middle-school teacher, I used touch on a daily basis to both connect with and correct the behavior of my students.

If a student was having trouble focusing, a light touch on the shoulder served as a gentle reminder to get back to work. When parents divorced, grandmothers fell ill, or guinea pigs died, hugs served as a tangible reminder of my emotional support on an otherwise anxious or upsetting day.

Recently, I changed jobs, and have become much more hesitant to reach out and use touch as a teaching tool. I currently teach English and writing at an inpatient drug and alcohol rehabilitation facility, and many of my adolescent students have endured sexual and physical abuse. Consequently, I am acutely aware of the power of touch—both to heal and to harm—and have been thinking quite a bit about the complex emotional messages my well-meant expressions of appropriate social touch could convey to my students.

Positive student-teacher relationships are an important part—I would argue the most important part—of effective teaching, so I wanted to understand the role touch plays in those relationships and how other teachers use this tool in their classrooms.

http://go.uen.org/2IA

 

 

 

 

 

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NATIONAL NEWS

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House Education Panel Head Endorses Annual Student Testing Associated Press

 

WASHINGTON — The chairman of the House Education and the Workforce Committee on Thursday endorsed continuing the federally required annual testing of students under the No Child Left Behind education law.

With Congress trying to update the President George W. Bush-era law, debate has centered on the requirement that states test students in reading and math in grades three to eight and again in high school.

Some educators and parents say that has created a high-stakes testing environment, and that states and districts should determine testing policy.

The House committee chairman, Rep. John Kline, R-Minn., said he believes the annual results help parents and policymakers know where students stand.

http://go.uen.org/2H5

 

 


 

 

 

Advocacy Groups Oppose Removal of Special Education Testing Caps Education Week

 

Lawmakers are wading into the complicated issue of accountability tests as they ponder changes to the law currently known as No Child Left Behind, but a group of disability advocacy organizations are already saying they don’t want to see one change that has been floated—an elimination of the cap on students who can be tested to “alternate achievement standards.”

Currently, about 1 percent of all students—equivalent to about 10 percent of students with disabilities—can be counted as proficient for accountability purposes on tests that have less depth, breadth, and complexity than the assessments given to their typically developing peers. These “1 percent tests” have been aimed at students with severe cognitive disabilities. (The tests are formally known as “alternate assessments based on alternate achievement standards,” or AA-AAS.)

The draft renewal legislation proposed by Sen. Lamar Alexander, a Republican from Tennessee who chairs the Senate education committee, would lift those caps, leaving it up to the states to decide how many students can be counted as proficient when taking these alternate tests.

The Consortium for Citizens with Disabilities’ education task force—a coalition of more than 20 groups— said in a Jan. 21 letter that such a move would “essentially wipe out a decade of progress which has allowed parents, teachers and school leaders to better understand the potential of students with disabilities.”

The organization argues that without a cap, potentially millions of students could be moved off an academic track that leads to a regular high school diploma.

http://go.uen.org/2Iu

 

 

 


 

 

Is ‘The Test’ failing American schools?

NewsHour

 

As Congress considers revisions to the No Child Left Behind education law, there’s a larger debate about the role and efficacy of using standardized tests as assessment. Anya Kamenetz, author of “The Test: Why Our Schools Are Obsessed With Standardized Testing, But You Don’t Have To Be,” joins Hari Sreenivasan to discuss the evolving role of testing and the “big, unintended consequences.”

http://go.uen.org/2Iy

 

 


 

 

Condoleezza Rice Taking Over Jeb Bush’s Education Foundation Associated Press

 

DES MOINES, Iowa — Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush on Thursday tapped former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice to serve as chairman of his education foundation, turning over the organization to the former diplomat and academic who remains popular inside the Republican Party.

Rice, a professor at Stanford University and partner in a consulting firm, has for the past two years served as a board member of the Foundation for Excellence in Education.

Bush launched the group after serving two terms as Florida governor. It served as the primary vehicle through which he maintained a public profile and pushed to export the education policies he pioneered in Florida to other states.

http://go.uen.org/2I0

 

http://go.uen.org/2Iw (Ed Week)

 

 

 


 

 

Co-sponsor changes stance on bill to repeal Common Core Associated Press via Nashville Tennessean

 

A co-sponsor of legislation to repeal Tennessee’s Common Core standards said Thursday the measure probably will change after discussions with teachers and other educators who say the higher benchmarks in English and math are helping students.

Senate Education Committee Chairwoman Dolores Gresham and Senate Government Operations Committee Chairman Mike Bell, both Republicans, filed the proposal in November. Bell did not immediately return a call seeking comment on Thursday.

But Gresham told The Associated Press that she’s now OK with the current standards after talking with teachers and other educators who have convinced her that “children are really learning.”

http://go.uen.org/2I1

 

 


 

 

 

Latino Education Gains Are Encouraging: New Report NBC

 

Despite challenges, a top education group said the national data on Latino students is encouraging and shows solid growth.

“The conversation about Latinos and education is often very deficit-based, where we’re English language learners, we’re high school dropouts, and we’re illegal immigrants,” Deborah Santiago, vice president at Excelencia in Education and author of a new report, told NBC News. “While we still have to address those important issues in our country, the profile of Latinos is one of asset opportunities, growth, improvement and education potential.”

The report, “The Condition of Latinos in Education: 2015 Factbook,” released by Excelencia in Education, paints a more accurate profile of Latino students, one spotlighting achievement and countering misperceptions and myths.

The report shatters the perception that most Latino students are not proficient in English. The reality, according to the data, is that 18 percent of young Latinos in the U.S. are English language learners.

http://go.uen.org/2IC

 

A copy of the report

http://go.uen.org/2ID (Excelencia in Education)

 

 


 

 

State of Indian Nations Speech Underlies US-Tribe Relations Associated Press

 

FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. — Tribes must insist the federal government honor its commitments to them and create partnerships with them based on deference, not paternalism, the president of the National Congress of American Indians said Thursday.

Brian Cladoosby said in the annual State of Indian Nations address that too many reservations are plagued with high unemployment and dropout rates, rampant drug and alcohol abuse, and an epidemic of suicides.

Congress needs to update laws and regulations on energy, taxation and education to help tribes overcome those long-standing challenges, but it shouldn’t dictate solutions, he said.

http://go.uen.org/2Iq

 

A video of the speech

http://go.uen.org/2Ir (National Congress of American Indians)

 

 


 

 

 

Arts Integration (With Celebrity Visitors) May Help School Turnaround, Study Finds Education Week

 

Low-performing schools that implemented an arts integration program over two years showed improved attendance, fewer suspensions, and substantial gains in academic achievement, according to a new report.

In 2012, the President’s Committee on the Arts and the Humanities, a White House advisory committee, launched a pilot arts program in eight so-called “turnaround” schools—those that are among the lowest-achieving 5 percent in their states. Through the program—which is supported by both public and private groups, including the National Endowment for the Arts, Crayola, and the Ford Foundation—schools receive arts education supplies, professional development, strategic planning, and coaching, and are able to hire additional music, theater, and dance teachers. They are not required to follow a particular curriculum.

They also get help from famous artists. Singer Marc Anthony, actress Elizabeth Banks, architect Frank Gehry, and musician Elton John, among others, have “adopted” Turnaround Arts schools, meaning they engage with students through visits, performances, and Skype sessions.

An evaluation of the program, conducted by Booz Allen Hamilton and led by researcher Sara Ray Stoelinga of the Urban Education Institute at the University of Chicago, found that seven out of the eight schools improved in reading proficiency, and six of eight improved in math. Every school improved in at least one of those subjects.

http://go.uen.org/2IE

 

A copy of the study

http://go.uen.org/2IF (President’s Committee on the Arts and the Humanities)

 

 


 

 

Pediatrician group urges measles vaccinations amid Disneyland outbreak Reuters

 

LOS ANGELES – The leading U.S. pediatrician group on Friday urged parents, schools and communities to vaccinate children against measles in the face of an outbreak that began at Disneyland in California in December and has spread to more than 50 people.

The American Academy of Pediatrics said all children should get the measles, mumps and rubella vaccine between the ages of 12 and 15 months old and again between 4 and 6 years old.

http://go.uen.org/2Ip

 

http://go.uen.org/2Iv (Ed Week)

 

 


 

 

 

Lawmaker: Schools should post vaccination rates online Cronkite News via (Phoenix) Arizona Republic

 

PHOENIX — A state lawmaker wants to require Arizona schools to post health-related information on their websites, including immunization rates among students — information he says is especially important given the measles outbreak originating at Disneyland.

“Large populations are refusing to vaccinate their children,” said Rep. Juan Jose Mendez, D-Tempe.

Mendez authored House Bill 2466, which would make public schools post the immunization rate among their pupils and whether each school employs a nurse or has another employee perform that role. If a school lacks a nurse, the bill would require it to post the qualifications of the person doing that job.

http://go.uen.org/2II

 

 


 

 

Fired Florida School Chief Still a Finalist for National Superintendent of the Year Education Week

 

Ousted Hillsborough County, Fla., schools Superintendent MaryEllen Elia is still a finalist for the National Superintendent of the Year honor awarded by the AASA, the School Superintendents Association, officials there said.

“The superintendent’s job is one of the most difficult and demanding jobs in America. That’s one of the reasons why AASA was disappointed to learn … that MaryEllen Elia, one of the finalists for the 2015 National Superintendent of the Year, is being terminated, without cause,” AASA Executive Director Daniel Domenech said in a statement.

AASA will announce the recipient of its annual top honor during its national conference in late February in San Diego. Elia will still be employed as a superintendent when the award is handed out. Her last day on the job is March 15.

http://go.uen.org/2Ix

 

 

 


 

 

Schools open halls to electronic billboards

(Tucson) Arizona Daily Star

 

Students in two Southern Arizona school districts will soon be sharing the hallways with digital billboards that resemble jumbo-sized iPods.

The person-sized touch screens will allow schools to display their own content, such as photos, event announcements and schedules.

But that school content will share space with advertising sold by SkoolLive LLC. The California company is installing the screens in Vail and Sunnyside district schools for free next month, in return for being able to sell ads.

“Essentially a kiosk is a digital poster,” said SkoolLive Director of Business Development George Kuhn.

The boards are expected to bring in up to $300 a month each, with the money, at least initially, going to the school’s student councils.

http://go.uen.org/2IG

 

 


 

 

Paris Announces Plan to Promote Secular Values New York Times

 

PARIS — Officials in France announced new measures on Thursday aimed at reinforcing secular values at French schools, after the terrorist attacks in and around Paris exposed serious cultural rifts between children in heavily immigrant communities and others in classrooms throughout the country.

Teachers are to receive new training, students would be exposed more deeply to civics and morals lessons, and classroom activities would include the singing of “La Marseillaise.”

The measures were devised to counter rampant “conspiracy theories” at French schools, the education minister, Najat Vallaud­Belkacem, said at a news conference Thursday. She said the issues had become apparent when some students refused to observe a moment of silence in schools after the attacks, which left 17 people dead.

http://go.uen.org/2In

 

http://go.uen.org/2Is (AP)

 

http://go.uen.org/2Io (Paris Match … en français)

 

 

 

 

 

 

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CALENDAR

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USOE Calendar

http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

 

 

UEN News

http://www.uen.org

 

 

January 26:

Opening day of the Utah Legislature

Capitol Building

http://le.utah.gov/

 

 

January 27:

Public Education Appropriations Subcommittee meeting

8 a.m., 445 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2015&com=APPPED

 

 

January 29:

Public Education Appropriations Subcommittee meeting

8 a.m., 445 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2015&com=APPPED

 

Utah State Board of Education meeting

5 p.m., 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

 

 

February 12:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://go.uen.org/1pn

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