Education News Roundup: Feb. 24, 2015

Gov. Gary Herbert shakes hands with Granite Park Jr. High students. Photo from Utah Governor Gary Herbert's website.

Gov. Gary Herbert shakes hands with Granite Park Jr. High students. Photo courtesy of Tami Pyfer.

Education News Roundup

Today’s Top Picks:

 

Poll finds Utahns support Gov. Herbert’s plan to add $500 million to education.

http://go.uen.org/309 (UP)

 

Provo Herald looks at Trust Lands money in Utah schools.

http://go.uen.org/30g (PDH)

 

Iron County reflects on 60 years without a school closure for a snow day. Generations of children weep.

http://go.uen.org/30A (SGN)

and http://go.uen.org/30B (KCSG)

 

Alan Hall, chairman of Prosperity 2020, and Nolan Karras, co-chairman of Education First speak out on Utah public education.

http://go.uen.org/30e (DN)

 

Is journalism being left out of the education debate?

http://go.uen.org/30L (Scholastic)

 

The U.S. House of Representatives is scheduled to begin debating the rewrite of No Child Left Behind on Wednesday.

http://go.uen.org/30h (NYT)

and http://go.uen.org/30I (Ed Week)

 

 

 

 

————————————————————

TODAY’S HEADLINES

————————————————————

 

 

UTAH

 

Poll: Utahns Overwhelmingly Support Herbert’s Proposal to Add $500 Million to Education Funding

 

House advances supply expense tax credit

 

House passes bill to increase select teacher salaries

 

Utah lawmakers reject limits on use of federal money

 

Online Testing Program for AP Testing Fails After Educators Call it a Waste

 

Lawmakers Ask State School Board to Scrap SAGE Test

 

House panel approves bill to require civics test to graduate

 

Lawmakers seek applicants to develop $2 million land transfer legal strategy Legislature » The 26-page request seeks outside lawyers for two separate contracts.

 

A field trip to the Capitol for PTA Day

 

Utah County schools receive $7 million

 

Things are changing in the polygamist towns of Hildale and Colorado City

 

Old letters and WWII vet teach power of primary sources

 

Elementary school teacher incorporates live trout in every day curriculum

 

Utah’s First Annual STEM Fest Will Let Students Get Their Hands on Science and Technology

 

6 decades, no snow days: School district clocks 61 years without snow cancellation

 

Centennial Elementary on track for fall opening

 

Granite preschool director receives administrator award

 

Granite District students compete with treats

 

Murray School District employees, volunteers honored

 

Ogden school board approves administrative changes

 

Competency question delays sentencing in Duchesne High stabbing case

 

Mosh pits force early end to Layton High formal

 

Search for assault & kidnapping suspect forces 3 schools under lockdown

 

North Park Elementary celebrates Chinese New Year

 

 


 

 

OPINION & COMMENTARY

 

Utah education fails children, future state economy

 

The newest bailout begins at home(school)

 

Could False Beliefs About the Common Core Bolster Support for the Standards?

 

Social Media: New Study Suggests Journalism Being Left Out Of Education Debate

 

How methodology decisions affect the variability of schools identified as beating the odds

 

 


 

 

NATION

 

More Conflict Over Cutting Federal Role in Education

 

Common Core repeal bill fosters testimony crossfire House committee takes up sweeping anti-standards legislation

 

In LA, Missing Kindergarten Is A Big Deal

 

FCC Plan for ‘Net Neutrality’ Addresses Schools’ Needs

 

Senate unanimously backs school broadband stopgap funding, sends to guv

 

Big U.S. majority favors mandatory vaccinations: Reuters/Ipsos poll

 

Rule reversal allows schools to bill Medicaid for services

 

 

 

————————————————————

UTAH NEWS

————————————————————

 

Poll: Utahns Overwhelmingly Support Herbert’s Proposal to Add $500 Million to Education Funding

 

Utahns heavily support GOP Gov. Gary Herbert’s request to put an extra $500 million into public education next year, a new UtahPolicy poll shows.

Several weeks ago, before updated state revenue estimates showed another $101 million coming into the state this budget year and next, Senate budget chairman Lyle Hillyard, R-Logan, told UtahPolicy he doubted his body would take around $95 million from the state’s Transportation Fund and transfer it to public education spending for fiscal 2015-2016 – as Herbert desires.

Now that there is an extra $101 million it is more likely that Herbert and education advocates can see that half-a-billion dollars in public education next year.

Although that is certainly not guaranteed.

In a survey taken last month, pollster Dan Jones & Associates found that 68 percent of Utahns “strongly” or “somewhat” support Herbert’s $500 million boost in education funding.

http://go.uen.org/309 (UP)

 

 


 

 

 

House advances supply expense tax credit

 

When Rep. Steve Eliason, R-Sandy, found out how much his son’s teacher was spending of her own money on classroom supplies, he decided to do something about it.

His HB207 (first substitute) to give teachers a maximum $50 tax credit for personal money they spend on supplies passed the House with a vote of 48-24. It now goes to the Senate.

“Importantly, it is a small recognition for some of the personal sacrifices our teachers make in the classroom on behalf of our children,” said Eliason.

The bill would also require the Utah State Office of Education to conduct a study to find out how much the average teacher is spending out-of-pocket so the tax credit could be adjusted in the future.

Lawmakers voiced a few concerns about the bill.

http://go.uen.org/30c (SLT)

 

http://go.uen.org/305 (KUER)

 

 


 

 

 

House passes bill to increase select teacher salaries

 

SALT LAKE CITY — The Utah House of Representatives passed a bill Monday to increase teachers’ salaries to attract and retain more educators in math, science and special education fields.

HB203 would increase those teachers’ wages by $5,100 next year, with salaries increasing each year until they reach $10,000 above current annual salaries.

http://go.uen.org/30f (DN)

 

http://go.uen.org/30w (KSL)

 

 


 

 

 

Utah lawmakers reject limits on use of federal money

 

SALT LAKE CITY — Lawmakers have killed a proposal that would limit use of federal funds in Utah.

Rep. Robert Spendlove, a Sandy Republican, presented the constitutional amendment to lawmakers Tuesday. The change would prevent federal funds from making up more than 40 percent of the state budget.

http://go.uen.org/30N (OSE)

 

 


 

 

Online Testing Program for AP Testing Fails After Educators Call it a Waste

 

A bill that would have provided online resources for students taking Advanced Placement exams failed to gain the endorsement of the House Education Committee Monday.

HB 114 – Test Preparation Resources, which is sponsored by Representative Brad Last (Republican – Hurricane), would require the State Board of Education to contract with a provider, who would be selected through an request for proposal process, to furnish an online program to help prepare students for the AP exams.

http://go.uen.org/30u (UPC)

 

 


 

 

 

Lawmakers Ask State School Board to Scrap SAGE Test

 

Two Republican State Senators are asking the Utah State Board of Education to do away with its new computer-adaptive SAGE test and replace it with a different system.

Republican Senators Aaron Osmond and Howard Stephenson are behind the push to suspend SAGE testing. Utah students took the test for the first time last spring. But Osmond says it’s already a point of political contention and frustration for students, parents and many educators.

“We are not suggesting that testing isn’t important, that we don’t have testing, that we don’t need to know where our students are, he says. “But the sheer amount of testing that we’re doing right now relative to SAGE and the challenges that we’ve had with the SAGE testing tool have created a lot of concern in the state.”

SAGE, or Student Assessment of Growth and Excellence tests students in grades three through eleven on language arts, math, science and writing. Osmond says it rolled out with a number of technical issues.

“And then there is the simple issue of scheduling,” he says. “Many of the schools have their labs scheduled from now to the end of the year, just doing testing, so we’re taking time away from instruction.

http://go.uen.org/30D (KUER)

 

 


 

 

House panel approves bill to require civics test to graduate

 

SALT LAKE CITY — Five years ago, Gillian Both had to take a civics test to become a naturalized U.S. citizen.

Her daughter, Rebecca, helped her study and they both passed, said Gillian’s husband, Bill Both.

With Rebecca by his side, Bill Both urged lawmakers Monday to pass a bill that would require students to pass the same test before graduating high school.

“I find it troubling that an immigrant, within 20 or 30 minutes of studying, knows more about how our government works than people who have been through 12 years of (American) school,” he said.

“It’s just what we need to know,” said Rebecca Both, now 16 and a junior at Cyprus High School. “It’s basic knowledge.”

The committee later approved the bill 11-0, recommending it for further debate on the House floor.

http://go.uen.org/30x (KSL)

 

http://go.uen.org/30E (MUR)

 

http://go.uen.org/30M (Ed Week)

 

 


 

 

Lawmakers seek applicants to develop $2 million land transfer legal strategy Legislature » The 26-page request seeks outside lawyers for two separate contracts.

 

Utah lawmakers started taking applications Monday from firms interested in tapping a $2 million war chest for the state’s fight over public lands.

The Legislature’s Commission for the Stewardship of Public Lands released a 26-page request for proposals, or RFP, seeking outside lawyers for two separate contracts — one for legal consulting services and the other for “relation services,” including lobbying.

Lawmakers and the governor have set aside $2 million to launch the legal fight. And legislators are contemplating adding another $1 million to the fund during the 2015 Legislature.

“You have to plant your tree and wait two or three years before you get your first good peach. You have to nurture it along,” said commission co-chairman Rep. Keven Stratton, R-Orem.

Stratton is pushing his colleagues to add more money to get expert legal advice and galvanize support outside Utah.

In the three years since Utah enacted the Transfer of Public Lands Act, no other Western state has traipsed into the states rights fight. Meanwhile, Utah’s deadline for the federal government to hand over the land has passed.

At the same time, lawmakers have not spelled out how the state would manage lands currently administered by the Bureau of Land Management and the U.S. Forest Service.

http://go.uen.org/30a (SLT)

 

http://go.uen.org/30b (DN)

 

 


 

 

 

A field trip to the Capitol for PTA Day

 

SALT LAKE CITY – Over 200 students visited the Hill last Wednesday as a part of the PTA Day at the Capitol. The annual event, hosted by the Utah PTA, seeks to bring students and parents from around the state to the Capitol to learn more about the Utah government and how it works.

Students started their day with a tour around the Capitol, from the beautiful rotunda to the extravagant Gold Room. They then participated in a series of workshops, including a mock session where they debated the merits of a bill that would give each student a smartphone.

“I think smartphones would be a distraction for students, just based on the fact that I see eight, wait, nine students on their phones in this room right now,” one student said.

Most students never get the chance to visit the Capitol and learn about to the legislative process in such a hands-on way.

“If others don’t bring their kids here, then they don’t get the opportunity to be part of and learn about the legislature, what goes on and how to be better citizens,” Julia Mutton, a PTA organizer, said.

While the students played legislators for the morning, parents met with the PTA Legislative Action Committee in the State Office Building, where Governor Gary Herbert gave an address.

http://go.uen.org/30F (Capital West News)

 

 


 

 

Utah County schools receive $7 million

 

UTAH COUNTY — Helping children and their schools has long been considered a long-term investment.

Utah’s School and Institutional Trust Lands Administration (SITLA) can vouch for that. But it’s paying off.

Property was set aside when Utah became a state, with the plan that public schools and others would receive revenues from those lands. This year schools in the Alpine, Nebo and Provo City school districts are receiving $7 million from that initial investment.

“Alpine School District received over $4 million in Trust Land funds for our 80 plus schools, which is wonderful,” district spokeswoman Kimberly Bird said. “The more we receive there are higher expectations.”

Those expectations are laid out by SITLA, which administers the lands and the funds they generate. The schools have to report how they will use the funds they receive, then later back up those plans.

http://go.uen.org/30g (PDH)

 

 


 

 

 

Things are changing in the polygamist towns of Hildale and Colorado City

 

HILDALE, UT – Hildale, Utah and Colorado City, Arizona are best known as an enclave of the polygamist sect of the FLDS Church. They are small cities. The latest census says the towns total about seven and half thousand people. Even though FLDS leader Warren Jeffs was convicted and sentenced to life for sexually assaulting underage girls in Texas — most say the FLDS Church remains in control of city hall and law enforcement.

However, some say that grip is loosening up. And the people and community are starting to change. And one of the most noticeable changes is a school that is now rebuilding lives.

But people here say the most important change – the re-opening of Water Canyon School in Hildale. The small school, that sits at the base of beautiful red rock canyon, re-opened this past fall. Principal Darin Thomas says many of the students “had not been in public education ever before. They’d never even stepped foot in a school. So we’re trying to teach them what school is.” That’s because 13 years ago FLDS leader Warren Jeffs banned public education – and when enrollment dropped – the school closed its doors. Something Ted Barlow remembers well. “You have a whole generation right there that didn’t go become doctors, didn’t go become nurses, didn’t go become scientists, didn’t go pursue what they wanted to do.” Barlow, who left the FLDS faith four years ago, and works at the school, says that decision was a blow to students and the entire area. “It’s very sad because it could have brought so much more to the community.”

But that was then. And Thomas says this is now. “We teach them language, social studies, math and we team up with Hurricane High School and the middle school there where the kids go for electives.” Those educational opportunities are making a huge impact on students. Ted Barlow, Jr. Is one of those students. “I don’t know that I even would have had a life. I could barely read.” The 15-year-old started attending the school in the fall and says it has already changed his outlook and ambition.”I want to go to college, get a good job, good pay, take care of a family.”

http://go.uen.org/30v (KTVX)

 

 


 

 

Old letters and WWII vet teach power of primary sources

 

OGDEN — History is coming to life for students at Ogden High School, thanks to some long-forgotten letters and a visit from a veteran of World War II.

Michelle Braeden wanted to teach her World History students about the value of primary sources when studying the past. Letters are one example of a primary source, she told them — such as the ones she had found in a historic building in Ogden.

“A few years ago, my brother purchased the Berthana building,” Braeden said. “It was full of odds and ends — you name it … and one of the things I found was a box of World War II letters. Since I teach history, I saved them and they’ve been in my basement.”

http://go.uen.org/30q (OSE)

 

 


 

 

 

Elementary school teacher incorporates live trout in every day curriculum

 

PARK CITY — Something is a little fishy at Parley’s Park Elementary and the students love it.

The Park City School became just the eighth in the state to participate in the program, Trout in the Classroom, which is run by the Utah Chapter of Trout Unlimited.

This past January DWR donated 200 rainbow trout eggs to John Howard’s fourth grade classroom. The fish tank has become the most popular feature of the room.

http://go.uen.org/30z (KSTU)

 

 


 

 

 

Utah’s First Annual STEM Fest Will Let Students Get Their Hands on Science and Technology

 

Research has proven that one of the best ways to engage students in science, technology, engineering and math is with hands-on activities.

Utah’s first annual STEM Fest will do just that. More than 10,000 seventh and eighth grade students will engage with science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) through interactive experiences from March 25 to 27.

STEM Fest will take place at the UCCU Center at Utah Valley University. Seventh and eighth grade classes will attend Wednesday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. The event will be open to the public from 2-8 p.m. on Friday.

http://go.uen.org/30d (UP)

 

 


 

 

 

6 decades, no snow days: School district clocks 61 years without snow cancellation

 

CEDAR CITY – Despite Iron County typically being a snowy place in winter, it’s been more than 60 years since the Iron County School District has cancelled school due to a “snow day.”

“We don’t have snow days here. If the buses are able to travel, we have school,” Jennifer Wood, director of secondary education for Iron County School District, said. “As long as I’ve been in the district – this is my 11th year – we haven’t had a snow day.”

And the district’s no-snow-day history goes back much further than that.

http://go.uen.org/30A (SGN)

 

http://go.uen.org/30B (KCSG)

 

 


 

 

Centennial Elementary on track for fall opening

 

Construction of the new Centennial Elementary School in Roosevelt is well underway, and the project is on track for the school’s scheduled opening in the fall of 2015.

http://go.uen.org/30p (Uintah Basin Standard)

 

 


 

 

Granite preschool director receives administrator award

 

SALT LAKE CITY — The Utah Association of Educational Office Professionals has named Brenda Van Gorder, Granite School District’s director of preschool services, the 2015 Administrator of the Year.

http://go.uen.org/30m (DN)

 

 


 

 

Granite District students compete with treats

 

Fourth-graders from throughout the Granite School District wore toques and white jackets Friday as they prepared their favorite snacks in the 2015 Future Chefs competition. Students in the annual nationwide challenge create their own recipes and are encouraged to make good nutritional choices. The young cooks worked at the Granite Education Center’s café at 2500 S. State Street and were assisted by professional chefs from Granite Food Services.

The contest’s grand champion was Kaleb Johnson from Orchard Elementary, for his Fruit Burrito entry. Kaleb will go on to compete in the regional competition.

http://go.uen.org/30l (SLT)

 

 


 

 

 

Murray School District employees, volunteers honored

 

MURRAY — The Murray Education Foundation has announced recipients of the 12th annual Pinnacle Awards, which recognize excellence in educational service in Murray City School District.

This year’s Pinnacle Awards recipients are: Leslie Campbell, Liberty Elementary, library aide classified; Ian MacDonald, Murray High, chemistry teacher; Karen Peterson, Horizon Elementary, fourth-grade teacher; Joelle Rasmussen, Parkside Elementary, speech language pathologist; Jeanne Simpson, Grant Elementary, fourth-grade teacher; Janet Thackeray, Riverview Junior High, volunteer; Toni Wilkins, Liberty Elementary, fourth-grade teacher; and Laurel Fetzer, Parkside, Riverview and Murray High, volunteer.

http://go.uen.org/30n (DN)

 

 


 

 

 

Ogden school board approves administrative changes

 

OGDEN – The Ogden school board has approved several administrative changes for the 2015-16 school year.

http://go.uen.org/30r (OSE)

 

 


 

 

Competency question delays sentencing in Duchesne High stabbing case

 

DUCHESNE — A man who stabbed a classmate at Duchesne High School and hit his own sister with a hammer in separate incidents was supposed to be sentenced Monday.

Questions about Leland Patrick King’s mental competency, however, have put his sentencing in both cases on hold.

King, 19, pleaded no contest in December to aggravated assault on school premises, a second-degree felony; and aggravated domestic violence assault, a class A misdemeanor. Two other misdemeanor charges were dismissed under the terms of a deal with Duchesne County prosecutors.

http://go.uen.org/30o (DN)

 

http://go.uen.org/30y (KSL)

 

 


 

 

 

Mosh pits force early end to Layton High formal

 

SALT LAKE CITY — The apparent bad behavior of dozens of Layton High students ruined a dance for the other 300 attendees.

Their principal, Ryck Astle, said they wouldn’t stop forming mosh pits.

“They’re out there jumping up and down and bumping into kids,” Astle said. “We didn’t want someone to get hit or fall down. So we just thought it was best, at that point, to end it,” 35 minutes early.

http://go.uen.org/30R (KSL)

 

 


 

 

Search for assault & kidnapping suspect forces 3 schools under lockdown

 

Salt Lake City police are searching for a man accused of aggravated assault and kidnapping.

The incident took place near 1400 W. 900 South around 10 a.m.

Glendale Jr. High, Mountain View Elementary, and Parkview Elementary have been placed under lockdown as police search the area for the suspect.

http://go.uen.org/30S (KUTV)

 

http://go.uen.org/30O (KTVX)

 

http://go.uen.org/30Q (KSL)

 

http://go.uen.org/30T (KSTU)

 

http://go.uen.org/30P (SLT)

 

http://go.uen.org/30V (DN)

 

 

 

North Park Elementary celebrates Chinese New Year

 

NORTH LOGAN — Students at North Park Elementary immersed themselves in the culture of China during a special celebration of Chinese New Year on Monday. The school is in its second year of Chinese duel immersion and invited the whole school to celebrate the festive holiday.

http://go.uen.org/30t (LHJ)

 

 

 

 

 

————————————————————

OPINION & COMMENTARY

————————————————————

 

Utah education fails children, future state economy Deseret News op-ed by Alan Hall, chairman of Prosperity 2020, and Nolan Karras, co-chairman of Education First

 

Utah has put funding of its education system on the back burner for too long, and it is starting to show in the achievement levels of our children. In the last two decades, Utah has lost the advantage it once held of being among the most highly educated states in the nation. We now often rank as average or middle-of-the-pack. Some of the concerning data include:

http://go.uen.org/30e

 

 


 

 

 

The newest bailout begins at home(school)

(Provo) Daily Herald op-ed by Pamela Romney Openshaw, author of “Promises of the Constitution”

 

Spend some time at Home School conventions, as we do, and you realize that America is experiencing another great bailout. This one isn’t in the financial sector, it’s in education. Parents have been bailing their children out of public education in record numbers.

Homeschooled children have increased at least 20 fold since 1999, according to www.educationnext.com. States finally broke the stranglehold of mandatory public education in the ’90s, giving parents in every state their constitutional right to teach their own children, though state laws control the process. The home school movement then took off.

Some parents are being driven from the public system by deep concern, even anger toward Common Core. They object to the shadow takeover of education by the federal government and the humanist philosophy behind it. Of particular concern is the attack on religious worship.

http://go.uen.org/30s

 

 


 

 

 

Could False Beliefs About the Common Core Bolster Support for the Standards?

Education Week commentary by columnist Andrew Ujifusa

 

A new poll about the Common Core State Standards shows that a plurality of those surveyed don’t have an opinion about the standards, followed closely by the share of those who disapprove of the common core. But the Fairleigh Dickinson University poll released last week reveals something else that may seem counterintuitive: the possibility that incorrect beliefs about the standards could actually increase support for them among some.

Some critics of the standards, largely if not exclusively on the conservative side of the spectrum, have long linked various controversial curriculum topics and other issues to the standards. Examples of this are allegations that the standards promote certain forms of sex education and advocate the scientific concepts of global warming and evolution—even though the common core does not deal with those topics. Back in 2013, I wrote about how common-core opponents believed, incorrectly, that the standards were linked to the use of facial-recognition technology that measured (among other things) students’ “smile intensity.”

Common-core supporters bemoan these stories, saying that Republican politicians who previously supported the standards have waffled because of such inaccurate attacks linked to conservative-base voters.

Why am I bringing all this up? The “PublicMind” poll from Fairleigh Dickinson attempts to link false beliefs about the standards to support and opposition to them.

http://go.uen.org/30J

 

 


 

 

 

Social Media: New Study Suggests Journalism Being Left Out Of Education Debate Scholastic commentary by columnist Alexander Russo

 

There are lots of different ways to look at the new CPRE/UPennGSE report about social media and the Common Core debate, but at least one of them is to observe just how small a role journalists and non-advocacy media outlets seem to have been playing — even in areas where you’d think that mainstream and trade publications who share out information all day would have a big advantage:

*Just 13 of 158 high-volume “transmitters” (8 percent) are journalists. “These include print, online, and radio media, and represent both non-partisan and partisan media entities.” I’ve asked for a list.

*Just 22 (16 percent) of 139 “transceivers” (who pass information along and have their tweets shared) are journos/media outlets. They include @educationweek, @BenSwann (who?), and @ NEAMedia (not really a journalistic outlet). This is the list where journalists are strongest, relatively speaking — journalism’s wheelhouse, really. But journalists come in third. (List requested.)

*Just 3 media outlets qualify for the list of 41 “transcenders” (the elite group in the study). They are @educationweek, @StateEdWatch (penned by Andrew Ujifusa) & @ellemoxley. The report adds @NEAMedia to the list but again that’s a whole different thing.

Of course, the study is limited to tweets directly related to Common Core, and a certain time period.Other kinds of criteria would surface larger numbers of journalists and education outlets that are high-volume, high-retweet, or high-influence.

But my sense is that the report illustrates a deeper dynamic, which is that journalists and media outlets lag far behind activists on the use of Twitter, in part because of the decline in traditional journalism but even more so because of self-imposed limitations on expressing views or attempting to shape the debate. Advocates, think tankers, and even academics have a green light that journalists don’t.

http://go.uen.org/30L

 

#CommonCore website

http://www.hashtagcommoncore.com/

 

 


 

 

How methodology decisions affect the variability of schools identified as beating the odds National Center for Educational Evaluation and Regional Assistance analysis

 

Methodology decisions can affect which school are identified as “beating the odds’ — that is performing better than expected given the populations they serve. Using data from Michigan, this study demonstrates how the identification of schools changes when statistical methods and technical specifications change. The methodology choices made in identifying beating-the-odds schools are policy decisions that require careful consideration.

http://go.uen.org/308 (NCES)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

————————————————————-

NATIONAL NEWS

————————————————————-

 

More Conflict Over Cutting Federal Role in Education New York Times

 

As the House of Representatives prepared to take up a Republican proposal for the reauthorization of No Child Left Behind, Congress and the White House on Monday inched toward a confrontation over the federal role in education.

The House is expected to pass a plan this week that would cut back federal regulation of education from kindergarten through 12th grade and give state and local authorities more discretion over everything from assessing teacher and student performance to the flow of Title I money, the largest stream of federal funding for low­income students.

The House Education Committee approved the bill on Feb. 11. Representative John Kline, Republican of Minnesota and chairman of the committee, said after the committee vote that the plan would “provide American families the education system they deserve, not the one Washington wants.”

The Obama administration, however, sees the plan as a step backward, threatening funding of the neediest schools.

On Monday, Secretary of Education Arne Duncan released new data that he said showed that the plan could be detrimental to school districts with a high percentage of low­income students, which receive extra money under the current law. Under the proposed law, states could let students take their funding to the public school of their choice, an approach known as portability.

Mr. Duncan said the largest school districts with high concentrations of black and Hispanic students could lose more than $3 billion in federal funding over the next six years under the Republican plan.

http://go.uen.org/30h

 

http://go.uen.org/30I (Ed Week)

 

 


 

 

 

Common Core repeal bill fosters testimony crossfire House committee takes up sweeping anti-standards legislation Topeka (KS) Capital Journal

 

A parade of advocates on Monday demanded the House Education Committee stand against tyranny by uprooting K-12 student performance standards adopted by the Kansas State Board of Education.

Opponents of House Bill 2292 lined up to argue the repeal legislation would destroy Kansas College and Career Ready Standards in place since 2010, while also devouring standards related to college admission tests, advanced placement courses and an array of academic elements outside Common Core’s realm.

Elected members of the state Board of Education implemented a version of Common Core, which had its start nationally in work by the Council of Chief State School Officers and the National Governors Association.

http://go.uen.org/30k

 

 


 

 

 

In LA, Missing Kindergarten Is A Big Deal NPR Morning Edition

 

In kindergarten, kids are learning really important stuff. Basic reading skills. Numbers and math concepts. And to keep from falling behind, one of the major things they need to do is make it to school every day.

In Los Angeles, the nation’s second largest school district, kindergarten absence is a big problem, with some students missing 10, 20, 30 days or more. In 2012, district officials say that almost 10,000 students were chronically absent from kindergarten. Last year that number it improved, but only slightly.

It’s a problem around the country as well, and research confirms the academic peril chronic absence creates for the youngest students.

http://go.uen.org/30C

 

 


 

 

 

FCC Plan for ‘Net Neutrality’ Addresses Schools’ Needs Education Week

 

Federal Communications Commission Chairman Tom Wheeler recently released a plan to protect “net neutrality” that would meet the needs of schools in a number of ways.

The proposal, if approved later this month, would for the first time regulate broadband firms that provide high-speed Internet service as though they are public utilities. The goal is to help maintain a free and open Internet, which is the basis of net neutrality.

School and library officials had feared that the FCC, acting in response to a federal court ruling, might change its policies in ways that would restrict access to online resources, specifically by creating a “fast lane” for companies that paid for speedier delivery of their content, which could slow delivery of other content.

But the chairman’s long-awaited proposal, which is a change in direction from an earlier version that triggered a record 4 million public comments, would close the door on that possibility.

“I haven’t met a school yet that doesn’t want an open Internet,” said Evan C. Marwell, the CEO of EducationSuperHighway, a San Francisco-based nonprofit that advocates improving Internet access in schools. “We don’t want them to have to pay more to have access.”

http://go.uen.org/30K

 

 


 

 

Senate unanimously backs school broadband stopgap funding, sends to guv Spokane (WA) Spokesman Review

 

The Senate has voted unanimously, 33-0, in favor of HB 168, the stopgap funding bill for school broadband services in the wake of the Idaho Education Network debacle. The bill, which previously passed the House with just one “no” vote, now goes to Gov. Butch Otter.

The measure sends $3.64 million to state Superintendent of Schools Sherri Ybarra to distribute to school districts, either as reimbursements or advances, to pay for broadband internet service for the rest of the current school year. It also pulls $5 million back from the state Department of Administration in unspent funding for the Idaho Education Network, for which a court has declared the state’s $60 million contract with two politically connected vendors illegal.

“The bill does not address any back payments, attorney fees or potential damages related to the lawsuit between Syringa and the state of Idaho, nor does it address the federal e-rate funds that have been withheld,” Senate Education Chairman Dean Mortimer, R-Idaho Falls, told the Senate. “This is not a situation that any of us thought that we would be in, but we know it is very, very important that we protect the education process and our children’s right to that.”

http://go.uen.org/30j

 

 


 

 

 

Big U.S. majority favors mandatory vaccinations: Reuters/Ipsos poll Reuters

 

WASHINGTON – A large majority of Americans favor mandatory vaccinations of children, a Reuters/Ipsos poll showed on Tuesday, apparently unswayed by some senior Republicans who have raised fears the medical shots could lead to autism.

Seventy-eight percent of respondents in the online survey said all children should be vaccinated unless there is a direct health risk to them from vaccination.

Only 13 percent opposed vaccinations.

“The numbers are absolutely overwhelming in favor of vaccinations with a consistent minority in opposition,” said Ipsos pollster Julia Clarke.

http://go.uen.org/30G

 

 


 

 

 

Rule reversal allows schools to bill Medicaid for services Reuters

 

Due to an unexpected federal policy reversal sought by advocates for nearly 10 years, schools could start billing Medicaid for health services such as asthma screenings, vaccinations and care for chronic diseases provided to some low-income students.

“Clearing away the obstacle was a first step, but the next step is educating the public about it,” said Ed Walz, vice president of communications with the First Focus Campaign for Children, a nonprofit children’s advocacy organization.

According to a 1997 rule by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), known as the “free care rule,” if schools provided a service to the public for free, the schools couldn’t ask Medicaid to pay for that service when provided to a Medicaid-eligible student – even if Medicaid would pay for the service if provided in a medical setting. Exceptions were allowed for some children with disabilities.

For example, if a school provided free asthma screenings to all students, the school couldn’t ask Medicaid to reimburse for screening Medicaid-eligible students, even though screenings would be covered in a hospital, said Mary-Beth Malcarney, assistant research professor with George Washington University’s Department of Health Policy.

Districts could circumvent the rule by charging all children for the services. That approach, however, placed a burden on low-income families not enrolled in Medicaid who may not be able to afford even nominal fees.

http://go.uen.org/30H

 

 

 

 

 

————————————————————

CALENDAR

————————————————————

 

USOE Calendar

http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

 

 

UEN News

http://www.uen.org

 

 

February 24:

Senate Education Committee meeting

8 a.m., 210 Senate Building

http://le.utah.gov/~2015/agenda/SEDU0224.ag.htm

 

Senate Business and Labor Committee meeting

8 a.m., 215 Senate Building

http://le.utah.gov/~2015/agenda/SBUS0224.ag.htm

 

House Government Operations Committee meeting

8 a.m., 30 House Building

http://le.utah.gov/~2015/agenda/HGOC0224.ag.htm

 

House Political Subdivisions Committee meeting

8 a.m., 450 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/~2015/agenda/HPOL0224.ag.htm

 

House Revenue and Taxation Committee meeting

8:30 a.m., 445 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/~2015/agenda/HREV0224.ag.htm

 

House Education Committee meeting

4:10 p.m., 30 House Building

http://le.utah.gov/~2015/agenda/HEDU0224.ag.htm

 

 

February 25:

8 a.m., House Natural Resources, Agriculture, and Environment Committee meeting

445 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/~2015/agenda/HNAE0225.ag.htm

 

Senate Revenue and Taxation Committee meeting

8 a.m., 250 Senate Building

http://le.utah.gov/~2015/agenda/SREV0225.ag.htm

 

Senate Retirement and Independent Entities Committee meeting

Noon, 20 House Building

http://le.utah.gov/~2015/agenda/SRIE0225.ag.htm

 

Senate Health and Human Services Committee meeting

4 p.m., 250 Senate Building

http://le.utah.gov/~2015/agenda/SHHS0225.ag.htm

 

House Economic Development and Workforce Services Committee meeting

4:10 p.m., 20 House Building

http://le.utah.gov/~2015/agenda/HEDW0225.ag.htm

 

 

February 26:

Utah State Board of Education meeting

Noon, 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

 

 

March 12:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://go.uen.org/1pn

 

 

 

 

Related posts:

Comments are closed.