Education News Roundup: March 19, 2015

childEducation News Roundup

Today’s Top Picks:

 

KUER previews today’s Utah State Board of Education meeting on HB 360.

http://go.uen.org/3eJ (KUER)

 

Cache District approves new high school boundaries.

http://go.uen.org/3eG (LHJ)

 

Ogden High football is going independent.

http://go.uen.org/3f0 (OSE)

and http://go.uen.org/3f1 (SLT)

 

Civil rights complaints are at a new high at the U.S. Department of Education.

http://go.uen.org/3et (WaPo)

 

The nation’s longest serving state superintendent is retiring after 10 years on the job.

http://go.uen.org/3eT (Ed Week)

 

 

 

 

 

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TODAY’S HEADLINES

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UTAH

 

State School Board Considers Asking Governor to Veto Education “Clean-up” Bill

 

Cache County School District Board of Education approves new high school boundaries

 

UHSAA approves Ogden High football independence

 

Utah students leave millions in financial aid unclaimed

 

Bake sale ignites gender controversy in Utah high school

 

Seven GCHS seniors to compete as 2015 Sterling Scholars

 

Provo player stable after lacerating kidney in game Prep softball » Kacie Allman remains in intensive care after collision on Tuesday.

 

Artificial turf to be installed at Brighton High

 

UHSAA’s Thompson leaves to become executive director of Nevada Interscholastic Activities Association

 

Ex-Teacher Sentenced For Child Porn

 

Testing backlash: Students and parents chaffing at explosion of standardized tests

 

 


 

 

 

OPINION & COMMENTARY

 

How many teachers would do what a Maine educator is doing with her $1 million global prize?

 

Meet 16-year-old refugee Mezon Almellehan, Syria’s own ‘Malala’ pushing for education

 

Lawmakers, not courts, should decide how to pick school board members

 

Revisiting my predictions of Legislature’s ‘March Madness’

 

Mindful Activity

 

Dickensian superintendent

 

Sports over school

 

How Salt Lake City And Utah Became The New Gold Standard

 

 


 

 

 

NATION

 

Civil rights complaints to U.S. Department of Education reach a record high

 

Report: Blacks, Hispanics Doing Better but Still Lag Whites

 

Rebranding No Child Left Behind Act a Tough Marketing Call

 

What this spring’s Common Core tests promised, and what they will actually deliver Four years and over $360 million later, new Common Core tests are here. What’s new and what isn’t

 

Gov. Bobby Jindal looks to legislative battle to get rid of Common Core

 

How Will the Education Department Handle Schools With High Opt-Out Rates?

 

Test Security Now Means Checking Social Media for Cheaters

 

A Parent’s Guide to All That ‘Ed Tech’ In Your Kid’s Classroom What to ask when your school says “the iPads are coming!”

 

Emerging countries say Internet bad for morality, study finds

 

Mich. Picks Local Superintendent With Lobbying Background as Next State Chief

 

US 1st Lady Puts Focus on Empowering Girls Through Education

 

Judge sends strong message sending teacher to prison Oakland County judge says double standard is unacceptable in cases involving female teachers and male students.

 

 

 

 

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UTAH NEWS

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State School Board Considers Asking Governor to Veto Education “Clean-up” Bill

 

The Utah State Board of Education on Thursday will consider asking the governor to veto a bill that aims to streamline the state’s education code.

The Utah legislature passed House Bill 360 during this year’s session. It requires the state school board to prepare a report summarizing the last 15 years of policy changes in Utah’s public education system and develop a 10-year plan detailing outdated policies and programs that can be repealed. They’re expected to present the findings to the state Education Interim Committee in 2016 for approval. The bill’s sponsor, Republican Representative LaVar Christensen told the Utah House of Representatives earlier this month the education code has grown far too bloated.

“Year after year we get a new idea, “Christensen says. “And nobody ever evaluates whatever happened.”

State School Board Vice Chair Dave Thomas says some board members aren’t comfortable with the language requiring the board get approval from the Education Interim Committee.

“So really the distinction is between the legislative authority over education and the executive authority over public education and as you might imagine, those lines get a little bit blurred.”

http://go.uen.org/3eJ (KUER)

 

 


 

 

Cache County School District Board of Education approves new high school boundaries

 

The Cache County School District Board of Education has approved new high school boundaries that will go into effect when the two new high schools are completed. At their meeting Tuesday, the board refrained from deciding on the middle school boundaries after members of the public asked for a look at more options.

Under the decision, students from Avon, Hyrum, Mendon, Mt. Sterling, Paradise, Petersboro and Wellsville will attend Mountain Crest, while students from College Ward, Millville, Nibley, Providence, River Heights and Young Ward will attend the yet-unnamed south high school in Millville. Sky View will have students from Cornish, Cove, Lewiston, Richmond, Smithfield and Trenton, while the new high school in North Logan will have students from Amalga, Benson, Cache Junction, Clarkston, Hyde Park, Newton and North Logan.

The new North Logan high school will open in 2017, and the new Millville high school in 2016.

http://go.uen.org/3eG (LHJ)

 

 


 

 

 

UHSAA approves Ogden High football independence

 

OGDEN – The Utah High School Athletics Association gave the final stamp of approval for Ogden High School’s football team to be independent of 4-A play for the next two years.

The UHSAA voted to approve a “memo of understanding” between Ogden School District and UHSAA stating that independence would be granted with seven guidelines.

The guidelines include the understanding that the only sport to be independent is football, all other sports will remain in current status. Under the guidelines, OHS football is allowed to play any member school within UHSAA and they can play in UHSAA and National Football High School sanctioned tournaments. Ogden must also still comply with all UHSAA guidelines including eligibility, age requirements and moratorium periods.

Another important guideline reads, “If Ogden High School desires to return to full membership status for football, they will apply with written notice of intent. The intent will then be considered by the Executive Committee. The intent will be initiated with time to include Ogden High School football in the next scheduled realignment.”

http://go.uen.org/3f0 (OSE)

 

http://go.uen.org/3f1 (SLT)

 

 


 

 

Utah students leave millions in financial aid unclaimed

 

For parents out there who have high school seniors, you might find that money is your biggest concern when it comes to sending your son or daughter off to college.

In fact studies show, that Utah ranks the lowest in the country when it comes to applying for federal student aid and high school counselors are looking to change that, and quick.

http://go.uen.org/3eH (KUTV)

 

 


 

 

Bake sale ignites gender controversy in Utah high school

 

Sandy • A group of teenagers in a Salt Lake City suburb is trying to combat gender inequality one cookie at a time.

Wednesday was the final day of a Sandy high school’s Gender Equality Bake sale, in which the Young Democrats club charged boys $1 for cookies and girls just 77 cents.

Jordan High School students used the price discrepancy to highlight the statistic that on average, women earn 77 cents for every dollar earned by a man. The sale was held Tuesday and Wednesday during lunchtime in the school’s common area.

Kari Schott, a 16-year-old junior who is president of the Young Democrats, said she wanted to raise awareness “in a way that can touch people’s lives.”

Utah’s wage gap is the fourth largest in the nation and not expected to equalize until 2102, she said.

The bake sale idea generated some backlash on the group’s social media pages and also got some negative reactions in person, Schott said.

“A lot of people were angry, they would try to get into fights with me,” said Schott, who said several students called her sexist.

http://go.uen.org/3ev (SLT)

 

http://go.uen.org/3ey (DN)

 

http://go.uen.org/3eF (PDH)

 

http://go.uen.org/3eX (Inquisitr)

 

 


 

 

 

Seven GCHS seniors to compete as 2015 Sterling Scholars

 

Grand County High School will have seven seniors participating in the 35th annual Southeastern Utah Sterling Scholars competition, scheduled for Thursday, March 26 at Monticello High School. According to adviser Cari Caylor and assistant adviser Dee Hannigan, the competition will include more than 60 seniors from southeastern Utah high schools vying for the top spots in 14 different academic categories.

http://go.uen.org/3f2 (Moab Times-Independent)

 

 


 

 

Provo player stable after lacerating kidney in game Prep softball » Kacie Allman remains in intensive care after collision on Tuesday.

 

Provo • Softball player Kacie Allman was transported by ambulance after suffering a laceration on her kidney following a collision with a Provo High School teammate on Tuesday. Since stabilized from critical condition, she remains in intensive care at Utah Valley Regional Medical Center.

Allman, a junior, is a three-year starter for the Bulldogs’ program as the leadoff hitter and shortstop. The injury occurred against Wasatch, when Allman pursued a fly ball into left field.

She collided with her teammate, whose knee struck Allman’s kidney.

http://go.uen.org/3ew (SLT)

 

 


 

 

 

Artificial turf to be installed at Brighton High

 

SANDY — The Canyons Board of Education voted unanimously to install artificial turf on the football field at Brighton High School.

Land constraints have forced the Bengal football team and other school athletic squads to practice on the stadium field. This has caused holes and divots in the grass that are difficult to repair and maintain.

http://go.uen.org/3eB (DN)

 

 


 

 

 

UHSAA’s Thompson leaves to become executive director of Nevada Interscholastic Activities Association

 

MIDVALE — Bart Thompson loved his job and the people he worked with at the Utah High School Activities Association.

Which is a large part of the reason he waited until the last day possible to apply for the job of leading the Nevada Interscholastic Activities Association.

http://go.uen.org/3eC (DN)

 

 


 

 

 

Ex-Teacher Sentenced For Child Porn

 

A former Alpine teacher is spending the next eight months behind bars. Edward Greene pled guilty to child pornography charges earlier this year. He was sentenced yesterday to 240 days in jail, followed by 36 months of probation. Greene was arrested last year after police tracked an IP address used to upload sexually explicit photos of young boys. At the time of his arrested, he was a fifth-grade teacher at Westfield Elementary School.

http://go.uen.org/3eK (MUR)

 

 


 

 

Testing backlash: Students and parents chaffing at explosion of standardized tests

 

When Ethan Rediske was on his deathbed in January of 2014, the state of Florida wanted him to take a standardized exam. A severely disabled 11-year-old, Ethan was blind and mostly deaf. He had never talked or walked and was fed through a tube.

In his final weeks, his special-needs teacher, who had become attached to him and he to her, came to his home to work with him, read to him, and lift his spirits.

But then, in mid-January, the school district said that Ethan needed to take the annual educational progress exam or get a waiver.

http://go.uen.org/3ez (DN)

 

 

 

 

 

 

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OPINION & COMMENTARY

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How many teachers would do what a Maine educator is doing with her $1 million global prize?

Deseret News editorial

 

Finally, a teacher gets some extra cash and what does she do with it? She puts it back into her profession. At least that’s the plan for Nancie Atwell, an English teacher from Maine. And this is more than just a little bonus going to purchase classroom supplies — rather, Atwell won the $1 million Global Teacher Prize on Sunday.

Atwell is the founder of the Center for Teaching and Learning, a private K-8 school in Edgecomb, Maine. The school only services about 75 students, and while its nearly $9,000 annual tuition seems pricey, it’s about a third of the average cost of private schools along the East Coast and the school helps subsidize tuition for almost 80 percent of student families.

http://go.uen.org/3eA

 

 


 

 

 

Meet 16-year-old refugee Mezon Almellehan, Syria’s own ‘Malala’ pushing for education Deseret News editorial

 

For Mezon Almellehan, a 16-year-old Syrian now living in Jordan, there is a way out of the darkness of life as a refugee. That way, she is correct to believe, is education. “I think education is the focal point for everything. With education, we can solve anything. … That motivates me to continue.”

If that wisdom sounds familiar, it’s because Mezon’s hero is 17-year-old Malala Yousafzai, one of two winners of last year’s Nobel Peace Prize and an advocate for girls’ education around the world. In 2014, Malala met up with Mezon in the Zaatari Refugee Camp in Jordan to inspire her protégée to make a difference in the fight for girls’ rights in education.

Since that time, Mezon has been dubbed the “Malala” for Syrian refugees.

http://go.uen.org/3eE

 

 


 

 

Lawmakers, not courts, should decide how to pick school board members Deseret News commentary by columnist Jay Evensen

 

I would guess a lot of conservative lawmakers in Utah share the opinion that elected representatives, not an unelected judge, ought to decide important matters. “Judicial activism” is a term best left out of polite conversation, unless you agree it’s contributing to the decline of civilization.

How ironic, then, that lawmakers have decided an important matter — how to select members of the state school board — should be left in the hands of one unelected man, U.S. District Judge Clark Waddoups.

I suppose you could argue it was Waddoups, in the first place, who interjected himself in this matter by ruling last year that the way the state selected school board candidates was unconstitutional. But if you do, you haven’t studied how carefully he reached his decision. This was no power grab.

http://go.uen.org/3er

 

 


 

 

 

Revisiting my predictions of Legislature’s ‘March Madness’

Deseret News commentary by columnist Dan Liljenquist

 

The NCAA Tournament begins in earnest today, but for political junkies like me, the real March Madness ended at midnight Thursday when the Utah Legislature adjourned. The 2015 legislative session was a remarkable event, every bit as riveting as the best college basketball game to the neurotic few who have politics and policy in their blood.

Before the session began, I made several predictions — my own tournament bracket of sorts — and it is time to see how I did.

* I correctly predicted public education would receive a significant funding increase, but not the 6.5 percent proposed by the governor. I also correctly predicted legislators would look like the bad guys despite appropriating record amounts to public education.

* While the Legislature refused, as I predicted, to raise income taxes, it did pass the largest property-tax increase in decades. I did not see that one coming, and I suspect many Utahns will be upset when they get their property-tax bills later this year.

* I thought the legislators would roll over for the cute elementary schoolchildren who requested that the golden retriever be named the state dog. They did not and barked down the bill.

http://go.uen.org/3es

 

 


 

 

 

Mindful Activity

Salt Lake City Weekly commentary by columnist Colby Frazier

 

Utah’s School and Institutional Trust Lands Administration (SITLA) is busy every day making money off land that belongs to school children. The ways it makes money—oil & gas leasing, grazing, outright sales to developers and many more—will be open to scrutiny at their monthly meeting. Then, cure your legislative hangover by attending an event by the Forum for Questioning Minds during which a new Latino advocacy group will be discussed. Follow that up by training to become a school-programs volunteer at Red Butte Gardens.

SITLA Board Meeting

Thursday, March 19

Anyone interested in what happens on Utah’s public lands should attend a meeting of the School & Institutional Trust Lands Administration, which, with rapidly expanding oil & gas leasing, and tar sands and oil-shale development, has bought a lot of books and pencils for Utah’s schoolchildren. At this meeting, they’ll discuss grazing and selling off parcels to developers, and a mineral lessee will give a presentation.

SITLA board room, 675 E. 500 South, Salt Lake City, March 19, 9 a.m.-noon, TrustLands.Utah.gov http://go.uen.org/3eZ

 

 


 

 

 

Dickensian superintendent

Salt Lake Tribune letter from Chris Fassler

 

Superintendent Brad Smith pretends that citizens who protest anemic education funding are like the spoiled toddler who thinks she doesn’t get enough Christmas presents. It’s a story bearing no resemblance to the facts.

http://go.uen.org/3ex

 

 


 

 

 

Sports over school

Deseret News letter from Erin Barrow

 

A heinous crime was recently committed against every child in Utah. The Legislature denied further funding to schools, yet in the same session backed Aggie sports with 1.5 million in taxpayer dollars.

Utah’s lawmakers have decided that sports take precedent over education in the form of “Utah Wellness Program.” This title is a flat-out lie to hide where the money is going from unsuspecting residents. Taxes will now go to an 18-year-old college student to throw a ball around while doing damage to his body, which may result in him never playing the sport again.

In the meantime, our children will go without proper school supplies while teachers scrape by to build the future of Utah.

http://go.uen.org/3eD

 

 


 

 

 

How Salt Lake City And Utah Became The New Gold Standard Forbes commentary by columnist Marian Salzman

 

Austin envy is alive and well, especially on the heels of another jam-packed SXSW, but suddenly Utah is looking like the new benchmark for business and quality of life. A rash of new studies and rankings is proving that the Beehive State, and especially Salt Lake City, is increasingly the place to be.

Contributing to the state’s strong economy: the “entrepreneurial spirit” of Utahns, industrial diversity and a “balanced approach” to pursuing the right policies, said John McKernan, president of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation, in a story that appeared on local news outlet KSL.com.

In terms of job growth and economic performance, Utah ranked as the overall best performing state for the second year in a row, according to the U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation’s annual Enterprising States study. This is just one of the high ratings that’s proving that the state’s centrist government and wise investments are working.

Utah also landed atop Forbes’s list of best states for business in 2014, and the state consistently ranks high in quality-of-life measures. And while the Enterprising States survey ranked Utah No. 3 for economic performance, behind North Dakota and Texas, it was the only state to land in the top 10 in all six major categories of the study. There’s that balance. And the centrism: Gov. Gary Herbert attributed the state’s high scores to government policies that “empower the private sector” and advocate job growth in both high-tech and middle-skill industries.

At the city level Utah looks shiny, too—and proves that with education, you get what you pay for. While Utah’s overall record on teacher salaries isn’t the greatest—though the government is taking meaningful steps to change that—Salt Lake City is investing more in education. A recent study found that Salt Lake pays secondary-school teachers more than the national average and more than nine of 12 other Western metropolitan statistical areas—including $17,000 more on average than Tucson and $8,000 more than even that capital of envy, Austin.

Utah pays more to its teachers, and this pays off in the form of other good things: a robust talent pipeline, a boom in exports and international trade, plenty to get excited about in the way of technology and entrepreneurship, and a reassuringly stable business climate. Or maybe the state’s teacher salaries are better because of these good happenings in the local economy. Either way, the city’s teachers are paid well, and the money floods back into the consumer economy. Centrist government policies pay off here, too.

That’s one reason Salt Lake City was named the sixth-best-performing city in the U.S. for 2014 in the annual report published by Milken Institute that dubbed the area “a financial hub with a highly skilled workforce.”

http://go.uen.org/3eY

 

 

 

 

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NATIONAL NEWS

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Civil rights complaints to U.S. Department of Education reach a record high Washington Post

 

Straining under a record number of civil rights complaints, the U.S. Department of Education wants to hire 200 more investigators to expand its civil rights division by 30 percent.

Attorneys and investigators in the civil rights office have seen their workloads double since 2007, and the number of unresolved cases mushroom, as complaints have poured in from around the country about students from kindergarten through college facing discrimination on the basis of race, sex and disabilities.

“Some of this is about the community believing that we’re here and we’re in business and we’re prepared to do the work,” said Catherine E. Lhamon, the department’s secretary for civil rights. Some of the increase, she said, was due to guidance her agency has issued, reminding the public as well as schools and universities of various protections under federal law and how to report illegalities.

Complaints of discrimination to the department have soared from 6,364 in fiscal 2009 to a record of 9,989 in the most recent fiscal year. Lhamon expects another record to be set when the current fiscal year ends in September. It is a sign that “we have the trust of the national community bringing to us their deepest hurts and asking for resolution,” she said.

http://go.uen.org/3et

 

 


 

 

 

Report: Blacks, Hispanics Doing Better but Still Lag Whites Associated Press

 

WASHINGTON — Despite high-profile concern over issues underscored by the racial unrest in Ferguson, Missouri, African Americans and Hispanics are faring well in certain areas, including better health care and reductions in violent crime, the latest State of Black America report from the National Urban League says.

The National Urban League derives its numbers from an “equality index” that is based on nationally collected data from federal agencies including the Census Bureau, the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the National Center for Education Statistics and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

With full equality with whites in economics, health, education, social justice and civic engagement set at 100 percent, the National Urban League said this year’s equality index for blacks stands at 72.2 percent, an improvement over a revised index of 71.5 percent from last year. The equality index for Hispanics improved to 77.7 percent, compared with 75.8 percent last year.

http://go.uen.org/3eO

 

A copy of the report

http://go.uen.org/3eP (NUL)

 

 


 

 

 

Rebranding No Child Left Behind Act a Tough Marketing Call Education Week

 

If put in front of a focus group today, the title of the nation’s top K-12 education law would be met with the kind of enthusiasm reserved for day-old cafeteria pizza.

Congress may still be arguing about what provisions of the current law should be extended and which should be axed. But educators and politicians appear to agree on at least one thing: The outdated No Child Left Behind Act needs a fresh brand.

What, though, should replace “NCLB,” which has been around since 2001, as a catchy tag for the next version of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act? And how much does it matter?

“A name is one piece of a puzzle, and it’s an important piece of a puzzle, because it’s a hook,” said Sasha Stack, a partner in the Boston-based strategy group at Lippincott, a branding firm that counts companies like Southwest Airlines and Samsung among its clients.

http://go.uen.org/3eR

 

 


 

 

 

What this spring’s Common Core tests promised, and what they will actually deliver Four years and over $360 million later, new Common Core tests are here. What’s new and what isn’t Hechinger Report

 

New Common Core tests are debuting on time this spring, but after years of bruising attacks from both left and right, the groups tapped by the federal government to build them are struggling to meet all the hype.

Back in 2010, the plans for the new exams were introduced with much fanfare and many promises: The exams would end the era of dumbed-down multiple-choice tests and the weeks of mindless prepping that precede them. They would force teachers to introduce more critical thinking and in-depth study. They would bring coherency to a mishmash of state tests and for the first time allow states to compare local students to their peers elsewhere in the U.S. And with their online format, the new tests would make testing more efficient, more accurate and more relevant to the digital age.

But a lot has changed since U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan, heralding the arrival of “Assessments 2.0,” promised teachers the tests that many of them had “longed for.”

“One-shot, year-end bubble tests administered on a single day, too often lead to a dummying down of curriculum,” Duncan said of the old state tests. The new exams would test “critical thinking skills and complex student learning.”

The federal government invested $360 million on a grant competition to spur development of the new tests. Two coalitions of states — calling themselves the Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers (PARCC) and the Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium — won grants after agreeing to create tests aligned to the Common Core, a set of grade-level expectations in math and English adopted by over 40 states. States hurried to sign up after the U.S. Department of Education made college- and career-ready exams a condition for some federal funding.

Since then political battles over the Common Core have dampened enthusiasm for the tests. Some have cried foul over how the federal government incentivized the program, calling it federal overreach. Others have complained about how long these tests will take — Smarter Balanced will take eight and a half hours, while some PARCC tests will take over ten hours. Yet more critics have panned the tests because they will be used in some states to evaluate teachers.

http://go.uen.org/3eU

 

 


 

 

Gov. Bobby Jindal looks to legislative battle to get rid of Common Core New Orleans Times-Picayune

 

Gov. Bobby Jindal kicked off the upcoming legislative session’s expected battle over Common Core, announcing Wednesday (March 18) that he would back three pieces of legislation aimed at removing the education standards.

The bills would stop what Jindal described in a press conference as a “federal takeover of what should be local decisions.” Common Core supporters State Superintendent John White and the head of the state school board, Chas Roemer, however, fired back, saying Jindal’s plan represents the position of “extreme outliers” and will take Louisiana’s education system “back in time.”

Jindal’s new plan involves bills that would lead the state to start from the beginning and come up with a new set of standards and test, using a “clear and transparent standards adoption process.” In the meantime, students and teachers would go back to the state’s 2004-2005 standards and take the LEAP and iLEAP tests.

The proposed law would ask all elected officials in Louisiana who deal with education — that’s every local school board member, all state legislators, and the state Board of Elementary and Secondary Education — to vote on a draft of the new standards. The final version would be approved by the legislature and then sent to BESE for amendments.

http://go.uen.org/3eu

 

http://go.uen.org/3eL (WaPo)

 

 


 

 

How Will the Education Department Handle Schools With High Opt-Out Rates?

Education Week

 

As more parents choose to “opt” their children out of state standardized assessments, states have found themselves in a bit of pickle. The No Child Left Behind Act requires schools to test 95 percent of their students, or else face sanctions.

Colorado wants to add language to its waiver from provisions of the NCLB law through the waiver-renewal process, ensuring that opt-outs don’t count against a school’s 95 percent participation threshold.

The state’s rationale, as explained in this summary of proposed changes in its NCLB renewal request, which is due to the feds at the end of the month:

http://go.uen.org/3eS

 

 


 

 

Test Security Now Means Checking Social Media for Cheaters Associated Press

 

For the organizations that give standardized tests, it’s a common – and common-sense – security measure.

But to the growing number of critics of the exams, the practice of monitoring students’ social media accounts against leaks of test questions is evidence that the tests and the companies that create them are too invasive.

The debate exploded last week in New Jersey when a school administrator emailed some colleagues about her district’s experience. In the email, Watchung Hills Regional High School District Superintendent Elizabeth Jewett said the state Education Department contacted her district at a testing company’s request at 10 p.m. one night last week with news of a possible test breach. A student apparently had posted a photo of a question from the Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers test, or PARCC, on Twitter.

http://go.uen.org/3eN

 

 


 

 

A Parent’s Guide to All That ‘Ed Tech’ In Your Kid’s Classroom What to ask when your school says “the iPads are coming!”

(New York) WNYC

 

A challenge for you: Ask a 4-year-old about their day in school. Ask what they did, who they played with, what they learned. When you’re done with your little interview, see what you’ve learned — and whether you have any idea why they were doing what they were doing.

Quick case in point:

Most parents are sending their kids into classrooms that function radically differently from the ones they attended themselves, and many of you have told us you’re overwhelmed.

So, to that end, we brought Anya Kamenetz, NPR’s lead education blogger and author of “The Test: Why Our Schools are Obsessed with Standardized Testing — But You Don’t Have to Be,” and Adriene Hill, senior reporter for Marketplace’s LearningCurve project on education and technology, together to tell us what, exactly, happens in the schools of our 21st century children — and they gave us some good questions designed to cut through the buzzwords popping up everywhere:

http://go.uen.org/3eI

 

 


 

 

 

Emerging countries say Internet bad for morality, study finds USA Today

 

Many people in developing countries think the Internet has a positive influence on education and a negative influence on morality, according to a report released Thursday from the Pew Research Center.

Pew interviewed more than 36,000 people in 32 emerging and developing countries for the study and asked questions about their individual Internet and cellphone usage.

The majority of users, 64%, said the Internet has a positive influence on education. However, 42% also thought the Internet was bad for morality, with only 29% saying the Internet is a good influence.

Peoples definition of morality differs from country to country, according to Randall Curren, professor of philosophy at University of Rochester.

http://go.uen.org/3eV

 

A copy of the report

http://go.uen.org/3eW (Pew Research Center)

 

 


 

 

 

Mich. Picks Local Superintendent With Lobbying Background as Next State Chief Education Week

 

The Michigan Board of Education selected Brian Whiston, the superintendent of the state’s Dearborn public schools, to be its next chief state school officer. The board voted 7-1 on March 18 to pick Whiston as the replacement for state Superintendent Mike Flanagan, who will retire later this year after 10 years on the job.

Whiston has led the 19,000-student district since 2008. He previously worked as the director of government and community relations for the Oakland school district in Michigan. Whiston has also served on local school boards and taught university courses at Wayne State University, according to his profile at the Dearborn schools website.

Brian-Whiston-Michigan-State-Superintendent-of-Public-Instruction-blog .jpg

Whiston, whose appointment will become official once his contract negotiations with the board are complete, beat out two other local superintendents who were finalists to replace Flanagan, who is the longest-serving state chief in the country.

http://go.uen.org/3eT

 

 


 

 

US 1st Lady Puts Focus on Empowering Girls Through Education Associated Press

 

TOKYO — Education is the starting point for opportunity, U.S. first lady Michelle Obama said Thursday as she and her Japanese counterpart Akie Abe showcased efforts to help girls stay in or return to school.

“Like so many women I was able to achieve both my professional and personal goals because of my education,” Mrs. Obama said after Abe announced plans for Japan to support the “Let Girls Learn” project aimed at promoting education for girls in the developing world.

http://go.uen.org/3eQ

 

 


 

 

Judge sends strong message sending teacher to prison Oakland County judge says double standard is unacceptable in cases involving female teachers and male students.

Detroit Free Press

 

Saying there is no room for double standards, an Oakland County judge sentenced a 30-year-old female teacher to spend the next six to 15 years in prison for having a sexual relationship with a student.

Kathryn Ronk, who taught Spanish at a Catholic high school, could have been sentenced to as little as a year in jail, but Oakland County Circuit Court Judge Nanci Grant opted for prison time Tuesday, noting the boy was 15 at the time.

http://go.uen.org/3eM

 

 

 

 

 

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CALENDAR

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USOE Calendar

http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

 

 

UEN News

http://www.uen.org

 

 

March 19:

Utah State Board of Education meeting

Noon, 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

 

 

April 9:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://go.uen.org/1pn

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