Grades 6 – 8 Science Standards

Newsrelease

Public Comment Sought on Grades 6 – 8 Science Standards

SALT LAKE CITY – The Utah State Board of Education released the 6th-8th grade Utah Science and Engineering Education (SEEd) standards for 90-day public review. Utah SEEd standards are available online for the public to view and provide feedback using an online survey tool. The SEEd standards, as well as the link to the online review tool, are available at: http://www.schools.utah.gov/CURR/science/Revision.aspx.

Additional to the online review tool there will be five public meetings held throughout the state where discussion can occur regarding the standards. Each meeting will start at 7 p.m. and run at least one hour.

  • Thursday, April 23: Washington School District Office Board Room, 121 Tabernacle St., St. George, UT 84770 (Enter through front side doors)
  • Tuesday, April 28: Uintah School District Office Board Room, 635 West 200 South, Vernal, UT 84078
  • Wednesday, May 6: Provo School District District Office, 280 West 940 North, Provo, Utah, 84604
  • Wednesday, May 13: Cache County School District Office, 2063 North 1200 East, North Logan, UT 84341
  • Tuesday, May 19: Salt Lake Center for Science Education Media Center, 1400 Goodwin Ave., Salt Lake City Utah, UT 84116

After the 90-day review period ends on July 9 and revisions based on feedback are made, the standards will be presented to the Utah State Board of Education for final adoption.  If final drafts of the standards are approved, they will be fully implemented throughout state 6th-8th grade science classes starting the 2017-18 school year.

www.schools.utah.gov

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2 comments to Grades 6 – 8 Science Standards

  • S Blamires

    I gave up on the survey that was sent to teachers. It is too limiting. For one thing, the demographic question has no option for 6th grade teachers in an elementary setting – which I am. In my particular situation, I do not teach science, but my my teammates do – although they are not specialists in science. Then, the questions for each section only gave two options:1) is the section is appropriate, 2) suggestions for that section. My difficulty is, I can’t say that any section is appropriate without more information, and I’m so confused I can’t possibly make suggestions.
    Much of this new core at the 6th grade level covers weather and matter, which are currently covered in the 4th and 5th grade cores, respectively. Is this 6th grade core supposed to extend on those concepts, or is this overlap an oversight? If it is supposed to be deeper coverage, teachers should know that, and it should be clear how the previous core should be connected to the new core.
    My biggest concern lies in the individual standards. MANY of them throughout the document are incomprehensible. My team feels that you probably need an engineering degree to even begin to teach these concepts, much less design and build the models suggested. (One of my teammates is married to an engineer, and he’s even baffled by this document.)
    As the core is currently presented, there would have to be MASSIVE clarification and training for teachers, in addition to the availability of clear, easy to use resources. Even with those supports, the experiments suggested are bound to be quite an expense to schools – particularly elementary schools that don’t have a “science department” and therefore have very little in the way of a science budget.
    The general feeling toward this core at at my school right now is negative. We think the items in the current core that have been moved or removed (microorganism, heat, light, and sound, solar system, etc) are too valuable to lose. There are fragments of them in the new core, but not enough for students to have the background knowledge they need for the deeper explorations.
    I think there is a lot of work still to be done before this core is approved or implemented, and frankly, I would prefer 6th grade keep the core it currently has.

  • Laura W

    Please don’t adopt lower standards for science. We are unhappy with Common Core in English and Math and are positive Science Common Core curriculum will not be better.