Education News Roundup: April 30, 2015

"Macro Monday" by Joanne Johnson/CC/flickr

“Macro Monday” by Joanne Johnson/CC/flickr

Education News Roundup

Today’s Top Picks:

 

KUER takes a closer look at the property tax increase for public schools.

http://go.uen.org/3xd (KUER)

 

Grand County looks at random drug testing students involved in extracurricular activities.

http://go.uen.org/3xr (Moab Times-Independent)

 

Trib follows up on yesterday’s release of history, geography, and civics national test results.

http://go.uen.org/3wU (SLT)

 

New study finds young teachers maybe aren’t leaving the profession in the high numbers previously assumed.

http://go.uen.org/3×0 (WaPo)

or a copy of the study

http://go.uen.org/3×1 (NCES)

 

New student digital privacy bill is being introduced.

http://go.uen.org/3wY (NYT)

and http://go.uen.org/3xm (Hechinger Report)

 

 

 

 

 

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TODAY’S HEADLINES

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UTAH

 

Osmond: Property Tax Hike Good, but Schools Need More

 

School board considers random drug testing for GCHS students participating in extracurricular activities

 

Nation’s students flatline in U.S. history, geography and civics education

 

Nebo School District appoints new administrators

 

Stewart, Bishop launch group aiming to get state control of public lands

 

Community-wide project offers students free prom dress rentals

 

York Prep board to interview finalist to lead school

 

Utah’s First Transgender Prom Queen Is Happy Living an ‘Authentic Life’

 

Bail reduced for ex-counselor at BYU youth camp

 

Infographic: New Cache County school mascots, colors

 

 


 

 

 

OPINION & COMMENTARY

 

Will civics test help boost dismal Nation’s Report Card?

 

Engaging youth in science, the outdoors

 

Tested to death

 

An education agenda for the states: Fostering opportunity from pre-K through college

 

Get Your School Prepared for Disasters With America’s PrepareAthon!

 

 


 

 

 

NATION

 

Study: Far fewer new teachers are leaving the profession than previously thought

 

Legislators Introduce Student Digital Privacy Bill

 

Federal Aid Formulas a Sticky Issue in ESEA Debate

 

Obama Promotes E-Book Gift for Poor Kids Amid Inequality Debate

 

Department of Education cracks down on Illinois for lack of science exam Illinois placed on “high-risk status” for not complying with school testing requirements

 

Detroit Closes Many Schools for Day Due to Teacher Shortage

 

Lawsuit challenges Ann Arbor schools’ gun ban Is it reasonable for teachers and parents to worry that a person is openly carrying a gun around kindergartners in a public school? Maybe; but gun-rights buffs in Michigan beg to differ.

 

Standardized test backlash: More parents pull kids from exams as protest For parents fed up with the growing numbers of tests and the increasingly high stakes, ‘opting out’ is now the popular form of protest. Critics say it aims at the wrong target and ignores importance of data gleaned.

 

‘World’s best teacher’ does not believe in tests and quizzes

 

Skip A Grade? Start Kindergarten Early? It’s Not So Easy

 

The Bad News (Poverty) and Good News (Education) About Millennial Parents

 

Hour of TV daily may lead to weight gain in kindergartners, study says

 

Pakistan Court Jails 10 for Involvement in Attack on Malala

 

 

 

 

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UTAH NEWS

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Osmond: Property Tax Hike Good, but Schools Need More

 

Supporters say a $75 million property tax increase will benefit Utah’s public education system and it will likely go further to increase funding in the future.

The change is meant to help school districts that are struggling by raising taxes to an average of $46 annually per household statewide. Starting this year, revenue from the increase will favor more underserved districts. This will allow Jordan School District for instance to give teachers a 6.5 percent pay increase next school year. But Spokesperson Steve Dunham points out the district is on the cusp of joining districts like Park City, Rich, Emery and Kane that won’t benefit from the tax hike, but won’t lose money either.

“And so in a few years, you could see us being a net giver as opposed to a net receiver,” Dunham says. “And we’re not disappointed in that because we truly feel that it’s better overall for children everywhere.”

Income tax revenue in Utah is already distributed equally among rich and poor districts. But districts with low property values often end up paying higher tax rates than their wealthy neighbors who can afford to keep tax rates low.

http://go.uen.org/3xd (KUER)

 

 


 

 

 

School board considers random drug testing for GCHS students participating in extracurricular activities

 

The Grand County Board of Education is considering a policy that would require students of Grand County High School to submit to random drug testing in order to participate in extracurricular activities. If adopted, the policy would include all students participating in any Utah High School Activities Association activity, including sports, music, drama, debate and student government.

GCHS Activities Director Ron Dolphin said the administration has been considering a drug testing policy since September, for a number of reasons. One reason is the physical safety of the students and spectators, he said. Dolphin said studies have shown that players under the influence of drugs or alcohol increase the risk of injury or death, for themselves as well as others.

http://go.uen.org/3xr (Moab Times-Independent)

 

 


 

 

Nation’s students flatline in U.S. history, geography and civics education

 

History repeats itself, and so have history test scores among the nation’s eighth-grade students.

The latest scores from the National Assessment of Educational Progress show most students falling short of proficiency standards in U.S. history, geography and civics. The scores remained virtually unchanged from 2010 and 2014.

Localized data were not available Wednesday, but Utah students were expected to be in line with their national peers, according to Robert Austin, a social studies specialist with the Utah State Office of Education.

“It’s a good reminder that we still have a lot of work to do,” he said.

http://go.uen.org/3wU (SLT)

 

 


 

 

 

Nebo School District appoints new administrators

 

The Nebo School Board of Education recently appointed Tiffanie Miley as the Springville High School Assistant Principal for Nebo School District.

The Nebo School Board of Education also appointed Jesse Sorenson as the Payson High School Assistant Principal for Nebo School District.

Alesha LeMmon was appointed as the Payson Junior High Assistant Principal for Nebo School District.

http://go.uen.org/3×5 (PDH)

 

 


 

 

 

Stewart, Bishop launch group aiming to get state control of public lands

 

WASHINGTON, D.C. – Two members of Utah’s congressional delegation announced the launch of special group designed to aid in transferring public lands from federal to state control Tuesday.

Republican Reps. Chris Stewart and Rob Bishop announced the launch of the “Federal Land Action Group” that, according to a statement from Stewart’s office, will work to build upon the work Utah and other states have started in recent years.

http://go.uen.org/3×8 (SGN)

 

 


 

 

 

Community-wide project offers students free prom dress rentals

 

SANDY, Utah – Jordan High School students who normally could not afford prom may now be able to go, thanks to an ongoing community-wide service project.

It is that special time of the year again for high school students across Utah. Prom season is now in full-swing, but the extravagant experience seems to be costing more now than ever.

For Junior Class Historian Lexi Bernson, gearing up for the big night is exciting and stressful all at the same time.

“It’s nuts how much people spend, honestly, on prom,” she told Good 4 Utah’s Ali Monsen.

According to a recent VISA survey, the average family will spend more than $900 on prom this year, but a local group of lawyers is trying to change that.

The Young Lawyers Division of Utah is offering high school students the chance to rent from a large assortment of dazzling dresses, free of charge. The group started their project called “The Cinderella Boutique” five years ago, claiming prom should not have to break the bank.

http://go.uen.org/3×9 (KTVX)

 

 


 

 

 

York Prep board to interview finalist to lead school

 

The board of directors of York Preparatory Academy will meet in closed session Thursday to interview one of two finalists to lead the school.

Wade Glathar, principal of Ascent Academies of Utah, a charter school with three campuses in the state, is scheduled to be interviewed.

York Prep board Chairman Abram Cramer said Glathar has already talked with some board members. Thursday’s meeting will be a chance for new board members to talk with him, Cramer said.

The other remaining finalist, Charles Sachs, head of the Chadwick International School in Incheon, South Korea, will be interviewed early next week, Cramer said.

A third finalist, Kevin McIntyre, assistant superintendent for Milford Public Schools in Massachusetts, withdrew his name from consideration, Cramer said Wednesday.

http://go.uen.org/3xq (Rock Hill [SC] Herald)

 

 


 

 

 

Utah’s First Transgender Prom Queen Is Happy Living an ‘Authentic Life’

 

With a sleek seafoam gown borrowed from her mom’s closet, freshly polished nails and an assist from her younger sister in the hair-curling department, Maka Brown was all set for her high school spring prom in Salt Lake City.

But she never dreamed she’d bring home a new accessory that night: a sparkling tiara from her election as prom queen.

For the transgender teen, a senior focusing on dance at the Salt Lake School for the Performing Arts, the unexpected honor Saturday was proof that today’s generation “is more accepting of people who are different,” says Brown, 18, the first transgender prom queen to be crowned in the conservative state of Utah.

http://go.uen.org/3xt (People)

 

http://go.uen.org/3xu (Las Vegas Review-Journal)

 

 


 

 

Bail reduced for ex-counselor at BYU youth camp

 

FARMINGTON — A judge reduced the bail for a former BYU-affliated youth counselor who is accused of having sex with a teenage boy he met three years ago.

Keldon Severn Cook, 29, made his first court appearance on Wednesday since his arrest April 16 by Bountiful police.

Cook is charged in 2nd District Court with four counts of forcible sodomy, first-degree felonies; one count of forcible sexual abuse, a second-degree felony; one count of sexual exploitation of a minor, a second-degree felony; and one count of dealing in harmful material to a minor, a third-degree felony.

Judge Micheal Allphin agreed to reduced Cook’s bail from $300,000 to $100,000.

A preliminary hearing is scheduled for July 1.

Allphin also ordered Cook not to have any contact with the teenage boy or with anyone under the age of 18. Allphin did say Cook could have contact with family members under the age of 18 as long as the visits were supervised.

Cook was employed with Granite School District as an assistant cheerleading coach at Alta High School this school year,  but is no longer employed with the district, officials said.

The 17-year-old boy told police he had a sexual relationship with Cook, whom he met when he was 14 years old while attended Especially for Youth, according to court documents.

EFY is a week-long religious seminar sponsored by the Brigham Young University Division of Continuing Education, according to the BYU website.

http://go.uen.org/3×4 (OSE)

 

 


 

 

 

Infographic: New Cache County school mascots, colors

 

A look at possible names, mascots and colors for Cache County School District’s two new high schools.

http://go.uen.org/3×6 (LHJ)

 

 

 

 

 

 

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OPINION & COMMENTARY

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Will civics test help boost dismal Nation’s Report Card?

Deseret News commentary by columnist Jay Evensen

 

“No Child Left Behind” didn’t work. Various state laws requiring tests or threatening schools with closure if students don’t perform has a spotty record. We’re not quite sure about Common Core because we can’t seem to stop arguing about it long enough to see.

So maybe the new requirement for high school seniors to pass a civics test before being allowed to graduate — now the law in Utah and five other states — will make a difference.

Before you dismiss that notion, you should at least listen to the man behind it.

http://go.uen.org/3wV

 

 


 

 

 

Engaging youth in science, the outdoors

(St. George) Spectrum commentary by Rachel Carnahan, Public Affairs Officer, BLM Arizona Strip District

 

With my nerves a little on end, I entered the high school’s big, empty lecture hall early in the morning. My mind felt just as fuzzy as the half-awake students appeared that poured off the buses and filtered into the halls minutes before. At least we’d be on the same page – none of us seemed ready to take on the world yet.

Left to my pre-speech jitters, I wondered how effective my colleagues and I would be in capturing the interest of nearly 100 skeptical sophomores. Months before, student teacher Jessica Stant contacted me to see if a few agency specialists would provide a resource-focused presentation to several 10th grade high school biology classes. No problem. Partnering with other federal agencies, land management agencies provide natural resource interpretation routinely in a variety of fun and educational environments and venues. The challenge would be to garner excitement for biology, natural resources and public lands — from sophomores.

http://go.uen.org/3×7

 

 


 

 

Tested to death

Deseret News letter from Jordan Brough

 

Do Utah students know about what it takes to be a citizen? Many students in high schools like Copper Hills, Bingham, Herriman and Riverton have been citizens their whole lives and have been taught K-12 about the United States on national, state and local levels about what makes the country “tick.” I am an 18-year-old who thinks that the recently passed Utah bill requiring graduating seniors to take a citizenship test to graduate is good, but do Utah schools really need another test to take for the end of the year?

http://go.uen.org/3×3

 

 


 

 

An education agenda for the states: Fostering opportunity from pre-K through college American Enterprise Institute commentary

 

* In US education, with all its rich human dynamics, what matters is not whether a reform is attempted, but rather how it is executed. The states, given their sufficient control over schools and colleges and their proximity to their communities, are in a far better position than the federal government to effectively execute policies.

* Although many education reform efforts have fallen flat over the years, there are promising initiatives on the horizon that state leaders would be well-advised to pursue. Governors and legislators are right to look for strategies that can provide the highest-quality education to the largest number of students.

* In pre-K, state leaders have a rare opportunity to build a system from the ground up; in K–12, they have the chance to remove barriers to give more freedom to teachers and parents; and in higher education, they have the opportunity to look beyond the existing system to create new, more affordable postsecondary options that allow more flexibility for students and innovation for course providers.

http://go.uen.org/3×2

 

 


 

 

 

Get Your School Prepared for Disasters With America’s PrepareAthon!

U.S. Department of Education commentary by Gwen Camp, Director of Individual and Community Preparedness for the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), and Amy Banks, a management and program analyst in the Center for School Preparedness at the U.S. Department of Education

 

It’s time for America’s PreparAthon!

Every spring, parents and educators across the country are encouraged to practice preparedness in the event of an emergency. Now is a great opportunity to make your campus a safer and more resilient one by joining the millions of people across the country participating in National PrepareAthon! Day on April 30.

Schools are an effective channel to reach students and families by conducting preparedness activities and messages. Teachers, faculty, staff, and administrators have the unique ability to make schools and institutions of higher education more prepared to withstand and recover from an emergency.

Twice a year America’s PrepareAthon! promotes national days of action – specifically April 30 and September 30 – to highlight the importance of preparing for disasters and emergencies.

http://go.uen.org/3xe

 

 

 

 

 

 

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NATIONAL NEWS

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Study: Far fewer new teachers are leaving the profession than previously thought Washington Post

 

New teachers are far less likely to leave the profession than previously thought, according to federal data released Thursday.

Ten percent of teachers who began their careers in 2007-2008 left teaching after their first year, according to the National Center for Education Statistics. But attrition then leveled off, and five years into their careers, 83 percent were still teaching.

That figure — indicating that just 17 percent of new teachers left their jobs in the first five years — stands in stark contrast to the attrition statistic that has been repeated (and lamented) for years: That between 40 percent and 50 percent of teachers leave the profession within their first five years.

The higher estimate, which has become a fixture in education debates, comes from the work of Richard Ingersoll, a professor at the University of Pennsylvania and a leading scholar on the nation’s teacher workforce.

But Ingersoll’s famous estimate was just that — an estimate. A “crude approximation,” he said in an interview Wednesday, made necessary by the fact that no one had tracked a cohort of new teachers over time to see how long they stayed in the classroom.

But now federal officials have done just that. They followed a representative sample of teachers who began their careers in the 2007-2008 school year in order to find out what happened to them. And the new findings present such a different picture that they have the potential to change the national conversation about new-teacher attrition, a problem that cascades across issues ranging from student achievement to school district budgets.

http://go.uen.org/3×0

 

A copy of the study

http://go.uen.org/3×1 (NCES)

 

 


 

 

Legislators Introduce Student Digital Privacy Bill New York Times

 

Months after President Obama proposed to strengthen digital privacy protection for students, two legislators on Wednesday introduced a comprehensive bill in Congress intended to accomplish that goal.

Titled the Student Digital Privacy and Parental Rights Act of 2015, the bill would prohibit operators of websites, apps and other online services for kindergartners through 12th graders from knowingly selling students’ personal information to third parties; from using or disclosing students’ personal information to tailor advertising to them; and from creating personal profiles of students unless it is for a school­related purpose.

The bill would give parents access to information held about their children and allow them to correct it; to delete information about their children that schools do not need to retain; and to download any material their children have created.

It would allow operators of services to use and disclose aggregated student information without personal identifiers to improve their own educational products or market their effectiveness.

And it would allow companies to sell or disclose student information as part of a merger or acquisition, provided the successor company continued to be subject to the restrictions under which the data was originally collected.

http://go.uen.org/3wY

 

http://go.uen.org/3xm (Hechinger Report)

 

 


 

 

 

Federal Aid Formulas a Sticky Issue in ESEA Debate Education Week

 

When the Senate education committee marked up and approved a bipartisan rewrite of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act earlier this month, one of the few issues members sparred over was changing a formula used to distribute federal funds to states and school districts for activities such as teacher preparation.

Meanwhile, the committee didn’t touch another complex, long-standing, and politically sensitive issue: the way Title I money for low-income students flows to states and districts.

Though, in theory, everything is up for grabs in the long-overdue revision of the ESEA, altering federal funding formulas is politically problematic because it shifts money from one state or district to another. That means there will always be some entity that loses money so to speak, even if most lawmakers and advocates recognize revising the formula is the fair thing to do.

http://go.uen.org/3xj

 

 


 

 

Obama Promotes E-Book Gift for Poor Kids Amid Inequality Debate Bloomberg

 

President Barack Obama will announce Thursday that book publishers have committed $250 million in new e-book donations to help low-income children access some of the most popular titles in kids’ literature.

Obama will unveil the program during a trip to the predominantly black Washington neighborhood of Anacostia. Aides hinted that the president would use the event as a demonstration of how the administration is addressing income inequality amid racial unrest in cities like Baltimore.

“If we’re serious about living up to what our country is about, then we have to consider what we can do to provide opportunities in every community, not just when they’re on the front page, but every day,” National Economic Council director Jeff Zients said Wednesday in a conference call for reporters.

But the program, which features commitments from brand-name publishers like Penguin Random House, Harper Collins, and Simon & Schuster, faces some hurdles in reaching the children who could benefit the most.

Just 14 percent of homes with incomes below $30,000 annually own an e-reader, according to a Pew Research study released last year. Tablet ownership is slightly higher, with 26 percent of those making below $30,000 a year reporting they have such a device.

http://go.uen.org/3wW

 

http://go.uen.org/3wX (Time)

 

http://go.uen.org/3xf (AP)

 

 


 

 

 

Department of Education cracks down on Illinois for lack of science exam Illinois placed on “high-risk status” for not complying with school testing requirements Chicago Tribune

 

In the latest controversy over state exams, Illinois is in hot water with the federal government for not administrating statewide science tests this school year.

Failure to give the exams is a violation of the law, according to a stern letter from the U.S. Department of Education, and the Illinois State Board of Education has been placed in what the federal agency calls “high-risk status” for not complying with testing requirements.

The letter dated April 20 states that the board must come up with a plan and timeline by June 30 to come into compliance and give the science assessments in 2015-16.

“We’re working on our plan to provide a science assessment in 2015-16 and will submit it to the U.S. Department of Education by June 30, per the letter,” board spokeswoman Mary Fergus said Wednesday in an email to the Tribune.

http://go.uen.org/3wZ

 

 


 

 

 

Detroit Closes Many Schools for Day Due to Teacher Shortage Associated Press

 

DETROIT — Classes have been canceled in 18 Detroit schools after teachers failed to appear on the same day as a major announcement about the district’s future.

Detroit Public Schools emergency manager Darnell Earley expressed regret about the closings Thursday and says the “unplanned turn of events” by teachers “is seriously misguided.”

Many parents of students at the schools expressed frustration when they got the news.

http://go.uen.org/3xh

 

http://go.uen.org/3xi (Detroit Free Press)

 

 


 

 

 

Lawsuit challenges Ann Arbor schools’ gun ban Is it reasonable for teachers and parents to worry that a person is openly carrying a gun around kindergartners in a public school? Maybe; but gun-rights buffs in Michigan beg to differ.

Detroit Free Press

 

A statewide gun-rights group and a father with children in the Ann Arbor schools are suing the school district over its new policies that ban firearms on school grounds.

The lawsuit, filed in Washtenaw County Circuit Court, comes just as a crowd of about 500 gun-rights advocates are expected Wednesday at the annual Second Amendment March around the Capitol Building in Lansing. After hearing speakers, the crowd of pistol packers customarily stride into the chambers of state lawmakers, prominently bearing their arm.

“We like to remind the legislators who we are and what our rights are,” said Jim Makowski, a Dearborn lawyer who filed the lawsuit and said he personally served it Monday afternoon at the offices of Ann Arbor Public Schools. Makowski planned to march Wednesday in Lansing and is scheduled to speak from the Capitol steps.

The lawsuit challenges the Ann Arbor school board’s three rulings on April 15: Policy 5400 lets the superintendent close schools and cancel events if staff see any dangerous weapons, including a handgun; Policy 5410 designates all school property as “Dangerous Weapon & Disruption-free Zones”; and Policy 5420 says no one possessing a dangerous weapon, including a handgun, can be on school property, with exceptions being police officers or individuals hand-picked by the superintendent.

Gun-rights advocates contend that the three policies violate state laws regarding gun possession on public property, including school grounds.

http://go.uen.org/3xp

 

 


 

 

Standardized test backlash: More parents pull kids from exams as protest For parents fed up with the growing numbers of tests and the increasingly high stakes, ‘opting out’ is now the popular form of protest. Critics say it aims at the wrong target and ignores importance of data gleaned.

Christian Science Monitor

 

BOULDER, COLO. — It had never really occurred to Chantal Kovach to keep her fifth-grade son from taking Colorado’s new annual assessments, until an e-mail started circulating among parents.

Ms. Kovach became concerned that the test would be measuring material her son’s class hadn’t covered yet, that the results wouldn’t be available to his teacher until the fall. She also was worried that the class would have to devote significant hours to taking the test, and then more hours later in the spring taking other tests on the material they had studied.

But it wasn’t until she went to the teacher, wondering if it might still be useful to her son as practice, that she made up her mind.

“The feedback I got was that only when an educated group of parents takes a stand against this colossal waste of time will anything change,” says Kovach, who kept her son home in March and will do so again next week and in May, and says many other parents at her Boulder, Colo., elementary school are doing the same.

For a segment of parents fed up with the growing numbers of tests and the increasingly high stakes placed on their scores, “opting out” is now the popular form of protest. And in certain states and communities, the movement is gaining steam, with large percentages of parents and students sitting out required exams. With schools required by current federal law to test at least 95 percent of their populations, the burgeoning opt-out numbers raise the possibility of federal sanctions.

But what some see as important grass-roots protest against a testing regime they say has become too onerous and that has negative effects on children and education, others say is misguided, a protest that stems from understandable frustration but that aims at the wrong target, and that ignores the important information gained from such tests.

http://go.uen.org/3xl

 

 


 

 

 

‘World’s best teacher’ does not believe in tests and quizzes NewsHour

 

For 25 years, Nancie Atwell has run a small, independent K-8 school in Maine, where the goal is not just teaching young students, but also teachers. At the Center for Teaching and Learning, the school day is driven by a simple motto: let kids have choices. Now Atwell’s work and philosophy have earned her education’s highest honor, the Global Teacher Prize.

http://go.uen.org/3xk

 

 


 

 

 

Skip A Grade? Start Kindergarten Early? It’s Not So Easy NPR

 

On the first day of school, perhaps the only person more discussed than the “new kid” is the “new kid who skipped a grade.”

Words like “gifted,” “brilliant” and “genius” get thrown around to describe these students. Education researchers generally refer to them as “accelerated.” It’s a catch-all term to describe students who have either entered kindergarten early, grade-skipped or taken single subjects above grade level.

Part of the hype comes from how uncommon it is.

Researchers estimate no more than 2 percent of students fall into these categories.

But two new reports in the past few weeks argue that there should be a lot more of this acceleration, and that states and school districts often get in the way.

http://go.uen.org/3xa

 

Copies of the reports

http://go.uen.org/3xb (Acceleration Institute)

 

http://go.uen.org/3xc (Jack Kent Cooke Foundation)

 

 


 

 

 

The Bad News (Poverty) and Good News (Education) About Millennial Parents Wall Street Journal

 

Much has been written about millennials–the nickname for the generation of young people born in the 1980s and 1990s–and the rough time they’ve had in the economy. But now that the generation is getting older, and  the oldest millennials are in their mid-30s by some definitions, an increasing number are parents themselves.

A new report from Konrad Mugglestone, a policy analyst at Young Invincibles, a Washington-based group that represents the interests of young Americans, has dived into the data on millennial parents (defined in this report as those ages 18 to 34).

The biggest challenge has been the damaged economy. The weak economy itself is no surprise, but what’s surprising is that this postrecession period has been especially hard on young parents.

Young parents have always been somewhat more likely than nonparents to be in poverty. This has especially been the case in recent years, with close to one-quarter of young parents in poverty. Since 2009, the share of impoverished young people has been higher than at any other point in the past 25 years. Since 2009, 16% of young people without children were in poverty, up 5 percentage points from the late 1990s. As many as 23% of young parents were in poverty, however, an 8 percentage point increase.

But there’s good news, too, about young parents. Today’s youngest mothers and fathers are better educated than parents 10 and 20 years ago. The economy has placed increasing value on education over recent decades. If the economy continues to improve, these parents may prove well positioned to provide for their children.

http://go.uen.org/3xn

 

A copy of the report

http://go.uen.org/3xo (Young Invincibles)

 

 


 

 

 

Hour of TV daily may lead to weight gain in kindergartners, study says CNN

 

Even a little bit of television viewing goes a long way to potentially hurt a child’s health, according to new research.

Kindergartners and first-graders who watched even an hour of television a day were more likely to be overweight or obese, according to new research presented at the Pediatric Academic Societies annual meeting in San Diego.

The research builds on existing studies that have shown a direct link between sedentary behavior and obesity for children and adults.

http://go.uen.org/3xs

 

 


 

 

Pakistan Court Jails 10 for Involvement in Attack on Malala Associated Press

 

MINGORA, Pakistan — A Pakistani court on Thursday sentenced 10 militants to life in prison for their involvement in the 2012 attack on teenage activist Malala Yousafzai, a public prosecutor said.

Sayed Naeem said the court announced the ruling at an undisclosed location because of security concerns.

“Each militant got 25 years in jail. It is life in prison for the 10 militants who were tried by an anti-terrorist court,” he said. In Pakistan 25 years is considered a life sentence.

Malala was shot in the head by the Pakistani Taliban when she was returning from school. The militants targeted her because she advocated education for women. Malala was initially treated in Pakistan, but was later flown to a hospital in Britain, where she now lives with her family.

Malala, now 17, won world acclaim for her campaign and last year was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

Mullah Fazlullah, the Taliban leader who ordered the attack, is still at large, as are other militants who took part in it.

http://go.uen.org/3xg

 

 

 

 

 

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CALENDAR

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USOE Calendar

http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

 

 

UEN News

http://www.uen.org

 

 

May 7-8:

Utah State Board of Education meeting

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

 

 

May 14

Utah State Charter School Board meeting

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://go.uen.org/1pn

 

 

May 19:

Executive Appropriations Committee meeting

2 p.m., 445 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2015&com=APPEXE

 

 

May 20:

Education Interim Committee meeting

9 a.m., TBD

http://le.utah.gov/interim/2015/pdf/2015InterimSchedule.pdf

 

 

 

 

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