Education News Roundup: May 8, 2015

"Mystical Mathematical Mandalas" by South Summit Elementary's fourth grade students.

“Mystical Mathematical Mandalas” by South Summit Elementary’s fourth grade students.

Education News Roundup

Today’s Top Picks:

 

Utah Foundation looks at how many more kids will be entering Utah schools over the next 35 years. It’s a lot.

http://go.uen.org/3AV (DN)

and http://go.uen.org/3AX (UP)

and http://go.uen.org/3AY (KUTV)

and http://go.uen.org/3B9 (KSL)

or a copy of the report

http://go.uen.org/3AW (Utah Foundation)

 

Alpine Board names Assistant Superintendent Sam Jarman as new superintendent, replacing the retiring Vern Henshaw.

http://go.uen.org/3B3 (PDH)

 

KSL looks at salaries in Utah schools and districts.

http://go.uen.org/3B8 (KSL)

 

KSL also looks at the starting times of Utah schools.

http://go.uen.org/3Ba (KSL)

 

ACT expands computer-based testing.

http://go.uen.org/3Bf (AP)

 

 

 

 

 

 

————————————————————

TODAY’S HEADLINES

————————————————————

 

 

UTAH

 

Is Utah prepared to handle 1 million students by 2050?

 

Jarman selected as Alpine School District superintendent

 

KSL Investigates: Who makes the most in our public schools?

 

Mike Monson moving to Mountain Crest High after 14 years at Mount Logan Middle School

 

Should Utah schools start classes later?

 

Life of Art

Provo art teacher honored as best in the state

 

High tech camp encourages girls to pursue STEM-related fields

 

Davis schools show muscle in automotive repair competition

 

High School Student with Schizophrenia Gets a Dream Prom – Thanks to Her Classmates

 

BDHS hosts career fair

 

Classes resume after Westlake High School is evacuated due to small fire

 

‘Kids Adventure Challenge’ returns with mud, spartan, color, foam run challenge

 

Get free ice cream for wearing a seatbelt

 

Inside Our Schools

 

 


 

 

 

OPINION & COMMENTARY

 

Sexy Science Education

 

Utah lawmaker finally responds — once campaign cash is offered

 

SAGE math test is defective on many levels

 

Memorizers are the lowest achievers and other Common Core math surprises

 

No Inequality Left Behind

The Senate’s bipartisan education reform plan would undermine the goal of educational equity

 

Why Schools Need to Bring Back Shop Class Viewing vocational programs as second-rate is one of the most corrosive problems in education

 

What Schools Must Learn From LA’s iPad Debacle

 

 


 

 

 

NATION

 

ACT to Expand Computer-based Testing

 

Anti-Common-Core Bills Diversify as Democrats’ Skepticism Grows, Report Says

 

Research Project Aims to Build Better Math Texts Project draws on findings in cognitive science

 

New School-Leader Standards Stir Dissent

 

Congress Temporarily Renews Funding Program For Rural Schools

 

Montana moves to save indigenous languages from extinction

 

Fairfax school board approves transgender protections

 

In Surprise Move, Teacher Ed. Accreditation Group Ousts President

 

When school safety drills weren’t so smooth, these students made a training video

 

Zions Bank employees teaching about savings

 

 

 

 

————————————————————

UTAH NEWS

————————————————————

 

Is Utah prepared to handle 1 million students by 2050?

 

SALT LAKE CITY — Utah is expected to gain about 385,000 K-12 students by 2050, but state leaders are past due in planning and preparing for future growth while ensuring adequate school funding and satisfactory student performance.

That’s the message from a Utah Foundation report released Thursday that takes a look at what education in the state could be like given the growth and increasing ethnic diversity over the next 35 years.

State leaders and educators are in the process of developing a 10-year statewide education plan, but “inadequate policy responses” to education needs up to now have caused Utah to fall behind in its support for schools and the academic achievement of its students, the report states.

http://go.uen.org/3AV (DN)

 

http://go.uen.org/3AX (UP)

 

http://go.uen.org/3AY (KUTV)

 

http://go.uen.org/3B9 (KSL)

 

A copy of the report

http://go.uen.org/3AW (Utah Foundation)

 

 


 

 

 

Jarman selected as Alpine School District superintendent

 

AMERICAN FORK — Sam Jarman became the successor of Superintendent Vern Henshaw of the Alpine School District, who said in March he would retire at the end of the school year.

The Alpine School Board of Education members unanimously selected Jarman on Monday during a closed session; and made the public vote and announcement on Thursday afternoon at the school district administration building in American Fork.

“[I am] very, very grateful that it was a unanimous vote from the board,” Jarman said. “I think that shows that our board can come together on a very important decision and that when they can show our entire district that they are united in this effort, I think it says a lot about the top leadership in our district.”

Jarman assumes his position as superintendent of the largest school district in the state on July 1. He said he doesn’t see much changing as far as where the district is headed.

“I’ve worked here for the last 11 years, and I feel like I have been part of that effort to make the improvements that have been achieved, and so I don’t see us making any major changes,” Jarman said.

http://go.uen.org/3B3 (PDH)

 

 


 

 

 

KSL Investigates: Who makes the most in our public schools?

 

The latest U.S. Census Bureau report puts Utah at the bottom for spending — both in the classroom and in administration costs. Utah spends $447 in per student administration spending, the nation’s lowest.

“All of our administration costs compose one-half of 1 percent of our overall budget,” Horsley said in regards to the Granite School District books. “People get concerned that we are top-heavy, and that certainly is not the case here in the state of Utah. And that certainly is not the case here at Granite.”

Utah spent $2,397 in instructional salaries per student according to the report, also the nation’s lowest.

“I think people have this perception that we’re top-heavy and these people are making a lot of money,” Horsley said. “We’re not paying market value for employees. If we were, we’d be paying higher salaries. Not just for teachers, but administrators as well.”

http://go.uen.org/3B8 (KSL)

 

 


 

 

Mike Monson moving to Mountain Crest High after 14 years at Mount Logan Middle School

 

After 14 years at Mount Logan Middle School, Principal Mike Monson is leaving to be the new assistant principal at Mountain Crest High School. Monson is not only switching schools but also leaving the Logan City School District for the Cache County School District.

http://go.uen.org/3B5 (LHJ)

 

 


 

 

 

Should Utah schools start classes later?

 

PARK CITY — Morning comes early for Park City High School students like Efren Valeriano, who starts AP physics lab at 6:30 a.m.

He and classmates may be in school, but they’re not always completely awake.

“I have a hard time just comprehending what’s happening,” said Adam Wall.

Senior Will Radovan added, “I usually just fall asleep in class, just pass out on the desk.”

Still, he and the other students in his class aren’t complaining: all of them chose to be here.

http://go.uen.org/3Ba (KSL)

 

 


 

 

 

Life of Art

Provo art teacher honored as best in the state

 

PROVO — Jeff Cornwall admits to being an anomaly. He has been an art teacher at Provo’s Edgemont Elementary School for four years and recently won the Utah Elementary Art Educator of the Year award. The school is partially funded by the Beverley Taylor Sorenson Arts Learning Program (BTS-ALP) as are 130 other schools across the state.

“The program’s objective is to provide elementary schools with arts educators including visual arts, music, dance and theater,” said Cornwall. “Even within that sphere, I am quite the anomaly. Most BTS-ALP teachers are serving multiple schools or are just part time.”

Cornwall is the only full-time teacher in one school in the whole program. His full-time status is possible because the parents and community of Edgemont do fundraisers to bring in the needed additional dollars to support the program.

http://go.uen.org/3Bq (PDH)

 

 


 

 

High tech camp encourages girls to pursue STEM-related fields

 

LEHI — More than 80 high school girls from across the state recently participated in a STEM-focused camp held at Microsoft’s Lehi campus.

Held in mid-April, the purpose of the DigiGirlz High Tech Day Camp was to dispel myths of what it means to have a career in the high-tech industry and give girls a chance to experience firsthand what it is like to develop cutting-edge technology.

http://go.uen.org/3B4 (PDH)

 

 


 

 

Davis schools show muscle in automotive repair competition

 

SANDY — Half of the teams that qualified at the state level of the Ford/AAA Student Auto Skills competition were from Davis County schools.

“We’ve always seen strong representation from Davis County,” said Rolayne Fairclough, spokeswoman for AAA Utah.

According to Fairclough, 278 high school juniors and seniors took a written test to evaluate their automotive knowledge. Those with the highest scores moved up to the hands-on portion of the competition, held at the Salt Lake Community College Miller Campus in Sandy on Wednesday.

Bountiful, Clearfield, Davis, Syracuse and Woods Cross high schools all sent teams to the competition.

http://go.uen.org/3B2 (OSE)

 

 


 

 

 

High School Student with Schizophrenia Gets a Dream Prom – Thanks to Her Classmates

 

Audrey Rhodes thought she’d never get another chance to dress up and dance with Tyler Hanks, the boy she had a crush on.

Rhodes, 16, was unable to attend her high school prom at Lone Peak High School in Highland, Utah, last month because she was hospitalized in February with autism, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia.

http://go.uen.org/3Bv (People)

 

 


 

 

BDHS hosts career fair

 

Beaver Dam Junior/Senior High School (BDHS) hosted a career fair Wednesday that gave the Diamondbacks a chance to explore some job opportunities.

http://go.uen.org/3Bu (SGS)

 

 


 

 

Classes resume after Westlake High School is evacuated due to small fire

 

SARATOGA SPRINGS, Utah – Crews responded to a small fire at Westlake High School Thursday afternoon.

Owen Jackson, Saratoga Springs spokesman, says a toilet paper dispenser caught fire in the boy’s bathroom of a portable classroom building.

http://go.uen.org/3B7 (KTVX)

 

 


 

 

 

‘Kids Adventure Challenge’ returns with mud, spartan, color, foam run challenge

 

  1. GEORGE – “Kids Adventure Challenge” returns with its exciting half-mile race at Fossil Ridge Intermediate School, 383 S. Mall Drive in St. George, Friday and Saturday. The challenge features an obstacle course, mud run, inflatable run, spartan race, color and foam run – all rolled into one. It is designed specifically for school-aged children to promote living an active lifestyle as well as raise money for local schools.

http://go.uen.org/3Bt (SGN)

 

 


 

 

Get free ice cream for wearing a seatbelt

 

The Utah Highway Patrol has partnered with the Creamies Ice Cream Company in helping to recognize and reward high school students for their commitment to always wearing a seatbelt.

UHP Troopers, along with student body officers from three Utah high schools, have been working with students throughout the school year in an attempt to help them understand the importance of buckling up while riding in a vehicle.

http://go.uen.org/3Br (KTVX)

 

 


 

 

Inside Our Schools

 

Arrowhead Elementary

Lava Ridge Intermediate

Hurricane Valley Academy Charter

George Washington Academy

Dixie Middle School

http://go.uen.org/3B6 (SGS)

 

 

 

 

 

 

————————————————————

OPINION & COMMENTARY

————————————————————

 

Sexy Science Education

Salt Lake Tribune editorial cartoon by Pat Bagley

 

http://go.uen.org/3AZ

 

 


 

 

 

Utah lawmaker finally responds — once campaign cash is offered Salt Lake Tribune commentary by columnist PAUL ROLLY

 

Mark Besendorfer, a 60-year-old elementary school teacher, impresses on his students the importance of involvement in their representative government and tries to practice what he preaches.

So, on Jan. 25, just as the legislative session was about to begin, he wrote to his new state representative, Bruce Cutler, R-Murray, to congratulate him on his election and to urge him to properly fund public schools and support teachers.

He asked Cutler to respond to him about his education views but did not hear from the lawmaker.

On March 1, after the Republican-dominated Legislature indicated it would not meet Gov. Gary Herbert’s requested increase for public education, Besendorfer again emailed Cutler on the need to support education and asked for a response.

Nothing.

On March 9, as the 2015 legislative session was winding down, Besendorfer emailed Cutler and invited the lawmaker to visit his classroom.

No answer. Again.

But when Besendorfer emailed Cutler on May 1, saying that he and his friends wanted to donate to the legislator’s campaign, voilà, he got a response right away.

http://go.uen.org/3B0

 

 


 

 

 

SAGE math test is defective on many levels Salt Lake Tribune letter from Chris S. Coray

 

During the past month I have carefully examined my ninth grade granddaughter’s “SAGE review” assignments in mathematics. My review concludes that these SAGE reviews and the SAGE testing adopted by Utah are in fact destructive. I will urge my daughter to have my granddaughter opt out of the test. Some of the reasons are:

http://go.uen.org/3B1

 

 


 

 

 

Memorizers are the lowest achievers and other Common Core math surprises Hechinger Report commentary by JO BOALER, professor of mathematics education at Stanford University

 

It’s time to debunk the myths about who is good in math, and Common Core state standards move us toward this worthy goal. Mathematics and technology leaders support the standards because they are rooted in the new brain and learning sciences.

All children are different in their thinking, strength and interests. Mathematics classes of the past decade have valued one type of math learner, one who can memorize well and calculate fast.

Yet data from the 13 million students who took PISA tests showed that the lowest achieving students worldwide were those who used a memorization strategy – those who thought of math as a set of methods to remember and who approached math by trying to memorize steps. The highest achieving students were those who thought of math as a set of connected, big ideas.

The U.S. has more memorizers than most other countries in the world. Perhaps not surprisingly as math teachers, driven by narrow state standards and tests, have valued those students over all others, communicating to many other students along the way – often girls – that they do not belong in math class.

The fact that we have valued one type of learner and given others the idea they cannot do math is part of the reason for the widespread math failure and dislike in the U.S.

http://go.uen.org/3Bm

 

 


 

 

 

No Inequality Left Behind

The Senate’s bipartisan education reform plan would undermine the goal of educational equity U.S. News & World Report op-ed by Andrew J. Rotherham, cofounder and partner at Bellwether Education Partners

 

For the past several years, economic inequality grabbed headlines, sparked protests and spurred Americans to ask hard questions about the structure of opportunity in our society. In the wake of Baltimore, North Charleston, Ferguson, Cleveland and other episodes, the conversation and attention of protesters is giving way to an even more immediate concern about disparate treatment of Americans by law enforcement based on their race. That, too, is another kind of structural inequality. Here in the education sector people are quick to identify with the protesters and the issues they raise yet there is an inescapable and uncomfortable dissonance: Attacking inequality is at the forefront of our national conversation, but in American education we are actually becoming more accepting of it as a fact of life.

Perhaps nothing illustrates this better than the ongoing saga of the No Child Left Behind Act of 2002, or NCLB. Congress has tried to overhaul NCLB since 2007, when it was first scheduled to do so. Disagreement about how to improve the law resulted in failure that year and over several subsequent tries. Now an overhaul bill is again moving through Congress buttressed by bipartisan agreement that Washington should scale back its efforts to force states to hold schools accountable for performance.

That bill walks away from requiring states to do much of anything to receive federal education dollars – especially from NCLB’s emphasis on accountability for improving results for low-income and minority students. It doesn’t attack key problems that drive educational inequality, such as federal rules for allocating funds that inadvertently send more money to better resourced schools and less to poor ones or expand support for low-income students through pre-kindergarten education or more school choice.

Yes, the bill preserves annual testing as civil rights groups and business coalitions demanded. But one might ask, why bother?

http://go.uen.org/3Bn

 

 


 

 

 

Why Schools Need to Bring Back Shop Class Viewing vocational programs as second-rate is one of the most corrosive problems in education Time commentary by Sir Ken Robinson, author of “Creative Schools, The Element, Finding Your Element and Out of Our Minds”

 

The Education Committee of the US Senate is currently considering the re-authorization of No Child Left Behind. Much of the original rhetoric in NCLB was about improving job readiness and employability. In a tragic irony, the focus of the last ten years has not been on improving vocational programs at all but on testing narrow academic standards. Overall, the impact on students, schools and employability has been baleful. This is the time to change.

A study from 2013 estimated that almost 6 million Americans between the ages of 16 and 24 are neither in school or work. Although the unemployment rate for that demographic is on the decline since its 2010 high, it’s yet to reach the lows of around 10-11% in the past ten years. Meanwhile, there’s a widening skills gap between what schools are teaching and what kinds of jobs are available and needed. There’s plenty of work to be done, but too many people lack the skills to do it.

In practice, our communities — and economies — depend on an enormous diversity of talents, roles, and occupations. The work of electricians, builders, plumbers, chefs, paramedics, carpenters, mechanics, engineers, security staff, and all the rest is absolutely vital to the quality of each of our lives. Yet the demands of academic testing mean that schools often aren’t able to focus on these other capabilities at all.

http://go.uen.org/3Bp

 

 


 

 

What Schools Must Learn From LA’s iPad Debacle Wired

 

WHEN LOS ANGELES schools began handing out iPads in the fall of 2013, it looked like one of the country’s most ambitious rollouts of technology in the classroom. The city’s school district planned to spend $1.3 billion putting iPads, preloaded with the Pearson curriculum, in the hands of every student in every school.

Less than two years later, that ambitious plan now looks like a spectacularly foolish one. In August, the Los Angeles Unified School District halted its contract with Apple, as rumors swirled that Apple and Pearson may have received preferential treatment in the district’s procurement process, something the FBI is investigating. Then, this spring, the district sent a letter to Apple seeking a refund, citing crippling technical issues with the Pearson platform and incomplete curriculum that made it nearly impossible for teachers to teach. If a deal can’t be reached, the district could take legal action. (Apple did not immediately respond to WIRED’s request for comment.)

Pearson, whose stock tumbled following the news, has publicly defended the curriculum, which LAUSD’s director of the so-called Instructional Technology Initiative denounced as utterly unusable in a memo earlier this year.

But while the the parties involved continue pointing the finger and picking up the pieces, the important question to ask now is what this fiasco means for the future of technology in the classroom. If one of the country’s largest school districts, one of the world’s largest tech companies, and one of the most established brands in education can’t make it work, can anyone?

http://go.uen.org/3Bo

 

 

 

 

————————————————————-

NATIONAL NEWS

————————————————————-

 

ACT to Expand Computer-based Testing

Associated Press

 

WASHINGTON — ACT test takers take note: The No. 2 pencil is losing its cachet. Greater numbers of high school students will be able to take the college entrance exam on a computer next year.

The ACT announced Friday that computer-based testing will be available next year in the 18 states and additional districts that require students, typically juniors, to take the ACT during the school day. About 1 million students could be affected.

But don’t throw away those pencils yet.

Participating schools provide the computers for testing, and ACT officials say it’s too early to predict how many schools will be ready next year to offer the online testing. Even where computer-based testing is available, ACT officials said the traditional paper test will still be an option.

http://go.uen.org/3Bf

 

 


 

 

 

Anti-Common-Core Bills Diversify as Democrats’ Skepticism Grows, Report Says Education Week

 

How have legislators’ opposition to the Common Core State Standards changed over the last several years, and what does that shift say (and not say) about the state of pushback to the standards?

Researchers Ashley Jochim and Lesley Lavery aim to answer those questions in their just-released “The Evolving Politics of the Common Core” report for the Brookings Institution. The report draws conclusions from the types and sponsors of bills that in some way react oppose the standards or treat them in a “negative fashion.

Utilizing Dan Thatcher’s common-core bill tracking at the National Conference of State Legislatures, Jochim and Lavery counted 238 “negative” bills dealing with the common core from 2011 to 2014. (All but eight states dealt with some form of such bills during that time, although if you include bills from this year, that number would shrink.) Then they divided them into various categories based on what policies they dealt with, and tracked the number of bills by category that were introduced.

In an interview, Jochim told me that the question she and Lavery asked about whether to include a bill in the study was: “Does it aim to support implementation or undermine it?”

http://go.uen.org/3Bi

 

A copy of the report

http://go.uen.org/3Bj (Brookings)

 

 


 

 

 

Research Project Aims to Build Better Math Texts Project draws on findings in cognitive science Education Week

 

Chicago – As teachers dig into implementing new standards in mathematics, a federal research project is working to make their curricular materials more effective at getting content across.

A five-year, $10 million project by the National Research and Development Center on Cognition and Mathematics Instruction is field-testing how to apply cognitive-science findings on how students learn. In randomized controlled experiments in 17 states, researchers are testing changes to one of the most popular middle school math-textbook series, Pearson’s Connected Mathematics.

Teams of researchers from WestEd, Carnegie Mellon University, Temple University, the University of Illinois at Chicago, the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and Worcester Polytechnic Institute are testing potential revisions to the Connected Mathematics curriculum materials for grades 6 to 8, based on the federal Institute of Education Sciences’ practice guide, “Organizing Instruction and Study to Improve Student Learning.”

Research teams are testing better text and illustration integration, use of sample problems, and homework and practice pacing. They are also looking at how well teachers are trained to implement the curriculum.

http://go.uen.org/3Bh

 

 


 

 

New School-Leader Standards Stir Dissent Education Week

 

New professional standards for school leaders, which are scheduled to be released next week, are drawing criticism from some educators who say they were sidelined in a final revision process that they contend puts too little emphasis on important aspects of the principal’s job relating to issues of social justice, cultural responsiveness, and ethics.

At the heart of their disagreement over the updated set of standards—which describes what principals, assistant principals, and other school leaders should know and be able to demonstrate in their work—are questions about the role principals play in today’s schools, the core functions that accompany the job, and who should have the final say over setting the professional benchmarks used to prepare, train, and evaluate school leaders.

The proposed new version of the principal standards—known as the Interstate School Leaders Licensure Consortium Standards—were released for public comment last fall and have been subjected to major revisions ever since. Most states use the standards for their school leaders.

http://go.uen.org/3Bg

 

 


 

 

 

Congress Temporarily Renews Funding Program For Rural Schools NPR All Things Considered

 

Rural counties and school districts can now breathe a sigh of relief. Federal money for schools to offset the loss of tax revenue from nontaxable federal lands expired last September. The fix was tucked into another bill, but it’s only temporary.

http://go.uen.org/3Bb

 

 


 

 

 

Montana moves to save indigenous languages from extinction Reuters

 

Two bills designed to preserve the dying languages of Montana’s 13 Native American tribes have been signed into law by Governor Steve Bullock, who said the indigenous tongues represented “the culture and history of our entire state.”

The legislation seeks to protect and promote languages that began to wither in the 19th century during white settlement of the American West and early campaigns by the U.S. government to force Indian children to adopt English.

Montana is the latest of just a few states to approve initiatives aimed at reviving links to a past where indigenous languages and customs predominated. Alaska and Hawaii have formally recognized indigenous languages, although English remains the official tongue in both states.

Bullock, a Democrat, hailed the legislation approved by the Republican-led legislature during a signing ceremony on Wednesday.

“Tribal languages are more than just a collection of words and phrases tied together. They represent the culture and history of not only Native Americans in our state, but in fact they represent the culture and history of our entire state,” he said in a statement.

The bills, sponsored by Democratic state lawmakers who are Native Americans, would encourage school districts to create Indian language immersion programs and formalize a pilot program that seeks to preserve and perpetuate native languages through methods that include audio and visual recordings.

http://go.uen.org/3Be

 

 


 

 

 

Fairfax school board approves transgender protections Washington Post

 

The Fairfax County School Board voted to approve expanding protections to transgender students and staff Thursday night at a rambunctious meeting that included chants, jeers and vocal opposition from hundreds of parents.

The School Board voted 10 to 1 with one abstention to add “gender identity” to its non-discrimination policy, two months after Virginia Attorney General Mark R. Herring (D) issued an opinion granting local school boards the authority to expand protections to transgender people.

The School Board voted in November to include sexual orientation in its non-discrimination policy after the Supreme Court let stand rulings that allow gay marriages in Virginia and other states.

http://go.uen.org/3Bc

 

http://go.uen.org/3Bd (Fox)

 

 


 

 

 

In Surprise Move, Teacher Ed. Accreditation Group Ousts President Education Week

 

The board of the Council for the Accreditation of Educator Preparation, now the sole national accreditor of teacher-preparation programs, made an unexpected move May 7 to replace the group’s founding president, James G. Cibulka.

Christopher Koch, until recently the Illinois state superintendent of schools, will serve as CAEP’s interim director while a search for a new president is launched, the organization said in a release.

The release gave no explanations for the sudden change in leadership.

http://go.uen.org/3Bk

 

 


 

 

 

When school safety drills weren’t so smooth, these students made a training video NewsHour

 

As schools around the country work to ramp up safety, a high school in Phoenix has enlisted journalism students to create a helpful video for their peers on what to do during emergencies.

http://go.uen.org/3Bl

 

 


 

 

 

Zions Bank employees teaching about savings Meridian (ID) Press

 

Zions Bank reported having a 6 percent balance increase among its Ada County savings accounts between January 2010 and January 2015. This information came from a review of local banking data.

This is up from the 2 percent balance rate before the 2007 to 2009 recession.

To keep future generations saving, over 120 Zions Bank employees are visiting local schools in Idaho and Utah to teach more than 9,300 students grades K-12 about saving. The move is also in honor of National Teach Children to Save day.

http://go.uen.org/3Bs

 

 

 

 

————————————————————

CALENDAR

————————————————————

 

USOE Calendar

http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

 

 

UEN News

http://www.uen.org

 

 

May 8:

Utah State Board of Education meeting

8 a.m., 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

 

Administrative Rules Review Committee meeting

9 a.m., 445 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/Interim/2015/html/00002228.htm

 

 

May 13:

Middle School Science Standards Public Meeting

7 p.m., Cache County School District, 2063 N 1200 East, North Logan

http://schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

 

 

May 19:

Executive Appropriations Committee meeting

2 p.m., 445 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2015&com=APPEXE

 

 

May 20:

Education Interim Committee meeting

9 a.m., TBD

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2015&Com=INTEDU

 

 

May 21:

Instructional Material Commission meeting

9:30 a.m., 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://schools.utah.gov/CURR/imc/News-and-Information/History.aspx

 

 

July 9:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://go.uen.org/1pn

 

 

 

Related posts:

Comments are closed.