Education News Roundup

Terryl Warner, State Board of Education member.

Terryl Warner, State Board of Education member.

Education News Roundup

Today’s Top Picks:

 

Congratulations to Salt Lake County/Granite School District’s Pay for Success voluntary preschool program for its recognition from Harvard.

http://go.uen.org/3Gj (DN)

or http://go.uen.org/3Gk (Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation)

 

KSL looks for radon in Granite schools.

http://go.uen.org/3Gw (KSL)

 

Utah State Board of Education Member Terryl Warner discusses standardized testing.

http://go.uen.org/3Ga (SLT)

 

Compton, Calif., schools sued for allegedly failing to address needs of trauma-affected students.

http://go.uen.org/3Gb (LAT)

and http://go.uen.org/3GM (Ed Week)

and http://go.uen.org/3GN (CSM)

and http://go.uen.org/3GE (AP)

 

CBS MoneyWatch looks at ads on school buses.

http://go.uen.org/3GQ (CBS MoneyWatch)

 

And don’t forget tonight’s meeting on proposed Science Standards.

http://schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

 

 

 

 

 

 

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TODAY’S HEADLINES

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UTAH

 

Harvard recognizes Salt Lake County preschool program as one of the best in innovation

 

Is radon in Utah schools? KSL investigates

 

Cache County School District Board of Education chooses middle school boundaries

 

Worldwide experts in Autism research meet at conference

 

What to do if your teen is falling behind in school

 

Northern Utah social worker charged with rape

 

Man defrauds Utah school district, employer of thousands

 

Utah high school bans students with special needs from appearing in yearbook: mother

 

Grads: What I learned in high school that I’ll remember in 20 years

 

Graduation time is here

 

Spectrum Media rewards PVHS school spirit with pizza

 

Shakespeare Festival offers student access passes

 

Fitch Affirms Granite School District, UT’s GOs at ‘AAA’; Outlook Stable

 

1 in 3 parents are worried their child won’t eat before home room

 

 


 

 

 

OPINION & COMMENTARY

 

Don’t let testing kill the thrill of learning

 

Utah School Board is changing the science standards?

 

Bad Deal in Baltimore

Progressives and unions gut a charter-school reform.

 

The Paperwork Pile-Up

Measuring the Burden of Charter School Applications

 

 


 

 

 

NATION

 

Compton Unified sued for allegedly failing to address trauma-affected students

 

No school for thousands of kids as teachers hold 1-day walkout

 

Powering Up: The campaign to teach computer science to a digital nation

 

Native American schools long have been crumbling, but now Washington is paying attention

 

Should school districts allow ads on buses?

 

Sen. Rand Paul, Presidential Candidate, Not Opposed to National Testing

 

Jindal touts education record — but is silent on Common Core — before possible presidential run

 

ETS Hauls in Texas Assessment Deals Worth $280M, Tops Pearson

 

Education board orders Douglas to open office back up

 

U.S. Supreme Court denies teachers’ Katrina layoffs suit

 

Officials: Westfield school employee built stage that collapsed No criminal charges will be filed, officials said, after investigation into stage collapse at Westfield High that injured 17.

 

Tiger Mascot at Issue in Ohio Exotics Crackdown

 

Unequal Schools in France Prompt Strike, Soul-searching

 

 

 

 

 

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UTAH NEWS

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Harvard recognizes Salt Lake County preschool program as one of the best in innovation

 

SALT LAKE CITY — Harvard University has recognized Salt Lake County’s public-private preschool program as one of the best in the country for government innovation.

The Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation at the John F. Kennedy School of Government noted Salt Lake County’s Pay for Success Funding for Preschool — under the leadership of United Way of Salt Lake — as a top 25 program in this year’s Innovations in American Government Awards competition.

Salt Lake County in 2013 began participating in the first Pay for Success public/private partnership to help expand access to voluntary, high-quality preschool for 600 children from low-income families.

With a unanimous vote from the County Council, Mayor Ben McAdams budgeted a one-time appropriation of $350,000 for a Granite School District program, in order to make more slots available to 3- and 4-year-old children living in the Granite District.

http://go.uen.org/3Gj (DN)

 

http://go.uen.org/3Gk (Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation)

 

 


 

 

 

Is radon in Utah schools? KSL investigates

 

HOLLADAY — A silent killer may be lurking in Utah schools, but districts aren’t required to test for it. Radon is a colorless, odorless gas that seeps up from the ground. Health officials say it is the second-leading cause of lung cancer after smoking. Many Utahns have tested their homes and found high levels of radon, but what’s going on in our schools?

To find out, the KSL Investigators teamed up with radon technicians and district officials to test six elementary schools in the City of Holladay: Cottonwood Elementary, Crestview Elementary, Howard R. Driggs Elementary, Morningside Elementary, Oakwood Elementary, and Spring Lane Elementary.

http://go.uen.org/3Gw (KSL)

 

 


 

 

Cache County School District Board of Education chooses middle school boundaries

 

The Cache County School District Board of Education has finalized the middle school boundaries after a 6-1 vote during their meeting Thursday.

http://go.uen.org/3Gn (LHJ)

 

 


 

 

Worldwide experts in Autism research meet at conference

 

SALT LAKE CITY – Autism research, aide, and treatment center workers gathered at the Grand America Hotel in Salt Lake City from May 13 to May 16 to share ideas and innovation.

The International Society for Autism Research (INSAR) hosted their annual meeting with thousands in attendance from China, Scandinavia, and all across the U.S. The conference included hundreds of university sponsored research projects on autism.

The “innovative technology demonstrations” varied from studies and research to apps designed to help those with autism. One project even included google glass-type wear as part of their presentation. Most of the projects and speakers at the conference focused on early detection of autism as the key factor in treatment.

http://go.uen.org/3Gm (OSE)

 

 


 

 

 

What to do if your teen is falling behind in school

 

What do you do when your teen is struggling and looks like they may not be able to graduate on time?

http://go.uen.org/3Gs (KUTV)

 

 


 

 

Northern Utah social worker charged with rape

 

A Cache Valley school-based social worker has been arrested and charged with rape and other sex crimes for an alleged incident with a 16-year-old girl.

Donavan Daniel Faucette, 34, of Hyrum, was charged Monday with two counts of forcible sodomy, and one count each of rape and object rape in Logan’s 1st District Court. All are first-degree felonies which carry a possible punishment of life in prison.

Faucette was arrested late Sunday and booked in to the Cache County jail after the alleged sex assault was reported to the sheriff’s office by his employer, Bear River Mental Health Services, Inc., (BRMH), sheriff’s Chief Deputy Matt Bilodeau said.

http://go.uen.org/3Gi (SLT)

 

http://go.uen.org/3Go (LHJ)

 

http://go.uen.org/3Gu (KUTV)

 

http://go.uen.org/3Gv (KTVX)

 

http://go.uen.org/3Gx (KSL)

 

http://go.uen.org/3Gy (KSTU)

 

 


 

 

 

Man defrauds Utah school district, employer of thousands

 

A St. George man was arrested Thursday after allegedly defrauding thousands of dollars from Washington County school district and his employer.

Dustin Taylor, 38, worked for an audio equipment supplier in town and after a long investigation police found Taylor was running a little side business of his own, and both the school district and employer had no idea he was doing it.

Lyle Cox,  Executive Director of Human Resources with the Washington County School District, said police wanted to keep the investigation quiet so it wouldn’t spook Taylor.

“We feel deceived by the fact that somebody would do that,” said Cox. He said when the school district submitted a bid to request service, the audio company Taylor worked for gave a good deal.

“We generally go out for bid and we generally provide the specs for the equipment we want,” said Cox.

Taylor and his employer were hired to install audio equipment into three of the district’s elementary schools in the county and Cox said unfortunately the equipment installed was not what was laid for.

http://go.uen.org/3Gt (KUTV)

 

 


 

 

 

Utah high school bans students with special needs from appearing in yearbook: mother

 

A Utah high school banned students with special needs from appearing in the yearbook this year, one of their fuming mothers claims.

“It sends the message that, ‘We’re not including you. You’re not part of us. We don’t accept you,” mom Leslee Bailey told the Daily News. “It made me feel very angry.”

Bailey’s daughter Amber Bailey, who has Down syndrome, had shown up in Blue Peak High School’s yearbooks for the last two years.

But they were shocked to find Amber and 16 other students with special needs missing from the annual Tooele County school’s publication when flipping through the pages last week.

http://go.uen.org/3GR (New York Daily News)

 

http://go.uen.org/3GU (Time)

 

http://go.uen.org/3GS (London Daily Mail)

 

http://go.uen.org/3GT (Daily Kos)

 

 


 

 

Grads: What I learned in high school that I’ll remember in 20 years

 

SOUTHERN UTAH – Another year has come and gone. As this year’s high school seniors get ready to step into the next phase of their lives, we asked them:

“What are you taking with you from high school that you’ll still be talking about at your 20-year reunion?”

Here’s what the class of 2015 had to say:

http://go.uen.org/3Gr (SGN)

 

 


 

 

 

Graduation time is here

 

The halls of education in Sanpete County will be a little emptier at the end of this week. Middle school and high school graduations begin on Tuesday with North Sanpete Middle School presenting diplomas at 6 p.m. Ephraim Middle School will hold a student recognition night on Wednesday at 6 p.m. followed by a dance from 7 to 9. Gunnison Valley Middle School graduation will be held on Thursday at 7 p.m.

http://go.uen.org/3GA (MUR)

 

 


 

 

Spectrum Media rewards PVHS school spirit with pizza

 

The smell of melted cheese fills the car as the heat of 30 hot pizzas steams up the back windows.

I’m riding with my boss, Rhett Long, Spectrum Media president and publisher, and we’re about to make some hungry high school kids really happy. Our colleagues Casie Forbes and Jud Burkett have the rest of the pizzas in their car, making a total of 50 pies we’re delivering to Pine View High School for lunch.

This is how Spectrum Media recognizes school spirit.

http://go.uen.org/3Gq (SGS)

 

 


 

 

Shakespeare Festival offers student access passes

 

Students who wish to see the work of Shakespeare, but operate within the confines of a student budget have an option to enjoy the famous playwrite in full splendor this season at the Utah Shakespeare Festival.

In an effort to help students plays at reduced prices, the Festival has announced the return of the Student Access Pass. This pass can be purchased for a one-time fee, and it gives the student the ability to attend as many Festival plays as he or she wants, at no additional cost, said Nikki Allen Koontz, Marketing and Public Relations director for the Utah Shakespeare Festival.

The Student Access Pass is $35 and allows one student unlimited access to Festival productions from June 25 through October 31, 2015 http://go.uen.org/3Gp (SGS)

 

 


 

 

 

Fitch Affirms Granite School District, UT’s GOs at ‘AAA’; Outlook Stable

 

SAN FRANCISCO–Fitch Ratings has affirmed the following Granite School District, Utah (the district) general obligation (GO) school building bond ratings:

–$189.7 million series 2010, 2011, 2012, and 2013 at ‘AAA’.

This ‘AAA’ underlying rating reflects the district’s credit quality without consideration of the ‘AAA’-rated guaranty on the GO bonds provided by the Utah School Bond Default Avoidance Program.

The Rating Outlook is Stable.

http://go.uen.org/3GP (Business Wire)

 

 


 

 

1 in 3 parents are worried their child won’t eat before home room

 

Many families with young children are concerned they won’t have enough food to feed their kids through the end of the school week, according to a new report from Kellogg’s.

http://go.uen.org/3Gl (DN)

 

 

 

 

 

 

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OPINION & COMMENTARY

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Don’t let testing kill the thrill of learning Salt Lake Tribune op-ed by Utah State Board of Education Member Terryl Warner

 

Tonight more than 635,000 Utah school kids will close their eyes and go to sleep. Tomorrow they will be expected to awaken cheerfully, be ready to learn, take tests and more tests!

Unfortunately, statistics paint a less cheerful picture for many Utah kids. Thousands of Utah children live with a myriad of social problems. They live in homes with domestic violence and substance abuse. They are victimized by sexual assault and emotional maltreatment. They live with mental health issues. Some students have learning disabilities, health problems or family tragedies affecting them.

For these reasons, I am extremely concerned about Utah’s emphasis on high stakes standardized testing and tying those scores to teacher and school evaluations and educator merit pay. When I was first appointed to the Utah State Board of Education, I realized the pressure many students, parents and teachers felt toward high stakes testing and how much instructional time was spent preparing for and taking tests. In fact, students have been preparing for and taking these tests since February.

I am not opposed to tests when they are used for the purpose in which they are intended: to monitor progress and to assist teachers with instruction. What I am opposed to is the amount of time standardized tests are taking from class time and the idea of tying educator and school evaluations along with educator merit pay to student performance on those tests.

http://go.uen.org/3Ga

 

 


 

 

 

Utah School Board is changing the science standards?

KNRS commentary by columnist Rod Arquette

 

Well in a move that isn’t entirely unexpected the Utah State School Board has decided to start the long process of updating the science standards being taught in the schools, and already it’s run in to issues. Given the enormous opposition to Common Core here in Utah they’ve already been under pressure to not repeat the same mistakes that occurred during that roll out and subsequent implementation.

But because nobody ever listens to us, ya know the people who put the elected officials in office, the Utah School Board has plans to develop these standards as a compliment to Common Core…because the best way to end a controversy is to simply compound upon it. Yea…brilliant idea.

So what might these new science standards contain? And are we going to be able to read them before they are shoved on our kids? Or will this be another education takeover where parents who simply ask a question will be shut down like we’ve seen with Common Core?

Guest Alert: Vincent Newmeyer, a member of the Standards Review Committee, will be on the program tonight at 6:20 to discuss the expected changes.

http://go.uen.org/3Gz

 

 


 

 

Bad Deal in Baltimore

Progressives and unions gut a charter-school reform.

Wall Street Journal editorial

 

The Baltimore riots produced national lamentations about urban poverty, but don’t expect much to be done about it. Witness how the Maryland legislature gutted a charter-school reform that could have offered an escape for poor children.

Baltimore schools are some of the worst in the country. According to the 2013 National Assessment of Educational Progress, a mere 14% of Baltimore fourth graders and 16% of eighth graders were proficient in reading. One in four students fails to graduate from high school. This is a disgrace.

Many states have used charter schools as an alternative to let educators operate without the rules that favor teacher tenure and other protections over student learning in failing schools. But Maryland’s chartering law is one of the stingiest. It makes local school boards the sole chartering authority, and they see charters as competition. The state also limits the freedom of charter schools to innovate and demand high performance.

http://go.uen.org/3Gf

 

 


 

 

The Paperwork Pile-Up

Measuring the Burden of Charter School Applications American Enterprise Institute analysis

 

In 1988, Albert Shanker, head of the United Federation of Teachers, suggested that small groups of teachers could design charter (performance-based) schools as alternatives to local public schools. In theory, charter school teachers would be held in check by a performance contract but would be otherwise free from rules, norms, and regulations that have stifled innovation in America’s traditional public school system. Charter school leaders would thus make a bargain, trading autonomy for accountability.

In practice, however, the charter bargain has become fairly one-sided. Charter school authorizers often include hundreds of tasks in the application to open a charter school, creating an onerous and lengthy process that risks freezing out potential school operators. To be sure, many application tasks are well within authorizers’ rights to require, but others are unnecessary and unduly burdensome for applicants. This is a real problem for the groups of teachers that Shanker envisioned, who might lack the time or resources to tackle these outsized applications and create new educational options for students.

After coding each of the requirements in applications from 40 charter authorizers, we found that while a plurality (43 percent) of the application requirements were clearly appropriate for authorizers to include, the majority of requirements were either unnecessary (34 percent) or clearly inappropriate (23 percent). This means that authorizers could shorten the average application by at least one-third without sacrificing their ability to ensure quality—a change that could save applicants more than 700 hours of work, based on interviewed school leaders’ estimates of the amount of time it takes to complete a charter application. Interviews and application data point to a handful of lessons about charter school authorizing.

http://go.uen.org/3Gg

 

 

 

 

 

 

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NATIONAL NEWS

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Compton Unified sued for allegedly failing to address trauma-affected students Los Angeles Times

 

In a groundbreaking effort to address a key underlying cause of poor academic performance, students who have suffered from violence and other trauma are suing the Compton Unified School District for allegedly failing to address their problems and provide an appropriate education, according to a class-action lawsuit filed Monday.

The lawsuit will test whether “complex trauma” qualifies as a disability under federal law, which would require school districts to offer special academic and mental health services. If successful, it could vastly expand support for scores of struggling students, especially in low-income, high-crime minority neighborhoods.

Decades of research have found that children who have suffered serious trauma are far more likely to repeat a grade, be suspended from school and have severe attendance and behavioral problems, according to Marleen Wong, an associate dean and clinical professor at the USC School of Social Work. Her 2003 study of thousands of sixth-graders in South and East Los Angeles found that nine of 10 had witnessed or experienced violence and had lower reading scores, higher absenteeism and other problems.

“If you really want to do something about the achievement gap, childhood trauma is the place to start,” said Mark Rosenbaum, an attorney with Public Counsel, a Los Angeles-based pro bono law firm that filed the lawsuit along with Irell & Manella LLP.

The lawsuit is seeking training for staff to recognize trauma, mental health support for students to cope with their condition and a shift from punitive disciplinary practices to those based on reconciliation and healing.

http://go.uen.org/3Gb

 

http://go.uen.org/3GM (Ed Week)

 

http://go.uen.org/3GN (CSM)

 

http://go.uen.org/3GE (AP)

 

 

 

 

No school for thousands of kids as teachers hold 1-day walkout Seattle Times

 

Hundreds of public-school teachers plan to march in downtown Seattle on Tuesday to appeal for higher pay and to protest what they say is the Legislature’s failure to fund voter-approved class-size reductions.

Seattle Public Schools teachers are scheduled to march from Seattle Center at about 11 a.m. to a rally at Westlake Plaza. Teachers in the Issaquah and Mercer Island school districts will join the protest. Classes in all three districts are canceled.

Seattle Parks and Recreation is offering activities at 21 designated community centers for Seattle students from kindergarten to eighth grade. The free program will operate from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. Teen Centers will be open from 2:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Nearly 60 teachers unions have held or have agreed to hold similar one-day walkouts across the state, according to the Washington Education Association. Teachers in Peninsula also planned a one-day walkout Tuesday, and 13 other teachers unions have protests scheduled for later this week.

http://go.uen.org/3Gc

 

 


 

 

 

Powering Up: The campaign to teach computer science to a digital nation Washington Post

 

Code.org, the non-profit organization that has gotten children as young as five years old to try computer coding, has joined with the College Board to try to expand computer education in U.S. public schools, particularly to girls and minorities.

Seattle-based Code.org, founded by two tech entrepreneurs, and the College Board, the New York-based non-profit that administers the SAT and Advanced Placement tests, are offering to help 35 of the country’s largest school districts teach new computer science classes.

Too many students, particularly girls and teens of color, attend high schools that do not teach computer science, or they are not encouraged to take those classes if they are offered, said Hadi Partovi, a co-founder of Code.org.

http://go.uen.org/3GC

 

 


 

 

 

Native American schools long have been crumbling, but now Washington is paying attention Washington Post

 

Official Washington has rarely paid much attention to the Bureau of Indian Education, a long-dysfunctional corner of the federal bureaucracy that is responsible for overseeing nearly 200 schools serving approximately 50,000 Native American children in 23 states.

But now that might be changing.

President Obama is seeking to boost funding for Indian education by $150 million, including nearly $60 million to begin fixing dozens of tribal school facilities that have languished in disrepair for decades. The funding request is part of a broader administration effort to improve lives for Native American youth.

The push comes as Rep. John Kline (R-Minn.), the powerful chairman of the House Committee on Education and the Workforce, has sought to highlight the Bureau of Indian Education’s management troubles with two hearings in recent weeks.

http://go.uen.org/3GB

 

 


 

 

 

Should school districts allow ads on buses?

CBS MoneyWatch

 

An advertising watchdog group is urging parents to fight the growing popularity of school bus ads, arguing that they unfairly target young, impressionable consumers.

The ads are allowed in New Jersey, Texas, Arizona, Massachusetts, Colorado, Massachusetts, Utah, Nevada and New Mexico, according to the Campaign for a Commercial-Free Childhood (CCFC). Legislation to allow them was recently enacted in Georgia, and a bus ad bill is pending in Oklahoma. One recently passed the Indiana State Senate.

About 20 districts in New Jersey currently allow the ads, and several others are considering the idea, according to radio station New Jersey 101.5. Schools in Washington County, Tennessee, are mulling whether to sell the ads. Among other districts that have bus ads are Texas’ Austin Independent School District and the Scottsdale Unified District in Arizona.

“The first message and the last message that a kid sees each day is an ad,” Josh Golin, the CCFC’s associate director, told CBS MoneyWatch. He added that the ads aren’t very profitable for districts, netting them on average about $1 per pupil, and “parents lose the ability to shield their kids from advertising.”

http://go.uen.org/3GQ

 


 

 

Sen. Rand Paul, Presidential Candidate, Not Opposed to National Testing Education Week

 

Sen. Rand Paul, a Kentucky Republican and 2016 presidential candidate, talked education during an interview Sunday on NBC’s Meet the Press, during which he said that he’s not against national testing, despite his anti-federal-meddling attitude. Though to be sure, he’s still very much opposed to a national curriculum.

The interview largely focused on foreign affairs issues, but crept into the edu-world when host Chuck Todd asked Paul about an idea in his book, Taking a Stand: Moving Beyond Partisan Politics to Unite America.

The idea, loosely explained, is that a superb teacher should be teaching millions of students via online classes, not 20 to 30 students in a small classroom.

http://go.uen.org/3Gd

 

 


 

 

 

Jindal touts education record — but is silent on Common Core — before possible presidential run New Orleans Times-Picayune

 

On the day Gov. Bobby Jindal announced his preliminary interest in the 2016 presidential race, he gave an education speech that was pure 2012.

Jindal’s Monday (May 18) speech to the American Federation for Children had two uses of the phrase “I’m a conservative Republican,” a dozen references to the American Dream, at least one use of the subjunctive mood — and not a single mention of Common Core.

Three years ago, Jindal persuaded Louisiana lawmakers from both parties to pass reforms promoting free-market competition in education. That’s what he wanted to emphasize to a national audience in New Orleans: not his fierce opposition to the academic benchmarks but his record of supporting a parent’s right to decide where they wanted their child to go to school.

“One of the most important, lasting legacies, I believe, will be the reforms we’ve implemented in education, especially school choice,” he said.

http://go.uen.org/3Ge

 

 


 

 

 

ETS Hauls in Texas Assessment Deals Worth $280M, Tops Pearson Education Week

 

It’s been a good couple of months in the assessment market for the Educational Testing Service.

Less so, apparently, for Pearson, which in a decision announced Monday, lost out on the awarding of a cluster of lucrative Texas state testing contracts, worth roughly $280 million, to ETS.

The decision comes just weeks after Pearson lost out on another deal to ETS, in California, where state officials awarded the Lawrenceville, N.J.-based nonprofit a huge, multiyear assessment contract. That decision deeply angered Pearson, which said the process ran afoul of the law.

http://go.uen.org/3GK

 

http://go.uen.org/3GL (Houston Chronicle)

 

 


 

 

Education board orders Douglas to open office back up

(Phoenix) Arizona Republic

 

The leadership spat between Gov. Doug Ducey and state schools chief Diane Douglas over who is in charge of State Board of Education staffers continued Monday when the board voted to direct Douglas to re-open its offices and files to board employees who investigate complaints against certified teachers.

Board executive director Christine Thompson told the board that a chief investigator, charged with investigating complaints against certified teachers, was being denied access to electronic files needed to complete investigations.

Douglas was the lone board member to vote against a motion that read “the board directs the superintendent to provide the state board’s Investigative Unit access to all documents necessary to do their jobs, including virtual access to the directors and files on the ADE’s network that the Investigative Unit requires to fulfill their duties.” The action should be taken by Tuesday, the motion stated.

Board staff members moved out of the education department building and into the governor’s tower on May 8. Douglas has ordered them to return to work in her building.

http://go.uen.org/3Gh

 

 


 

 

 

U.S. Supreme Court denies teachers’ Katrina layoffs suit New Orleans Times-Picayune

 

It’s the end of the road for the thousands of New Orleans public school employees who said they were wronged when they lost their jobs after Hurricane Katrina. They lost in Louisiana in October, and the U.S. Supreme Court denied their appeal Monday (May 18), according to court documents.

The Louisiana Supreme Court’s decision against the plaintiffs was doubly negative — most of the court’s justices threw the case out, and said they would have ruled against the plaintiffs anyway — and doubly surprising, because the teachers had won at trial in the appeals court. The trial judge awarded damages that could have totaled $1.5 billion.

About 7,500 teachers and staff were part of the suit. It charged that the Orleans Parish School Board did not follow proper procedures when it laid off almost its entire workforce after the 2005 storm. Moreover, plaintiffs said, the state Recovery School District, which took over most of the schools, should have given them priority in hiring.

http://go.uen.org/3GH

 

http://go.uen.org/3GI (Ed Week)

 

A copy of the denial

http://go.uen.org/3GJ (U.S. Supreme Court)

 

 


 

 

Officials: Westfield school employee built stage that collapsed No criminal charges will be filed, officials said, after investigation into stage collapse at Westfield High that injured 17.

Indianapolis Star

 

Police and school officials on Tuesday morning said the stage that covered an orchestra pit that collapsed last month at Westfield High School was designed and constructed by a school employee, and not properly supported.

However, the Westfield Police Department announced at a news conference Tuesday that no criminal charges will be filed in the accident. The school is now conducting its own investigation, which may lead to disciplinary action.

The students were exuberantly dancing and singing “Don’t Stop Believing,” the final act to a year-end show on April 23, when the stage below them collapsed, sending dozens plunging into the orchestra pit. In all, 17 students were injured. All but one has returned to class. None of the injuries were life threatening.

Dramatic video captured the collapse.

Westfield Superintendent Mark Keen said the police investigation revealed that Quinten James, the auditorium director, wanted to create more space in the orchestra pit by removing large steel support beams. James, Keen said, wanted students to be able to perform in the orchestra pit with the stage cover in place, so that other students could also stand on the cover.

http://go.uen.org/3GD

 

 


 

 

 

Tiger Mascot at Issue in Ohio Exotics Crackdown Associated Press

 

COLUMBUS, Ohio — A school that uses a live tiger cub as a mascot has been warned it must submit more documentation to continue that tradition without violating Ohio’s law on dangerous animals.

The booster club that provides tigers for Massillon Washington High School is among more than a dozen animal owners contacted by the Ohio Department of Agriculture in recent months over compliance concerns, according to records obtained by The Associated Press.

It’s not clear if or how that might affect the live-mascot tradition in Massillon, where football passion runs deep: Cleveland Browns and Cincinnati Bengals founder Paul Brown got his start as a high school coach in the northeast Ohio city, and each boy born there gets a football in his bassinet.

And, for each football season since 1970, they’ve brought in a new tiger cub called Obie.

http://go.uen.org/3GG

 

 


 

 

Unequal Schools in France Prompt Strike, Soul-searching Associated Press

 

PARIS — France is trying to shake up a top-down system of teaching, end an elite bilingual program and give schools more say in how students spend their time, saying entrenched inequality in education threatens the country’s future.

The plan from the Socialist-led government came after an international study ranked France among the developed world’s most unequal school systems, with student performance highly dependent upon their socio-economic status. The changes set to start in 2016 are relatively modest: scaling back Latin and Greek, rescheduling and expanding foreign language teaching, and letting schools – rather than the central government – decide how to spend 20 percent of students’ time.

But the plan prompted a strike on Tuesday, drawing criticism from both left-leaning teachers’ unions and French conservatives. It’s a debate that is similar to discussions about underperforming students in the United States.

http://go.uen.org/3GF

 

http://go.uen.org/3GO (CSM)

 

 

 

 

 

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CALENDAR

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USOE Calendar

http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

 

 

UEN News

http://www.uen.org

 

 

May 19:

Executive Appropriations Committee meeting

2 p.m., 445 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/Interim/2015/html/00002401.htm

 

Middle School Science Standards Public Meeting

7 p.m., Salt Lake Center for Science Education, 1400 Goodwin Ave., Salt Lake City

http://schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

 

 

May 20:

Education Interim Committee meeting

9 a.m., 30 House Building

http://le.utah.gov/Interim/2015/html/00002324.htm

 

 

May 21:

Instructional Material Commission meeting

9:30 a.m., 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://schools.utah.gov/CURR/imc/News-and-Information/History.aspx

 

 

June 18-19:

Utah State Board of Education meeting

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

 

 

July 9:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://go.uen.org/1pn

 

 

 

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