Education News Roundup: May 20, 2015

Step-up-ready-grants-300x138Education News Roundup

Today’s Top Picks:

 

The proposed middle school science standards get one last public hearing in Salt Lake.

http://go.uen.org/3GX (SLT)

or a copy of the draft and a link to comment

http://go.uen.org/3q2 (USOE)

 

John Glenn, by the way, puts in a good word for teaching evolution in schools.

http://go.uen.org/3Hv (AP)

 

D-News looks at the StepUP READY grant program.

http://go.uen.org/3GY (DN)

 

Standard looks at credit recovery programs ahead of high school graduation.

http://go.uen.org/3Ha (OSE)

 

Utah gets some kudos as the U.S. Senate looks at open education resources.

http://go.uen.org/3HH (Ed Week)

 

Congratulations to North Davis Preparatory Academy on its award from the Embassy of Spain.

http://go.uen.org/3H9 (OSE)

 

Guess what America’s top teachers name as the biggest barrier to student success.

http://go.uen.org/3Ht (WaPo)

or a copy of the survey

http://go.uen.org/3Hu (Scholastic)

 

 

 

 

 

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TODAY’S HEADLINES

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UTAH

 

Parents, educators debate new science standards in Salt Lake City The final meeting on the proposals brings up issues of teaching controversial topics and role of the feds.

 

Grant enhancing K-12, higher ed partnership leads to better student outcomes, educators say

 

Many high school students making up credits to graduate

 

‘Open Educational Resources’ Promoted in U.S. Senate Proposal

 

North Davis Preparatory Academy wins national award

 

Partnership preps 7th graders to discover college

 

1st senior graduates from school Warren Jeffs forced into closure 14 years ago

 

Weber school property deals fuel commercial ventures

 

School Makes Yearbook Insert for Special Education Students

 

Enrollment climbing again in Washington County schools

 

ICSD approves bonding for new North Elementary

 

Master planning workshop reveals dramatic changes may be coming to PCSD Under favored scheme, Kearns Boulevard campus would be significantly altered

 

School board hears from parents concerning ninth graders

 

3 Utah County students awarded National Merit scholarships

 

Utah social worker’s alleged sex assault victim was a client, documents say

 

Man charged with theft for allegedly defrauding his employer and a Utah school district

 

Utah’s School-to-Prison Pipeline

 

Tooele High School Students in Hot Water for “Prank”

 

High school students take home top culinary awards

 

Local high school actors win top honors

 

Murray City School District honors teacher, employee

 

Diplomas to be presented this week at five area high schools

 

West Side High School grad profile: Kelsie Winward thrives in new family, looks to future

 

Educator of the Week: Angie Meacham

 

Student of the Week: Benton Herd Aegerter

 

Home builders association awards $14,000 in Scholarships

 

“Click It For Creamies”

 

States that pay elementary teachers the most

 

 


 

 

 

OPINION & COMMENTARY

 

Summer well deserved for you great teachers

 

SAGE tests don’t help students if they don’t count

 

Sex ed, not catchy billboards, will reduce teen pregnancy

 

Why Technology Will Never Fix Education

 

 


 

 

 

NATION

 

Poverty, family stress are thwarting student success, top teachers say

 

In marathon session, lawmakers tackle drug tests, school vouchers Working into night, lawmakers also tackle education issues

 

John Glenn: Evolution Should be Taught in Schools

 

Bill introduced to curb falling milk consumption in schools Bill will preserve milk’s role in school feeding programs while complying with the most recent Dietary Guidelines for Americans

 

Minn. Lawsuit Raises Questions About Teacher-Licensure Portability Educators from out of state cite barriers

 

Reading Fluency Viewed as Neglected Skill

 

 

 

 

 

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UTAH NEWS

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Parents, educators debate new science standards in Salt Lake City The final meeting on the proposals brings up issues of teaching controversial topics and role of the feds.

 

Opponents of a proposed set of school science standards made a final pitch to state education managers Tuesday during the last of five informational meetings organized by the Utah State Office of Education.

Before the meeting, a group of roughly 15 people met at the Day-Riverside Library to review their concerns and strategize.

They were then joined by roughly 50 others at the Salt Lake Center for Science Education, where they spoke against the nationalization of science education and the inclusion of what they consider controversial topics in middle school classrooms.

“This is about science, but on a more important level this is about freedom,” Christel Swasey said. “Academic freedom has to continue.”

But there were as many supporters of the standards at Tuesday’s meeting, who praised an update to Utah’s science education framework.

The two sides alternated turns at a podium, with their comments occasionally prompting interruptions and applause from the audience.

http://go.uen.org/3GX (SLT)

 

A copy of the draft and a link to comment

http://go.uen.org/3q2 (USOE)

 

 


 

 

 

Grant enhancing K-12, higher ed partnership leads to better student outcomes, educators say

 

SALT LAKE CITY — Utah educators hope a modest but well-placed boost in funding will strengthen the relationship between public schools and higher education, helping more students enroll and succeed in college.

Now in its second year, the StepUP READY grant provides $500,000 in ongoing state money that is awarded through the Utah System of Higher Education to schools and colleges committed to partnering to make college a reality for more students.

So far, some schools, such as Olympus High School, are using last year’s funds to expand support services for at-risk students preparing for college. Others, such as Dixie State University, are using the money to hire college math students to help high schoolers with their math homework.

http://go.uen.org/3GY (DN)

 

 


 

 

 

Many high school students making up credits to graduate

 

OGDEN — As students are picking up diplomas from area high schools over the next couple of weeks, an increasing number of teens are only getting those diplomas because they have made up credits from failed classes during their high school years.

At first glance, the numbers seem pretty staggering. At Ogden High School, students have recovered 393 quarter credits this year. At Ben Lomond, 783 quarter credits have been recovered. The Weber School District reports 559 from all its high schools.

District leaders see both good and bad from those numbers.

“Would we like it to be lower? Sure we would. We want it that way. But it is encouraging to see that so many kids want to make up the credits and want to graduate,” said Tim Peters, executive director of the central cone of schools in Ogden School District.

But those credits also come with a price tag. In the Ogden School District, students make up credit by completing a packet relating to the subject of the failed class. The cost of the packet is $20.

In Weber School District, students go through a process of credit recovery where students first work with the teacher of the class they failed. The teacher tries to get them as far as they can and then after that the rest of the credit is recovered online. Reid Newey, assistant superintendent, said the district has been using the online model for a couple of years and they like it better than the packet system, although it is pricier, about $10 to $20 more per credit.

http://go.uen.org/3Ha (OSE)

 

 


 

 

 

‘Open Educational Resources’ Promoted in U.S. Senate Proposal Education Week

 

Federal lawmakers want to encourage schools to consider using free, modifiable learning resources for students before investing in costly textbooks and curricula.

A move in the U.S. Senate to promote schools’ use of open educational resources, if enacted by Congress and ultimately embraced by schools, could have a major impact on the development of curricula and on the companies that provide content to schools, some education experts say.

The latest Senate version of the main federal law on K-12 education includes new wording to encourage the use of open education resources—alternatives to proprietary products created by commercial companies—through grants that the Elementary and Secondary Education Act would make available to states.

The bipartisan amendment to the proposed Senate rewrite of the law is meant to encourage schools “to use and share open educational resources to disseminate best practices and provide an alternative to costly textbooks,” Sen. Orrin Hatch, R-Utah, said in a statement to Education Week.

Sen. Hatch—whose state has taken a lead role in encouraging the use of open resources—and Sen. Tammy Baldwin, D-Wis., sponsored the amendment, which was approved by a voice vote April 16. The overall bill awaits a vote of the full chamber.

http://go.uen.org/3HH (Ed Week)

 

 


 

 

North Davis Preparatory Academy wins national award

 

LAYTON – When it comes to teaching Spanish, North Davis Preparatory Academy is doing something right.

The charter school, with a 900-plus student enrollment, just received national honors from the Education Office of the Embassy of Spain. The award, which comes with $5,000 in cash, teaching materials and access to a virtual Spanish classroom, was only given to seven Spanish immersion schools in the United States. Approximately 100 schools applied for the honor.

NDPA is the only school to ever receive the award in the state of Utah.

The award was given specifically to the middle school of NDPA, which consists of about 300 students.

http://go.uen.org/3H9 (OSE)

 

 


 

 

 

Partnership preps 7th graders to discover college

 

Cedar Middle School has teamed with Southern Utah University to provide a day of workshops and activities, which provides seventh-graders the opportunity to see a university and spark an interest to help the students become life-long learners.

The partnership between the two Cedar City schools is a natural fit, said CMS science teacher Lisa Allred.

“In years past, we would take our year end trip to Zion, but we found that we spent too much time on the bus and in transit,” Allred said. “We brainstormed of somewhere local, and I mentioned SUU as a destination. It turned out great, it is a whirlwind. There is a lot of cooperation with CMS and SUU and this trip has worked out just great.”

http://go.uen.org/3Hm (SGS)

 

 


 

 

 

1st senior graduates from school Warren Jeffs forced into closure 14 years ago

 

HILDALE – Nine months ago, a Hildale school that sat empty for 13 years was slowly coming back to life. Where dirt had abounded for more than a decade, lawn was going in. Classrooms that had been cobwebbed and desolate were being aired out and readied for their first new pupils since 2001. Out in front of the building, a brand new sign was being erected.

When I first walked in, I was like, ‘Oh, my heaven, we have a lot of work to do “I remember when I first walked in, I was like, ‘Oh, my heaven, we have a lot of work to do,’” Water Canyon School Principal Darin Thomas said, “and here we are a year later.”

Nine months after its reopening, the Water Canyon School, formerly known as Phelps Elementary School, will celebrate its first-ever high school graduation Wednesday.

Phelps Elementary was closed by the Washington County School District in 2001 after Warren Jeffs, leader of the Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, ordered his followers to pull their children out of the school in 2000, which caused enrollment to drop severely.

In its former incarnation, the Water Canyon School did not house high school students, so 2014-15 has marked the first year high school pupils have been educated at the school.

http://go.uen.org/3Hn (SGN)

 

 


 

 

Weber school property deals fuel commercial ventures

 

The Weber school board is selling a piece of land in North Ogden and looking at signing on to a Community Development Area plan with Marriott-Slaterville.

The land being sold is in the Coldwater area of North Ogden, near 2700 North and 1200 East.

District spokesman Nate Taggart the land had been purchased in case a school was needed in the area, but that has been deemed necessary, so the parcel is being sold.

The undeveloped land was appraised at $750,000.

“We asked for that amount, and that’s what it came in at,” Taggart said.

http://go.uen.org/3Hb (OSE)

 

 


 

 

School Makes Yearbook Insert for Special Education Students

 

A Utah mother says the high school that angered her by leaving special education students out of its yearbook has decided to print special inserts with their photos.

Leslee Bailey says the principal of Blue Peak High School in Tooele called her to apologize Tuesday.

Bailey has said her daughter, Amber Bailey, had been upset by the omission, but the principal told her he never meant to for that to happen.

“It’s too late, but they’re trying really hard to fix it,” Leslee Bailey said. “They’re owning up to the mistake.”

Students will be able to pick up the insert page, featuring pictures of 21-year-old Amber Bailey and her 16 classmates, next week.

http://go.uen.org/3H3 (AP)

 

http://go.uen.org/3H2 (SLT)

 

http://go.uen.org/3Hg (PDH)

 

http://go.uen.org/3Ho (KSL)

 

http://go.uen.org/3Hp (KSTU)

 

http://go.uen.org/3Hs (MUR)

 

http://go.uen.org/3HE (Disability Scoop)

 

http://go.uen.org/3HK (Reuters)

 

http://go.uen.org/3HL (Redbook)

 

http://go.uen.org/3HM (CNN)

 

 


 

 

 

Enrollment climbing again in Washington County schools

 

After surprisingly low enrollment numbers to start the school year, an influx of new students has the Washington County School District forecasting more growth moving forward.

The district’s total enrollment count was 28,461 according to its May report, up only slightly from the October counts but enough to have district officials planning to add another 500 or so by the beginning of the next school year.

Typically the numbers drop from fall to spring as students leave high schools for early graduation, work or other reasons, Superintendent Larry Bergeson said, but this year the figures ticked upward, especially in elementary schools.

“It’s all move-ins, new people coming in,” Bergeson said. “It does alarm us a little bit. If it’s a precursor of things to come we need to make sure we’re planning accordingly.”

http://go.uen.org/3Hi (SGS)

 

 


 

 

 

ICSD approves bonding for new North Elementary

 

The Iron County School Board voted unanimously to approve the $14.9 million bond for the construction of a new North Elementary.

Hunter Shaheen, energy specialist for the Iron County School District, said the bonds for the financing have been purchased by State Bank of Southern Utah.

http://go.uen.org/3Hl (SGS)

 

 


 

 

 

Master planning workshop reveals dramatic changes may be coming to PCSD Under favored scheme, Kearns Boulevard campus would be significantly altered

 

The Park City School District continues to zero in on plans to accommodate an additional grade at Park City High School and to construct a new school for fifth- and sixth-graders.

VCBO Architecture, the district’s master planner, revealed four possible schemes last week during the district’s third community master planning workshop. Participants in the workshop helped narrow the selections down to one option the firm will continue to pursue.

The favored scheme represents a dramatic change to the district’s Kearns Boulevard campus.

http://go.uen.org/3HI (PR)

 

 


 

 

 

School board hears from parents concerning ninth graders

 

The Emery County School District held their monthly meeting on May 6 at Cottonwood Elementary. Dean Stilson requested summer travel for the girls basketball team. The basketball team would like to attend a camp this summer, preferably the Utah Valley camp. They would like to use their travel money to attend a camp instead of participating in a tournament. The school board approved the request.

Thomas Sitterud, representing a group of parents and ninth grade students approached the school board concerning moving the ninth grade students to high school and the sixth grade students to middle school.

http://go.uen.org/3HJ (Emery County Progress)

 

 


 

 

3 Utah County students awarded National Merit scholarships

 

The National Merit Scholarship Corporation announced the 2015 National Merit $2,500 Scholarship winners earlier this month, and of the 23 selected from Utah, three are Utah County students.

They are Kyle Hatch and Jeremiah Madsen from Orem, and Mckay Jensen from Provo.

Hatch will graduate from Orem High School and plans to pursue a career in medicine. Madsen will graduate from Mountain View High School in Orem and plans to pursue a career in writing. Jensen will graduate from the Utah County Academy of Sciences in Orem and plans to pursue a career in biophysics.

http://go.uen.org/3Hc (PDH)

 

 


 

 

 

Utah social worker’s alleged sex assault victim was a client, documents say

 

State licensing documents reveal that the alleged 16-year-old sexual assault victim of a Cache Valley school-based social worker was one of the social worker’s clients.

Donavan Daniel Faucette, 34, of Hyrum, was charged Monday in Logan’s 1st District Court with two counts of forcible sodomy, and one count each of rape and object rape. All are first-degree felonies which carry a possible punishment of life in prison.

On Tuesday, according to a state Division of Occupational and Professional Licensing document, Faucette surrendered his license to practice, which he has held since August 2009.

The surrender document also states that the alleged the female victim was a client of Faucette’s.

http://go.uen.org/3HA (SLT)

 

http://go.uen.org/3HB (DN)

 

 


 

 

Man charged with theft for allegedly defrauding his employer and a Utah school district

 

A 38-year-old Utah man is facing theft and communications fraud charges after he allegedly defrauded the company he worked for and a southern Utah school district.

The former Poll Sound employee was charged last week in 5th District Court with the two second-degree felonies after his employer contacted police and alleged the man had ordered valuable equipment for the Washington County School District, but had instead installed inferior equipment in three schools.

Court records allege the more expensive equipment had been installed in a separate school outside of the county.

“It appears [the suspect] had been operating his own business on the side while employed by Poll Sound,” a detective wrote in a probable cause statement filed in court. “They [the company] believed their equipment was stolen and installed in other contracts for his personal benefit.”

http://go.uen.org/3H1 (SLT)

 

http://go.uen.org/3Hk (SGS)

 

 


 

 

 

Utah’s School-to-Prison Pipeline

 

Something changed in America’s schools after the tragedy at Columbine High School. Worried about child safety, administrators, parents, and teachers teamed up with police to crack down on discipline. Trouble that once landed kids in detention is now punished with out-of-school suspension, expulsion, even arrest. The result is a pipeline that funnels children from school straight to prison. Wednesday, we’re talking about the school-to-prison pipeline in Utah and asking whom it affects and what can be done to stem its flow.

RadioWest is hosting this conversation in partnership with the Salt Lake County Bar Association.

http://go.uen.org/3Hq (KUER RadioWest)

 

 


 

 

 

Tooele High School Students in Hot Water for “Prank”

 

Some Tooele High School students are in trouble, after breaking into their school and carrying out a senior prank, that school officials say, went too far.

Police were called — but no arrests were made — after the students scattered glitter and toilet paper throughout the school.

District officials are still considering how to discipline the group.

http://go.uen.org/3Hr (KNRS)

 

 


 

 

High school students take home top culinary awards

 

UTAH COUNTY — Students from Utah Valley schools have been cooking it up during recent Restaurant Association Industry ProStart Culinary competitions.

When the culinary team at Springville High School competed at the regional level earlier this year, it actually placed behind Provo High School and Westlake High School. But when the schools met again at the state competition in April, Springville edged out Provo and other schools from throughout the state for the win, earning the title of 2015 ProStart Culinary State Champion.

http://go.uen.org/3Hf (PDH)

 

 


 

 

 

Local high school actors win top honors

 

Utah’s best young actors reside in the top of Utah.

That is the judgement of the Utah High School Musical Theater Awards, held this month in Logan.

Best actress honors were awarded to Abby Watts, a senior at Woods Cross High. Best actor honors went to Jordan Kirkman, a senior at Layton’s Northridge High School. In addition, Northridge High won best production for “The Wedding Singer.”

http://go.uen.org/3HF (OSE)

 

 


 

 

Murray City School District honors teacher, employee

 

MURRAY — The Murray City School District has announced Rob Wilson as its Teacher of the Year and Sharon Gillen as its Classified Employee of the Year.

http://go.uen.org/3H8 (DN)

 

 


 

 

 

Diplomas to be presented this week at five area high schools

 

Approximately 200 students will receive diplomas this week at graduation ceremonies throughout the San Juan School District. Many students are hard at work finalizing their school work in anticipation of receiving a diploma.

http://go.uen.org/3HC (San Juan Record)

 

 


 

 

West Side High School grad profile: Kelsie Winward thrives in new family, looks to future

 

There are many unique aspects to senior Kelsie Winward of West Side High School. Besides running track and cross-country, she is an active member of the Book Club and president of the Key Club. She particularly loves the Key Club because she loves doing service.

http://go.uen.org/3Hh (LHJ)

 

 


 

 

Educator of the Week: Angie Meacham

 

Educator of the Week Angie Meacham is a business teacher and student council adviser at Springville High School.

http://go.uen.org/3Hd (PDH)

 

 


 

 

 

Student of the Week: Benton Herd Aegerter

 

Benton Herd Aegerter, 15, was chosen as this week’s Student of the Week. He is a ninth grader at Springville Junior High.

http://go.uen.org/3He (PDH)

 

 


 

 

 

Home builders association awards $14,000 in Scholarships

 

SOUTHERN UTAH – The Southern Utah Home Builders Association has announced its 2015 SUHBA Scholarship recipients. A total of $14,000 in college scholarships will be given out this year to 28 students and are made possible in part by funds generated from the annual home builders assocaition Charity Golf Tournament which will take place on June 5, and the St. George Area Parade of Homes which will take place February 12-21, 2016. The Southern Utah Home Builders Association has distributed over $80,000 for college scholarships since 2006.

http://go.uen.org/3HG (SGN)

 

 


 

 

“Click It For Creamies”

 

LOGAN — Troopers with the Utah Highway Patrol visited Logan High School Tuesday afternoon, passing out ice cream to students who were wearing their seat belts.

http://go.uen.org/3HD (LHJ)

 

 


 

 

 

States that pay elementary teachers the most

 

How do you judge the worth of a teacher?

While there are certainly plenty of intangible ways to understand how much our educators are valued, it seems as if the easiest method is simply finding out how much they’re paid.

But by that metric, not all states value teachers equally. In fact, a recent study by the Bureau of Labor Statistics reported on the median wage of elementary school teachers in each state.

http://go.uen.org/3H7 (DN)

 

 

 

 

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OPINION & COMMENTARY

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Summer well deserved for you great teachers (St. George) Spectrum commentary by Arianne Brown, a mother of 6

 

The close of the school year is always filled with a whole slew of emotions —most of them on the side of excitement for the months ahead.

If you have been following my column, you may know by now, that nothing brings me more joy than having my children home with me.

http://go.uen.org/3Hj

 

 


 

 

SAGE tests don’t help students if they don’t count Salt Lake Tribune letter from Donald J. Ries

 

I loved teaching middle and high school science for 35 years, both in this country and overseas at some of the best international schools. Motivation of students was a key element in their success in learning. While tests are one of the poorer motivators, it is a given that if the test doesn’t count for anything, the majority will expend little effort on it.

A test that covers the whole year is especially challenging for such students. That it should count for nothing for them says the material must not be very important. So why has the Legislature decided the SAGE test won’t count for students? What insight into student motivation and learning do they have from outside the classroom that says this is a valid assessment?

http://go.uen.org/3H6

 

 


 

 

Sex ed, not catchy billboards, will reduce teen pregnancy Salt Lake Tribune letter from Molly Wheeler

 

A few weeks ago, I noticed what seemed to be an unfortunate mistake in billboard advertising — a teen-pregnancy hotline public service announcement partially torn down with an underage-drinking PSA printed behind it. As time passed, however, more of these “coincidences” cropped up all over town. The ad, original and eye-catching, effectively asserts that underage drinking causes teen pregnancy.

Both underage drinking and teen pregnancy are serious societal issues. However, advertising that they have an exclusively causal relationship is a cheap scare tactic. Yes, alcohol consumption may lead to riskier sexual activities. In turn, unsafe sexual activity can lead to pregnancy or disease. Yet, a myriad of socioeconomic factors, as well as sex education, also dramatically influence an individual’s risk of teen pregnancy, perhaps even more so than underage drinking.

As a state that adheres to “abstinence only” education, it is unwise and unfair to proclaim that teenage drinking is the activity that causes teen pregnancy. Indeed, comprehensive and effective sex and substance education must be made available to teens, not just scare tactics targeted towards parents on creative billboards.

http://go.uen.org/3H5

 

 


 

 

 

Why Technology Will Never Fix Education

Chronicle of Higher Education commentary by Kentaro Toyama, author of Geek Heresy: Rescuing Social Change From the Cult of Technology

 

In 2004, I moved to India to help found a new research lab for Microsoft. Based in Bangalore, it quickly became a hub for cutting-edge computer science. My own focus shifted with the move, and I began to explore applications of digital technologies for the socioeconomic growth of poor communities. India struggles to educate its billion-plus population, so during the five years that I was there, my team considered how computers, mobile phones, and other devices could aid learning.

Sadly, what we found was that even when technology tested well in experiments, the attempt to scale up its impact was limited by the availability of strong leadership, good teachers, and involved parents — all elements that are unfortunately in short supply in India’s vast but woefully underfunded government school system. In other words, the technology’s value was in direct proportion to the instructor’s capability.

Over time, I came to think of this as technology’s Law of Amplification: While technology helps education where it’s already doing well, technology does little for mediocre educational systems; and in dysfunctional schools, it can cause outright harm.

http://go.uen.org/3Hz

 

 

 

 

 

 

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NATIONAL NEWS

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Poverty, family stress are thwarting student success, top teachers say Washington Post

 

The greatest barriers to school success for K-12 students have little to do with anything that goes on in the classroom, according to the nation’s top teachers: It is family stress, followed by poverty, and learning and psychological problems.

Those were the factors named in a survey of the 2015 state Teachers of the Year, top educators selected annually in every U.S. state and jurisdictions such as the District of Columbia and Guam.

The survey, to be released Wednesday by the Council of Chief State School Officers and Scholastic Inc., polled the 56 Teachers of the Year, a small but elite group of educators considered among the country’s best, on a range of issues affecting public education.

Asked to identify the greatest barriers to student academic success, the teachers ranked family stress highest, followed by poverty, and learning and psychological problems.

http://go.uen.org/3Ht

 

A copy of the survey

http://go.uen.org/3Hu (Scholastic)

 

 


 

 

 

In marathon session, lawmakers tackle drug tests, school vouchers Working into night, lawmakers also tackle education issues Milwaukee (WI) Journal Sentinel

 

Madison— In a marathon session that stretched into Wednesday, Republicans on the Legislature’s budget committee voted to require drug tests for some people receiving public benefits, funnel more money to public schools and greatly expand voucher school programs.

The sweeping schools plan by Republicans on the Joint Finance Committee would boost spending on public schools instead of cutting it by $127 million over two years as GOP Gov. Scott Walker has proposed.

It would also require the state to come up with education guidelines separate from the Common Core standards and have the state rate schools on a five-star scale — instead of the letter-grade system Walker wanted.

http://go.uen.org/3H0

 

 


 

 

 

John Glenn: Evolution Should be Taught in Schools Associated Press

 

COLUMBUS, Ohio — John Glenn, who declared as a 77-year-old in a news conference from space that “to look out at this kind of creation out here and not believe in God is to me impossible,” says facts about scientific discovery should be taught in schools – and that includes evolution.

The astronaut, now 93 with fading eyesight and hearing, told The Associated Press in a recent interview that he sees no contradiction between believing in God and believing in evolution.

“I don’t see that I’m any less religious by the fact that I can appreciate the fact that science just records that we change with evolution and time, and that’s a fact,” said Glenn, a Presbyterian. “It doesn’t mean it’s less wondrous and it doesn’t mean that there can’t be some power greater than any of us that has been behind and is behind whatever is going on.”

http://go.uen.org/3Hv

 

 


 

 

 

Bill introduced to curb falling milk consumption in schools Bill will preserve milk’s role in school feeding programs while complying with the most recent Dietary Guidelines for Americans Farm Futures

 

Milk consumption is falling in schools, according to a recent National Dairy Council report, and a new bill is designed to do something about it.

Reps. G.T. Thompson, R-Pa., and Joe Courtney, D-Conn., on Tuesday introduced the School Milk Nutrition Act of 2015 to preserve milk’s role in school feeding programs, while complying with the most recent Dietary Guidelines for Americans.

The School Milk Nutrition Act of 2015 reaffirms the requirement that milk is offered with each school meal, consistent with current law and the DGA. The bill also supports variety and availability of milk served in schools through a new pilot program and research.

http://go.uen.org/3GZ

 

 


 

 

 

Minn. Lawsuit Raises Questions About Teacher-Licensure Portability Educators from out of state cite barriers Education Week

 

All Aberdeen Rodriguez wanted to do was to teach English in her home state of Minnesota after seven years as a middle school teacher in Texas. She took and passed the state’s licensing tests and found a school willing to hire her. But then, she says, she was flummoxed when a state official suggested she might need to retake American and British literature to qualify for a license.

“In my mind I did all I could at the time to demonstrate that I was ready to teach in Minnesota,” Ms. Rodriguez said. “I could go to a community college and take some cheap classes, but I don’t see how that relates to what I’m doing day to day in the classroom.”

Her experience may not be unique.

http://go.uen.org/3Hw

 

 


 

 

 

Reading Fluency Viewed as Neglected Skill Education Week

 

For typically developing readers, fluency—or the ability to read with speed, accuracy, and expression—is often simply a product of practice. Having mastered the letter sounds, decoding rules, and a good base of sight words, many pupils begin to feel the flow of good reading, and eventually, the process becomes second nature.

But for some young readers, fluency becomes a blockade. The letter sounds, words, or phrases never seem to fit together correctly. The sentences said aloud come out choppy or robotic. Far from fluid, the process is a series of hiccups.

Fifteen years ago, the National Reading Panel, a group of reading experts convened by Congress, flagged fluency as a pillar of reading instruction, along with phonemic awareness, phonics, vocabulary, and comprehension. But the researchers also noted that fluency, a precursor of comprehension, “is often neglected in classroom instruction.”

According to some experts, not too much has changed since then. While studies have identified some best practices, fluency remains neglected, and also somewhat misunderstood.

http://go.uen.org/3Hy

 

 

 

 

 

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CALENDAR

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USOE Calendar

http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

 

 

UEN News

http://www.uen.org

 

 

May 19:

Executive Appropriations Committee meeting

2 p.m., 445 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/Interim/2015/html/00002401.htm

 

Middle School Science Standards Public Meeting

7 p.m., Salt Lake Center for Science Education, 1400 Goodwin Ave., Salt Lake City

http://schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

 

 

May 20:

Education Interim Committee meeting

9 a.m., 30 House Building

http://le.utah.gov/Interim/2015/html/00002324.htm

 

 

May 21:

Instructional Material Commission meeting

9:30 a.m., 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://schools.utah.gov/CURR/imc/News-and-Information/History.aspx

 

 

June 18-19:

Utah State Board of Education meeting

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

 

 

July 9:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://go.uen.org/1pn

 

 

 

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