Education News Roundup: May 26, 2015

Carrie Trenholm was recognized with a Lifetime Achievement in Arts Education award at the Sorenson Legacy Awards.

Carrie Trenholm (holding award) was recognized with a Lifetime Achievement in Arts Education award at the Sorenson Legacy Awards.

Education News Roundup

Today’s Top Picks:

 

Standard catches up on Thursday’s interim meeting on the future of public education in Utah.

http://go.uen.org/3Jn (OSE)

and http://go.uen.org/3JZ (KSL)

 

Rich Kendell discusses Utah Core Standards.

http://go.uen.org/3Kc (KSL via audioboom)

 

Standards reviews the International Baccalaureate program at Ogden High.

http://go.uen.org/3JJ (OSE)

 

Trib looks at the new Roots Charter High School.

http://go.uen.org/3Kd (SLT)

 

And the National Spelling Bee begins tomorrow.

http://go.uen.org/3Ju (USAT)

and http://go.uen.org/3K1 (DN)

or the website:

http://spellingbee.com/

And the best of luck to Utah’s four spellers:

https://secure.spellingbee.com/public/spellers/speller_roster

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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TODAY’S HEADLINES

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UTAH

 

State legislators meet to discuss the future of education

 

Indepth look at Governor’s task force investigating Utah Core Standards

 

High-end academic program costly but valued in Ogden

 

New farm-based high school taking Roots in West Valley City

 

Great-grandfather receives honorary diploma, ending 70 years of regret

 

86-year-old high school grad looks to the future

 

School at the mall: West High students find new venue for testing

 

Timpview earns prestigious honors

 

Elementary arts educator wins statewide awards

 

Parowan yearbook staff honored with national award

 

AG’s Office: Davis School District can’t be sued in teacher sex case

 

Utah Educational Savings Plan awards elementary schools, offers $25 match for new accounts

 

Davis School District approves teacher raises

 

Utah State Office of Education revises seclusion and restraint rules

 

Tooele teacher saves colleague who went into cardiac arrest

 

Pen pals from Logan city, Cache Count schools meet for the first time

 

Book Smart: Charity puts reading material in kid’s hands

 

Lt. Gov. Cox announces Energy Workforce Scholarship Program

 

Park Elementary students celebrate arts, music

 

Tuacahn High School offers professionally taught summer workshops for teens

 

SUU provides shirts for CMS trip to D.C.

 

Local firefighter now fighting for his life

Family sets up website to raise funds for medical care

 

Students wear green to honor 2 Hillcrest students killed in accident

 

After encounter, police to increase Roosevelt school patrols

 

2015 Utah Valley high school graduations

 

InTech Collegiate High School graduate Simon Davies looking to engineering career

 

Online school’s graduation final in area

 

‘Clas of 2015’: High School Seniors Given Graduation Medals With Typo

 

Students with special needs give it their all at sports day

 

Family stress and poverty affect student success, study says

 

 


 

 

 

OPINION & COMMENTARY

 

Science is the best we can do

 

Loaded and locked with zero tolerance

 

Utah teachers have no choice but to strike

 

Science-standards hearings only serve to embarrass Utah

 

Public schools should emphasize practical knowledge

 

Invest in subsidized early education programs

 

We need to solve the school-lunch-waste problem

 

Shepherd praising Intermountain Healthcare trainer at Payson High

 

Killpack congratulating this years graduating seniors.

 

Flyer Field

 

Rugby, Lacrosse should be school-sanctioned sports

 

What College Applications Shouldn’t Ask

 

Our K-12 Policies Resemble Those of Imperial Japan

 

Truth and consequences

 

Dreams of sports stardom lead disadvantaged students astray

 

Jeb wants to follow the Bush family playbook on education. It won’t work.

 

 


 

 

 

NATION

 

One Man’s Millions Turn a Community in Florida Around

 

Education commissioner warns of state action if Fayette doesn’t support low-achieving schools

 

How one Massachusetts town turned around early reading program

One school in Malden, Mass., is outpacing schools across the state in early reading literacy. Here’s How.

 

How to hook young people on math and science? Robots.

 

High School Teachers Can Help Teens Soar With Aviation, Aerospace

These ideas and resources can help educators who want to study flight in their classrooms.

 

Can we really prepare kids for both college and career?

California’s answer is a resounding “Yes”

 

Does Google Help Students Learn (or Just Think They Do?)

 

Six of the nation’s largest school districts dump polystyrene trays

 

Holy stichomythia! The spelling bee is back

 

 

 

 

 

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UTAH NEWS

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State legislators meet to discuss the future of education

 

SALT LAKE CITY – The House Education Committee met Tuesday to discuss the long-term plan for Utah education. The committee discussed the year’s progress and reviewed education bills that passed in 2015.

Committee chairman Rep. Bradley Last, R-Hurricane, explained the Education Committee receives a high number of bill requests each year. “We received 195 requests for education bills (in 2015), and 61 of those bills passed,” Last said.

Brad Smith, the State Superintendent of Public Instruction, hopes the committee continues to produce laws for education change and progression. “We are moving from a question of what have you done to us, to what have you done for us. Hopefully we can reach the point where we can say, ‘What have you done with us,’” Smith said.

Smith explained “non-negotiable” elements to Utah’s future education plan. Education in Utah must be results oriented.

“If we do not have a focus on the children we have missed our mark,” Smith said.

http://go.uen.org/3Jn (OSE)

 

http://go.uen.org/3JZ (KSL)

 

 


 

 

 

Indepth look at Governor’s task force investigating Utah Core Standards

 

This is more from Rich Kendell, former Utah commissioner of High Ed, who was asked to look into the Utah Core Standards.

http://go.uen.org/3Kc (KSL via audioboom)

 

 


 

 

 

High-end academic program costly but valued in Ogden

 

OGDEN — In the last five years the Ogden School District has spent $665,000 on its International Baccalaureate program to see only 12 students graduate with IB diplomas.

But district officials and the IB adviser stand by their decision to bring the program to Ogden High School and say the results are more than just the number of graduates. The IB program is an international program that provides students with a “balanced education to facilitate geographic and cultural mobility,” according to the IB website, www.ibo.org. If the diploma program is completed, students can earn two years of college credit.

Last year the first group of students finished the first two-year group of courses, which requires students to take up to 12 end-of-class of tests at the end of their senior year. Twenty-two students tested and 12 passed.

This year the graduating class of 2015 has 24 students enrolled in the two-year program and their test results won’t be in until July.

http://go.uen.org/3JJ (OSE)

 

 


 

 

 

New farm-based high school taking Roots in West Valley City

 

West Valley City • To many people, the farm is a just a place to grow fresh vegetables, raise animals and tend a beehive or two.

But the creators of the new Roots Charter High School see the farm as a learning tool: a way to teach students basic subjects like math, science and language arts as well as life skills such as hard work, accountability and “reaping what you sow.”

“The goal isn’t just to create farmers,” said 38-year-old Tyler Bastian, the founder and principal of Roots. “It’s to create kids who have the tools they need to accomplish what they want in life.”

Rather than focusing on skill-and-drill lessons, students at Roots in grades 9-12 will tackle farm projects, work in teams and solve problems. And while some students eventually may choose to run a farm, their experiences also are designed to prepare them for college and possible degrees in science and environment studies, Bastian said.

http://go.uen.org/3Kd (SLT)

 

 


 

 

 

Great-grandfather receives honorary diploma, ending 70 years of regret

 

  1. GEORGE — Throughout the month, parents and grandparents are attending graduation ceremonies. But one Utah veteran got quite the surprise when he attended his great-granddaughter’s high school graduation last week.

In 1944, Foy Seegmiller was just 17 years old when he dropped out of Dixie High School and enlisted in the military.

“I knew I was going to be drafted,” Seegmiller said. “I kind of wanted to be able to choose. I wanted to choose the Navy.”

He was assigned to the U.S.S. Braxton, where he traded math and science for ship skills.

http://go.uen.org/3JE (DN)

 

http://go.uen.org/3JN (PDH)

 

 


 

 

 

86-year-old high school grad looks to the future

 

SPANISH FORK — Joyce Schollenberger burst into tears as her name was announced at her high school graduation ceremony last week at Landmark High School in Spanish Fork.

At age 86, she was the oldest graduate in her class of 208 students in the Nebo Adult Education program. As she received her diploma, everyone stood to applaud and cheer this great-grandmother who had overcome so much to reach her lifelong goal.

Schollenberger, who is legally blind, was escorted by her 15-year-old great-grandson Mason Koomes, a student at Springville Junior High.

http://go.uen.org/3JM (PDH)

 

 


 

 

School at the mall: West High students find new venue for testing

 

SALT LAKE CITY — Amid the ruckus of traffic, music and passers-by along the streets at The Gateway, there’s a place where even a whisper can be heard from across the room.

On the façade of that space, once occupied by a Gap store and later an art gallery, a hand-colored sign expresses a heartfelt message from students and administrators at Salt Lake City’s downtown high school: “Thank you Gateway!”

On Friday, West High School students finished occupying the former shopping center to take Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate exams. In the past 17 days, 432 students from the school have taken 1,862 tests, sometimes with as many as 200 students testing at the same time, according to exam coordinator Shannon Wilson.

Having almost one-fourth of the school’s student body enrolled in voluntary tests to earn college credit makes for proud teachers, but it creates a need for space that not even the school gym can satisfy, especially when computer labs and libraries are reserved for SAGE, the state-mandated year-end exam.

http://go.uen.org/3JF (DN)

 

http://go.uen.org/3JY (KSL)

 

 


 

 

 

Timpview earns prestigious honors

 

PROVO — It’s not the reason they do it, but it’s nice when someone notices.

Timpview High School in Provo has received recognition from several sources this year. The most recent was being named the top high school in Utah by U.S. News and World Report. The rankings are based on student performance on statewide and advanced placement tests. Those doing the ratings also studied student-teacher ratios and the performance of minority and low-income students.

http://go.uen.org/3JO (PDH)

 

 


 

 

 

Elementary arts educator wins statewide awards

 

CEDAR CITY – After a career that has spanned 30 years and impacted the lives of thousands of students, Carrie Trenholm was recently awarded the Governor’s Education Leadership in the Arts Award and the Sorenson Legacy Lifetime Achievement Award for Arts Education.

http://go.uen.org/3Kf (Iron County Today)

 

 


 

 

 

Parowan yearbook staff honored with national award

 

PAROWAN – Representatives at Parowan High have been notified that the yearbook company Jostens has named Parowan as one of four schools in Utah to be awarded the National Yearbook Program of Excellence award.

This award is based on three categories: creating an inclusive yearbook, generating school engagement, and successfully managing the yearbook creation process.

http://go.uen.org/3Kp (Iron County Today)

 

 


 

 

AG’s Office: Davis School District can’t be sued in teacher sex case

 

FARMINGTON — The Attorney General’s Office claims Davis School District and Davis High School cannot be civilly sued in a lawsuit filed against them and Brianne Altice.

Assistant Attorney General Joel Ferre filed a motion in 2nd District Court to dismiss all claims against the school district and the high school stating that both “are immune.” The motion was filed on May 20 in the second civil suit filed against Altice, the high school and the school district. The civil lawsuit was filed by a former student and his parents in April.

Another civil suit was filed against Altice, the district and the school in March by another victim and his parents. No similar motions have been filed at this time in that case.

The Attorney General’s Office is asking the judge set a hearing date for oral arguments concerning the motion that has been filed.

In the filed motion, the Attorney General’s Office is claiming that even though school and district administrators may have been negligent in hiring, supervising or retaining Altice or failed to provide a safe environment for the student, the injuries the teenage boy suffered were from the assault and battery Altice caused, not the district or the school, so neither entity is liable.

http://go.uen.org/3Ki (OSE)

 

 


 

 

Utah Educational Savings Plan awards elementary schools, offers $25 match for new accounts

 

With a play on May 29 — College Savings Day — Utah Educational Savings Plan managers are launching two promotions to remind Utahns about so-called 529 accounts.

Two Utah elementary schools received an award of $529 for new books and library resources from the college savings account agency, officials announced Tuesday.

Jackling Elementary in West Valley City and Northlake Elementary in Tooele were named the winners of a reading competition organized by the Savings Plan and Road to Success.

“The impact of reading cannot be underestimated,” Road to Success Program Manager Megan Ware said in a prepared statement. “Literate children are our future leaders, scholars, and innovators.”

And on Friday, May 29 or “529 Day ” — a reference to the 529 plans that allow a person to set aside tax-advantaged funds for future college or university costs — the agency will match up to $25 invested in new savings accounts.

http://go.uen.org/3Kb (SLT)

 

 


 

 

Davis School District approves teacher raises

 

FARMINGTON — After seven years without a cost of living increase in their paychecks, teachers in Davis School District will get a 4 percent cost of living allowance and Steps and Lanes will be reinstated.

Teachers have stood by as the their salaries were frozen, Steps and Lanes cut back, medical insurance costs increased, and supply budgets for their classroom cut to the wick, and yet they kept teaching while they waited for the tide to turn.

The Davis School District board members unanimously accepted the negotiated agreements with the Davis Education Association, pending ratification of principals and teachers, although according to initial reports, they are seeing an overwhelmingly positive response.

http://go.uen.org/3JK (OSE)

 

 


 

 

 

Utah State Office of Education revises seclusion and restraint rules

 

The Utah State Office of Education has revised its rules on the use of seclusion or restraint of special education students for disciplinary purposes.

Utah State Office of Education has amended Utah Administrative Rule R277-609, prohibiting the seclusion or restraint of a child for disciplinary purposes — a practice that is only permissible if the student is a danger to themselves or others.

http://go.uen.org/3Kh (Universe)

 


 

 

Tooele teacher saves colleague who went into cardiac arrest

 

TOOELE — Health studies teacher Rick Spencer says he is full of gratitude that he was able to help save the life of a fellow teacher.

Social studies teacher Alan Drake remained hospitalized Friday, but was recovering well.

Monday, he passed out inside his classroom at Tooele High School, the result of cardiac arrest. One student saw him collapse as she walked into his classroom. She rushed out to call for help.

http://go.uen.org/3JC (DN)

 

 


 

 

 

Pen pals from Logan city, Cache Count schools meet for the first time

 

After spending the school year exchanging letters, students from Bridget Elementary and Heritage Elementary finally met Friday during a picnic lunch at Bridget. The two schools both have Spanish dual-language immersion classes, and the second-graders have been exchanging letters in Spanish to gain practice.

http://go.uen.org/3JT (LHJ)

 

 


 

 

 

Book Smart: Charity puts reading material in kid’s hands

 

LAYTON — When Lincoln Elementary sixth-grade teacher Jennifer Roberts assigned her students 30 minutes of reading homework every night, she was surprised how many of them were not completing the assignment.

The culprit, Roberts learned, was there were no reading books in their home. She quickly remedied the situation by offering books to take home from her classroom library. Then the assignments were getting done.

“I knew they weren’t making excuses that they didn’t want to do it because when they had a book from my classroom, they were doing the assignment,” Roberts said.

The school’s media specialist Kathy Bundy said there are a large number of students at Lincoln Elementary who are transitional, moving with their military families before the school year finishes. A lot of times belongings are kept to a minimum, meaning few books, if any, are owned by those families.

The Altrusa International of Ogden, a community service organization, believes owning a book is a luxury for some. So for the last 26 years the group has been donating books to students through a program called Book of My Own.

http://go.uen.org/3JI (OSE)

 

 


 

 

 

Lt. Gov. Cox announces Energy Workforce Scholarship Program

 

The Governor’s Office of Energy Development and Chevron will launch the Utah Energy Workforce Scholarship Program to expand science, technology, engineering and math educational opportunities for Utah students. The new energy education and workforce development program is aligned with the state’s existing STEM curriculum.

Chevron, a company that has long demonstrated its leadership in the realm of K-12 education, has deployed millions of dollars into Utah schools over the last few years through its “Fuel Your School” program. Chevron is expanding its commitment to STEM education in Utah by providing a generous gift of $20,000 to launch the scholarship program.

http://go.uen.org/3Kg (UP)

 

 


 

 

Park Elementary students celebrate arts, music

 

RICHMOND — It was a night of music, song and dance at the annual Art in the Streets celebration on Thursday evening.

http://go.uen.org/3JS (LHJ)

 

 


 

 

 

Tuacahn High School offers professionally taught summer workshops for teens

 

This summer, Tuacahn High School for the Performing Arts will offer a variety of arts related summer workshops to Washington County youth entering into grades 7 through 12. They are offering three separate week-long sessions, two in June and one in July. The deadline for registration is Friday, May 29.

http://go.uen.org/3Kq (Southern Utah Independent)

 

 


 

 

SUU provides shirts for CMS trip to D.C.

 

Southern Utah University is providing T-shirts to Cedar Middle School students to represent Utah on their trip to Washington, D.C. this week.

Students will tour monuments and museums in our nation’s capital with Jennifer Rowland, an eighth-grade core teacher from CMS.

Rowland says the trip is based in education — the students get a hands on look at the subjects they have learned about, but she also wants them to have fun.

http://go.uen.org/3JV (SGS)

 

 


 

 

 

Local firefighter now fighting for his life

Family sets up website to raise funds for medical care

 

Park City is rallying behind a local family whose son was critically injured in a motorcycle accident Saturday morning in Peoa.

Saturday morning, Jeremy Morgan was riding his bike southbound on State Road 32 when he was struck by a bus from the Oakley School.

According to the Utah Highway Patrol incident report, the bus was traveling northbound on S.R. 32 and turned left onto the Brown’s Canyon Road in front of Morgan.

Morgan was thrown under the bus by the impact and suffered multiple injuries. He was flown by medical helicopter to the University of Utah Medical Center where, as of Monday, he was listed in critical condition.

According to Sergeant Jed Jorgenson of UHP, no one on the bus was injured. There were six students and school staff member, in addition to the driver, onboard at the time of the accident. The driver was cited for failing to yield to oncoming traffic.

http://go.uen.org/3Kj (PR)

 

http://go.uen.org/3Kk (SLT)

 

http://go.uen.org/3Kl (KTVX)

 

http://go.uen.org/3Kn (KSL)

 

http://go.uen.org/3Km (KSTU)

 

 


 

 

 

Students wear green to honor 2 Hillcrest students killed in accident

 

MIDVALE — As one person noted on Twitter Friday, “I see more green today than I ever did on St. Patrick’s Day. Proud Warrior. Proud Husky. Proud Utahn.”

Students across the state wore green Friday to show their support and respect for two Hillcrest High School students who were killed in a traffic accident Wednesday night.

http://go.uen.org/3JD (DN)

 

http://go.uen.org/3JX (KTVX)

 

 


 

 

 

After encounter, police to increase Roosevelt school patrols

 

ROOSEVELT — Police plan to increase patrols around all four Roosevelt schools after a student at East Elementary School said she was approached Wednesday by a stranger who asked her to get in his truck.

The girl told school staff and police she was outside for recess when a man got out of a black four-door pickup truck and walked toward her, according to Roosevelt Police Chief Rick Harrison.

http://go.uen.org/3K0 (KSL)

 

 


 

 

 

2015 Utah Valley high school graduations

 

Utah Valley high schools held commencement ceremonies for their Class of 2015 graduates.

http://go.uen.org/3JL (PDH)

 

http://go.uen.org/3JP (PDH)

 

 


 

 

 

InTech Collegiate High School graduate Simon Davies looking to engineering career

 

Simon Davies is an all-around great kid.

The 19-year-old InTech Collegiate High School senior from Logan will be graduating this week, in addition to giving the graduation speech to the members of his class.

When he spoke to The Herald Journal earlier this month, Davies was still mulling over what he was going to say.

http://go.uen.org/3JU (LHJ)

 

 


 

 

 

Online school’s graduation final in area

 

After mid-week’s heavy slate of high school commencements, a few more seniors got their turn to shake hands and receive diplomas.

Utah Online High School’s commencement took place Friday in the Dixie Lecture Hall 100.

http://go.uen.org/3Ke (SGS)

 

 


 

 

 

‘Clas of 2015’: High School Seniors Given Graduation Medals With Typo

 

Seniors at a Utah high school received one final spelling lesson at their graduation ceremony.

600 graduates of Fremont High School in Ogden, Utah, were given graduation medals inscribed with the words “Clas of 2015.”

Yes, that’s “class” with only one “s.”

http://go.uen.org/3Ko (Fox)

 

 


 

 

Students with special needs give it their all at sports day

 

About 350 students in Jordan School District who have special needs gathered Friday in Riverton to give it their all in track and field events during the annual Special Needs Sports Day.

http://go.uen.org/3JB (DN)

 

http://go.uen.org/3K2 (KSTU)

 

 


 

 

Family stress and poverty affect student success, study says

 

A survey of top teachers in the nation found that family stress and poverty are top factors affecting many students’ success, and that teachers would like to put funding into reducing those barriers

http://go.uen.org/3JA (DN)

 

 

 

 

 

 

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OPINION & COMMENTARY

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Science is the best we can do

Salt Lake Tribune commentary by columnist GEORGE PYLE

 

Looks like I picked the wrong week to argue for the infallibility of science.

Actually, it is always the wrong week to argue that any human endeavor is flawless. If humans are involved, the likelihood is that even the most perfectly balanced equations and the most beautifully crafted theories stand a chance of, eventually, being tossed into the proverbial cocked hat.

Too bad it’s all we’ve got.

This is the crux of the fuss over the proposal now before the Utah State Board of Education to update science standards for the sixth through the eighth grade. Experts here want to follow experts elsewhere and adopt a set of standards that are more experimental and hands-on. A vocal group of dissenters, who don’t trust out-of-town experts, would like some science standards without so much science in them, please.

The not-invented-here argument holds no water. Or should our doctors not prescribe any treatments or perform any surgeries that were tested and perfected in Massachusetts or Minnesota?

The real concern, honestly put by some folks, is the fear that their children might learn too much about that age-old bugaboo, evolution, or its modern cousin, climate change. In each case, the current status of scientific understanding is that both are real and that any personal, scientific, cultural or political decisions in certain areas will be hopelessly flawed unless those facts are understood and acted upon.

That’s science today, so that’s what science classes today must teach.

http://go.uen.org/3Jr

 

Salt Lake Tribune editorial cartoon by Pat Bagley

http://go.uen.org/3Js

 

 


 

 

 

Loaded and locked with zero tolerance

Salt Lake Tribune commentary by columnist ROBERT KIRBY

 

Given the educational standards of today, I’m happy to have received my formal schooling in the ’60s. It’s the only reason I can think of as to why I have a high school diploma.

Had I gone to school in the last 10 years, I would have only made it partway through the third grade. That’s still more than enough education to write a newspaper column, but not much else.

The problem today would be the zero tolerance of most public schools regarding anything resembling a weapon or part of a weapon.

http://go.uen.org/3Jt

 

 


 

 

 

Utah teachers have no choice but to strike

Salt Lake Tribune letter from Patricia Peleschka

 

After reading Paul Rolly’s column (“Schools superintendent is a creation of the right wing,” May 16), I can only think of one thing to say: “How many kicks in the face does it take before you go on strike!?”

Get organized, step up, be heard and quit letting the legislators and the school board bully you. Your profession depends on it! Save it while you still can. At this point striking is the only way to have your voice heard!

http://go.uen.org/3Jw

 

 


 

 

 

Science-standards hearings only serve to embarrass Utah

Salt Lake Tribune letter from Michael Johnson

 

In response to the debate on new science standards, I have just one thing to say: Everyone has opinions, but not everyone’s opinion is valid.

If my plumbing breaks at 2 a.m., I don’t call my therapist. If I am building a new house, I don’t worry much about the differing opinions between my contractor and my bus driver. I don’t argue with my doctor over my cancer diagnosis because my tarot reader said I don’t have cancer.

When the vast majority of leading experts in science, not statewide but globally, agree on the validity of a theory like evolution, it is no longer “controversial” except to people who, quite frankly, don’t know what they are talking about and whose opinions should mean very little when it comes to teaching facts and science to our schoolchildren.

http://go.uen.org/3Jx

 

 


 

 

 

Public schools should emphasize practical knowledge

Salt Lake Tribune letter from Todd Hills

 

As I observe the trends we see in society today, I believe it is time to acknowledge that our public school system does not address very basic, but equally critical, life skills. The areas in which we are woefully deficient are easy to identify by looking at a couple of the problems most prevalent in our nation today: obesity and debt.

As important as subjects like calculus, biology and chemistry are to advancements in science and research, we have more imminent problems to address. I know plenty of people, myself included, who have no use for these sciences in their professions, much less their personal endeavors. But I don’t know a single person who hasn’t benefited from learning how to properly budget and invest their money or maintain a healthy lifestyle.

http://go.uen.org/3Jy

 

 


 

 

 

Invest in subsidized early education programs

Deseret News letter from Patrick Holman-Hart

 

In order for a village to raise a child, it is necessary for people to first build a village that will support the children and bring them into adulthood. Building the village must begin early, while children are still young. We can do this by investing in subsidized early education programs.

While countless studies have shown the positive impacts of early education, the United States still lacks the essential infrastructure to carry out these programs.

http://go.uen.org/3JH

 

 


 

 

 

We need to solve the school-lunch-waste problem

Salt Lake Tribune letter from Carmen M. Figueroa

 

The United States spends millions of dollars on schools’ free lunches and breakfast. It is sad to state that all the money spent and the food served is being wasted.

For the past 23 years I have been working in a public school and witnessing the waste day by day. I believe that it is time for the school districts and the government to take some action in the matter.

Every day students choose to go out to play instead of eating their lunches. The school has to give them the portion suggested, and, even if they don’t want the food, they have to take it. They don’t have to eat it. They just throw it away. The lunch helpers cannot oblige a student to eat some or all their food.

http://go.uen.org/3Jv

 

 


 

 

 

Shepherd praising Intermountain Healthcare trainer at Payson High

(Provo) Daily Herald letter from McKenzie Shepherd

 

I’m so lucky to attend one of the many schools Intermountain Healthcare supports.

Andrew Weeks (Daily Herald May 17, provodh.com/jwikz) is the trainer at my school, he has helped me recover from many injuries during the season and on the off season. His main goal is to make sure we are healthy and to get us back out on that field playing the game we love for our school.

http://go.uen.org/3JR

 

 


 

 

Killpack congratulating this years graduating seniors.

(Provo) Daily Herald letter from Colton S. Killpack

 

I would just like to say congratulations to all of the graduating seniors this year and I wish them luck.

http://go.uen.org/3JQ

 

 


 

 

Flyer Field

Deseret News letter from Greg Brooks

 

Principal Campbell (principal of Dixie High School in St. George), you have said the new field at Dixie High School wasn’t built by coach Don Lay. You are wrong. This is the field coach Don Lay built. He built it over 20 plus years of sweat, tears, heartbreak, smiles, frowns, losses and wins. He built it on countless hours away from his wife and children, making sure his players were ready to play. He built it piece-by-piece, day-by-day. He built it from a dream.

http://go.uen.org/3JG

 

 


 

 

Rugby, Lacrosse should be school-sanctioned sports

Salt Lake Tribune letter from Alex Whisler

 

I believe that rugby and lacrosse should become school-sanctioned sports. It makes it very difficult on the coaches when you can’t travel as a team on the same bus. Kids might not have a way to get the game. Therefore, you would be down players and lower your chances of a win.

http://go.uen.org/3Jz

 

 


 

 

What College Applications Shouldn’t Ask

New York Times editorial

 

Over the last several years, the federal government has been pushing school districts across the country to dial back disciplinary policies under which children are suspended for minor misbehavior that once would have been dealt with in a meeting with parents or though minor sanctions like detention. These “zero tolerance” policies make it more likely that children will drop out, and they are especially damaging to minority students, who are disproportionately subjected to suspension, expulsion or even arrest for nonviolent offenses. Now, colleges that penalize applicants for high school disciplinary records should change their policies as well.

The problem is underscored in an alarming new study by the Center for Community Alternatives, a nonprofit group that focuses on alternatives to incarceration. The study traces the problem to questions on the Common Application, which is used by some 500 colleges and universities. The applicant is asked about his or her disciplinary history, and the high school is asked whether the applicant committed disciplinary violations from ninth grade on that led to probation, suspension, removal, dismissal or expulsion.

http://go.uen.org/3Jl

 

 


 

 

 

Our K-12 Policies Resemble Those of Imperial Japan

Education Week op-ed by Lawrence Baines, associate dean for research at the University of Oklahoma

 

Year after year, students from Japan are at the top of the charts in international comparisons of student achievement, particularly in mathematics and science. In addition to their high achievement, Japanese students seem to be compliant and cooperative in school. According to a 2013 report of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, Japan has “the best disciplinary climate among students in all other OECD countries.”

What is not as widely known is that, after the end of World War II, the United States helped Japan create a new K-12 education system. The Report of the United States Education Mission to Japan, published by the U.S. State Department in 1946, explicates the flaws of Imperial Japan’s system of education and outlines a detailed plan for the future “based on the recognition of the worth and dignity of the individual.”

In the foreword to the book, Gen. Douglas MacArthur, the commander of allied forces in the Pacific and then directing the reconstruction of Japan, states that the report is “a document of ideals high in the democratic tradition.” In particular, its American authors excoriate the old Japanese regime for its mistaken beliefs about education. The system the Japanese built, they write, was conceptually flawed:

  • It presumed “a fixed quantum of knowledge to be absorbed, and tended to disregard differences of ability and interest among students.”
  • It established that “the measure of efficiency was the degree to which standardization and uniformity was secured.”
  • And it “lessened the opportunities for teachers to exercise their professional freedom.”

What is most surprising about the 1946 Mission Report is that the educational practices of Imperial Japan, which the report’s American authors characterized as “malicious,” are strikingly similar to recent reforms enacted in the United States.

http://go.uen.org/3K5

 

 


 

 

 

Truth and consequences

Fordham Institute commentary by Chester E. Finn, Jr., Distinguished Senior Fellow and President Emeritus

 

Amid way too much talk about testing and the Common Core, not enough attention is being paid to what parents will actually learn about their children’s achievement when results are finally released from the recent round of state assessments (most of which assert that they’re “aligned” with the Common Core).

Ever since states adopted more rigorous standards—and the two assessment consortia began to develop next-generation tests that will faithfully gauge pupil performance in relation to those standards—there’s been vast anxiety about the bad news that’s apt to emerge. How will people react when informed that their kids aren’t doing nearly as well academically as the previous standards-and-testing regime had led them to believe? Will more parents “opt out” of testing? Will the political backlash cause more states to repudiate the Common Core, change tests yet again, or lower the “cut scores”?

We know the Common Core standards are more challenging than what preceded them in most places. That was the point. We know that the new assessments—at least those custom-built by PARCC and Smarter Balanced—are supposed to probe deeper and expect more. We understand that this reboot of America’s academic expectations is indeed like moving the goal posts. There’s ample reason for such a move, but we know this means it will be harder to score without additional training and conditioning. Finally, we know that changing from one test to another generally yields an initial drop in scores.

Acknowledging all that: What exactly are states going to tell parents (and others) about how their kids are doing?

There’s reason to worry, as early evidence indicates that the ways student performance will be reported will soft-pedal the truth, playing into parents’ innate conviction that their kids are fine even if others aren’t—and in so doing, undermine the fundamental rationale for the Common Core itself.

http://go.uen.org/3K9

 

 


 

 

Dreams of sports stardom lead disadvantaged students astray

Washington Post commentary by columnist Jay Mathews

 

Byron Leftwich left H.D. Woodson High School in 1997, but people there still talk about his nine seasons as a quarterback in the National Football League and the riches and fame that came with them. Like many other U.S. high schools, Woodson’s best athletes still dream of where their talents could take them.

They have little chance of becoming a pro if they don’t go to college, so their grades and test scores must reach a certain level. Schools try to give them extra academic help, such as Woodson having math teacher Caleb Stewart Rossiter tutor top athletes in the fall of 2012 for the SAT.

On the surface, it seemed like a sensible effort to give disadvantaged students who might win athletic scholarships the kind of test-prep they couldn’t afford. But in Rossiter’s new book about the mistreatment of our most-disruptive and least-productive students, “Ain’t Nobody Be Learnin’ Nothin’: The Fraud and the Fix for High-Poverty Schools,” he portrays after-school tutoring sessions as a well-intended gesture to help kids that instead leads them astray.

http://go.uen.org/3Jq

 

 


 

 

 

Jeb wants to follow the Bush family playbook on education. It won’t work.

The Week commentary by columnist Michael Brendan Dougherty

 

The Bushes have what you could call a family tradition: Finding a position on education that is out of sync with the conservative movement.

As a matter of politics, this worked well for George H.W. Bush, as well as his son George W. Bush. It allowed them to appear non-ideological, bipartisan. They could claim to be common-sense moderates on an issue that is important to a certain kind of independent voter.

But it may not work for Jeb.

The conservative movement has traditionally wanted to decrease or eliminate the federal government’s role in education. The libertarian side wants to get rid of the Department of Education not only because it sees it as a meddling and clumsy bureaucracy, but also because it dislikes public education generally. The “moral majority” wants it gone because it sees the department as a vehicle for destroying local control of education and imposing liberal values through the schools.

The Bushes had other ideas. They wanted to use the federal government to create standards and accountability in American education. This appeals to both the liberal and conservative mind. Liberals go along because they view education as the motor of social and economic progress. Raising the standards will hopefully create better results. On the other side, conservatives are sympathetic to regulation when it cracks the whip on teacher’s unions and public schools.

http://go.uen.org/3Ka

 

 

 

 

 

 

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NATIONAL NEWS

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One Man’s Millions Turn a Community in Florida Around

New York Times

 

ORLANDO, Fla. — Two decades ago, Harris Rosen, who grew up poor on the Lower East Side of Manhattan and became wealthy in the Florida hotel business, decided to shepherd part of his fortune into a troubled community with the melodious sounding name of Tangelo Park.

A quick snap from the city’s tourist engine, this neighborhood of small, once­charming houses seemed a world away from theme park pleasures as its leaders tried to beat back drugs, crime and too many shuttered homes. Nearly half its students had dropped out of school.

Twenty­one years later, with an infusion of $11 million of Mr. Rosen’s money so far, Tangelo Park is a striking success story. Nearly all its seniors graduate from high school, and most go on to college on full scholarships Mr. Rosen has financed.

Young children head for kindergarten primed for learning, or already reading, because of the free day care centers and a prekindergarten program Mr. Rosen provides. Property values have climbed. Houses and lawns, with few exceptions, are welcoming. Crime has plummeted.

http://go.uen.org/3Jm

 

 


 

 

 

Education commissioner warns of state action if Fayette doesn’t support low-achieving schools

Lexington (KY) Herald-Leader

 

In a strongly worded letter, Kentucky Education Commissioner Terry Holliday has warned the Fayette County school district that it must improve support of low-achieving schools or face state actions.

Holliday raised “several causes for alarm” in the May 14 letter to Fayette County school board chairman John Price.

The issues include “significant” achievement gaps in reading and math between minority, disabled and poor students and other students, the letter said.

“If district support of low performing schools does not immediately improve, all options must be considered to narrow Fayette County’s significant achievement gaps at the elementary, middle and high school levels,” the letter said.

http://go.uen.org/3K3

 

 


 

 

 

How one Massachusetts town turned around early reading program

One school in Malden, Mass., is outpacing schools across the state in early reading literacy. Here’s How.

Christian Science Monitor

 

MALDEN, MASS. — When Carlos entered Kristen Reidy’s first-grade class at the Salemwood School in Malden, Mass., nearly five years ago, his reading scores put him in the “at risk” category. He missed his dad, who was still in the family’s home country in Central America, and he “could get into some behavior problems if you didn’t have the right mitts to catch him and let him know you believe in him,” Ms. Reidy says.

By the end of first grade, Carlos (not his real name) had become one of the top readers, and Reidy, now his fifth-grade teacher, has watched him become “empowered” by reading.

When he chose Pam Muñoz Ryan’s award-winning “Esperanza Rising” – about a girl from Mexico who loses her wealthy father and has to work in a field in California – “he sat there one day and just was crying, going, ‘This is amazing.’… He has fallen so in love with literature,” Reidy says. He went home and made his mother read the book, too.

Aiming to catch up every child who is behind in reading, and watching some soar beyond the grade-level expectation, has become part of the culture at Salemwood. Through partnerships with the nonprofit Bay State Reading Institute (BSRI), Salemwood and about 40 other schools in Massachusetts have begun to transform the way they teach reading, and many have made strides toward closing stubborn achievement gaps, particularly for low-income students.

http://go.uen.org/3K7

 

 


 

 

How to hook young people on math and science? Robots.

NewsHour

 

In the United States, the number of college students pursuing degrees in math and science fields lags well behind dozens of industrialized countries. The numbers are even smaller for women and people of color. But one program is using robotics as a way to inspire interest young people while they’re still in high school.

http://go.uen.org/3K6

 

 


 

 

High School Teachers Can Help Teens Soar With Aviation, Aerospace

These ideas and resources can help educators who want to study flight in their classrooms.

U.S. News & World Report

 

Some high school teachers are encouraging teens to reach new heights – literally – through aviation and aerospace education.

“Most kids have had the experience of flying in an aircraft and most people when they fly in an aircraft they feel one of two things,” says Rebecca Vieyra, an Albert Einstein distinguished educator fellow at NASA and a former high school physics teacher.

They feel fear, but they also feel a sense of amazement – Vieyra likes to call that combination of experiences awe. Teaching students about how flight occurs is a good way to grow their interest in science, technology, engineering and math topics, she says.

Aeronautics is the science of aircraft​. The term usually refers just to travel in the Earth’s atmosphere and is pretty much synonymous with aviation, Vieyra says. Aerospace is a broader term that includes space travel.

High schoolers nationwide are exploring these topics.

http://go.uen.org/3Jo

 

 


 

 

 

Can we really prepare kids for both college and career?

California’s answer is a resounding “Yes”

Hechinger Report

 

SAN DIEGO — Ana Sical, 25, once thought she was destined for a full-time job at the Jack in the Box fast food restaurant where she worked for three years alongside her mom, dad, aunts and uncles. Instead, she graduated valedictorian from her high school and won a full scholarship to San Diego State University, earning a bachelor’s degree in construction engineering.

For the past two years, Sical has worked as a project engineer at University Mechanical in El Cajon, in southern California. She’s part of a team of engineers overseeing the construction of a new San Diego courthouse. It’s a good job that allowed Sical to assume permanent guardianship of her siblings, ages 16, 13, and 10, when her parents were unable to care for them.

“It’s a lot of responsibility, but they are totally worth it,” says Sical. “I am beyond happy with my career choice and my life.”

Sical says she owes her success to the training she received at Kearny High School in San Diego, from which she graduated in 2008. The school trains students in one of four career fields: engineering, business, science and technology, and digital media. Sical says her experience in the engineering program led her to consider career possibilities she didn’t even know existed.

“High school to Harvard is the upper-middle-class vision of an education, and the upper-middle class rules in America.”

California is making a big investment in “linked learning” — career-centered programs like these. In response to the Common Core Standards’ call to make every student “college and career ready,” linked learning programs not only aim to prepare high school students for college, but also set them on a career path. In 2014, the state doled out $250 million in competitive grants to develop linked learning programs, and it will match that amount in 2015. Many schools and districts also receive hefty sums from the federal government. Los Angeles Unified alone received $7 million from the U.S.      Department of Education and U.S. Department of Labor to expand career programs in healthcare, technology and business at three high schools.

Hundreds of schools across the state are adding career programs in an attempt to get students into college or a job after graduation. So far, only 27 high schools — reaching about 14,000 students — have certified linked learning programs. That number is expected to grow to 19,000 by the end of the year. Curriculum at these certified schools includes rigorous academics (all students take college-prep courses) plus on-the-job training in a career field in one of the state’s 15 major industry sectors, such as business and finance, engineering, health sciences, manufacturing and entertainment.

But, in a country committed to college preparation for all kids, no matter what their background, the idea of career training in high school raises eyebrows. Can linked learning really prepare students for both college and a career?

http://go.uen.org/3K8

 

 


 

 

Does Google Help Students Learn (or Just Think They Do?)

Education Week

 

New York City – There’s no question that in the era of the smartphone, the Internet has become a go-to place to find out something in a hurry, but does “outsourcing your memory” actually help students learn new concepts, or does it just make people think they are smarter than they are?

A little of both, find researchers at the annual Association for Psychological Science conference here. In a symposium on the effects of students’ online searches, several studies looked at how using the Internet affects both the way we remember and the way we think about what we learn.

Analyzing about 900 college students’ search habits, Adrian F. Ward of the University of Colorado, Boulder, found 59 percent looked for a “quick answer,” 26 percent sought “in-depth information” on a topic, and another 15 percent were simply browsing. Even when students knew the answer to a question, they were likely to check the Internet before answering. “There’s a sense that it’s in there somewhere but it’s easier to pull out your phone than think about it,” Ward said.

http://go.uen.org/3K4

 

 


 

 

Six of the nation’s largest school districts dump polystyrene trays

Washington Post

 

Six of the largest U.S. school districts have pooled their collective purchasing power to make significant changes to school lunch, and they’re starting by jettisoning the polystyrene tray.

The Urban School Food Alliance, a coalition that includes the school systems of New York City, Los Angeles, Chicago, Miami-Dade, Dallas and Orlando, has commissioned a school lunch dish that is made from recycled newsprint and can be turned into compost after use.

The plate replaces trays made from polystyrene — most commonly known by the Dow Chemical brand name Styrofoam — a petroleum-based plastic that gets buried in landfills after use. Polystyrene, which can remain intact for hundreds of years, leaches pollutants into the water and air and is a major source of marine debris.

For those reasons, communities around the country are increasingly banning polystyrene containers — including the District, where the city’s restaurants and food trucks will have to give up foam plastic containers by January and the school system has transitioned away from the material. The Montgomery County Council voted in January to ban polystyrene containers by 2017, and the county’s schools are phasing out their use of foam food-service trays.

http://go.uen.org/3Jp

 

 


 

 

 

Holy stichomythia! The spelling bee is back

USA Today

 

WASHINGTON — It’s May in Washington, which means the cherry blossoms have finished blooming, Congress is debating the budget, and the nation’s top spellers are coming to town.

Nearly 300 students from as far away as Asia already have begun arriving ahead of next week’s 2015 Scripps National Spelling Bee at National Harbor, Md., just south of Washington.

http://go.uen.org/3Ju

 

http://go.uen.org/3K1 (DN)

 

The website:

http://spellingbee.com/

 

 

 

 

 

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CALENDAR

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USOE Calendar

http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

 

 

UEN News

http://www.uen.org

 

 

June 16:

Executive Appropriations Committee meeting

2 p.m., 445 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2015&Com=APPEXE

 

 

June 17:

Education Interim Committee meeting

9 a.m., 30 House Building

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2015&Com=INTEDU

 

 

June 18-19:

Utah State Board of Education meeting

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

 

 

July 9:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://go.uen.org/1pn

 

 

 

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