Education News Roundup: June 2, 2015

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Education News Roundup

Today’s Top Picks:

 

This year’s SAGE results are being reported to parents.

http://go.uen.org/3Q4 (SLT)

 

Voices for Utah Children looks at the status of children in the state.

http://go.uen.org/3Q0 (DN)

and http://go.uen.org/3Q1 (UP)

and http://go.uen.org/3Q2 (KTVX)

and http://go.uen.org/3Qr (KSL)

or a copy of the report

http://go.uen.org/3Q3 (Voices for Utah Children)

 

Latest Census report shows Utah is still last in per-pupil funding.

http://go.uen.org/3QP (SLT)

and http://go.uen.org/3QQ (WaPo)

or a copy of the report

http://go.uen.org/3QR (Census)

 

KUER looks at access to autism treatment in Utah.

http://go.uen.org/3Qu (KUER)

 

And in case you missed it, the Health STEM 5K and STEM Fair was held over the weekend. Here’s your chance to see how it went:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/utahpubliceducation/sets/72157653491357510

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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TODAY’S HEADLINES

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UTAH

 

Most parents should see their child’s SAGE test scores this month, statewide comparisons will come in the fall

 

Report examines the needs of Utah’s growing youth population

 

We’re No. 51: Utah last again for per-student spending

 

More Children with Autism to Gain Access to Treatment in Utah

 

Utah Congresswoman Mia Love Returns Home To Norwalk High

 

Former Utah middle school teacher admits touching female students

 

Man who stabbed Duchesne High student sentenced to prison

 

Hunter student hit by car wins ‘Absolutely Incredible Kid’ award

 

Provo District announces administrative changes

 

AAA awards National Lifesaving Medal to Utah boy

 

West Kearns educator named Teacher of the Year

 

Chevron And The State Of Utah Teaming Up For Scholarship

 

Symbolism powers Sunset Junior High’s Holocaust studies

 

Senior Pranks: Harmless fun or should students be punished?

 

Former principal of Cokeville Elementary school remembers the events of school bombing

 

 


 

 

 

OPINION & COMMENTARY

 

Lawmaker follows through

 

Thanks to Mr. Wright and his fellow Utah educators

 

Got a graduation ceremony to attend? Why not just watch it from home?

 

Thanks to The Gateway for school help

 

Socialism destroys the soul, costs us our freedom

 

PBS Documentary Finds New Meaning in Shop Class

 

Personality Quiz: Am I a Wannabe Edu-Bureaucrat?

 

Lindsey Graham On Education: 4 Things The Presidential Candidate Wants You To Know

 

 


 

 

 

NATION

 

Turnaround schools bill gets final legislative OK

 

Nevada GOP Governor Secures Unlikely Win with Tax Increase

 

Vouchers give kids ‘the first real chance to succeed,’ judge says

 

How Can Students Better Apply Math Learning? New Studies Hold Answers Even within STEM, transfer is tough

 

Parent Engagement on Rise as Priority for Schools, Districts Push for formal role, rather than add-on

 

Charter Schools Have an Awkward Secret: They’re Not Very Good at Innovating So a Group of Education Entrepreneurs in New Orleans is Helping Them Learn the ABCs of Disruption, by Starting Small

 

Schools failing to address biased student discipline

 

Free Test-preparation Program for Revamped SAT Goes Online

 

Students Get Pass on SAT Makeup: School Finds Missing Exams

 

Vermont Says No to the Anti-Vaccine Movement

 

Texas Votes to End High School Steroids Tests After 8 Years

 

Native American student sues school district over right to wear feather

 

Summer Meals Programs for Poor Children Grow, But Unmet Need Persists

 

Mpls. private school takes students to adult novelty store for sex ed lesson The field trip upset some parents at Gaia School. “It’s just a major breach of trust,” said one parent.

 

Bay Area teacher begs NBA MVP Stephen Curry to stay away from his school

 

Dissident Teachers in Mexico Strike Over Education Overhaul The action leaves at least a million children without classes

 

Report Says Schools for Canadian-Indians “Cultural Genocide”

 

 

 

 

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UTAH NEWS

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Most parents should see their child’s SAGE test scores this month, statewide comparisons will come in the fall

 

Last year’s SAGE scores took more than six months to reach parents, but educators are hoping to beat that record this summer.

Because SAGE is computer- based, individual student scores were calculated immediately after the tests were completed. And state education managers say they expect those reports to be made available to parents in the coming weeks.

“It’s sort of up to every individual school,” said Jo Ellen Shaeffer, assessment director for the State Office of Education. “The opportunity is there for them to have those immediate results as soon as the student finished testing this year.”

http://go.uen.org/3Q4 (SLT)

 

 


 

 

Report examines the needs of Utah’s growing youth population

 

SALT LAKE CITY — As Utah grapples with a growing population that produces roughly 10,000 new students each year, advocates are calling for improvement to the way Utah children are cared for from birth through their teen years.

A report released Monday by Voices for Utah Children found dropping numbers of children who live below the poverty level from 2012 to 2013. Utah’s rate of fatal child injuries and teen pregnancy continue to decline, and the percentage of pregnant women receiving prenatal care is on the rise.

But the state continues to struggle with its youth suicide rate, which is fifth highest in the nation. Sexually transmitted infections have also increased rapidly, according to the report.

http://go.uen.org/3Q0 (DN)

 

http://go.uen.org/3Q1 (UP)

 

http://go.uen.org/3Q2 (KTVX)

 

http://go.uen.org/3Qr (KSL)

 

A copy of the report

http://go.uen.org/3Q3 (Voices for Utah Children)

 

 


 

 

 

We’re No. 51: Utah last again for per-student spending

 

Once again, Utah public school students get the smallest chunk of government education funding in the country.

A report released by the U.S. Census Bureau Tuesday ranked the state’s 2013 per-student spending — $6,555 a year — at the bottom of the heap for U.S. states.

The analysis found that per-student spending increased by nearly 1 percent nationwide, to an average of $10,700 between 2012 and 2013.

But Utah’s per-student funding earned a ranking of 51st — behind all 50 states and Washington, D.C.

Utah’s spending level was also less than one-third of the highest-ranked state, which was New York, at $19,818 per student.

http://go.uen.org/3QP (SLT)

 

http://go.uen.org/3QQ (WaPo)

 

A copy of the report

http://go.uen.org/3QR (Census)

 

 


 

 

More Children with Autism to Gain Access to Treatment in Utah

 

Up until now, autism was not covered by health insurance in Utah, but that’s about to change. Treatment options available in the state are adapting to the new policies. One partnership is going to expand the number of children with autism who can be treated.

Last year, the legislature passed a bill that says Applied Behavior Analysis – an intensive and often expensive treatment for autism – is medically necessary. By next year, certain types of insurance companies and Medicaid will be required to cover it. In preparation for this change, Utah Autism Academy will be taking over management of Clear Horizons Academy in Orem.

http://go.uen.org/3Qu (KUER)

 

 


 

 

Utah Congresswoman Mia Love Returns Home To Norwalk High

 

NORWALK, Conn. – Utah Congresswoman Mia Love, who made history with her election last fall, told students to take advantage of their opportunities when she returned to her alma mater Norwalk High School on Friday.

Love graduated from Norwalk High School in 1993. She later moved to Saratoga Springs, Utah, where she served on the City Council from 2003 until 2010, when she was elected mayor. In November, she was elected to serve as the representative for Utah’s 4th Congressional District. She is the first black female Republican to serve in the U.S. House of Representatives.

During an assembly at Norwalk High School, Love talked about how her parents immigrated to the United States from Haiti with $10 in their pockets, and how the freedom they found here allowed them to achieve their dreams.

http://go.uen.org/3QX (Norwalk [CT] Daily Voice)

 

 


 

 

Former Utah middle school teacher admits touching female students

 

A former Summit County middle school teacher accused of sexually abusing four of his students has pleaded guilty to reduced charges.

Rory Bowen, 37, of Oakley, was initially charged with four counts of aggravated sexual abuse of a child — a first-degree felony punishable by up to life in prison — for allegedly assaulting four 12- and 13-year-old girls who were in his math class.

On Monday, Bowen pleaded guilty to three lesser counts of class A misdemeanor sexual battery.

He faces up to one year in jail on each count when he is sentenced on Aug. 3 by 3rd District Judge Paige Petersen.

http://go.uen.org/3Qe (SLT)

 

 


 

 

 

Man who stabbed Duchesne High student sentenced to prison

 

DUCHESNE — A man who stabbed a classmate at Duchesne High School, hit his own sister with a hammer and started a fire in an unoccupied trailer home in separate incidents pleaded guilty but mentally ill Monday and was sentenced to prison.

However, Leland Patrick King, 19, will likely be housed at the Utah State Hospital under the sentence handed down by Judge Samuel Chiara.

Citing the findings of three mental competency evaluations, Chiara ruled that King poses a danger to himself and the public due to mental illness. The judge ordered the state Department of Human Services to evaluate King and find the facility that will best protect the public and provide King with treatment.

http://go.uen.org/3Qj (DN)

 

http://go.uen.org/3Qv (KNRS)

 

 


 

 

Hunter student hit by car wins ‘Absolutely Incredible Kid’ award

 

WEST VALLEY CITY — Students from Hunter High School rose to their feet and cheered loudly Monday for one of their classmates who is overcoming the odds.

Two and a half years ago, while he was on his way to school, Walter Peralta was hit by a vehicle, suffering several traumatic brain injuries.

Peralta, 17, has since started to relearn basic functions, such as walking and talking.

http://go.uen.org/3Qi (DN)

 

http://go.uen.org/3Qo (KUTV)

 

http://go.uen.org/3Qq (KSL)

 

http://go.uen.org/3Qs (KSTU)

 

 


 

 

Provo District announces administrative changes

 

PROVO — The Provo City School District has announced changes in its administration.

Anne-Marie Harrison Paulsen has been hired as executive director of teaching and learning. She replaces Assistant Superintendent Ray Morgan in that role. Morgan will retire this month.

http://go.uen.org/3Qh (DN)

 

 


 

 

AAA awards National Lifesaving Medal to Utah boy

 

AAA Utah gave its National Lifesaving Medal Monday to fifth-grader Brad Mason of Hawthorn Academy in West Jordan.

A news release said the boy’s “awareness and quick-thinking actions while on-duty as a patroller helped save the life of a little girl who was about to run out in front of traffic.”

http://go.uen.org/3Qd (SLT)

 

http://go.uen.org/3Qp (KUTV)

 

 


 

 

 

West Kearns educator named Teacher of the Year

 

SOUTH SALT LAKE — West Kearns Elementary fourth-grade teacher Shantelle Ford has been named the 2015 Granite School District Teacher of the Year.

http://go.uen.org/3Qg (DN)

 

 


 

 

 

Chevron And The State Of Utah Teaming Up For Scholarship

 

The Utah Energy Workforce Scholarship will be awarded to four eleventh-graders interested in science, technology, engineering or math.

According to Jeffrey Barrett, the deputy director in the Governor’s office of energy development, Chevron is currently spending millions of dollars investing in Utah schools.

http://go.uen.org/3QZ (UPR)

 

 


 

 

Symbolism powers Sunset Junior High’s Holocaust studies

 

SUNSET — School ended on a somber note for eighth-graders at Sunset Junior High when they learned the fate of the people whom they researched leading up to the Holocaust memorial ceremony Monday afternoon.

One by one, names were announced of the research subjects, people affected by the Holocaust. Students made their way over to the bleachers of survivors, but students who studied those who had died, stood and deposited one of their shoes at the front of the gym next to a row of electric candles, then sat in the bleachers representing those who had died.

Eighth-grader Emilee Garcia represented one girl who spent time in the Auschwitz concentration camp and worked as a seamstress for an SS officer and his family. The girl would steal dog biscuits from the family dog to survive the starvation that existed in the concentration camp.

“I got emotionally attached to this girl as I learned about her, so I was so happy to learn that she had survived,” Emilee said. “I was really sad for her, though, because she was in such a horrible situation, but she was strong enough to survive. She is a true example to me. This is something I will always remember.”

http://go.uen.org/3Qk (OSE)

 

 


 

 

 

Senior Pranks: Harmless fun or should students be punished?

 

CLEARFIELD, Utah – The season of senior pranks is upon us.

This was the scene at Clearfield High School after a prank students said they thought was harmless but it has some seniors in hot water.

Officials said 12 students got into the school at about 2 a.m. and placed more than 1,000 Solo cups full of water in the halls.

There was no damage and the school said it was all cleaned up before classes started but the school still said it was going to suspend the pranksters.

But after agreeing to do some clean up work around the school, administrators allowed the students to get their diplomas and walk at graduation with their classmates.

http://go.uen.org/3Qt (KSTU)

 

 


 

 

Former principal of Cokeville Elementary school remembers the events of school bombing

 

He saw no angels in the room but Max Excell says he strongly feels that he and approximately 150 other people are alive today because of the miracles that happened at the Cokeville, Wyoming elementary school on June 5, 1986.

Excell was principal of the school and the 29th anniversary of the bombing there has once again stirred memories of the moment two deranged adults – fired town marshal David Young and his wife Doris – entered the school with a homemade gasoline bomb and a cache of firearms taking about 135 children hostage.

http://go.uen.org/3Qn (CVD)

 

 

 

 

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OPINION & COMMENTARY

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Lawmaker follows through

Salt Lake Tribune commentary by columnist Paul Rolly

 

I wrote May 8 about the frustration of Mark Besendorfer, a 60-year-old elementary school teacher, who wanted to talk with his legislator about public education.

He emailed new Rep. Bruce Cutler, R-Murray, asking for a response, but never got one. He then sent an email stating he was interested in making a campaign contribution and got a reply right away. Cutler told me at the time he hadn’t seen the earlier emails because they were during the legislative session, when he gets many, and his intern didn’t recognize Besendorfer’s address as being in his district.

After I called Cutler, he reached out to Besendorfer, and they arranged for the lawmaker to visit his school.

Last week, Cutler attended the fifth grade’s patriotic performance at Draper’s Willow Springs Elementary and promised Besendorfer he would spend a day with him in his classroom next year to better understand the daily challenges teachers face.

http://go.uen.org/3QY

 

 


 

 

Thanks to Mr. Wright and his fellow Utah educators Salt Lake Tribune commentary by columnist Ann Cannon

 

I recently had an opportunity to hear the principal of Dilworth Elementary, Jared Wright, speak, which I enjoyed because I was his T-ball coach many years ago and remember vividly what he looked like in a tiny T-ball uniform. Seriously, it’s very rewarding to listen to someone speak and know in your heart that you taught him everything he knows about T-ball.

But that’s not the point. The point is that Jared gave an absolutely sensational talk. It was smart and funny, and I especially loved the part where he read some letters the students had written him. Here are just a few, which I share with Jared’s permission.

http://go.uen.org/3QW

 

 


 

 

Got a graduation ceremony to attend? Why not just watch it from home?

(Ogden) Standard-Examiner commentary by columnist Mark Saal

 

Where was this awesomeness of technology when my kids were teenagers?

If you’ve got a senior graduating from one of the local high schools, odds are good you can now watch the ceremony on the Internet. That’s right. Your kid’s graduation, live and online.

Bob King, multimedia architect at Weber State University, says the school has been live-streaming the high school graduations held at the Dee Events Center for the last dozen years or so. Mostly, it started as a way to allow parents who are serving overseas in the military to be able to watch their seniors graduate. But it’s also turned out to be a boon to grandparents and other relatives living out-of-state.

Oh, there were a couple of years in there where technology and personnel changes precluded a live video stream of these proceedings. Needless to say, this was not well-received.

“We got lots of phone calls, and we really felt bad about it,” King said. “But we just couldn’t do it.”

But now, for the third year in a row, a live Internet feed of area high school graduation ceremonies is back.

“By popular demand,” King added.

http://go.uen.org/3Qm

 

 


 

 

Thanks to The Gateway for school help

Salt Lake Tribune letter from Jan Brock

 

On behalf of West High School, I would like to publicly thank the generous staff, owners and management of The Gateway for allowing 432 students to use their facility to take 740 AP exams and 1,122 IB exams over a recent four-week period. Bryan Hall, director of The Gateway’s management company RPIA, was wonderful in helping to accommodate so many students in the now vacant space that was previously occupied by The Gap.

http://go.uen.org/3Qf

 

 


 

 

 

Socialism destroys the soul, costs us our freedom

(Ogden) Standard-Examiner letter from DeAnna Hardy

 

Our ignorance to the Constitution is understandable because we have been taught in a government-controlled school system. Public education didn’t arrive in America until the 1850s, beginning first in the state of Massachusetts and then from there it spread like wildfire. We as a people have been dumbed down ever since.

http://go.uen.org/3Ql

 

 


 

 

 

PBS Documentary Finds New Meaning in Shop Class Education Week commentary by columnist Mark Walsh

 

When I was in wood and metal shop class in junior high school, I struggled to make some uneven wooden bookshelves, a metal hammer in which the head never screwed on properly to the handle, and a mysterious finger bowl fashioned out of tin. I pretty quickly decided I had a better future as a writer than as a carpenter or other form of skilled tradesman.

In “If You Build It,” a remarkable education documentary by director Patrick Creadon, the 10 students in the special “Studio H” shop program in a rural North Carolina school system put my shaky bookshelves and useless hammer to shame.

http://go.uen.org/3QH

 

http://go.uen.org/3QI (KUED)

 

 


 

 

 

Personality Quiz: Am I a Wannabe Edu-Bureaucrat?

Education Week commentary by Rick Hess of the American Enterprise Institute

 

Once, would-be reformers mostly agreed that century-old practices weren’t working anymore but admitted we were unsure as to just what should come next. We agreed on the importance of accountability for results but wanted room for new approaches to policy and practice—and hoped a variety of smart solutions would emerge. In the last five years or so, however, some reformers have evinced a growing faith in bureaucratic fixes. Abandoning the humble notion that it takes time to figure things out, such reformers have instead decided that regulation and top-down oversight can fix everything, everywhere, in a hurry (so long as it’s all overseen by really smart people, like them and their friends). How can you tell if you’re one of these aspiring bureaucrats, and whether you should dress accordingly? As a public service, I’ve tapped my old Ph.D. in government skills to provide this quick, easy-to-take quiz. Just answer the following true/false questions and tally up your answers to see how you score.

http://go.uen.org/3QM

 

 


 

 

 

Lindsey Graham On Education: 4 Things The Presidential Candidate Wants You To Know Forbes commentary by columnist Maureen Sullivan

 

Lindsey Graham, the senior senator from South Carolina, joined the growing ranks of candidates for the Republican presidential nomination in 2016. Graham, who recently announced his retirement after 33 years of service to the Air Force, has focused on foreign affairs, national security and armed services during his two terms in the Senate. He didn’t mention education issues in his launch speech on Monday in Central, South Carolina.

Earlier in his career he was elected to the House of Representatives in 1995 and served on the education committee and was instrumental in the negotiations over No Child Left Behind. He has supported prayer in schools and vouchers for students to attend private schools.

Back in 2013 an audience member asked him a question about Common Core State Standards and he replied, “What’s that?” Just a few months later he sponsored a bill to denounce the nationwide curriculum initiative. Here are some of his views on education:

http://go.uen.org/3QN

 

 

 

 

 

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NATIONAL NEWS

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Turnaround schools bill gets final legislative OK Las Vegas Review-Journal

 

CARSON CITY — The Assembly on Monday approved legislation that allows the state to designate underperforming public schools as turnaround schools and requires school districts to lay off the least effective teachers and administrators when staff reductions are necessary.

The Assembly voted 28-11 on Senate Bill 92, which now needs a signature from Gov. Brian Sandoval to become law. It passed the Senate on Sunday.

The bill part of Gov. Brian Sandoval’s education reform agenda for improving schools.

Under existing state law, school districts cannot lay off educators based solely on seniority. The bill expands that further, requiring schools to lay off ineffective educators first, and then move on to those who have been suspended for a disciplinary action or a criminal record.

Beyond that, a school district can look at whether the staff are in hard-to-fill positions. Seniority is only allowed as a final consideration after taking all other factors into account and when two or more employees equally match the criteria to be laid off.

If the state Department of Education designates a poor-performing school as a turnaround school, the school district’s board can decide whether to keep its principal there or reassign the administrator.

The principal of a turnaround school has wide latitude to make decisions about the curriculum and decide if teachers will be kept on board or reassigned elsewhere in the district. Reassigned teachers would get professional development.

http://go.uen.org/3Q7

 

 


 

 

 

Nevada GOP Governor Secures Unlikely Win with Tax Increase Associated Press

 

CARSON CITY, Nev. — Nevada’s Republican governor, Brian Sandoval, secured an unlikely victory when the conservative state Legislature approved a huge tax increase at his urging as part of a plan to boost education spending.

The $1.1 billion package raises taxes on businesses and cigarettes, and it makes permanent a $500 million bundle of temporary payroll and sales taxes.

Sandoval’s win on Monday came on the last day of the legislative session, and the proposal’s fate had been in doubt until late Sunday when several skeptical Republicans in the state Assembly pledged support.

http://go.uen.org/3QB

 

http://go.uen.org/3QJ (Las Vegas Sun)

 

 


 

 

Vouchers give kids ‘the first real chance to succeed,’ judge says New Orleans Times-Picayune

 

The U.S. Justice Department defended its attempt to monitor Louisiana’s private school voucher program during a hearing Monday (June 1) at the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in New Orleans. But one of the three judges was clearly skeptical of the government’s argument.

In the past year, the Louisiana Scholarship Program used public money to subsidize tuition at participating private schools for about 7,500 children from low-income families. “Editorially,” Judge Edith Jones of Houston said, vouchers gave those children “the first real chance to succeed educationally in the Louisiana system.”

The Justice Department sued Gov. Bobby Jindal’s administration in 2013 claiming the right to intervene. District Judge Ivan Lemelle ruled in 2013 that a 40-year-old case, Brumfield vs. Dodd, let the federal government gather information on programs that might impede school desegregation. His 2014 order requires the state to provide regular reports on voucher enrollment, including detailed demographics.

A group of parents whose children use vouchers appealed to the 5th Circuit. They are members of the Black Alliance for Educational Options. The conservative Goldwater Institute argued the case. The Jindal administration was not involved in the appeal, alliance officials said.

http://go.uen.org/3Q8

 

 


 

 

 

How Can Students Better Apply Math Learning? New Studies Hold Answers Even within STEM, transfer is tough Education Week

 

New York – Mathematics is the language of science, the foundation of engineering, the power switch for new technology—but students often struggle to transfer their understanding of math concepts to practical application in other STEM subjects.

Researchers at the Association of Psychological Science conference here last month discussed new findings on ways to help students link their math learning to science, technology, and engineering.

“Looking at the longer history of transfer of knowledge, the research shows that if you have students pull a general concept out of a combination of specific examples and give multiple different examples, it increases transfer of that concept to new examples,” said Holly A. Taylor, a psychology professor at Tufts University, in Medford, Mass.

“One reason that STEM concepts are difficult to transfer is because they are siloed. Although I believe that there is change afoot in this regard,” she said, because new mathematics and science standards in most states are focused more on underlying processes than on learning just facts.

http://go.uen.org/3QD

 

 


 

 

 

Parent Engagement on Rise as Priority for Schools, Districts Push for formal role, rather than add-on Education Week

 

Family-engagement practitioners and researchers say educators are adopting systemic and sustained efforts to integrate parents into the fabric of their schools—a welcome shift for advocates who have complained of lip service but scant support for programs they say can have a big impact on student achievement.

In the past seven years, large and mid-sized school districts such as Denver and Nashville have created positions and departments specifically geared toward parent involvement, with a concurrent growth in related organizations, increased attendance at conferences, and a heightened interest from some philanthropic groups to fund parent-engagement efforts.

Meanwhile, states are including family-engagement in their teacher-evaluation systems or making it a requirement in other programs.

http://go.uen.org/3QE

 

 


 

 

 

Charter Schools Have an Awkward Secret: They’re Not Very Good at Innovating So a Group of Education Entrepreneurs in New Orleans is Helping Them Learn the ABCs of Disruption, by Starting Small Fast Company

 

When Nia Mitchell took over as principal of Algiers Technology Academy, a New Orleans charter high school, she knew she wanted to introduce project-based learning into the curriculum. “That’s the direction that we’re going,” she says. But she had her hands full—only 19% of her students were scoring at college-ready levels, or at least 18 out of 36, on the ACT, and only 65% were graduating within four years. Plus, her opportunities to observe project-based learning in action at other schools were few and far between.

“I go and I see, and then I don’t get to see it again for months,” she says. Project-based approaches, in which students learn information and skills by tackling complex, interdisciplinary problems, are “relatively new for the state of Louisiana.”

That’s when Mitchell met Jonathan Johnson, a teacher turned entrepreneur. He had been prototyping his idea for a new charter school, called Rooted, through an after-school program, and was looking for a chance to test the model during the school day, in the form of a “school within a school.” Rooted’s pedagogical foundation: project-based learning.

“Public education is not creating a way out for kids like we need it to be,” says Johnson. “We have to figure out how to serve these kids in different ways.”

http://go.uen.org/3QT

 

 


 

 

Schools failing to address biased student discipline Phys.org

 

School districts are failing to address the discipline gap between students of color and white students — in some cases even blocking researchers from gathering data on the troubling trend, a Michigan State University scholar argues in a new paper.

Muhammad Khalifa set out to collect student discipline information from a handful of large school districts in Texas but said he was met with resistance from district administrators who viewed his efforts as a threat.

His findings, published in the academic journal Teachers College Record, highlight a larger national issue. The united Sates, Khalifa said, cannot solve the problem of black and Latino students being suspended at higher rates than whites if school districts don’t even acknowledge the gap exists.

http://go.uen.org/3QU

 

A copy of the study

http://go.uen.org/3QV (Teachers College Record)

 

 


 

 

 

Free Test-preparation Program for Revamped SAT Goes Online Associated Press

 

SAN FRANCISCO — The nonprofit organization behind the SAT college entrance exam has teamed up with a Silicon Valley pioneer in online education to make test preparation materials available for free starting Tuesday, a move aimed at making the college admissions race less stressful and more fair.

The College Board gave unprecedented access to the revamped SAT it plans to introduce next spring to Khan Academy, which has developed diagnostic quizzes and interactive practice tests that will be accessible to anyone with Internet access. Khan Academy, based in Mountain View, is known for its free web-based library of instructional videos and academic exercises.

College Board President David Coleman said the partnership aims to level the college admissions playing field by putting high-quality training within easy reach of students without the funds for commercial test-prep services or the family support often needed to stick with a self-paced practice book.

http://go.uen.org/3Q6

 

http://go.uen.org/3QC (Ed Week)

 

 


 

 

Students Get Pass on SAT Makeup: School Finds Missing Exams Associated Press

 

ASHBURN, Va. — More than 200 Virginia students probably won’t have to retake their SAT exams after all: Officials who blamed UPS for losing the box of tests say it’s been found at the school.

The college entrance exams went missing last month at Broad Run High School in Ashburn. The 260 students had taken the test May 2. Many were upset to learn they might have to retake it.

But Loudoun County schools spokesman Wayde Byard says the box was found Monday morning in a shipping area at the school. Byard says the box was still sealed and was handed over immediately to a member of Educational Testing Service, which administers the exam. Byard says he expects the results to be validated.

http://go.uen.org/3Q5

 

 


 

 

 

Vermont Says No to the Anti-Vaccine Movement New Yorker

 

Just a year after Vermont became the first state to require labels for products made with genetically modified organisms, Governor Peter Shumlin on Thursday signed an equally controversial but very different kind of legislation: the state has now become the first to remove philosophical exemptions from its vaccination law.

The two issues are both emotional and highly contested. But Vermont’s decisions could hardly be less alike: the G.M.O. bill, which has enormous popular support, has been widely criticized by scientists—largely because no credible evidence exists suggesting that G.M.O.s are dangerous. The vaccine law, however, opposed by many people, is the strongest possible endorsement of the data that shows that vaccines are the world’s most effective public-health tool.

Perhaps because the debate over removing the philosophical exemption has been rancorous and long, the governor first opposed the legislation. More recently, he suggested that he was neutral. On Thursday, possibly sensing the political peril involved in siding with the anti-vaccine movement, Shumlin signed the bill without much publicity. Rather than hold a news conference, as he did when signing the G.M.O. legislation last year, he simply released a statement.

http://go.uen.org/3Qa

 

 


 

 

 

Texas Votes to End High School Steroids Tests After 8 Years Associated Press

 

AUSTIN, Texas — Texas lawmakers voted Friday to dismantle the state’s high school steroids testing program after eight years and more than $10 million spent collecting thousands of samples that turned up only a handful of cheaters.

Once lauded as a model for the nation, the program instead turned into a target for critics who called it an ineffective waste of money. Several lawmakers defended it Friday as an effective deterrent against steroid use, but said it was no longer needed.

“We spent a lot of money. We raised awareness. We saved lives,” said Rep. Dan Flynn, a Republican who helped write the original testing law in 2007.

Friday’s vote stripped all money for the testing program out of the next state budget, which was sent to Gov. Greg Abbott to sign into law.

http://go.uen.org/3Qb

 

 


 

 

 

Native American student sues school district over right to wear feather Reuters

 

SAN FRANCISCO – A Native American student took a California school district to court on Monday after his high school banned him from wearing an eagle feather on his graduation cap, a civil rights group said.

The American Civil Liberties Union of Northern California (ACLU) said Clovis High School senior Christian Titman, 18, had notified the court of the emergency lawsuit ahead of his Thursday graduation.

Titman, a member of the Pit River Tribe, and his parents have repeatedly asked that he be granted permission to wear the feather during the ceremony to represent his heritage and religion, and mark his academic achievement, but their requests were denied, according to the ACLU.

http://go.uen.org/3Qx

 

 


 

 

 

Summer Meals Programs for Poor Children Grow, But Unmet Need Persists Education Week

 

More low-income children ate at federally subsidized summer meals sites in the summer of 2014, continuing a trend in growth in participation that started a few years before, a new report says.

But work remains to be done to ensure that all children who eat free and reduced-price meals during the school year have access to similar assistance in the summer, it says.

Summer meal programs, hosted by schools and approved non-profit organizations, offer free meals to children in areas where 50 percent or more of students qualify for free or reduced-price lunches. In some cases, those meals are offered from trucks and buses that go into low-income neighborhoods where children may lack transportation to meals sites.

http://go.uen.org/3QF

 

A copy of the report

http://go.uen.org/3QG (Food Research and Action Center)

 

 


 

 

Mpls. private school takes students to adult novelty store for sex ed lesson The field trip upset some parents at Gaia School. “It’s just a major breach of trust,” said one parent.

Minneapolis Star-Tribune

 

Some parents are outraged after the leader of a small Minneapolis private school took about a dozen middle- and high-school-aged students on a sex education field trip to an adult novelty store late last week.

“It’s just a major breach of trust,” said Lynn Floyd, whose 11- and 13-year-old daughters were part of the outing to the Smitten Kitten. “You just can’t erase those images.”

A leader of Gaia Democratic School and the host of the field trip defended the outing, saying the visit capped a monthslong sex education class.

Director Starri Hedges, who also teaches the school’s sex education class, said she wanted to provide a safe and welcoming environment for students to learn about human sexual behavior.

http://go.uen.org/3Qc

 

http://go.uen.org/3Qy (AP)

 

 


 

 

 

Bay Area teacher begs NBA MVP Stephen Curry to stay away from his school USA Today

 

Well, this is a new one.

While most teachers across the state of California would love to receive a visit from one of the newly-crowned Western Conference champion Golden State Warriors, one Bay Area teacher is begging that they stay away.

You read that right. Rather than be the beneficiary of one of the NBA Cares programs, which the league uses to connect with the community, Matt Amaral used a blog post to ask league MVP Stephen Curry to stay away.

Here’s the really crazy thing: He makes a great case.

It’s not that Amaral dislikes the Warriors. Quite the contrary; he’s a lifelong fan. And it’s not that he thinks the NBA’s community initiatives are empty public relations exercises; he goes to lengths to praise those as well. Rather, he worries that Curry and his teammates are so approachable and human that they will convince his students they can reach Curry’s heights as well.

That, as he makes clear, is a dangerous thing.

http://go.uen.org/3Qw

 

 


 

 

Dissident Teachers in Mexico Strike Over Education Overhaul The action leaves at least a million children without classes Wall Street Journal

 

TLAPA, Mexico—Members of a dissident teachers’ group went on indefinite strike in Mexico, vandalizing government offices, torching electoral documents and leaving at least a million children without classes, in an effort to halt an education overhaul and disrupt coming federal midterm elections.

The action Monday by the National Coordinator of Educational Workers—a branch of the national teachers union that is strong in the country’s poorest states—and the possibility of further disruptions ahead of Sunday’s vote pose a growing challenge to the administration of President Enrique Peña Nieto.

In 2013, the government passed an overhaul of Mexico’s troubled public school system that, among other things, calls for mandatory evaluations of the country’s teachers, due to begin later this year. In 2012 education tests drawn up by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, Mexico got the lowest marks in math and reading among its 34 member countries.

On Friday, under pressure from the CNTE, as it is popularly known, Mexico´s government said it would suspend “until further notice” plans to carry out the evaluations. The delay was broadly seen as a humiliating setback for the president, who has tried to cast himself as a reformer trying to modernize Mexico’s economy.

http://go.uen.org/3Q9

 

http://go.uen.org/3QO (CSM)

 

http://go.uen.org/3QA (AP)

 

 


 

 

 

Report Says Schools for Canadian-Indians “Cultural Genocide”

Associated Press

 

TORONTO — A long-awaited report into Canada’s decades-long government policy requiring Canadian Indians to attend state-funded church schools called it “nothing less than cultural genocide.”

Truth and Reconciliation Commission chair Justice Murray Sinclair said Tuesday that residential schools are one of the “darkest and most troubling chapters in our collective history.”

The report is the result of a six-year study of Canada’s former government policy requiring Canadian Indians to attend the schools, often the scenes of physical and sexual abuse. Indian leaders have cited the legacy of abuse and isolation as the root cause of epidemic substance abuse rates on reservations.

http://go.uen.org/3Qz

 

http://go.uen.org/3QS ([Toronto] Globe and Mail)

 

 

 

 

 

————————————————————

CALENDAR

————————————————————

 

USOE Calendar

http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

 

 

UEN News

http://www.uen.org

 

 

June 16:

Executive Appropriations Committee meeting

2 p.m., 445 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2015&Com=APPEXE

 

 

June 17:

Education Interim Committee meeting

9 a.m., 30 House Building

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2015&Com=INTEDU

 

 

June 18-19:

Utah State Board of Education meeting

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

 

 

July 9:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://go.uen.org/1pn

 

 

 

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