Education News Roundup: June 5, 2015

"Summer Break" by Ohsohappytogether/CC/flickr

“Summer Break” by Ohsohappytogether/CC/flickr

Education News Roundup

Today’s Top Picks:

 

New term limit movement launches in Utah.

http://go.uen.org/3St (SLT)

and http://go.uen.org/3Su (UP)

 

FairTest education director talks about standardized testing in Logan.

http://go.uen.org/3SE (CVD)

 

Utah Court of Appeals rules that surveillance video from inside a school is an education record and subject to FERPA rules.

http://go.uen.org/3Sz (NSBA)

or a copy of the ruling

http://go.uen.org/3SA (NSBA)

 

Wyoming pushes for an ESEA rewrite.

http://go.uen.org/3Sy (Wyoming Public Radio)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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TODAY’S HEADLINES

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UTAH

 

New drive launches to limit terms of Utah officeholders Petition » Organization says setting a two-term (eight-year) limit has broad support statewide, hopes to get 140,000 signatures.

 

Education organization wants to reduce the impact of standardized tests

 

FOX 13 Study: Utah’s per-pupil spending lowest in state’s biggest districts

 

Utah teen graduates after fleeing violence, losing parents

 

Utah Transgender Prom Queen Happy with Life, Credits Family and Friends

 

Man salvages Intermountain Indian School mural

 

Weber High gets brand new weight room

 

Utah DOT hosts a transportation summit for middle school girls

 

Sandy teacher makes top 15 in nationwide movie trailer contest

 

Tap dancer Savion Glover among headliners for University of Utah’s performing arts series Kingsbury Hall arts series has new focus, new name

 

New Young Men leader: He learned early to seek first the kingdom of God

 

Schools hire new secondary principal

 

 


 

 

 

OPINION & COMMENTARY

 

Paying for Utah schools takes more than faith

 

Stop the summer slide

 

Why does a teacher not want a NBA MVP to come visit his school…

 

Utah Court of Appeals rules that video from school camera was subject to FERPA disclosure restrictions because it was an “education record”

 

Calling the Nation’s Civil Rights Leaders Ignorant on Testing: Really?

 

Catholic education is fighting for survival and biggest losers are Hispanics

 

The 10 Best- And Worst-Paying Education Jobs

 

Rick Perry On Education: 7 Things The Presidential Candidate Wants You To Know

 

 


 

 

 

NATION

 

Wyoming Lawmakers Push For No Child Left Behind Rewrite

 

Recession, Politics and Policy Stretch Arizona School Budgets

 

Senate OKs bill to let governor appoint education commissioners

 

AltSchool: The next generation of education?

 

After 5 weeks, where are ACT scores from statewide test?

 

Hudson science teacher suspended for using cell jammer

 

Eight out of 10 Malala suspects ‘secretly acquitted’

Eight of the 10 men reportedly jailed for the attempted assassination of Pakistani schoolgirl Malala Yousafzai were acquitted, it has emerged.

 

 

 

 

 

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UTAH NEWS

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New drive launches to limit terms of Utah officeholders Petition » Organization says setting a two-term (eight-year) limit has broad support statewide, hopes to get 140,000 signatures.

 

A new group is launching a drive to limit terms for top state officeholders — plus all appointees to state boards and commissions — to no more than eight years.

“I think the U.S. Constitution has it right in limiting the executive office [of president] to two terms, and there are 36 other states around the country that have come to the same conclusion” to limit terms for governors, said Rick Larsen, organizer of Utah Term Limits NOW!

“It’s healthy,” he said. “It brings new ideas. I think it disrupts entrenched power where decisions are no longer transparent or decisions are based on re­election. I just think it’s good for democracy.”

http://go.uen.org/3St (SLT)

 

http://go.uen.org/3Su (UP)

 

 


 

 

 

Education organization wants to reduce the impact of standardized tests

 

Many colleges and universities across the country have been dropping their requirements for ACT or SAT testing, according to Bob Schaeffer who is with the National Center for Fair and Open Testing. On KVNU’s For the People program Wednesday, Schaeffer said some institutions are now making tests optional, including some in Utah.

He said in the education world we have become “test crazy” in the last 15 years and many parents, teachers, administrators and other decision makers complain about the over-use and misuse of standardized tests.

Instead, Schaeffer favors other methods.

http://go.uen.org/3SE (CVD)

 

 


 

 

FOX 13 Study: Utah’s per-pupil spending lowest in state’s biggest districts

 

SALT LAKE CITY — A FOX 13 News analysis of new Census numbers for per-pupil spending shows the state’s average is far higher than what most students receive.

Utah’s five largest districts–Alpine, Davis, Granite, Jordan and Canyons–each spend less than the state’s average of $6,555.

More than half of Utah’s 562,315 elementary and secondary public school students attend schools in those districts.

http://go.uen.org/3Sv (KSTU)

 

 


 

 

 

Utah teen graduates after fleeing violence, losing parents

 

Among the 433 graduates from West Jordan High School was a young man from Africa named Elie, who traveled a long road to graduation. Elie, who came to Utah as a refugee four years ago, knowing no English and barely smiling, grinned ear to ear as he accepted his diploma Friday at the Energy Solutions Arena.

“I am proud of myself,” he said noting that he finished high school with a 3.7 GPA.

As he accepted his diploma, Elie also thought of his parents whom he hasn’t seen in at least seven years. He assumed they were dead after his family was separated when a rebel group forced people out of his town in Congo. Eli and his sibling were at school, when the rebels stormed the town where they were in school. The principal told the school kids he couldn’t save them and everyone ran off.

http://go.uen.org/3SC (KUTV)

 

 


 

 

 

Utah Transgender Prom Queen Happy with Life, Credits Family and Friends

 

The Salt Lake School for the Performing Arts this year elected a transgender prom queen. Senior Maka Brown transitioned from male to female when she was 16 years old. Transgender people in this country are at elevated risk for homelessness, depression, murder, and suicide. Maka Brown has had her struggles, but she says her story has taken a different turn from most. Maka and her mother Toni Brown talk about prom night and the transformation they’ve both experienced.

http://go.uen.org/3SJ (KUER)

 

 


 

 

 

Man salvages Intermountain Indian School mural

 

BRIGHAM CITY, Utah— An effort to document the demolition of the Intermountain Indian School evolved into a labor of love for a local photographer.

Brad Peterson grew up in Logan and was fascinated by the school in Brigham City as a child. When he heard the buildings, which were boarded up and in disuse, were going to be demolished to make way for a new Utah State University campus, he wanted to make sure their history was preserved.

At first he just planned to take preservation photos of the buildings, but when the doors were opened up to him he discovered murals painted by students on the walls inside. He felt compelled to do more.

http://go.uen.org/3SY (PDH)

 

 


 

 

Weber High gets brand new weight room

 

PLEASANT VIEW — Matt Hammer had an idea when he first arrived at Weber High prior to the 2013 season why the football program was in shambles having lost 23 straight games, and it didn’t involve anything he saw on the football field.

The Warriors head coach, now getting ready for his third year, took exception with the school’s weight room.

“I walked into that old weight room and within the first 10 seconds it was just like this has to change,” Hammer said of the roughly 1,000 square-foot space located on the south end of the gymnasium. “I mean, literally, right when I walked in the room. It was almost comical to me. Like, really? This is it? This might sound bad in a way… it almost told me this is why the football situation (was what it was).”

Having already taken the Warriors from the moribund status that comes with two consecutive winless seasons to what last year was a Region 1 playoff team, Hammer has now led a charge to have a brand new weight room constructed.

http://go.uen.org/3SD (OSE)

 

 


 

 

 

Utah DOT hosts a transportation summit for middle school girls

 

The Utah Department of Transportation is trying to get more young women to consider the transportation industry as a potential career choice.

With that aim, the department recently hosted a transportation summit for 53 middle school girls from across Salt Lake County, Fox 13 in Salt Lake City reported.

http://go.uen.org/3SZ (Equipment World)

 

 


 

 

Sandy teacher makes top 15 in nationwide movie trailer contest

 

SANDY — Rachel Bingham, a first-grade teacher at Bellview Elementary in Sandy, likes to use film to facilitate learning in her classroom.

“I take a lot of video of my class for the school year. I make trailers for field trips, and for school projects we work together to create trailers and movies in my classroom,” Bingham, 47, said.

Parents love to see their children at work and play on the private site that Bingham created to house their classroom videos, but It’s also a fun, hands-on learning technique that helps her students express themselves in a way that their early writing skills would not accommodate.

http://go.uen.org/3SG (KSL)

 

 


 

 

 

Tap dancer Saion Glover among headliners for University of Utah’s performing arts series Kingsbury Hall arts series has new focus, new name

 

Kingsbury Hall Presents, the University of Utah’s performing-arts series, will kick off its new season this fall with a new name, UtahPresents.

“The new name allows us to accurately reflect the expansion we’re doing, ” says Brooke Horejsi, Kingsbury Hall executive director and assistant dean for the U.’s College of Fine Arts. “We’re presenting work all over the place, not just at Kingsbury Hall.”

The aim of UtahPresents is to embed arts into programs across campus and in the community, and its $2 million annual budget is funded by ticket sales and corporation donations, as well as taxpayers through the Salt Lake County Zoo, Arts and Parks tax and university allocations. “We’re paying a lot of attention to our donations,” she says. “I’m a bargain shopper in my personal life, so I’m clipping all the coupons I can” when it comes to programming.

The nonprofit’s new focus has changed the conversations when booking national and international acts, Horejsi says. No longer is the series lineup just based on the artists’ work and their touring calendar. In addition, Utah Presents is interested in how skilled and willing artists are at working with students.

Several local teachers, for example, have expressed interest in events beyond literature-based performances. So this year, UtahPresents has booked Doktor Kaboom!, a one-man science comedy show by Seattle comedian David Epley. In addition to public performances, Doktor Kaboom! will present three creativity workshops at local schools.

http://go.uen.org/3SW (SLT)

 

 


 

 

 

New Young Men leader: He learned early to seek first the kingdom of God

 

As a student at Brighton High School near Salt Lake City, Douglas D. Holmes was well liked, so much so that many associates encouraged him to run for student body president.

“A seminary teacher I loved came to me and asked me to serve as president of the seminary council,” recalled Brother Holmes, who was sustained at general conference April 4 as first counselor in the new Young Men general presidency.

“He said, ‘But you won’t be able to be the student body president; are you all right with that?’ I said, ‘Absolutely.’ It was a great experience, and I loved it.”

Biographical information

Community service: Board chairman of United Way of Davis County, Utah; board member of Safe Harbor women’s shelter in Davis County; chairman of Parents for Choice in Education.

http://go.uen.org/3SX (LDS Church News)

 

 


 

 

Schools hire new secondary principal

 

The Wrangell School Board elected to offer Kendall Benson the position as the new secondary schools principal during its May 19 meeting. He will replace outgoing principal Colter Barnes who served one year in the position. Barnes will be headed to Southeast Island School District to serve as an itinerant principal and greenhouse manager.

Benson begins August 1 and brings with him three decades of education experience. His most recent post was as principal of Cedar Middle School in Cedar City, Utah, which he finished last month.

http://go.uen.org/3SV (Wrangell [AK] Sentinel)

 

 

 

 

 

 

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OPINION & COMMENTARY

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Paying for Utah schools takes more than faith Salt Lake Tribune editorial

 

Denial. Anger. Bargaining. Depression. Acceptance. The five stages of grief. And of paying for public education in Utah.

Last week the state’s top education official, Superintendent Brad Smith, scandalized more than a few good Utahns by paraphrasing Barry (“Extremism in the defense of liberty is no vice”) Goldwater in a speech to the Utah Taxpayers Association. He told the approving audience that state educators, parents and politicians should just get over their obsession with the fact that our state generally sits at the bottom of any list measuring per-pupil spending.

“There is no virtue in rising higher on that list,” he said. “And there is no particular vice in being low on it.”

As if on cue, the U.S. Census Bureau reported just a few days later that, once again, Utah sits at the bottom of the list of the 50 states and the District of Columbia in the amount of money it spends on each student in its system of public education. At $6,555 a head, Utah in 2013 spent only about a third on each of its students as did the state of New York, and was well below the national average of $10,700.

Of course, everything costs a lot more in New York. And nobody is arguing that New York’s educational results, as measured in such things as high school graduation rates or college preparedness, are three times better than Utah’s.

Those figures don’t reflect a statewide property tax hike approved a few months ago. And the kernel of truth in Smith’s sentiment is that there is no guarantee that spending more money will automatically mean better results. Money spent well, on target, with clear ideas of what it is for and means of measuring outcomes, is more important than money just spent.

http://go.uen.org/3Sw

 

 


 

 

 

Stop the summer slide

(St. George) Spectrum editorial

 

Our nation’s strength depends on the academic talents and resourcefulness of each successive generation. According to the latest research from the Schott Foundation for Public Education, the United States will need 60 percent of its population to possess a postsecondary degree or credential by 2025 to remain globally competitive.

Educational achievement is built on positive experiences that occur both within school and out of school. The Annie E. Casey Foundation 2014 report “Early Warning! Why Reading by the End of Third Grade Matters” states, “Grade-level reading proficiency by the end of third grade is one of the strongest predictors of future success, including high school graduation, advanced education, employment outcomes, and successful adulthood.”

To be sure, early reading proficiency depends upon effective schools that nurture children’s potential. It also depends on children’s ability to retain what they’ve learned in school and become further enriched during the summers when they are outside the classroom.

http://go.uen.org/3SF

 

 


 

 

 

Why does a teacher not want a NBA MVP to come visit his school…

KNRS commentary by Rod Arquette

 

It’s another one of those stories involving a well written letter that is intentionally misleading…well kinda. A teacher in Hayward, California, a place that, despite it’s proximity, has been largely unaffected by the opulence and wealth that has poured in to the Bay Area, has penned a letter asking NBA star Stephen Curry, recently given the prestigious title of Most Valuable Player, to not visit his high school. The reason? He wouldn’t be able to relate….

Matt Amaral, the teacher who wrote the now viral letter, says that because of the way Curry was raised and his background of coming from a home with money and privilege he would be entirely unable to relate to the students Amaral teaches. He reasons that because of this, the dreams of the students could be adversely affected as many of them come from low income families and could therefore see the only way to get ahead would be through money and influence one can be born in to, rather than simply making something of themselves.

So is this a fair thing to say? Or would they benefit from having such a prominent figure come speak to their school?

http://go.uen.org/3SK

 

 


 

 

Utah Court of Appeals rules that video from school camera was subject to FERPA disclosure restrictions because it was an “education record”

National School Boards Association analysis

 

Bryner v. Canyons Sch. Dist., No. 20130566 (Utah App. Ct. May 29, 2015)

Abstract:  The Utah Court of Appeals has ruled that a videotape from a security camera placed outside the exit to a middle school classroom was subject to the disclosure restrictions of the federal Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA). The appellate court concluded that the videotape was an “education record” within the meaning of FERPA because it contained personally identifiable information of students. It rejected the plaintiff’s argument that FERPA’s application is limited to academic records. The appellate court found that the video: (1) contained information directly related to students; and (2) was maintained by persons acting for the school district.

The Court of Appeals also concluded that under the state’s government records access and management law the school district could provide the plaintiff with a redacted copy of the tape, but the plaintiff was responsible for paying the cost of redaction.

http://go.uen.org/3Sz

 

A copy of the ruling

http://go.uen.org/3SA (NSBA)

 

 


 

 

Calling the Nation’s Civil Rights Leaders Ignorant on Testing: Really?

Education Trust commentary by Trust President Kati Haycock

 

Last week, Marc Tucker, president of the National Center on Education and the Economy, took to the pages of Education Week to call leaders of the Urban League, the NAACP, the National Council of La Raza, the League of Latin American Citizens, the Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights, and other national civil rights and disabilities organizations unwitting participants in a plot to injure the nation’s most vulnerable children. Their crime? A unanimous conviction that our country should not abandon the annual testing that gives parents and teachers a regular objective measure of how well their children are progressing on their journey through school.

Tucker’s assertions are breathtaking in their arrogance: That these leaders — many of whom run large, complex organizations and have advanced degrees from some of the nation’s most prestigious universities — are somehow less capable than he is of understanding what the data say about the progress of black, brown, and Native children. That they are so untraveled or unread as to be somehow unaware that most high-performing nations don’t use such an approach. And, most breathtaking of all, that these leaders — all of whom have devoted their lives to bettering the conditions of low-income children, racial minorities, English learners, and children with disabilities — are willingly countenancing a policy that is doing actual damage to these very children.

http://go.uen.org/3Sx

 

 


 

 

 

Catholic education is fighting for survival and biggest losers are Hispanics Fox News Latino commentary by Dr. Grazie Pozo Christie who specializes in radiology in the Miami area

 

The saga in San Francisco continues, with the self-appointed enforcers of the New Intolerance attacking Archbishop Cordileone for trying to keep the high schools in his archdiocese Catholic in more than name. They insist that the Church change its doctrines relating to marriage and the family, and this insistence comes with thinly veiled threats to close Church schools by taking away their tax exempt status. Catholic education is fighting for survival and if this battle is lost, among the biggest losers will be Hispanics.

My experiences growing up were like the experiences of many Latinos. Hear our stories and you hear a common thread:  Disruption, upheaval, a little desperation from time to time, and a lot of hard work toward some eventual stability and peace.

http://go.uen.org/3SS

 

 


 

 

The 10 Best- And Worst-Paying Education Jobs Forbes commentary by columnist Kathryn Dill

 

To determine the Best- And Worst-Paying Education Jobs, Forbes consulted the most recent Occupational Employment and Wages data collected by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), which reflects May 2014 salary and employment data, and focused on Education, Training, and Library Occupations, plus education-related jobs in several other categories as well.

The oft-given advice to “do what you love” might be of particular relevance to education professionals, many of whom commit to years of study and multiple degrees to secure jobs that may not always guarantee a healthy paycheck.

But the education sector includes a broad variety of occupations paying anywhere from just over $25,000 annually to well into the $100,000s.

To determine the Best- And Worst-Paying Education Jobs, Forbes consulted the most recent Occupational Employment and Wages data collected by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), which reflects May 2014 salary and employment data, and focused on Education, Training, and Library Occupations, plus education-related jobs in several other categories as well.

According to the BLS, five of the ten largest public sector occupations were teaching jobs, including elementary school teachers, except special education; teacher assistants; and secondary school teachers, except special and career/technical education.

So which jobs in the education field have the best and worst compensation?

http://go.uen.org/3SQ

 

 


 

 

 

Rick Perry On Education: 7 Things The Presidential Candidate Wants You To Know Forbes commentary by columnist Maureen Sullivan

 

Former Texas Governor Rick Perry joined the growing ranks of contenders for the Republican presidential nomination with his announcement today in Addison,Texas. Perry has a long record of speaking out on education issues, including banning Common Core curriculum standards in Texas. As governor he promoted homeschooling as well as lifting the cap on charter schools. As a presidential contender in 2012, he supported the elimination of the Department of Education.

In his launch speech he said Texas has the second highest graduation rate in the country and the highest rate for African American and Hispanic students. Here are some of his views on education:

http://go.uen.org/3SR

 

 

 

 

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NATIONAL NEWS

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Wyoming Lawmakers Push For No Child Left Behind Rewrite Wyoming Public Radio

 

Wyoming lawmakers want more flexibility in how schools are assessed under the federal education law, No Child Left Behind.

Members of the Legislature’s Select Committee on Statewide Education Accountability met in Saratoga Wednesday to discuss how to reform Wyoming’s system for evaluating schools. A rework of the state’s accountability system is required by legislation passed this year.

The group voted to send a letter to Wyoming’s congressional delegation, advocating for a U.S. Senate bill that would replace the federal education law, restore more power to states and school districts, make testing less frequent and remove statewide teacher accountability requirements.

http://go.uen.org/3Sy

 

 


 

 

 

Recession, Politics and Policy Stretch Arizona School Budgets New York Times

 

PHOENIX — In the rural Saddle Mountain Unified School District 50 miles west of Phoenix, three new libraries have been locked since last year. In a neighboring county, an elementary school closed last month because there was no money to keep it open, even after the district agreed to shift to a four­day week.

More Arizona educators are also taking on double duty: In the Miami Unified School District east of here, the superintendent is also a grant writer and the principal of the elementary school is also in charge of keeping the toilets running, as the district’s director of maintenance.

“We’ve asked our teachers to double up — everybody is doubling up,” said Sherry Dorathy, the superintendent of the district, which is facing a 4 percent cut in next year’s budget. “And we haven’t given our teachers a raise in seven years.”

The needs of the nation’s schools have grown since the recession began: There are now 458,000 more students enrolled in public schools than in the fall of 2007. But while total state revenues have mostly rebounded to prerecession levels, state education funding per pupil is still down 3.6 percent across the country, according to an analysis by the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, a nonpartisan Washington think tank.

http://go.uen.org/3SL

 

 


 

 

 

Senate OKs bill to let governor appoint education commissioners Providence (RI) Journal

 

PROVIDENCE, R.I. — The Senate on Thursday approved legislation that would shift the authority for appointing Rhode Island’s two education commissioners from the state Board of Education to the governor with the Senate’s advice and consent.

The bill, which the Senate approved 30 to 5, with 3 members not voting, now heads to the House.

If the measure becomes law, Governor Raimondo would have authority to appoint a new commissioner of elementary and secondary education to replace Deborah A. Gist, who has announced she is leaving to become superintendent in Tulsa, Okla., when her contract expires later this month.

http://go.uen.org/3SU

 

 


 

 

AltSchool: The next generation of education?

CBS

 

Friday is graduation day at an unusual K-8 school in California — and there is only one graduate. He’s part of an experiment in San Francisco called AltSchool that could re-define how your kids get an education, reports Ben Tracy.

Curiel-Friedman is 13 years old. He’s the only 8th grader and about to become the first graduate of AltSchool.

“Here, we don’t do textbooks. We do computers and I really like that,” student Zev Curiel-Friedman said.

When the kids arrive at the school, the first thing they do is swipe in on a tablet on the wall and then grab their own tablet for class.

There are no bells and no principal. There are two teachers in every classroom and the kids are a mix of ages and grade levels. Curiel-Friedman says there are not even 30 kids in a classroom.

Launched just two years ago, AltSchool is part school, part start-up — an education incubator where kids are the beta-testers.

http://go.uen.org/3SP

 

 


 

 

After 5 weeks, where are ACT scores from statewide test?

Minneapolis Star-Tribune

 

While most students are packing up their books for the year, Minnesota’s juniors are still waiting for a key piece of academic information: their ACT scores.

The test’s first statewide administration happened April 28, and some counselors and parents aren’t happy about the timeline for receiving results. They said waiting five weeks — or more — is too long, with the delay resulting in students not knowing whether to sign up for the upcoming June ACT test or what they should review this summer to improve their fall scores.

“I don’t understand what the hold up is with ACT to get the tests back,” said Kathleen Nettleton, parent of a junior at Wayzata High School. “Keep in mind that a lot of students are applying for college this summer.”

And with the school year wrapping up, there’s no time to sit down with juniors and help them understand their scores, counselors said.

http://go.uen.org/3SB

 

 


 

 

 

Hudson science teacher suspended for using cell jammer (Tampa Bay, FL) Bay News 9

 

PASCO COUNTY — A Hudson science teacher was suspended without pay for taking a class experiment a little too far.

Fivay High School teacher Dean Liptak was sick of students using cell phones in class so he started using a cell jammer.

“The cell phone provider came to the campus and asked to search the campus, so at that point in time administration believed it was a student that might have had this device,” said the Director of Office for Employee Relations, Betsy Kuhn.

A likely guess, but not this time. It was Liptak, a former pro-wrestler, conducting an experiment with the device, to block cell signal.

http://go.uen.org/3SN

 

http://go.uen.org/3SO (Ed Week)

 

 


 

 

Eight out of 10 Malala suspects ‘secretly acquitted’

Eight of the 10 men reportedly jailed for the attempted assassination of Pakistani schoolgirl Malala Yousafzai were acquitted, it has emerged.

BBC

 

In April, officials in Pakistan said that 10 Taliban fighters had been found guilty and received 25-year jail terms.

But sources have now confirmed to the BBC that only two of the men who stood trial were convicted.

The secrecy surrounding the trial, which was held behind closed doors, raised suspicions over its validity.

The court judgement – seen for the first time on Friday more than a month after the trial – claims that the two men convicted were those who shot Ms Yousafzai in 2012.

http://go.uen.org/3SH

 

http://go.uen.org/3SI (WSJ)

 

http://go.uen.org/3SM (Reuters)

 

 

 

 

 

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CALENDAR

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USOE Calendar

http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

 

 

UEN News

http://www.uen.org

 

 

June 8:

Administrative Rules Review Committee meeting

9 a.m., 445 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/Interim/2015/html/00002681.htm

 

Public meeting on secondary math standards

6:30 p.m., 121 Tabernacle St., St. George

http://www.schools.utah.gov/CURR/mathsec/Revision.aspx

 

 

June 10:

Public meeting on secondary math standards

6:30 p.m., 3659 W 9800 South, South Jordan

http://www.schools.utah.gov/CURR/mathsec/Revision.aspx

 

 

June 16:

Executive Appropriations Committee meeting

2 p.m., 445 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2015&Com=APPEXE

 

 

June 17:

Education Interim Committee meeting

9 a.m., 30 House Building

http://le.utah.gov/Interim/2015/html/00002661.htm

 

 

June 18-19:

Utah State Board of Education meeting

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

 

 

June 24:

Charter School Funding Task Force

8 a.m., 445 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2015&Com=TSKCSF

 

Public meeting on secondary math standards

6:30 p.m., 960 S Main St., Brigham City

http://www.schools.utah.gov/CURR/mathsec/Revision.aspx

 

 

July 9:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://go.uen.org/1pn

 

 

 

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