Education News Roundup: June 11, 2015

Summer Food Service Program poster

Summer Food Service Program poster

Education  News Roundup

Today’s Top Picks:

 

Utah State Prison inmates earn their high school diplomas.

http://go.uen.org/3Vq (SLT)

http://go.uen.org/3Vu (DN)

http://go.uen.org/3VD (KUTV)

http://go.uen.org/3VF (KSL)

 

UVU holds math camp.

http://go.uen.org/3Vz (PDH)

 

House may move on an ESEA rewrite as early as next week.

http://go.uen.org/3Vp (Ed Week)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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TODAY’S HEADLINES

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UTAH

 

High school diplomas spell hope for Utah prison inmates About 150 inmates attend ceremony that represents hope for a future on the outside.

 

Can math and fun be used in the same sentence?

 

Child nutrition advocates say few parents aware of free summer meals program

 

Lawsuit against Utah teacher over sexual contact with students could be dismissed Courts » Attorneys for teen victim of Brianne Altice move to withdraw civil case.

 

A former teacher’s aide sentenced for sexting with student

 

Former teacher appointed as juvenile court judge

 

Groundbreaking set for new Provo schools

 

$6000 plus in WIB scholarships awarded to local women

 

 


 

 

 

OPINION & COMMENTARY

 

Utah used to spend more on public education

 

Cottonwood High needs to turn down the spigot

 

Bye, Bye, American History

Professors and historians urged opposition to the College Board’s new curriculum for teaching AP U.S. History.

 

Jindal & Christie Have Flip-Flopped on Common Core — So What?

 

The Myth of a White Minority

 

The North­South Divide on Two­Parent Families

 

From Caitlyn Jenner to a Brooklyn High School

 

What’s A Thamakau? Spelling Bee Is More About Entertainment Than English

 

 


 

 

 

NATION

 

House Looks to Resurrect ESEA Bill for Action as Early as Next Week

 

Student Insights Guiding Districts on Policy and Practice

 

Education Policy Issues Caught in Arizona Crossfire State chief, other officials tussle as decisions loom

 

Christie lays out education agenda in Iowa

 

New report urges freedom from state regulations for public schools

 

Review of Common Core to begin, will seek online comments

 

Millennials aren’t as tech savvy as people think

 

What Happens When an Ex-Google Executive Creates a School System?

Max Ventilla used to run a team that personalized your search results—now he wants to do the same for kids’ education.

 

Freedom With Fries? Texas Official Wants Deep Fryers Back In Schools

 

Republican Party passes resolution for Bibles inside public schools

 

In Norway, where college is free, children of uneducated parents still don’t go Advocates see it as a case study proving that the problem isn’t solely about money

 

 

 

 

 

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UTAH NEWS

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High school diplomas spell hope for Utah prison inmates About 150 inmates attend ceremony that represents hope for a future on the outside.

 

A mother and son, both serving time for assaulting people with knives, received high school diplomas on Wednesday during a graduation ceremony at the Utah State Prison.

Genevieve Billie, 52, and her son, Zechariah Curley, 26, are behind bars for committing the same crime — aggravated assault — but on separate occasions.

“I want to make it to the point when we don’t have to say, ‘See you later,’ in handcuffs,” the mother told The Tribune.

Curley said that being incarcerated together has allowed he and his mother to support each other.

“I’m happy to graduate with my mother,” Curley said. “I’m glad that we can help each other.”

The two were among about 150 inmates who attended the ceremony held in the prison gymnasium. A total of 241 actually graduated this spring from the prison’s South Park Academy, but some inmates had been paroled, others had been moved to county jails and security levels for others did not allow them to attend.

http://go.uen.org/3Vq (SLT)

 

http://go.uen.org/3Vu (DN)

 

http://go.uen.org/3VD (KUTV)

 

http://go.uen.org/3VF (KSL)

 

 


 

 

 

Can math and fun be used in the same sentence?

 

OREM — The words “math” and “fun” aren’t often seen together. In fact, many think math and yuck belong in the same sentence.

But there is a group of fourth-, fifth-, sixth- and seventh-grade students who are learning to change that viewpoint.

Utah Valley University has been putting on its Math Camp for the students. Approximately 40 have been participating in the week-long event.

http://go.uen.org/3Vz (PDH)

 

 


 

 

Child nutrition advocates say few parents aware of free summer meals program

 

SALT LAKE CITY — Utah school districts, city parks and community centers offer free meals for kids when school is out, but few Utah kids who need free meals are receiving them, according to a recent study.

Part of the reason is because many parents don’t know it’s available.

http://go.uen.org/3Vv (KSL)

 

http://go.uen.org/3VE  (KTVX)

 

 


 

 

Lawsuit against Utah teacher over sexual contact with students could be dismissed Courts » Attorneys for teen victim of Brianne Altice move to withdraw civil case.

 

The parents of one of the victims of former school teacher Brianne Altice has moved to withdraw their civil lawsuit against Altice and the Davis School District.

According to court records, attorneys for one of three teen boys who had sexual contact with Altice filed paperwork on Wednesday asking that their personal injury lawsuit against Altice and the school district be dismissed without prejudice — meaning the case could be refiled at a later date.

Assistant Utah Attorney General Joel Frerre said Wednesday that the family’s attorneys did not articulate their reasons for dropping the case, but that a motion to dismiss filed by his office on grounds of immunity likely contributed to their decision.

The attorney general’s office had asked a judge weeks earlier to dismiss the case, arguing in court papers that the district’s status as a governmental entity makes it immune to claims based on any injury or harm the teen suffered from Altice’s actions.

“However traumatic this experience may have been for [the teen], the district is not liable for its impact,” state attorneys wrote in court papers filed in Farmington’s 2nd District Court.

Mark Carlson, the boy’s family’s attorney said Wednesday, “We won’t be making any comments at this time as it remains undetermined on whether the [Utah Governmental Immunity Act] grants immunity in this case. Once the matter is adjudicated, we will gladly comment.”

http://go.uen.org/3Vr  (SLT)

 

http://go.uen.org/3Vy  (OSE)

 

http://go.uen.org/3VA  (PDH)

 

http://go.uen.org/3VC  (KUTV)

 

http://go.uen.org/3VH  (KSTU)

 

http://go.uen.org/3VL  (MUR)

 

 


 

 

 

A former teacher’s aide sentenced for sexting with student

 

OGDEN — A former teacher’s aide has been sentenced to jail for sexting with a 14-year-old student.

The Standard-Examiner newspaper in Ogden reports that 21-year-old Zachary Arrington was sentenced Tuesday in Ogden to six months in jail. He can begin work release after 20 days.

http://go.uen.org/3VB  (PDH)

 

http://go.uen.org/3VM  (MUR)

 

 


 

 

Former teacher appointed as juvenile court judge

 

SALT LAKE CITY — A former teacher and advocate for children in Utah’s justice system has been named the state’s newest juvenile court judge.

Elizabeth M. Knight, director of the Office of Guardian ad Litem since 2013, was tapped Wednesday by Gov. Gary Herbert to a judgeship in 3rd District Juvenile Court. Upon confirmation by the Utah Senate, Knight will succeed Judge Christine S. Decker who retired earlier this year.

In 2003 and 2004, Knight taught two sixth-grade classes in the Granite School District.

http://go.uen.org/3Vx  (DN)

 

 


 

 

Groundbreaking set for new Provo schools

 

PROVO — Groundbreaking ceremonies will signal the start of construction on the new Rock Canyon Elementary and Sunset View Elementary.

The ceremonies will take place on Wednesday, June 24 at each school.

http://go.uen.org/3Vw  (DN)

 

 


 

 

 

$6000 plus in WIB scholarships awarded to local women

 

CEDAR CITY, UT – While many factors can affect students entering colleges and universities, the lack of funds is a major challenge to overcome. Thanks to community efforts, eight women were awarded $6000 plus in scholarship money from Cedar City’s Women in Business to further their education in Iron County.

“This year, Women in Business decided to increase the number of awarded scholarships, helping local women pursue college degrees and education,” stated Tami Shugart, Women In Business Scholarship Chair. “These scholarships are possible to award due to the overwhelming generosity of our community who supported our annual fundraising efforts at the Pumpkin Festival and Women’s Expo.”

Scholarships are awarded annually to high school graduating seniors and non-traditional women students who are age 25 or older and returning to a college, university or trade school after a minimum of a three year break.

http://go.uen.org/3VI  (KCSG)

 

 

 

 

 

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OPINION & COMMENTARY

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Utah used to spend more on public education Salt Lake Tribune letter from Fred Ash

 

Our state superintendent of public education recently did a fair job explaining that, while Utah should never expect to be any better than the lowest per-pupil spender in the nation for public education, a higher percentage of what Utah spends for public ed goes directly into the classroom than the national average and our teachers and schools are producing students at or above the national average in most testing.

Facts associated with his comments indicate that in 2013 Utah ranked 35th in public education revenue per $1,000 personal income, at $40.47. It would have been nice if he had noted that back in 1995, about the same time Sen. Howard Stephenson was elected, Utah spent $50.29 per $1,000, ranking us ninth in the nation in efforts to fund public education. And perhaps someone could have explained why the state dropped from 9th to 35th, and while the financial support was dropping, why our Legislature increased pressure on schools and teachers to do more with the less they were receiving.

http://go.uen.org/3Vs

 

 


 

 

 

Cottonwood High needs to turn down the spigot Salt Lake Tribune letter from Ralph P. Schamel

 

Cottonwood High School has done it again, as it has done so often in the past: continued its regular watering schedule regardless of how much rain has fallen or is falling.

The ground is already saturated from all the rain that we’ve had. You can see this in the large numbers of mushrooms that have sprouted.

You’d think, with all the brilliant minds working for the school and the district, that someone would have the smarts to shut the system down when it’s raining or there is a weather forecast for rain.

http://go.uen.org/3Vt

 

 


 

 

Bye, Bye, American History

Professors and historians urged opposition to the College Board’s new curriculum for teaching AP U.S. History.

Wall Street Journal commentary by columnist DANIEL HENNINGER

 

The memory hole, a creation of George Orwell’s novel “Nineteen Eighty-Four,” was a mechanism for separating a society’s disapproved ideas from its dominant ideas. The unfavored ideas disappeared, Orwell wrote, “on a current of warm air” into furnaces.

In the U.S., the memory-sorting machine may be the College Board’s final revision of the Advanced Placement examination for U.S. history, to be released later this summer.

The people responsible for the new AP curriculum really, really hate it when anyone says what they are doing to U.S. history is tendentious and destructive. In April, the nine authors of the “curriculum framework” published a relatively brief open letter to rebut “uninformed criticisms” of the revision.

Last week, 56 professors and historians published a petition on the website of the National Association of Scholars, urging opposition to the College Board’s framework. Pushback against the new AP U.S. history curriculum has also emerged in Texas, Colorado, Tennessee, Nebraska, North Carolina, Oklahoma and Georgia.

http://go.uen.org/3Vh

 

 


 

 

Jindal & Christie Have Flip-Flopped on Common Core — So What?

Washington Monthly commentary by columnist Alexander Russo

 

The Tampa Bay Times’ PolitiFact site recently gave Louisiana governor Bobby Jindal a “full flop” for his ever-changing positions on Common Core — which was much deserved.

In recent weeks, the media have flagged New Jersey Governor Chris Christie’s much-changed position on the law as well, and praised Jeb Bush for sticking by his guns.

Fact-checking efforts like these, and media attention when they reveal big changes, are all well and good — especially given media’s tendency to pass things along that aren’t entirely true. According to Breitbart, PolitiFact leans “pro” on Common Core. I’d rather have them than not.

It can feel good when folks like Politifact call out elected officials, appointees, and candidates try and slide by with a big change in position:

What they often leave out, however, is a clear awareness that the elected officials and campaign staffers who are behind the changes know quite well that they’re changing positions and that there will be some amount of media attention.

Those involved have made the calculation that on the whole it’s worth it – that not so many people will notice the changed position, or care, and that the majority of targeted voters will be happy about the changed position.

As long as they can come up with some semi-reasonable explanation for the change, it’s an over all win.

But coverage of position changes in education doesn’t always seem to communicate this reality with sufficient emphasis, from what I see.

http://go.uen.org/3VN

 

 


 

 

The Myth of a White Minority

New York Times op-ed by RICHARD ALBA, professor of sociology at the City University of New York Graduate Center

 

IN 2012, the Census Bureau announced that nonwhite births exceeded white births for the first time. In 2013, it noted that more whites were dying than were being born. In March, it projected that non­Hispanic whites would be a minority by 2044.

But the forecast of an imminent white minority, which some take as a given, is wrong. We will seem like a majority­white society for much longer than is believed.

The predictions make sense only if you accept the outdated, illogical methods used by the census, which define as a “minority” anyone who belongs to “any group other than non­Hispanic White alone.” In the words “group” and “alone” lie a host of confusions.

A report the Pew Research Center is releasing today on multiracial Americans demonstrates how problematic these definitions have become. Pew estimates that 8.9 percent of Americans now have family backgrounds that involve some combination of white, black, Latino, Asian and Native American.

http://go.uen.org/3Vi

 

A copy of the report

http://go.uen.org/3Vj (Pew Research Center)

 

 


 

 

 

The North­South Divide on Two­Parent Families New York Times commentary by columnist David Leonhardt

 

When it comes to family arrangements, the United States has a North­South divide. Children growing up across much of the northern part of the country are much more likely to grow up with two parents than children across the South.

It’s not just a red­blue political divide, either. There is a kind of twoparent arc that starts in the West in Utah, runs up through the Dakotas and Minnesota and then down into New England and New Jersey. It encompasses both the conservative Mountain West and the liberal Northeast.

Single­parent families, by contrast, are most common in a Southern arc beginning in Nevada, and extending through New Mexico, Oklahoma and the Deep South before coming up through Appalachia into West Virginia.

These patterns — which come from a new analysis of census data — are important because evidence suggests that children usually benefit from growing up with two parents.

http://go.uen.org/3VW

 

 


 

 

From Caitlyn Jenner to a Brooklyn High School New York Times commentary by columnist Nicholas Kristof

 

People all over the world have been following the emergence of Caitlyn Jenner, but few as enthusiastically as Spencer and Joshua, two students at a New York City high school who see her as an inspiring role model.

Spencer, 16, was born a girl and given a girl’s name, but he says it never felt right. On the first day of kindergarten, his mom dressed him in a skirt — the school uniform — and he cried.

“That’s for the girls,” he remembers protesting tearfully.

“But you are a girl,” his mom responded, baffled.

Still, he resisted so vociferously that for the rest of the year he was allowed to wear pants rather than the girls’ uniform.

“I knew I felt different from age 4, but I didn’t have a word for it,” he remembers. “In my mind, I kept thinking, ‘Why can’t I be a boy, even though I don’t have boy parts?’ It confused me.”

In third grade, he announced he was lesbian, but he said that didn’t feel right either. Finally, at age 12, after Google searches, he found the word that fit: transgender.

That didn’t make life easier. Spencer says he was bullied and mocked in middle school, and, at 13, he tried to hang himself. But he couldn’t manage to tie the right knot or reach the ceiling fan, and he finally cried himself to sleep in frustration.

Caitlyn Jenner has started an important national conversation, but this must go beyond what she wore on the cover of Vanity Fair. Too often we as a society become distracted in transgender discussions by questions of surgery or of which restroom a person’s going to use. In fact, as Spencer’s story suggests, the fundamental challenge is simply acceptance.

http://go.uen.org/3Vk

 

 


 

 

 

What’s A Thamakau? Spelling Bee Is More About Entertainment Than English NPR Fresh Air commentary by columnist GEOFF NUNBERG

 

We English-speakers take a perverse pride in the orneriness of our spelling, which is one reason why the spelling bee has been a popular entertainment since the 19th century. It’s fun watching schoolchildren getting difficult words right. It can be even more entertaining to watch literate adults getting them wrong. I’ve seen that first-hand when I served as the judge for a spelling bee for San Francisco-area writers that’s held as an annual benefit for a Berkeley literary clearinghouse called Small Press Distribution.

It’s just as well that my status as a linguist precludes my being a contestant, since I’d probably go down on the first round. The only reason I’ve been able to keep my deficiencies as a speller under wraps is that now I have technology to intercede between me and my readers. Not a month goes by that spellcheck doesn’t remind me that “resistant” has an a in it or that “temperamental” has two. I do usually get the middle vowel of “separate” right, but only because I still recall what Mrs. Bosch told us in eighth grade, that the word has a rat in it.

It doesn’t matter that you’ve seen a word 1,000 times. Somebody asks you how to spell “myrrh” or “hemorrhoid” and all that comes to mind is a blur of r’s and h’s. Everyday English is strewn with orthographic pitfalls. “Bellwether,” no a. Two n’s in “mayonnaise” and “questionnaire,” but just one in “inoculate” — it’s not related to “innocuous.” Two of everything in “accommodate.” And as the media were reminding us just this week, “pharaoh” ends in “-aoh” not “oah,” other than in the names of racehorses that have won the Triple Crown.

The format of the spelling bee only aggravates the difficulties. In one of the authors’ spelling bees I judged, six contestants in a row went down in the first round on “privilege.” I suspect that most of them would have spelled it correctly if they’d been allowed to write it down first. But the spelling bee is a purely oral exercise, the only ritual of literacy you could conduct entirely in the dark.

http://go.uen.org/3VJ

 

 

 

 

 

 

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NATIONAL NEWS

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House Looks to Resurrect ESEA Bill for Action as Early as Next Week Education Week

 

Months after Republican leaders in Congress yanked a GOP-backed Elementary and Secondary Education Act reauthorization off the floor of the U.S. House of Representatives amid sinking support from their own caucus, they appear poised to call it up again.

As early as next week, according to sources, the Student Success Act could be brought to the floor under a new rule that allows members to vote on three new amendments in addition to final passage of the bill.

The momentum comes after a difficult three months of whipping the bill which began losing support from Republicans after the Club for Growth and Heritage Action—two powerful conservative lobby organizations—announced their opposition to it. The groups warned that if members voted in favor of the measure, it would count against them in a scoring rubric the organizations use to rate which members are most faithful to conservative principles of the GOP.

Among other things, the groups wanted to see provisions in the bill that would have pulled the federal government out of education entirely and would have allowed federal funds for low-income students to follow students to the school of their choice, including private schools.

http://go.uen.org/3Vp

 

 


 

 

 

Student Insights Guiding Districts on Policy and Practice Education Week

 

When leaders of the 63,000-student Washoe County school district in Reno, Nev., sought to bring down a high dropout rate, they found limits in relying solely on research and strategies used in other school systems.

What was missing, they determined, were real, unvarnished insights of their own students who’d faced challenges with finishing high school. So they went straight to the source for answers, and what they got was an honest, student-produced video that featured a series of interviews with students who had dropped out and later returned to school.

“I think you should try to understand your students more than trying to control them,” a sophomore girl advised Washoe County teachers in the video. “Really sit down, talk to your students, get to know them one-on-one. Even if there’s a lot of students, you could at least try.”

Done well, efforts to tap into students’ experiences and opinions—the Washoe video is one example—yield numerous benefits for all participants, researchers say.

For students, participation leads to increased engagement and a chance to build social and emotional skills like self-advocacy.

For school leaders, student voice projects contribute to a healthy school climate and build mutual trust among students and teachers, and they provide constructive input to help school improvement efforts be more effective.

http://go.uen.org/3VO

 

 


 

 

 

Education Policy Issues Caught in Arizona Crossfire State chief, other officials tussle as decisions loom Education Week

 

Disagreements between Arizona’s education chief and other state officials could complicate the state’s work on academic standards, school finance, and other issues.

Gov. Doug Ducey and Superintendent of Public Instruction Diane Douglas were both elected last year as Republicans, but their relationship hasn’t been particularly smooth. Disputes between Ms. Douglas and the governor, along with other officials including state board President Greg Miller, have included K-12 governance and even the physical location of state board staffers’ offices.

In some respects, the tension in Arizona mirrors the multiyear battle between Indiana Superintendent of Public Instruction Glenda Ritz, a Democrat, and GOP elected and appointed officials in that state, including Gov. Mike Pence. In Indiana, Ms. Ritz has fought Gov. Pence and others over control of the state school board and testing, among other issues.

“There’s an unspoken impact inside school buildings. And that has to do with the way you choose, as a state, to spend your emotional capital,” said Timothy L. Ogle, the executive director of the Arizona School Boards Association, referring to the state officials’ political fight. “It’s just not a good use of time and energy.”

http://go.uen.org/3VP

 

 


 

 

 

Christie lays out education agenda in Iowa Des Moines (IA) Register

 

AMES, Ia. – In a wide-ranging education policy speech at Iowa State University, Chris Christie took aim at unions and college spending and called for teacher tenure reform, merit pay, charter schools and greater disclosure of university expenses.

The speech, Christie’s fourth recent major policy address, kicked off a two-day tour in the first-in-the-nation caucus state.

Speaking to a crowd of about 160 and a swarm of media inside the ISU Memorial Union, Christie touted his record in New Jersey. As Governor, Christie said he has reformed teacher tenures, promoted charter school and school choice, installed performance-based pay, and unsuccessfully fought teachers unions for layoffs based on merit rather than seniority.

“We need a president who will fight for parents and their children, to put them in control of their education and not the unions and the education establishment,” he said.

http://go.uen.org/3VR

 

http://go.uen.org/3VS  (Newark [NJ] Daily News)

 

 


 

 

 

New report urges freedom from state regulations for public schools Columbus (OH) Dispatch

 

A new report urges Ohio lawmakers to give public schools unprecedented freedom from state regulations, allowing local educators to customize their approach to learning.

For instance, schools should be able to fire ineffective teachers, including those with tenure, hire teachers without licenses, and eliminate salary schedules now based on education and seniority to set their own.

The report, “Getting Out of the Way,” was commissioned by the influential Thomas B. Fordham Institute, a conservative education policy think tank with offices in Washington and Ohio.

http://go.uen.org/3VU

 

 


 

 

 

Review of Common Core to begin, will seek online comments Charleston (WV) Daily Mail

 

The West Virginia Department of Education is ready to conduct a comprehensive review of its Common Core-based English and math standards, Superintendent Michael Martirano announced Wednesday during a state Board of Education meeting.

With the help of West Virginia University and the Southern Regional Education Board, the department will begin its review later this month when it launches a public commenting website that will be open for three months. After the commenting period, feedback will be analyzed and used to determine if any changes need to be made.

http://go.uen.org/3Vn

 

 


 

 

Millennials aren’t as tech savvy as people think CNBC

 

It turns out the first digitally native generation may not be all that tech-smart. (Tweet This)

A report by the nonprofit Change the Equation, which focuses on science, tech, engineering and math literacy, shows that some 58 percent of millennials have failed to master tech skills that help increase workplace productivity. The number is more surprising given that they spend 35 hours per week using digital media, the report states.

“This current generation of young people has never lived without tech,” said Linda Rosen, CEO of Change the Equation. “It’s second nature to them.”

Yet, using technology for social reasons doesn’t make a person adept at using it in other settings, she said.

http://go.uen.org/3Vl

 

A copy of the report

http://go.uen.org/3Vm  (Change the Equation)

 

 


 

 

 

What Happens When an Ex-Google Executive Creates a School System?

Max Ventilla used to run a team that personalized your search results—now he wants to do the same for kids’ education.

Bloomberg Business

 

Emma Eisner, a 12-year-old with short hair dyed green in parts, has roped off an area around an art project she’s building from cardboard. “Go away, child,” reads a handwritten sign to ward off classmates. At about 10-feet long and 3-feet tall, the white structure looks like it could be a spaceship or maybe an elaborate tunnel. Actually, she says, “It’s about how the human quest for knowledge has turned the world inside out.”

There are no desks in the classroom, just some tables pushed together on one side of the room. Above Eisner’s art installation three boys wearing blue Beats headphones are crammed on a bunk bed working on laptops. Two other boys are outside on the rooftop patio, measuring to build a meditation garden that will overlook the neighborhood. Downstairs, in another classroom with younger children, some students are listening to audio books on their iPads, while another group binds their own journals. The school is located in a converted fitness center in San Francisco’s Marina neighborhood. It’s loud and rambunctious, as schools can be, and amid the organized chaos teachers roam around helping students with their work.

This is AltSchool, a for-profit, $21,000-a-year elementary school system founded by former Google executive Max Ventilla and backed by $133 million from venture capitalists and Mark Zuckerberg.

http://go.uen.org/3Vo

 

 


 

 

 

Freedom With Fries? Texas Official Wants Deep Fryers Back In Schools NPR All Things Considered

 

A little more than 10 years ago, Texas banned soda machines and deep fryers in public school cafeterias.

Now the state’s current agriculture commissioner, Sid Miller, wants to do away with that ban. He believes these kinds of restrictions should be in the hands of local school boards — not state regulators. But some students are among those who aren’t happy about this idea.

Take fifth-grader Austin Tharpe, who recently guided me through the narrow lunch line at Doss Elementary School in Austin. Healthful eating is a priority at the school. Ice cream hasn’t been sold in five years. Sodas? Try again. Candy? Not one piece of chocolate is for sale. Tharpe says he doesn’t think a soda machine or deep fryer would be welcome.

“All those oils are definitely not good for you on a daily basis,” Tharpe says.

Third-grader Sarah Garrett agrees. “Fried foods, I think, are more of a treat. And if they had them a lot, I don’t think it’d be as much of a treat as it is,” she says.

But Miller insists his proposal is not about treating kids to fried food. “We’re all about what our country was founded on — we’re about giving our school districts freedom, liberty and individual responsibility,” says Miller, a Tea Party Republican and former state representative, who is rarely seen in public without his white cowboy hat.

http://go.uen.org/3VK

 

http://go.uen.org/3VT  (The Blaze)

 

 


 

 

 

Republican Party passes resolution for Bibles inside public schools (Boise, ID) KBOI

 

BOISE, Idaho — The Idaho Republican Party wants to give public schools the option of including Bibles in the curriculum.

That’s the meat of a resolution passed at the party’s summer meeting.

David Johnston, Republican Party Executive Director, tells KBOI 2News the Bible would be used in multiple subjects just like a textbook.

“I don’t see it as a forcing upon anybody or interfering with it,” said Johnston. “Whether it be geography, history, literature or frankly just the study of the world religions; if there is a school district that thinks having the Bible as part of the curriculum would be useful, this resolution is basically saying, ‘we support the idea of allowing them to have that tool in their tool box.'”

http://go.uen.org/3VV

 

 


 

 

In Norway, where college is free, children of uneducated parents still don’t go Advocates see it as a case study proving that the problem isn’t solely about money Hechinger Report

 

OSLO—There’s a saying in famously egalitarian Norway that Curt Rice, the American-born incoming president of the country’s third-biggest university, likes to rattle off: “We’re all sitting in the same boat.”

What it means, said Rice, is that, “To single out anyone, we’re against that. That just does not sit well in the Norwegian soul.”

So all Norwegians have the same tuition-free access to college, no matter what their backgrounds. Every student gets the same allowance for living expenses.

But something surprising is happening in Norway, which explains a similar phenomenon in the United States that has been thwarting efforts to increase the number of Americans pursuing higher education.

Even though tuition is almost completely free here, Norwegians whose parents did not go to college are just as unlikely to go themselves as Americans whose parents did not go to college.

This conundrum demonstrates a critical point that’s widely misunderstood, according to higher-education experts: money is not the only thing keeping first-generation students from seeking degrees.

http://go.uen.org/3VQ

 

 

 

 

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CALENDAR

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USOE Calendar

http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

 

 

UEN News

http://www.uen.org

 

 

June 10:

Public meeting on secondary math standards

6:30 p.m., 3659 W 9800 South, South Jordan

http://www.schools.utah.gov/CURR/mathsec/Revision.aspx

 

 

June 16:

Executive Appropriations Committee meeting

2 p.m., 445 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/Interim/2015/html/00002820.htm

 

 

June 17:

Education Interim Committee meeting

9 a.m., 30 House Building

http://le.utah.gov/Interim/2015/html/00002661.htm

 

Government Operations Interim Committee meeting

9 a.m., 20 House Building

http://le.utah.gov/Interim/2015/html/00002734.htm

 

Economic Development and Workforce Services Interim Committee meeting

2:30 p.m., 20 House Building

http://le.utah.gov/Interim/2015/html/00002656.htm

 

 

June 18:

Utah State Board of Education workshop and committee meeting

2:30 p.m.250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

 

 

June 19:

Utah State Board of Education meeting

8 a.m., 250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

 

 

June 23:

Legislative Management Committee Audit Subcommittee meeting

9 a.m., 250 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/Interim/2015/html/00002781.htm

 

 

June 24:

Charter School Funding Task Force

8 a.m., 445 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2015&Com=TSKCSF

 

Retirement and Independent Entities Interim Committee meeting

1 p.m., 30 House Building

http://le.utah.gov/Interim/2015/html/00002692.htm

 

Public meeting on secondary math standards

6:30 p.m., 960 S Main St., Brigham City

http://www.schools.utah.gov/CURR/mathsec/Revision.aspx

 

 

July 9:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://go.uen.org/1pn

 

 

 

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