Education News Roundup: June 23, 2015

A group of students learn about hydrology during the 2015 Earth Connections Camp.

A group of students learn about hydrology during the 2015 Earth Connections Camp.

Education News Roundup

Today’s Top Picks:

 

There’s more follow up on Garfield’s loss of student enrollment.

http://go.uen.org/41q (SLT)

and http://go.uen.org/41r (DN)

and http://go.uen.org/41G (KTVX)

and http://go.uen.org/41J (KSL)

 

Utah teachers are learning about STEM instruction.

http://go.uen.org/41F (KUTV)

 

And about civics instruction.

http://go.uen.org/41I (KTVX)

 

The Openshaw family funeral was held in Provo yesterday.

http://go.uen.org/41C (PDH)

 

Education groups are pushing Congress on rewriting No Child Left Behind.

http://go.uen.org/41M (WaPo)

 

And the Education Department is issuing more NCLB waivers.

http://go.uen.org/41N (AP)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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TODAY’S HEADLINES

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UTAH

 

Southern Utah county declares state of emergency, blames Grand Staircase for low school enrollment  ‘State of emergency’ » Officials point at dropping school enrollment, say BLM policies hurt economy.

 

Utah teachers getting schooled on effective STEM instruction

 

The table is turned on Utah civics teachers at annual Huntsman Seminar

 

Openshaws’ funeral tells of hope and family’s zest for life

 

130 homes planned for old Granite High School property

 

Girls get hands-on experience at STEM camp

 

Summer program introduces children to other cultures

 

Rich High teacher gets termination notice in misconduct case

 

Alumna Receives Huntsman Award for Excellence in Education

 

 


 

 

 

OPINION & COMMENTARY

 

Lesson learned

 

No need for lawsuits in Altice case

 

Church are tax-free, while our schools suffer

 

Serving More Summer Meals in Rural and Tribal Areas

 

School choice is the best hope for New York’s kids — and America’s

 

Football or Music? What’s the Best K-12 Investment?

 

Education’s Wild West

Nevada is the new frontier for school choice, with a big opportunity to succeed or fail.

 

Brought To You By Wal-Mart?

How the Walton Family Foundation’s Ideological Pursuit is Damaging Charter Schooling

 

Breaking the School-to-Prison Pipeline for Students with Disabilities

 

 


 

 

 

NATION

 

Education groups to Congress: Please get rid of No Child Left Behind, already

 

Education Dept. Extends More No Child Left Behind Waivers

 

Why education is becoming especially ripe for technology developers

 

Years into Common Core, Teachers Lament Lack of Materials

 

Grading the Common Core: No Teaching Experience Required

 

What Do Students Need to Succeed? Guide Helps Educators Navigate the Research

 

New law requires cameras in special education classrooms

 

Embattled Newark Superintendent to Step Down

 

Campbell Brown to Launch Non-Profit Education News Site That Won’t Shy From Advocacy

 

Superintendent resigns to be superintendent — in the same Minnesota district

 

 

 

 

 

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UTAH NEWS

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Southern Utah county declares state of emergency, blames Grand Staircase for low school enrollment  ‘State of emergency’ » Officials point at dropping school enrollment, say BLM policies hurt economy.

 

Alarmed about dropping school enrollment, the Garfield County Commission on Monday declared a “state of emergency,” claiming restrictive federal land-management policies are endangering the future of Escalante, Panguitch and other communities in the southern Utah county.

The Bureau of Land Management and the U.S. Forest Service refuse to collaborate with counties in decision-making, according to the declaration unanimously approved by the commission. Timber has been eliminated, cattle are being pushed off the range and mineral resources are sequestered in the ground.

“We need good jobs and something to sustain our community,” Escalante Mayor Jerry Taylor said. “It’s tough right now. Tourism is up. We promote it, but we need something more. We can’t have all our eggs in one basket.”

While the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument is getting much of the blame, conservationists contend protected landscapes spur economic development outside ranching and traditional industries.

“The mining jobs were gone by the time the monument was created [in 1996]. They are isolated communities. Without an interstate highway it’s hard to attract investment,” said Scott Groene, executive director of the Southern Utah Wilderness Alliance. “It has boiled down to a one-liner: It’s all the federal government’s fault. No solution will ever come from blaming the United States for the economic woes of rural areas.”

Meanwhile, state data indicate that Garfield County’s job numbers and unemployment today are not much different than they were 19 years ago when then-President Bill Clinton shocked southern Utah with his designation of the monument. Jobs have hovered around 2,200 and the jobless rate is 8.6 percent, the same as it was in the late 1990s, although there has been plenty of fluctuation over the years, according the Utah Department of Workforce Services.

But for Commissioner Leland Pollock, the key statistic is the plunge in Escalante’s school population since the creation of the monument on the historic ranching town’s doorstep. Middle and high school enrollment has dropped 67 percent, from 150 to 50.

http://go.uen.org/41q (SLT)

 

http://go.uen.org/41r (DN)

 

http://go.uen.org/41G (KTVX)

 

http://go.uen.org/41J (KSL)

 

 


 

 

 

Utah teachers getting schooled on effective STEM instruction

 

School is out for the summer across most of the state, but Utah’s science and math teachers are not taking a break. This week the state is holding its first ever STEM best practices conference to gather the best ideas to get kids excited about science, technology, engineering and math.

Talking about jobs and where the money is at doesn’t always work with kids. Getting students excited about their future often means sparking their imagination and getting their hands dirty.

The first annual STEM conference in Utah this week is for industry leaders, teachers, universities and museums to meet and share successes and failures. The failures can be chalked up as a learning experience while the wins can be copied and used in other schools and arenas.

http://go.uen.org/41F (KUTV)

 

 


 

 

 

The table is turned on Utah civics teachers at annual Huntsman Seminar

 

Salt Lake City, Utah – It’s a different point of view for about 20 civics teachers from across the state of Utah. This week they are the ones sitting and taking notes.

They come from elementary, junior high and high schools across the state.

Merinda Davis from Lakeridge Junior High in Orem is one of them.

“We are talking to a younger generation that sometimes can get bogged down with the political process and so, finding ways to make it more engaging for our students,” said Davis.

They are finding those ways at the 2015 Huntsman Seminar in Constitutional Government for Teachers, hosted by the Hinckley Institute of Politics.

http://go.uen.org/41I (KTVX)

 

 


 

 

Openshaws’ funeral tells of hope and family’s zest for life

 

PROVO – It was standing-room-only as family and friends of the Mark and Amy Openshaw family paid their respects and heard messages of hope at the joint funeral of the parents and their two children, Tanner and Ellie.

The four were killed in a plane crash in Missouri on June 12. Injured in the crash was 5-year-old Max.

Family members shared memories of their brother, sister, niece and friend. Elder Neil L. Andersen of The Quorum of the Twelve of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints presided at the funeral and delivered the closing remarks.

http://go.uen.org/41C (PDH)

 

 


 

 

 

130 homes planned for old Granite High School property

 

SOUTH SALT LAKE – ABC 4 Utah News has learned that a new plan is on the table for the old Granite High School. The deal includes the school which was shut down in 2001 and the 27 acres it sits on just off 3300 South, between 500 and 700 East, in South Salt Lake.

Garbett Homes has signed a $10.6 million dollar contract with the Granite School District to buy the property. The deal must be closed in 6 months or it is off the table.

http://go.uen.org/41H (KTVX)

 

 


 

 

 

Girls get hands-on experience at STEM camp

 

SALT LAKE CITY — Hundreds of high school-aged girls are attending an engineering camp this summer at the University of Utah. It’s just one way to get more girls interested in the fields of science, technology, engineering and math.

The university’s Hi-GEAR — or Girls Engineering Abilities Realized — camp is more than a decade old. It introduces girls to engineering and computer science careers through hands-on learning and team projects.

http://go.uen.org/41W (KSL)

 


 

 

Summer program introduces children to other cultures

 

Local children are exploring the globe without leaving the comfort of Cache Valley.

Around the World is a daily program hosted at the Logan Family Center. Each day, students learn about a different country through presentations that usually include facts, a bit of the language, songs, crafts and games. At the beginning of the program, students receive a special stamp in a passport that they get to keep.

The program started June 1 and will continue until Aug. 14, with time off on July 1 to 6 and July 24. The first week, the kids learned about the Oceania region, including Hawaii, Nepal, Tahiti, Marshall Islands and Palau. The next two weeks explored Asia, including Australia/New Zealand, Mongolia, Singapore, Laos, India, Malaysia, Burma, Bangladesh, Philippines and Sri Lanka. In the coming weeks, students will explore the Middle East, Africa, Europe and the Americas.

http://go.uen.org/41D (LHJ)

 

 


 

 

Rich High teacher gets termination notice in misconduct case

 

RANDOLPH, Rich County — A longtime teacher and coach at Rich High School has been served with a termination notice after accusations surfaced of inappropriate sexual relations with a student more than a decade ago.

A girl who went to the school 16 years ago, who was a junior or senior at the time, recently came forward with allegations of sexual misconduct, according to Heidi Alder, an attorney for the Rich County School District.

Both the teacher and the student were interviewed, Alder said. Although the alleged illegal activity happened only once, district officials believe that inappropriate communication between the two went on for a couple of years.

The Rich County School Board held an emergency meeting Saturday night to discuss the situation and served the teacher with a termination notice on Monday.

http://go.uen.org/41z (DN)

 

http://go.uen.org/41K (KSL)

 

 


 

 

 

Alumna Receives Huntsman Award for Excellence in Education

 

Alyssa Larsen (’08), who has put her Southern Virginia University education to use by teaching and mentoring youth, recently received the Huntsman Award for Excellence in Education for her work at Spanish Fork High School.

http://go.uen.org/41X (Southern Virginia University)

 

 

 

 

 

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OPINION & COMMENTARY

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Lesson learned

(St. George) Spectrum editorial

 

Of the 49.8 million students who started elementary and secondary schools last fall, an estimated 3.3 million high school seniors donned cap and gown this spring to receive diplomas.

As students paraded proudly across thousands of stages nationwide, hundreds of thousands of equally proud parents filled gyms, auditoriums and theaters with cheers and applause as they witnessed the culmination of 12 years of hard work and determination by their children.

At Beaver Dam High School in Arizona, however, graduation day was only half the celebration it should have been. Of the 31 students slated to “walk the stage” that day in May, 13 were denied a diploma because of what Principal Mark Coleman called “scoring irregularities” in an online course the students were supposed to have taken and passed — honestly.

An investigation by Coleman found that one or more BDHS students stole a computer password, from a teacher, and then used it to alter course work and scores.

http://go.uen.org/41E

 

 


 

 

No need for lawsuits in Altice case

(Ogden) Standard-Examiner letter from Clell Buchanan

 

In regards to the school teacher, Brianne Altice, she made a terrible mistake with those young boys! However, there is enough blame to go around.

It is my belief that had the parents done their job by giving the boys good instruction in the home concerning sex and why, where and when it is appropriate to indulge, these boys may have thought, “No, my parents said it is wrong and that’s good enough for me.”

http://go.uen.org/41A

 

 


 

 

 

Church are tax-free, while our schools suffer

(Ogden) Standard-Examiner letter from M.J. Ogden

 

The New England author, Henry David Thoreau, whose thinking of long ago is still widely admired, stated:

“Some years ago, the State met me in behalf of the Church, and commanded me to pay a certain sum toward the support of a clergyman whose preaching my father attended, but never I myself. ’Pay,’ it said, ’or be locked up in jail.’ I declined to pay but, unfortunately, another man saw fit to pay it.”

Thoreau, himself a schoolteacher at the time, complained that “I did not see why the schoolmaster should be taxed to support the priest, and not the priest the schoolmaster.”

Indeed. Today every Utahn, even those with no religious affiliation whatever, is taxed to support the churches which pay no property tax. How so?

http://go.uen.org/41B

 

 


 

 

 

Serving More Summer Meals in Rural and Tribal Areas U.S. Department of Education commentary by U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan and U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack

 

Catholic Charities began their second year providing meals to children up to age 18 through the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Summer Food Service Program (SFSP) to children at the Basilica of Our Lady of San Juan Del Valle, TX on May 24, 2012. The SFSP is a federally funded program that is administered by the states in which they reimburse organizations for meals served to children during the summer months. USDA photo. (Photo courtesy of the U.S. Department of Agriculture)

Catholic Charities began their second year providing meals to children up to age 18 through the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Summer Food Service Program (SFSP) to children at the Basilica of Our Lady of San Juan Del Valle, TX on May 24, 2012. The SFSP is a federally funded program that is administered by the states in which they reimburse organizations for meals served to children during the summer months. USDA photo. (Photo courtesy of the U.S. Department of Agriculture)

During the school year, over 21 million children receive free and reduced-price breakfast and lunch each day through the USDA’s National School Lunch Program. But, when school is out, many children who rely on these meals go hungry. The challenge is particularly great in rural areas and Indian Country, where 15 percent of households are food insecure. In these areas, children and teens often live long distances from designated summer meal sites and lack access to public transportation.

According to Feeding America, 43 percent of counties are rural, but they make up nearly two-thirds of counties with high rates of child food insecurity. The consequences are significant. Several studies have found that food insecurity impacts cognitive development among young children and contributes to poorer school performance, greater likelihood of illness, and higher health costs.

The Obama administration has addressed the challenge head-on, investing unprecedented energy and resources to increasing participation in the USDA’s Summer Food Service Program.

And the impact has been significant.

http://go.uen.org/41L

 

 


 

 

 

School choice is the best hope for New York’s kids — and America’s New York Post op-ed by Jeb Bush, a Republican candidate for president

 

Last year, I met a 14-year-old student who is thriving through his attendance at a Success Academy school, a high-performing charter-school network serving New York City’s poorest communities.

He’s an excellent student and debating champion. He also lives in poverty, facing hardships most of us can’t imagine.

And yet the school he attends has him believing it’s possible to achieve the American Dream.

As a decades-long advocate for school choice, I have met countless parents and their children who have been given a second chance because of charter and private schools.

We know school choice works just by looking at New York City’s network of charter schools.

http://go.uen.org/41U

 

 


 

 

Football or Music? What’s the Best K-12 Investment?

Education Week op-ed by John R. Gerdy, author of Ball or Bands: Football vs. Music as an Educational and Community Investment

 

In a perfect world, all high school activities would be fully funded. But to educators struggling to find the financial means to establish and pay for educational priorities, it is clear that we do not live in a perfect world.

Today’s schools are subjected to growing pressures from increased academic standards and the expectation that they will provide all of their students with an education worthy of the 21st century. These demands must be met, moreover, in a climate of sharply declining resources. The world is changing at breathtaking speed, and the challenges inherent in responding to that change are daunting. So, too, are the economic stresses on schools.

All that being the case, communities and school boards have to be more open, honest, thoughtful, and strategic in considering how to allocate scarce educational resources. When program cuts are necessary, priorities must be set and difficult choices made. Traditionally, one choice has been between fielding elite athletics programs and maintaining enriching programs in the arts—with the arts usually being the first to suffer. Because the challenges and funding gaps for schools will only increase, such decisionmaking will become more and more difficult.

In such an environment, the fundamental question we should ask about program funding is this: Which activities produce the best educational return on investment? And the first principle in making such decisions should be clear: We can no longer afford to sponsor activities based only on anecdotal evidence of benefit, or simply because we have always done so, or because a particular activity’s “lobby” screams the loudest.

http://go.uen.org/41R

 

 


 

 

 

Education’s Wild West

Nevada is the new frontier for school choice, with a big opportunity to succeed or fail.

U.S. News & World Report op-ed by Nat Malkus, a research fellow in education policy studies at the American Enterprise Institute

 

Earlier this month, Gov. Brian Sandoval signed a bill establishing educational savings accounts in Nevada, creating an unprecedented state-wide opportunity for school choice. Nevada public school students will be eligible for accounts of more than $5,000 to spend on education expenses, including private schools.

School choice proponents are heralding this as a big win because of its unparalleled scope. But choice under Nevada accounts may be a blade that cuts both ways. As my colleagues Rick Hess and Mike McShane have written, passing a school choice law is the easy part. As Nevada’s experiment plays out, policymakers across the country should be watching to see if it becomes a market-based success story or a cautionary tale. Only time will tell, but it may all come down to what kind of school choice $5,200 will buy in Nevada.

Nevada has taken center stage for school choice because, unlike other programs, these accounts are open to all public school students. Students with disabilities or who live below 185 percent of the federal poverty line will receive $5,700. Proponents consider these accounts superior to vouchers because they can be used for private school tuition or for most other educational expenses.

But market-based reforms depend on a functionally competitive market, and educational savings accounts alone cannot guarantee that.

http://go.uen.org/41V

 

 


 

 

Brought To You By Wal-Mart?

How the Walton Family Foundation’s Ideological Pursuit is Damaging Charter Schooling American Federation of Teachers and In the Public Interest analysis

 

There was a sour breeze blowing through the nation’s charter schools in 2014.

Twenty-five years into our nation’s experiment with independently operated, publicly funded charter schools, the news didn’t look good: In May, a new report revealed more than $100 million in fraud, waste and abuse in just 15 of the 43 states that allow charters. (A year later, the report was updated, and the figure rose to $200 million.) Some of the stories defy belief: a school in Philadelphia that was doubling as a nightclub after hours; school operators embezzling millions to pay for high-flying lifestyles; real estate developers cashing in by using public funds to leverage sweet deals on millions of dollars’ worth of property. One after another, the stories emerged. And public officials around the country began to call for change.

In Connecticut, the state Department of Education announced new policies to govern oversight of the state’s charter sector. In New York, the charter lobby continued a seven-year fight to prevent the state comptroller from auditing charter schools. In Pennsylvania, the auditor general called the charter sector “a mess.”

How did an idea that promised small-scale innovation as a way to improve the education outcomes of disadvantaged children become a massive industry of more than 6,000 schools, spending upward of $20 billion from taxpayers a year, despite demonstrating no significant academic gains for students?

http://go.uen.org/41u

 

 


 

 

Breaking the School-to-Prison Pipeline for Students with Disabilities National Council on Disability analysis

 

In conjunction with its fall quarterly meeting, NCD convened a stakeholder forum in Atlanta in October 2014 to receive testimony on the role of special education in the School-to-Prison Pipeline. The findings and recommendations in this report are based upon the culmination of that testimony, interviews with experts, and review of available research. Studies show that up to 85 percent of youth in juvenile detention facilities have disabilities that make them eligible for special education services, yet only 37 percent receive these services while in school.  A disproportionate percentage of these detained youth are youth of color. These statistics should lead to the conclusion that many disabled youth in the juvenile justice and criminal justice systems are deprived of an appropriate education that could have changed their School-to-Prison Pipeline trajectory. NCD has concluded that IDEA can and should be an important part of the solution to the School-to-Prison Pipeline crisis. Thus, the recommendations in this report focus on ways to improve existing special education delivery and enforcement systems to better meet the needs of students with disabilities who risk entering the Pipeline.

http://go.uen.org/41t

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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NATIONAL NEWS

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Education groups to Congress: Please get rid of No Child Left Behind, already Washington Post

 

Enough, Congress!

Time to finally get rid of No Child Left Behind.

That’s the message that the nation’s two largest teachers unions and eight other major education groups, including the National PTA, are planning to deliver at a Tuesday news conference. They want the Senate to vote on a bill to revise No Child Left Behind, the long-expired and widely reviled federal education law.

The Senate’s education committee supported the bipartisan bill with a rare unanimous vote two months ago, but floor debate keeps getting pushed off by other issues — including, mostly recently, legislation related to President Obama’s trade agenda.

“Once again, a group of politicians has said we really, really care about kids, except that they’re not the most important thing that we’re going to do this week,” said Lily Eskelsen Garcia, president of the National Education Association. “It’s time that kids are the most important thing that can come before the Senate.”

Eskelsen said that Congress could miss a rare window of opportunity to end an “absolutely failed education policy” if it doesn’t act soon.

In addition to the National PTA and the NEA, which represents 3 million teachers nationwide, the groups calling for action include the American Federation of Teachers, the Council of Chief State School Officers and organizations representing principals, superintendents and school boards.

http://go.uen.org/41M

 

 


 

 

 

Education Dept. Extends More No Child Left Behind Waivers Associated Press

 

WASHINGTON — The Obama administration is giving seven more states and the District of Columbia more flexibility from the requirements of the Bush-era No Child Left Behind education law.

In addition to Washington, Education Secretary Arne Duncan on Tuesday renewed waivers for Georgia, Hawaii, Kansas, Missouri, Nevada, New York, and West Virginia http://go.uen.org/41N

 

 


 

 

 

Why education is becoming especially ripe for technology developers Chicago Tribune

 

The confluence of Common Core Standards for students and the increasing use of smart tablets in schools makes education technology a fertile field for startups, Leap Innovations CEO Phyllis Lockett told attendees at a Technori Pitch event in Chicago on Tuesday evening.

Lockett said schools are racing to meet the standards, which most states, including Illinois, have adopted. That’s good news for companies bringing new ideas to the education space, she said.

“Common Core is huge,” she said. “It’s inherently nationalized standards. What that means for technology developers is that if you develop solutions that are tied to the Common Core — 46 states have adopted them throughout the country — you can sell anywhere.”

Lockett said she launched Leap Innovations, a non-profit corporation, to help bridge the gap between schools and companies developing technology.

“We’ve been trying to get at this education technology issue with bricks and mortar,” she said. “But if we really want to change the paradigm in education, we’ve got to figure out how we bring innovation and technology into education.”

http://go.uen.org/41y

 

 


 

 

 

Years into Common Core, Teachers Lament Lack of Materials Associated Press

 

The learning standards were new. The textbooks were not.

So curriculum director Tammy Baumann and her team took the books apart, literally. Then they rearranged lessons, filled in holes with outside material and put it all together in what will be the K-2 math curriculum in the fall at her district in East Lansing, Michigan.

It was a time-consuming but necessary response, Baumann said, to what appears to be a near-universal lament of teachers as they page through textbooks and websites: a lack of high-quality teaching materials aligned to the Common Core Learning Standards that have been adopted by most states.

“We literally created our own curriculum … essentially creating it from scratch – creating the homework, creating the student achievement challenges,” Baumann said at the end of a school year spent collecting feedback and refining the materials.

Five years into the implementation of Common Core, standards meant to steer students from rote memorization toward critical thinking, 45 percent of school districts reported “major problems” finding good aligned textbooks, and another 45 percent reported “minor problems,” an October survey by the Center of Education Policy found.

http://go.uen.org/41O

 

 


 

 

Grading the Common Core: No Teaching Experience Required New York Times

 

SAN ANTONIO — The new academic standards known as the Common Core emphasize critical thinking, complex problem­solving and writing skills, and put less stock in rote learning and memorization. So the standardized tests given in most states this year required fewer multiple choice questions and far more writing on topics like this one posed to elementary school students: Read a passage from a novel written in the first person, and a poem written in the third person, and describe how the poem might change if it were written in the first person.

But the results are not necessarily judged by teachers.

On Friday, in an unobtrusive office park northeast of downtown here, about 100 temporary employees of the testing giant Pearson worked in diligent silence scoring thousands of short essays written by third­ and fifth­grade students from across the country.

There was a onetime wedding planner, a retired medical technologist and a former Pearson saleswoman with a master’s degree in marital counseling. To get the job, like other scorers nationwide, they needed a four­year college degree with relevant coursework, but no teaching experience. They earned $12 to $14 an hour, with the possibility of small bonuses if they hit daily quality and volume targets.

Officials from Pearson and Parcc, a nonprofit consortium that has coordinated development of new Common Core tests, say strict training and scoring protocols are intended to ensure consistency, no matter who is marking the tests.

http://go.uen.org/41s

 

 


 

 

 

What Do Students Need to Succeed? Guide Helps Educators Navigate the Research Education Week

 

What do young adults need to be successful in college, in careers, and in life? And what should educators do to ensure that their students have those qualities and skills when they graduate from high school?

A new report from the University of Chicago Consortium on Chicago School Research seeks to distill reams of research and insights from practitioners to help identify those core traits and give schools and community groups a developmentally sensitive roadmap for nurturing them in children.

There’s growing understanding that students need more than strong academic skills, but you’d be forgiven if you found it a little confusing to make sense of a swelling swirl of research about non-cognitive skills, social-emotional learning, academic mindsets, and student engagement. The report, “Foundations for Young Adult Success: A Developmental Framework,” seeks to show how those ideas fit together into sort of an ecosystem with the aim of helping educators and policymakers design and implement smart practices.

“This new report underscores that in order to be poised for success as young adults, children need to acquire both content knowledge and a wide range of skills, attitudes and behaviors that develop throughout childhood and adolescence,” University of Chicago CCSR deputy director Jenny Nagaoka said in a statement.

http://go.uen.org/41P

 

A copy of the guide

http://go.uen.org/41Q (University of Chicago)

 

 


 

 

 

New law requires cameras in special education classrooms (Corpus Christi, TX) KRIS

 

CORPUS CHRISTI – A new bill was passed Friday that would require school districts across the State of Texas to install cameras inside Special Education classes.

“Parents with normal children, they worry about their kids going to school. Parents who have their special angels it’s more of a worry,” said Velma Torres a Parent of a special needs child.

Velma Torres is one of many special needs parents that are happy that video cameras will be placed in the special needs classroom. So is Veronica Contreras.  Contreras says her son has multiple disabilities and he can’t speak for himself.

http://go.uen.org/41x

 

 


 

 

 

Embattled Newark Superintendent to Step Down Education Week

 

Newark, N.J., Superintendent of Schools Cami Anderson will leave her post by July 8, the New Jersey Department of Education announced Monday.

The announcement does not give a reason for the departure, but said that Anderson was “stepping down” from her post.

Anderson, who has had a rocky tenure since her appointment to the state-run district in May 2011, came under fire again just this month from the local advisory school board, which sent a petition to the state Board of Education asking for her immediate removal, and from the American Federation of Teachers, which sent a letter supporting the board. Various constituencies, including the local teachers’ union, Mayor Ras Baraka, Essex County politicians, parents and an activist student group, have called for her ouster over the years. Their most recent cause is the rollout of the One Newark plan, though their reasons for wanting her to go have included poor communication with the community and financial management.

“Superintendent Anderson has worked tirelessly over the last four years to implement a bold educational vision for the students and parents of Newark,” Education  Commissioner David Hespe said in the statement. “Under Cami’s leadership, the Newark school district signed a landmark teacher’s contract, implemented One Newark, and increased flexibility and support in virtually every school in Newark. We know that these positive educational reforms will continue to benefit the students and parents of Newark for years to come.”

In the statement, the DOE said that both Gov. Chris Christie and Mayor Baraka will issue a more detailed plan on the school district’s future in the coming days.

A member of the Newark Teachers Union, which has been among Anderson’s critics in the last few years after collaborating on what was considered a ground-breaking labor contract, did not mince words.

“Good riddance,” said a statement from John M. Abeigon, the union’s director of organization. “The damage she has done to children, parents and dedicated employees in this city is quantifiable and must now be reversed. We will work with whoever is in charge towards that end. She must not be allowed to get away with it. We hope that federal and state Departments of Education and law enforcement agencies will proceed with their due diligence and if wrong doing is proved that she be held accountable.”

Anderson will be replaced by Chris Cerf, a former deputy chancellor in New York City in Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg’s Education Department. Cerf also served as New Jersey’s state education commissioner from 2011 to 2014.

http://go.uen.org/41S

 

http://go.uen.org/41T (Newark [NJ] Star-Ledger)

 

 


 

 

 

Campbell Brown to Launch Non-Profit Education News Site That Won’t Shy From Advocacy Wall Street Journal

 

Former CNN host Campbell Brown went from a career in journalism to a second life as an education-reform advocate. Now she is looking to combine the two.

Next month, Ms. Brown will be launching a non-profit, education-focused news site called The Seventy Four, which she says refers to the 74 million school-age children in classrooms across the U.S.

“There are a lot of entrenched interests that are standing in the way of some the best possibilities for innovation” in education, she said in an interview at the offices of her nascent site in Lower Manhattan. “We want to challenge and scrutinize the powers that be.”

But the creation of the site is likely to stir controversy. Since turning to advocacy in the years after she left CNN in 2010, Ms. Brown became a lightning rod for criticism from the teachers’ union and its supporters who have seen her efforts – most notably a push to reform tenure rules in New York – as part of a thinly-veiled campaign aimed at union busting.

http://go.uen.org/41v

 

 


 

 

 

Superintendent resigns to be superintendent — in the same Minnesota district Grand Forks (ND) Herald

 

CARLTON, Minn. – Although Peter Haapala is resigning from his position as superintendent of the Carlton School District at the end of the month, he is taking a new position with the district immediately — as superintendent.

Haapala announced his retirement earlier this spring but has now started his own business, Haapala Services LLC, and starting in July will contract with the school district to work part time as superintendent for 121 days versus the current 260 days he works now.

“I will still be available 24/7, on-call, just like I am right now,” Haapala said, adding that the Cromwell-Wright School District also has been working with a contracted superintendent for the past year or two.

Shifting to a part-time superintendent position will free up funds to hire a technology integration expert to guide the district in its initiative to put an electronic learning device in the hands of every student in grades 3-12, he explained.

http://go.uen.org/41w

 

 

 

 

 

 

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CALENDAR

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USOE Calendar

http://www.schools.utah.gov/main/CALENDAR.aspx

 

 

UEN News

http://www.uen.org

 

 

June 23:

Legislative Management Committee Audit Subcommittee meeting

9 a.m., 250 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/Interim/2015/html/00002781.htm

 

 

June 24:

Charter School Funding Task Force

8 a.m., 445 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2015&Com=TSKCSF

 

Retirement and Independent Entities Interim Committee meeting

1 p.m., 30 House Building

http://le.utah.gov/Interim/2015/html/00002692.htm

 

Public meeting on secondary math standards

6:30 p.m., 960 S Main St., Brigham City

http://www.schools.utah.gov/CURR/mathsec/Revision.aspx

 

 

July 9:

Utah State Charter School Board meeting

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://go.uen.org/1pn

 

 

July 14:

Charter School Funding Task Force

8 a.m., 445 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/Interim/2015/html/00003031.htm

 

Executive Appropriations Committee meeting

2 p.m., 445 State Capitol

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?Year=2015&Com=APPEXE

 

 

July 15:

Education Interim Committee meeting

8:30 a.m., 30 House Building

http://le.utah.gov/asp/interim/Commit.asp?year=2015&com=INTEDU

 

 

August 6-7:

Utah State Board of Education meeting

250 E 500 South, Salt Lake City

http://www.schools.utah.gov/board/Meetings/Agenda.aspx

 

 

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